http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC Utica Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members

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Hinds CC Utica Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members
Posted by
11 November

Hinds CC Utica Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members

The Alpha Beta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus has inducted new members for fall 2016.

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Flanking the inductees on either side is Vice President Dr. Debra Mays-Jackson, left, and Academic Dean Dr. Marquise Loving, right. Inductees include Eddie Perry of Port Gibson, Tybrea Vivians of Jackson, Erykah Wilson of Utica, Teraneka Terrell of Utica, Ra’Shay Watts Port Gibson, Kathryn Green of Greenville, Artashia Stewart of Fayette, Areleatha Gibson of Montgomery, Ala., Marion Brooks of Canton and Jeffery Fairley of Jackson.

Three of the inductees received most of their credits while enrolled in dual credit courses in high school. From left, Erykah Wilson of Utica and Teraneka Terrell of Utica, who attended Crystal Springs High Schools, and Tybrea Vivians of Jackson, who attended Jim Hill High School.

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As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC Utica Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members.[/tweetable]

11 November, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Utica Campus continues Holtzclaw Lecture Series
Posted by
20 September

Hinds CC Utica Campus continues Holtzclaw Lecture Series

UTICA – A decorated author and historian on race and class issues in U.S. history will address the next installment of the [tweetable alt=””]Holtzclaw Lecture Series[/tweetable], sponsored in part by the Humanities Department at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus.

Jacqueline Jones

Jacqueline Jones

Jacqueline Jones, chair of the History and Ideas Department at the University of Texas, will speak at 7 p.m. Oct. 27 at the Gore Art Gallery at Mississippi College on a chapter of her 2013 book, “A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama’s America.” The chapter is dedicated to William H. Holtzclaw, who founded the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute in 1903 that is now the Utica Campus. The lecture itself is titled “A Dangerous Thing: Black Schooling in William Holtzclaw’s Mississippi.”

Jones will be signing copies of the book at 6:30 p.m., before the lecture.

The Holtzclaw Lecture Series is designed to bring nationally recognized scholars and experts on African American education in the South for public lectures in a variety of venues around the state. This lecture is co-sponsored by Hinds, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mississippi Humanities Council, the Mississippi College School of Humanities, with major funding by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Jones’ has penned eight books on American social history with emphases on race, class and gender. A Mastin Gentry White Professor of Southern History at UT, she won a Bancroft Prize for her 1985 work, “Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow: Black Women, Work, and the Family from Slavery to the Present.” The prize is awarded annually by Columbia University for books about diplomacy or history of the Americas. That book and “A Dreadful Deceit” were finalists for a Pulitzer Prize. In 1999, Jones was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, awarded for exemplary creativity in a wide array of disciplines.

The series is part of a National Endowment for the Humanities grant announced in 2015, “The Black Man’s Burden: William Holtzclaw and the Mississippi HBCU Connection,” that highlights the work of Holtzclaw in African-American education. The project will contribute to a growing body of research and interest in the “Little Tuskegees” as important forerunners of the Civil Rights Era in the Deep South.

This two-year research program is designed to equip faculty and student-scholars to explore themes in Holtzclaw’s writing in humanities courses, combined with the development of a Summer Teachers’ Institute and teaching resource kit that will be used by other institutions (both on the high school and community college level) to extend the work beyond the institution.

20 September, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Utica student named to 2016 HBCU All-Stars
Posted by
26 August

Hinds CC Utica student named to 2016 HBCU All-Stars

UTICA – Always a people person, Hinds CC Utica sophomore [tweetable alt=””]Sabrevian Davis can now count herself among a select group of high-achieving people[/tweetable] chosen by the nation’s highest office.

Davis, a Raymond native, is among 73 students from the nation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) named a top achiever by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Sabrevian Davis

Sabrevian Davis

As part of the honor, Davis, who is studying biology toward a pre-dental major, will participate in this year’s White House HBCU Conference Oct. 23-26 in Washington, D.C.

Sixty-three HBCUs nationwide are represented on this year’s list, comprised of undergraduate, graduate and professional students. All are recognized for their accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement.

Davis is a member of the Hinds CC Lady Bulldogs basketball team and of the campus’ Science, Technology Engineering and Mathematics Undergraduate Program (STEM-UP) Academy. She has attended multiple events associated with STEM careers, including conferences in the nation’s capital, a STEM internship at Jackson State University and a BalloonSAT experience in Huntsville, Ala.

“All these experiences allow me to have an advantage over other students in both community colleges and other undergraduates on the university level,” Davis said, adding her experience at Hinds has opened doors on many levels for her.

“The best part of my Hinds experience so far has been meeting new people,” Davis said. “I’ve always been a people-person, but I was a bit shy when I came out of high school. I’ve learned to open up and accept people easier. The people here, especially administration and staff, have definitely made my experience as a Bulldog worth it.”

HBCU All-Stars serve as ambassadors of the White House initiative by providing outreach and communication with fellow students on the value of education and the initiative’s role as a networking resource. Through social media and their relationships with community based organizations, the All-Stars will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to achieve their educational and career potential.

“I am extremely excited for Sabrevian,” said Dr. Mitchell Shears, executive director of Title III (HBCU) and Sponsored Grants at the Utica Campus. “She is respected on our campus as a star athlete and performs well in her academic studies. This will be an opportunity that she will never forget, as she will have an opportunity to network and develop relationships with many White House officials and other students across the country.

In addition to attending the conference, Davis and other All-Stars will take part in various national events and web chats with professionals from a range of disciplines.

26 August, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Utica Campus awarded nearly $400,000 to fortify math scores
Posted by
23 August

Hinds CC Utica Campus awarded nearly $400,000 to fortify math scores

UTICA – [tweetable alt=””]Nearly $400,000 has been awarded to Hinds Community College Utica Campus[/tweetable] to fortify its already robust math and science program.

The funding comes from the National Science Foundation and will support the Targeted Infusion Project, which aims to find and keep students interested in science, technology, engineering or math careers. Students are prepared to accelerate through developmental math courses in order to complete their associate degree and transfer to four-year institutions.

“We are very excited about this Targeted Infusion Project,” said Dr. Debra Mays-Jackson, vice president of the Utica and Vicksburg/Warren campuses. “The Utica Campus of Hinds Community College will use these funds to continue strengthening our STEM initiative and support students’ interest in math and science. We are a community college that is proud to be innovators in this multifaceted career choice.”

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) through Targeted Infusion Projects supports the development, implementation, and study of evidence-based innovative models and approaches for improving the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may pursue STEM graduate programs and/or careers.

At the Utica Campus, the project seeks to establish strategies to strengthen interventions and instruction to enhance student performance of high school and college students in mathematics. Specifics of the award from the independent federal agency mention 99 percent of the Utica Campus is African-American, with 64 percent being first-generation college students.

A four-point strategy to achieve goals in the project consists of (1) increasing high school students’ test scores on state assessments, performance-based assessments, ACT and the ACCUPLACER placement exam; (2) improve performance in developmental and college-level math courses; (3) increase awareness and interest of STEM education and careers; and (4) create a dynamic teaching and learning community that improves performance in developmental and non-developmental math courses and which transforms the Hinds Community College-Utica Campus academic/educational environment.

The project will be co-directed by Dr. Mitchell Shears, executive director of Title III (HBCU) and Sponsored Grants, who was academic dean at the time of the grant submission, and Mathematics Instructor Willie Perkins. Additionally, other members of the mathematics team, Demonia Hodge and Stephanie Williams, and the new academic dean, Dr. Marquise Loving, will be instrumental in implementing the project.

23 August, 2016 News more
Classes begin at Hinds CC Utica Campus
Posted by
16 August

Classes begin at Hinds CC Utica Campus

UTICA – Fall classes have commenced at Hinds Community College Utica Campus, and administrators are pleased with the start of the new semester.

“We are so eager to see our returning and new students! The first day of classes has gotten off to a tremendous start, and students are still flowing into the counseling offices to register for classes. We will continue to open sections to accommodate the influx, and we are accepting and placing all students who come to us,” said Dr. Marquise Loving, Utica campus academic dean.

Television and Radio Broadcasting program director Timothy Crisler explains the details of his program to freshman students. (Hinds Community College/Allison Morris)

Television and Radio Broadcasting program director Timothy Crisler explains the details of his program to freshman students. (Hinds Community College/Allison Morris)

Students may continue to register through Friday, Aug. 19 for full-term on campus courses and Sunday, Aug, 21 for full-term and first eight-week term online classes, with additional fees.

Transportation is available for Utica campus students in Vicksburg, Jackson, Crystal Springs, Hazlehurst, Utica Edwards, Bolton, Clinton, Terry, and Port Gibson. For more information about scheduling and pickup locations, students can contact the transportation department at 601.885.7080.

Mathematics instructor Willie Perkins outlines expectations for his eight-week math course at Hinds Community College Utica Campus. (Hinds Community College/Allison Morris)

Mathematics instructor Willie Perkins outlines expectations for his eight-week math course at Hinds Community College Utica Campus. (Hinds Community College/Allison Morris)

“We’d like students to be reminded that their student ID’s must be visibly worn at all times, and that all vehicles driven to campus must be registered. Decals can be purchased on campus at the business office. We’re looking forward to an outstanding year,” said Dean of Students Dr. Tim Rush.

16 August, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Utica Campus graduates nearly 100 students
Posted by
18 May

Hinds CC Utica Campus graduates nearly 100 students

[tweetable alt=””]Vonya and DeMarcus Grear made for a happy family in their caps and gowns on Sunday[/tweetable], May 15 as Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus held its spring 2016 commencement.

“It is an honor to graduate with my mom,” DeMarcus said, holding his career certificate in Automotive Technology. Vonya earned an Associate in Arts degree in Clothing and Fashion Design Technology.

DeMarcus Grear, left, enjoys a happy moment with Vonya Grear, his mother, following a graduation ceremony at Hinds Community College Utica Campus on May 15, 2016. DeMarcus received a career certificate in Automotive Technology, while Vonya received an Associate in Arts in Clothing and Fashion Technology. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

DeMarcus Grear, left, enjoys a happy moment with Vonya Grear, his mother, following a graduation ceremony at Hinds Community College Utica Campus on May 15, 2016. DeMarcus received a career certificate in Automotive Technology, while Vonya received an Associate in Arts in Clothing and Fashion Technology. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Graduates at Hinds this semester received more than 1,500 certificates and degrees, as some graduates received more than one credential.

Of the total number of graduates, 127 are graduating summa cum laude, which is a perfect 4.0 grade point average; 130 are graduating magna cum laude, which is a 3.60 to 3.99 grade point average and 238 are graduating cum laude, which is a 3.20 to 3.59 grade point average.

Two of Utica’s nearly 100 graduates walked across the stage at J.D. Boyd Gymnasium finished summa cum laude, Mary Cage and Demika Thomas. Four graduated magna cum laude, and 12 more graduated cum laude.

Jackson State University President Dr. Carolyn Meyers was the speaker for the commencement at Utica. Meyers encouraged graduates with words from the Dr. Seuss children’s book, “Oh, The Places You’ll Go!” and her own personal experiences since becoming JSU president in 2011.

Jackson State University President Dr. Carolyn Meyers gave the commencement address at the Hinds Community College Utica Campus graduation ceremony on May 15, 2016.

Jackson State University President Dr. Carolyn Meyers gave the commencement address at the Hinds Community College Utica Campus graduation ceremony on May 15, 2016.

“Be kind, like your president, Dr. Muse,” she advised, as she explained how Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse was one of the first people to welcome her to Mississippi.

Muse spoke of the merits of a community college education on two important levels.

“Not only do we have the lowest cost, and highest quality education, but we also have the best faculty and staff there is to offer,” Muse said.

Drs. Carolyn Meyers, left, and Debra Mays-Jackson, before a graduation ceremony at Hinds Community College Utica Campus on May 15, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Drs. Carolyn Meyers, left, and Debra Mays-Jackson, before a graduation ceremony at Hinds Community College Utica Campus on May 15, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Dr. Debra Mays-Jackson, vice president of the Utica and Vicksburg-Warren campuses, lauded Sunday’s event as a success.

“As Vice President of the Utica Campus, I am proud of our faculty and staff for their input and performance,” Mays-Jackson said. “Dr. Carolyn Meyers was an outstanding speaker and inspired us all. To our graduates, I appreciate you for choosing the Utica Campus of Hinds Community College for your collegiate experience and I am confident you are prepared to move on to challenges of the next chapter. I wish you all great success and a bright, fulfilling future. As new alums, do not forget the Utica Campus legacy,” Mays-Jackson said.

Instructors at the Utica Campus also earned credentials during Sunday’s ceremony.

Sheila White, a Biology instructor, received an Associate of Arts, while Eddie Perry, who instructs in the Automotive Technology program, received an Associate in Applied Science degree. Both graduated magna cum laude.

Dr. Mitchell Shears, academic dean for the Utica Campus, noted the achievements of all STEM graduates, those majoring in fields related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Three of them presented recently at the Emerging Researchers National Conference in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Mitchell Shears, back row in center, academic dean of the Utica Campus, stands with STEM graduates, from left, Brensha Richardson, Joshua Hodge, Darione Maxie, Classie Bradford and Asia Braxton. (Allison Morris/Hinds Community College)

Dr. Mitchell Shears, back row in center, academic dean of the Utica Campus, stands with STEM graduates, from left, Brensha Richardson, Joshua Hodge, Darione Maxie, Classie Bradford and Asia Braxton. (Allison Morris/Hinds Community College)

“We are very proud of our STEM students, because they are leaving the Utica Campus with something that a lot of college freshmen and sophomores do not – research experience,” Shears said. “Shears also noted that this experience gives Utica graduates a competitive advantage over other science majors headed to four-year universities.”

 

Gwendolyn Strong, admissions processor at the Utica Campus, led graduates as the Mace Carrier for the Hinds Community College Utica Campus graduation ceremony May 15, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Gwendolyn Strong, admissions processor at the Utica Campus, led graduates as the Mace Carrier for the Hinds Community College Utica Campus graduation ceremony May 15, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

18 May, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Utica Campus kicks off Holtzclaw Lecture Series
Posted by
31 March

Hinds CC Utica Campus kicks off Holtzclaw Lecture Series

As part of a recently announced National Endowment for the Humanities grant, “The Black Man’s Burden: William H. Holtzclaw and the Mississippi HBCU Connection,” the Humanities Department at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus will sponsor a series of public talks in the Holtzclaw Lecture Series.

William Andrews, the E. Maynard Adams Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will speak on “William H. Holtzclaw: the Man, the Mission, and the Mask” at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 28 at the Margaret Walker Center in Ayer Hall on the Jackson State University campus. A reception is before the lecture at 6 p.m. [tweetable alt=””]The lecture is the first in the Hinds’ Utica Campus Holtzclaw Lecture Series.[/tweetable]

William Andrews

William Andrews

His lecture will discuss Holtzclaw’s autobiography, “Black Man’s Burden,” along with William Pickens’ “Bursting Bonds,” in light of Booker T. Washington’s “Up from Slavery.”  Holtzclaw and Pickens were both Booker T. Washington protégés, but while Holtzclaw remained a Bookerite, Pickens had become by 1922 a supporter of Du Bois.  The talk will examine both men’s work, with an emphasis on the influence of Washington’s classic autobiography on both.

The Holtzclaw Lecture Series is designed to bring nationally recognized scholars and experts on African American education in the South for public lectures in a variety of venues around the state. The lecture is co-sponsored by the Mississippi Humanities Council and the Margaret Walker Center.

Andrews’ work centers on African American autobiography, along with the historical linkages between white and black writers in the formation of American literature, African American literature, and southern literature. Andrews is the author of “To Tell a Free Story: The First Century of Afro-American Autobiography, 1760-1865” and is co-editor of The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, The Oxford Companion to African American Literature, and The Literature of the American South: A Norton Anthology.

He is currently series editor of North American Slave Narratives, Beginnings to 1920, a complete digitized library of autobiographies and biographies of North American slaves and ex-slaves, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Ameritech, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

“Black Man’s Burden: William Holtzclaw and the Mississippi HBCU Connection” is a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant to highlight the work of William Holtzclaw, a pioneer in African American education. The project will contribute to a growing body of research and interest in the “Little Tuskegees” as important forerunners of the Civil Rights Era in the Deep South.

William Holtzclaw is the founder of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, which later became Utica Junior College, and is now the Utica Campus of Hinds Community College. The campus retains its historical HBCU status.

This two-year research program is designed to equip faculty and student-scholars to explore themes in Holtzclaw’s writing in humanities courses, combined with the development of a Summer Teachers’ Institute and teaching resource kit that will be used by other institutions (both on the high school and community college level) to extend the work beyond the institution.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

31 March, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Phi Theta Kappa chapters, members honored at regional convention
Posted by
31 March

Hinds CC Phi Theta Kappa chapters, members honored at regional convention

[tweetable alt=””]Three chapters of Phi Theta Kappa organizations at Hinds Community College have earned Five-Star Chapter distinctions.[/tweetable]

Honored with the distinctions Feb. 26-27 at the organization’s Mississippi/Louisiana Regional Conference at Mississippi State University were:

  • Gamma Lambda chapter, at the Raymond Campus. The chapter also won first place in the Theme Award category, with the theme of Quests of Human Expression, second place for the Honors in Action Award and fifth place for Most Distinguished Chapter.
  • Alpha Omicron Omega chapter, at the Rankin Campus. The chapter also won third place for College Project and seventh place for the Honors in Action Award.
  • Alpha Beta Xi chapter, at the Utica Campus. Two Horizon Awards for Advisors were awarded, to Beverly Trimble and Chelia Woodfork-Thompson, for their work with the chapter.
Gamma Lambda members who attended the regional conference Feb. 26-27 are, front row from left, Logan Williamson, Allison Mack, Shelby Mack, Taylor Stockton, Harrison Hunter, Hannah VanNoy, Ryan Williamson, Tyler Tatum, back row, from left, Jabari Williams, Mary-Saphrona Grey, Scottilyn Lloyd, Reginald Pickering, Dean Morgan, Megan Stockton, Olivia DeGrado, Eli Beatty and Eric Rush.

Gamma Lambda members who attended the regional conference Feb. 26-27 are, front row from left, Logan Williamson, Allison Mack, Shelby Mack, Taylor Stockton, Harrison Hunter, Hannah VanNoy, Ryan Williamson, Tyler Tatum, back row, from left, Jabari Williams, Mary-Saphrona Grey, Scottilyn Lloyd, Reginald Pickering, Dean Morgan, Megan Stockton, Olivia DeGrado, Eli Beatty and Eric Rush.

 

Alpha Omicron Omega members who attended the regional conferece Feb. 26-27 are, from left, Elysha Roush, Haley Current, Erin Harrison, Natalie Blakely, Cody Huff, faculty advisor Joy Rhoads, Dillion Lassiter, Julia McKinney, Savannah Jackson, Lauren Robertson, Leah Burkes, faculty advisor Judy Isonhood.

Alpha Omicron Omega members who attended the regional conference Feb. 26-27 are, from left, Elysha Roush, Haley Current, Erin Harrison, Natalie Blakely, Cody Huff, faculty advisor Joy Rhoads, Dillion Lassiter, Julia McKinney, Savannah Jackson, Lauren Robertson, Leah Burkes, faculty advisor Judy Isonhood.

 

Alpha Beta Xi members who attended the regional conference were, from left, faculty advisor Beverly Trimble, Breanna Gillard, Zavier Smith, Lillian Greer and faculty advisor Chelia Woodfork-Thompson. (Allison Morris/Hinds Community College)

Alpha Beta Xi members who attended the regional conference Feb. 26-27 were, from left, faculty advisor Beverly Trimble, Breanna Gillard, Zavier Smith, Lillian Greer and faculty advisor Chelia Woodfork-Thompson. (Allison Morris/Hinds Community College)

Hinds’ six PTK chapters “did us proud,” said Honors Institute Dean Deborah McCollum, faculty advisor for Gamma Lambda chapter and district dean for the college’s Honors Institute. “These hard working young men and women are the future leaders of our communities, and the skills they learn through PTK not only enhance their professionalism but also help promote their engagement in their communities.

Five-Star designations show chapter engagement in PTK activities.

“Our chapter is exceedingly gratified to have our work in community and college service recognized by achieving 5-star status again this year,” said Joy Rhoads, faculty advisor for the Rankin Campus chapter and coordinator of the campus’ Honors program. “The leadership and scholarship development through our efforts has benefited chapter members as well as the college and our community.”

“The Alpha Beta Xi chapter may be small but we have a mighty roar,” said Beverly Trimble, faculty advisor for the Utica Campus. “Our chapter is all about building and continuously growing to reach new heights. We are very proud to be a Five-Star Chapter but to whom much is given much is required.”

Also honored individually at the regional competition were:

  • Robert Harrison Hunter, Most Distinguished Officer, Gamma Lambda
  • Olivia DeGrado, Most Distinguished Officer runner-up, Gamma Lambda
  • Debbie McCollum, Horizon Award for Advisors, Gamma Lambda
  • Johannah Williams, Most Distinguished Advisor, Gamma Lambda
  • Hilda Wells, Horizon Award for Advisors, Alpha Zeta Omega

Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society of two-year colleges and academic programs. It is based in Jackson and has more than 2 million members in more than 1,250 chapters worldwide. Chapters operating at Hinds also include Alpha Zeta Omega, at the Jackson Campus, and Alpha Omega Chi, at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

31 March, 2016 News more
Gala celebration to raise funds for Hinds CC Utica Campus scholarships
Posted by
21 March

Gala celebration to raise funds for Hinds CC Utica Campus scholarships

UTICA – Among those to be honored at the March 25 Hinds Community College Utica Campus Vice President’s Scholarship and Hall of Honors Gala are Congressman Bennie Thompson and U.S. Attorney Greg Davis. [tweetable alt=””]The gala will honor 14 distinguished graduates and supporters of Hinds’ Utica Campus[/tweetable], including two husband-and-wife teams, as well as raise money for student scholarships.

The gala is 7 p.m. Friday, March 25 at the Old Capitol Inn in Jackson. An individual ticket is $100 with opportunities for sponsorship packages that include multiple tickets.

“Throughout our history, we have relied on partnerships and community leaders to build effective programs to serve our students. We ask that you consider partnering with us to help send a student to college. A higher education prepares our students for today’s careers,” said Dr. Debra Mays-Jackson, vice president for the Utica Campus. Mays-Jackson is an alumna of the campus.

The honorees include:

Retired Utica Campus Vice President Dr. George Barnes: Barnes, a native of Collins, served as a professional educator and administrator for 50 plus years at Hinds Agricultural High School, Utica Junior College and Hinds Community College before retiring in June 2013. He graduated from Carver Central High School in Collins. He earned degrees from several different colleges/universities: Jackson State College (BS, mathematics); Louisiana State University (MA, mathematics); Mississippi State University (EdS, Community College Education) and University of Southern Mississippi (PhD, Educational Administration). He did further study at the University of Illinois and Auburn University.

George Barnes

George Barnes

Dr. Barnes landed his first position as a mathematics teacher at Hinds Agricultural High School in 1962. This began his 51-year profession and family life in Utica. Among his many positions, he served as assistant basketball coach, college math instructor, Hinds AHS principal, academic dean, acting president of Utica Junior College. When he retired, he was vice president for Utica/Vicksburg-Warren Campuses and for Administrative and Student Services.

Pastor Phillip A. Burks, alumnus: Burks began his education at Hubbard’s Elementary School in Edwards and later Mixon Elementary School in Utica. He graduated from Hinds AHS in May 1974. He later attended Utica Junior College, majoring in Auto Body Repair. He played in the concert band and marching band. He also ran track.

Phillip Burks

Phillip Burks

After graduating, he established Burks Body Repair Shop in Vicksburg. He furthered his studies at Jackson State University and received a state teacher’s license for Auto Body Repair. This certification allowed Burks to teach at Oakley Training School in Raymond. He retired from Oakley in 2006 after 28 years of service.

Being led by God, Burks accepted his calling to preach in April 1998 and several months later was elected pastor of Belmont Missionary Baptist Church where he has served dutifully for the past 17 years.

Dr. Bobby G. Cooper, the director of the renowned Jubilee Singers on the Utica Campus: Cooper, a Bolton native, is currently chairman of the Humanities Division for Hinds Community College-Utica Campus and is also director of Choral Activities. He also teaches voice, piano and courses in music theory. He is director of the Wesley Foundation, a ministry of the United Methodist Church.

Bobby Cooper

Bobby Cooper

He has taught at Hinds Community College for 43 years, where he has been instrumental in developing the music curriculum in 1974. Prior to Hinds, he began his teaching career at E.T. Hawkins High School in Forest where he was the choral director and biology teacher.

Cooper was inducted into the Tougaloo College national Alumni Hall of Fame in 2005 and is an active member of the Southwest Chapter of TCNAA. He holds a B.S. degree from Tougaloo College, an M.S. degree from the University of Illinois, and both the Ed.S, and Ed. D. degrees from the University of Colorado. He has done additional studies in Music at Chicago Musical College.

Alumnus Gregory Davis, U.S. attorney for the Southern District: Davis is a native of Utica where he attended Utica Junior College from 1980 to 1981. He attended Mississippi State University and received a degree in chemical engineering in 1984. He continued his studies at Tulane Law School, where he graduated cum laude in 1987. He was admitted to the Mississippi Bar in October 1987.

Gregory Davis

Gregory Davis

President Barack Obama nominated Davis for U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Mississippi on June 29, 2011.  He was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on March 29, 2012, and entered duty on April 11, 2012.

As U.S. Attorney, Davis serves as the chief law enforcement officer for the Southern District of Mississippi. He is responsible for prosecution of all federal crimes, the defense of the United States in civil cases, and the collection of debts owed to the United States.  The district he serves includes 45 counties and more than 2 million people.

Community supporters James Drake and alumna and former instructor Rebecca Drake Rebecca Drake, a native of Ellisville, is a graduate of Louisiana State University School of Music with a master’s degree in piano performance. She arrived at Hinds Junior College in 1965, pursuing a teaching and performing career. She chose to stay connected to Hinds and taught at her alma mater for 20 years.

Rebecca and James Drake

Rebecca and James Drake

James Drake, a native of Reading, Mich., is a graduate of Michigan State University with a master’s degree in civil engineering He joined Waterways Experiment Station in 1965 as a research engineer. In 1983, he joined Applied Research Associates, Inc., a national engineering firm, as senior vice president and technical director.

The couple married in 1969 and has lived in Raymond since that time. A primary interest they share is helping to educate those who are talented and desire an education but need financial support. The Drakes created a scholarship in honor of Dr. Bobby G. Cooper, choral director at Hinds Community College Utica Campus and director of the famed Jubilee Singers.

Alumnus and supporter Jimmy Harris, who is being honored posthumously: Harris, who died in 2014, was a native of Lauderdale County who moved to Edwards at a young age. He attended Hinds AHS from 1966 to 1969 where he was active in band and played football.

Jimmy Harris

Jimmy Harris

He then attended Alcorn State University where he also played in the band. He and his wife LeeVella met at Alcorn.

A year after graduating, he was employed with Mississippi Valley Gas, now Atmos Energy, where he worked for nearly 40 years.

He was involved in a number of community organizations, including his church, New Lake Church of Christ Holiness USA and Habitat for Humanity. He was also active in Masonic organizations and was a member and worked with Rissah Temple #130, Jackson Consistory #117 and Flaming Sword Lodge #101. Additionally, he was active in the Shriner’s Motorcycle Club, Mississippi Valley Gas Credit Union, Hinds County PTA, Jackson Heart Study and helped to feed the football team every year for Hinds AHS.

After retiring, he returned to Edwards where he joined with his brother Otis to establish the Edwards Revival Center.

Alumna Dr. Beverly Wade Hogan, Tougaloo College president: Hogan has served as president at Tougaloo College since May 2002. She is the first woman and the 13th president to lead this historic institution.

Beverly Wade Hogan

Beverly Wade Hogan

A native Mississippian, Hogan attended high school at Hinds AHS. Hogan earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from Tougaloo College and master’s in public policy and administration from Jackson State University. She has done additional studies at the University of Southern Mississippi and University of Georgia. She is engaged in further doctoral studies in human development and organizational leadership at Fielding Graduate University.

Hogan serves on numerous state, regional and national boards including the United Negro College Fund and the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education. Hogan was appointed by President Barack Obama to serve on the President’s Board of Advisors on HBCUs and was selected by the Department of Defense to serve on the National Committee for HBCU/MI Programs.

Hogan is also a founding member and former president of the Central Mississippi Chapter, National Coalition of 100 Black Women, and a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and the Links, Inc.

Dr. William H. Holtzclaw, the founder of Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, who is being honored posthumously: Holtzclaw founded the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute for the Training of Colored Young Men and Women in 1903 in a rented log cabin.  From 1903-1910, the school operated in the town of Utica near St. Peter M.B. church.

William Henry Holtzclaw

William Henry Holtzclaw

About 1907, Holtzclaw sought property on which to relocate the school in order to move away from the distractions of the town and to be near subterranean water. By 1910, Holtzclaw had raised $25,000 from friends to purchase 2,000 acres of land located about five miles south of Utica. Holtzclaw guided the Utica Institute for 40 years.  In his educational outreach, he organized the Farmer’s Conference to help raise the standards of Negro farms and farming at The Institute. He also organized the Black Belt Society to encourage economic self-sufficiency among rural Negroes through the sale of land to farmers.

In 1915, Holtzclaw wrote and published “The Black Man’s Burden,” making him one of the first Negroes to publish a book in Mississippi. In 1925, he organized the Utica Institute Jubilee Singers, a group of male singers who toured various cities to help raise funds for The Institute.

Holtzclaw died in 1943. In 1946, William Holtzclaw Jr. and his mother, Mary Ella Holtzclaw, agreed to donate the school and property to Hinds County.

The County Board of Trustees assumed control of The Institute, and the school’s name was changed to Hinds County Agricultural High School, Colored. Eventually the school became Utica Junior College, which became the Utica Campus of Hinds Community College in 1982.

Alumnus and former athlete Dr. Lacey Reynolds, Assistant Professor for health and kinesiology at Texas Southern University: Reynolds attended Utica Junior College from 1970 to 1972 and has been a member of the Friends of the College since he graduated. He was an honor student, a member of Who’s Who in 1972 and played basketball.

Lacey Reynolds

Lacey Reynolds

After graduating, he attended what was then Mississippi Industrial College in Holly Springs. He received a master’s degree in physical education from Delta State University in 1975.

He has had numerous assistant and head basketball coaching jobs over the years. He began his career at Mississippi Industrial College where he was head basketball coach and athletic director. He was an assistant coach and physical education instructor at LeMoyne-Owen College in Memphis from 1977 to 1983. He was head coach at Grambling State University from 1995 to 1999 and was head women’s basketball coach at Texas Southern University from 2000 to 2003.

He is now an associate professor in the College of Education at Texas Southern University after receiving his doctorate in education from TSU in 2007.

Alumnus Delmer Stamps, state resource conservationist and member of the Hinds Community College Foundation board: Stamps of Jackson attended Hinds AHS from 1970 to 1973 and Utica Junior College from 1973 to 1974. He has been a member of the Friends of the College since 1970. He received academic awards in chemistry, zoology, biology and botany and was one of two students enrolled in a pre-agronomy program with Alcorn State University.

Delmer Stamps

Delmer Stamps

He graduated from Alcorn State University in 1977 with a Bachelor of Science in agronomy.

Among his many honors, he was inducted into the Alcorn State University National Alumni Association Hall of Honor in 2001 and received the Sen. Henry J. Kirksey Trail Blazer Award presented by the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. awards Committee in 2007.

He received a number of awards from the USDA, including Outstanding Performance award for leadership provided while serving as the state of Mississippi USDA point person in coordinating the development of the 2015 Gulf Restore Plan.

He is currently a member of the Hinds Community College Foundation Board of Directors.

After a 39-year career, he is retired as state resource conservationist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service. He is owner and manager of Stamps Livestock, Forestry, and Hunting Farms in Learned.

Congressman Bennie Thompson, alumnus: Thompson is the U.S. Representative for Mississippi’s Second Congressional District, serving since 1993.  In 2006 he became the first Democratic chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, and he has been the ranking member of the committee since 2011.   He has also served on the Agriculture, Budget and Small Business committees.

Bennie Thompson

Bennie Thompson

He is the longest serving African-American elected official in the state of Mississippi.

Thompson is a lifelong resident of Bolton, near Jackson. He attended Hinds County Public Schools and Hinds AHS before earning a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Tougaloo College in 1968 and a Master of Science in educational administration from Jackson State University in 1973.

Thompson initially worked as a schoolteacher before entering politics. He served as an alderman from 1968 to 1972 and then mayor of his hometown of Bolton from 1973 to 1980. From 1980 to 1993, Thompson served on the Hinds County Board of Supervisors and was a founding member and president of the state’s Association of Black Supervisors.

Alumnus Col. (retired) Paul Willis and alumna Dorothene Willis, owners/operators of Gazebo Lake Ranch in Utica Torry-Willis is from Utica. She is a 1975 graduate Hinds AHS and a 1978 Utica Junior College graduate with an Associate of Arts Degree in Social Services. She continued her studies at Alcorn State University and Chicago State University. Most recently she worked as the Regional Family Support coordinator for the Mississippi Valley Division Corps of Engineers in Vicksburg.

Paul and Dorothene Willis

Paul and Dorothene Willis

Col. Paul L. Willis hails from Edwards. He graduated from Hinds AHS in 1975 and Utica Junior College in 1977 where he was Mr. UJC and co-valedictorian. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from Alcorn State University in May 1979.

In May 1989, Col. Willis received his Master of Science Degree in Education from Chicago State University.  He was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Transportation Corps.

Col. Willis retired from active duty in August 2004 after serving more than 25 years. He assumed his current position as director of Army Instruction in Jackson Public Schools in July 2004.

Mr. and Mrs. Willis are the owners/operators of Gazebo Lake Ranch in Utica.

For information about the gala, see http://hub.hindscc.edu/gala.

In 1903, William Henry Holtzclaw founded the Utica Campus as the Utica Normal and

Industrial Institute (UNII), later transitioning to Hinds County Agricultural High School / Utica Junior College. As a student of Thurgood Marshall, Holtzclaw was challenged to go into a rural area and educate the underprivileged while also providing meaningful services. He opened the doors of UNII to local farmers and their families.

From its humble beginnings through the court-ordered merger with Hinds Community College in 1982, the Utica Campus of Hinds Community College continues to serve the community 113 years later in a Historically Black College & University (HBCU) status.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

21 March, 2016 News more
Five Hinds CC students selected for UMMC health initiative
Posted by
02 February

Five Hinds CC students selected for UMMC health initiative

Five students of Hinds Community College have been selected for a program aimed at building the ranks of males of color in healthcare.

Eddie V. Anderson, Utica Campus; Antonio McBeth and Christian Minor, Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center; Michael Pham, Raymond Campus and Zavier Smith, Utica Campus, will participate in the Health Equity and Leadership Initiative through the University of Mississippi Medical Center. The program provides those preparing for medical careers opportunities to develop skills from leaders in the healthcare workforce through in-person seminars and online sources.

“Males of color are underrepresented in our health profession schools and our goal is to offer an intimate experience for talented students such as those accepted to the Health Equity & Leadership Initiative,” said Dr. Juanyce D. Taylor, director of the program at UMMC. “The leadership development activities and shadowing experiences allow participants to learn the inner dynamics and clinical aspect of a large, complex academic health center. Essentially, [tweetable alt=””]we are building a stronger and more diverse health care workforce[/tweetable].”

Eddie V. Anderson

Eddie V. Anderson

Anderson, of Jackson, is a petty officer third class in the Navy and 2015 Hinds graduate who plans to attend nursing school. “I’m in the medical field to help people who aren’t knowledgeable about their health to do those things to improve their health,” he said.

Antonio McBeth

Antonio McBeth

Patient interaction is also important to McBeth, of Lena, in Leake County. “Interaction with the patient is an experience like no other,” said McBeth, who earned a degree in psychology from the University of Southern Mississippi before returning to Hinds to pursue eventually becoming a family nurse practitioner. “No two patients are the same, and I enjoy it.”

Applicants are recommended by faculty at their respective colleges, typically an instructor, adviser or community leader.

UMMC bases the program on research showing males of color are significantly underrepresented in most health professional programs. The program’s purpose is to support underrepresented males aged 17 to 25 enrolled in two-year colleges in Mississippi to become leaders in the healthcare workforce, while increasing access to health professional education, training, and career options. Funding for the program comes from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Dr. Mitchell Shears, academic dean for the Utica Campus, where Anderson and Smith attend class, sees the program as a chance to sell the medical field as a viable career option for an emerging pool of students.

“It is our desire on the Utica Campus to assist more students, particularly males of color, in finding opportunities like this to make them more marketable to four-year institutions and the workforce after their collegiate experiences,” Shears said.

Prospective medical careers have been shaped among this year’s participants by personal experiences.

Christian Minor

Christian Minor

“When my mother was in a car accident in 2002, I saw what the nurses in the hospital were able to do for her,” said Minor, of Jackson, a sergeant in the Mississippi National Guard who plans to be a registered nurse. “They asked about our spiritual lives and how we could get help financially.”

Michael Pham

Michael Pham

Pham, of Byram, plans to attend Mississippi State University in biochemistry before going to medical school. He doesn’t take for granted the opportunity he has. “My family left in Vietnam are farmers, so I wouldn’t have had the same opportunity to go to school there, learn something and give back to the community,” he said. “I’d have to drop out and help get money for my family, as my cousins do.”

Zavier Smith

Zavier Smith

Smith envisions being an orthopedic surgeon because of his personal experience. “I played football at Raymond High School, and I had a torn pec one time and had to have surgery. Going through that, I learned things, like how muscles contract,” he said.

The program fits with UMMC’s past support of expanding the health profession in more sectors of the community.

“The University of Mississippi Medical Center has a history of supporting pipeline programs designed to increase its diversity and create pathways to health profession careers,” said Taylor, who is assistant dean for Research and Innovation and chairs the Department of Health Sciences, where she is also an assistant professor. She is also program director for the Master of Health Sciences at UMMC’s School of Health Related Professions.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 11,500 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

02 February, 2016 News more