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Hinds CC students begin first week of classes
Posted by
17 August

Hinds CC students begin first week of classes

Hinds Community College began fall classes on Aug. 13. Hinds offers more than 450 academic courses guaranteed to transfer to universities, plus more than 70 career and technical program options. Students can take classes day or night at any of our six locations, or take online classes from the convenience of their own home.Hinds also offers many different starting points, so students can begin college when they are ready.

On-campus classes:

  • 16-week (full term) classes – Aug. 13
  • Eight-week classes – Aug. 13 and Oct. 4
  • Six-week classes – Sept. 4 and Oct.15
  • Four-week classes – Aug. 13, Sept. 10, Oct. 9 and Nov. 5

Online classes

  • 15-week (full term) classes – Aug. 20
  • Eight-week classes –Aug. 20 and Oct. 15
  • 4-week classes – Aug. 20, Sept. 17, Oct. 15 and Nov. 12

“Hinds Community College takes pride in its mission of providing a quality, affordable education that fits the life needs of our students,” said Raymond Campus Dean of Academics Dr. Ben Cloyd.

For more information on programs of study and scheduling, see www.hindscc.edu.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Linda Holley of Natchez, left, a Hinds Community College student at Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, purchases books for the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program with the help of bookstore employee Cynthia Smith of Terry.

Dilan Sanchez SanJuan of Brandon, left, and Anthony Davis of Brookhaven, are in the Emergency Medical Science-Paramedic Program at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

Associate Degree Nursing students Elason Kelly of Raymond, left, and Jessica Helder of Utica get the semester started at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

New students in the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program Alexis Rader of Vicksburg, Shelby Carroll of Clinton, Linda Holley of Natchez, Kacie McCluskey of Carrollton, Lindsey Jeselink of Clinton and Kathleen Lott of Carrollton get to know each other on their first day of class together at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

Respiratory Care Technology students took a tour on their first day of class on Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. They are, from left, Kayla Moore of Jackson, Meagan Brazell of Brandon, Sydney Phillips of Raymond, Lonnie Caine of Pearl, Victoria McDonald of Richland, Shulette McBeth of Carthage and Keisha Hoover of Byram.

Industrial Maintenance instructor Geoffrey Horne at Hinds Community College’s Vicksburg-Warren Campus gets the first day of classes started. (April Garon/Hinds Community College0

Jalin McDonald, left, and Frantrell Windom, both of Jackson, shop for supplies on Monday, Aug. 13, at the bookstore at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. McDonald plans to study art and Windom to study music. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Sandra Mullins, of Raymond, shops for a bookbag on Monday, Aug. 13 at the bookstore at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. Mullins is in her second semester at Hinds Community College and plans to study nursing. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Bookstore employee David Cruse, right, assists sophomore Stanley Kelker, of Jackson, on Monday, Aug. 13 at the bookstore at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. Kelker is a sophomore pursuing a degree in Physical Therapy.  (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Freshman student Jessica Fant, of Clinton, visits the bookstore at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus on Monday, Aug. 13. Fant is pursuing a degree in Forensics. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

D’Ajah Miley, right, a sophomore Veterinary Technology student from Clinton, gets a helping hand finding her next class from Hinds CC Raymond Campus Police Captain LaTridia Chambers on Monday, Aug. 13.  (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Freshmen Tarrius Kirkwood-Burr, left, and Christian Trejo sit outdoors Monday, Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. Kirkwood-Burr, of Jackson, plans to study Diesel Technology; Trejo, of Clinton, plans to study music education. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Hinds Community College employee Leigh Sarrett, left, gives freshman student Jamiracle Williams, of Vicksburg, directions to her next class on Aug. 13, the first day of fall classes. Williams plans to study nursing. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hinds Community College employee Emily Mitchell, left, gives freshman student Nyjah Smith, of Greenwood, directions to her next class. Smith plans to study art.  (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Chester Price, left, and Michael Parks, both of Jackson, are students in the Industrial Maintenance Technology program on the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College. Parks, 54, said he came back to school to pursue opportunities for an enriching career. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Joy Lawson gets her student ID photo taken Monday, Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus by Hinds employee Ray Westerfield. Lawson, of French Camp, is a sophomore Graphic Design Technology student.  (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

From left, Katelyn Foster, of Byram; Kaelyn Jones, of Terry; Hannah Gatewood, of Jackson; and Hallie Clark, of Jackson gather together on the first day of classes at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Ayana Alexander, of Byram, receives assistance from Test and Lab coordinator Hazel McLaurin-Dunbar as she signs in to take the Accuplacer Placement test on Monday, Aug.13 at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. Alexander is a first semester freshman. (Evelyn Stewart/Hinds Community College)

 

Freshman student Dahkeem Williams, of Utica, visits with Dr. Tyrone Jackson, vice president of the Utica Campus on Monday, Aug.13, 2018 at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. Williams traveled to Utica from Pennsylvania in hopes of playing basketball. (Evelyn Stewart/Hinds Community College)

 

DeKindre Dixon, left, and Jamar Williams, both of Utica, gets help from Librarian Jean Greene on Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. Dixon, an incoming freshman, plans to study Engineering while Williams, a second semester freshman plans to become a Physical Therapist.  Classes for the fall are now in session.  Late registration continues through Aug. 17. (Evelyn Stewart/Hinds Community College)

 

Students at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center buy books and supplies the first week of school. Pictured are, from left, book store employee Jerrica Murray and students Sarah Brown and Michel Davis, all Jackson residents.

Hinds Community College Medical Data Technology instructorAngela Garrett of Monticello, standing left, gets class started at Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Students are, seated from left, Chavet Bryant of Jackson, Pakendra Hall of Jackson, Eboni Galtney of Clinton and Anastasia Ellis of Jackson.

Campus police Lt. Maurice Winford makes IDs for Hinds Community College students Sonya Watson of Canton, Alexus Jones of Jackson, Mayia Horton of Jackson and Katlyn Stokes of Jackson at Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

Hinds Community College student Ashlyn Rader, of Puckett, is studying in the Honors Center at the Rankin Campus where she attends classes. She is a member of the Honors program and Phi Theta Kappa, Alpha Omicron Omega Chapter at the Rankin Campus. Hinds students returned to classes on Aug. 13.

Hinds Community College students, from left, Destiny Little of Florence, Eric Kinan of Florence and Amber Williams of Brandon are all members of the Alpha Omicron Omega Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa on the Rankin Campus. Little, who is studying psychology, is the vice president for Scholarship and is the Mississippi/Louisiana Regional Central District Representative of Phi Theta Kappa. Kinan, who is studying Pre-Veterinary Science, and Williams, an accounting major, are both members of the Honors Institute.

Amanda Blair of Pearl instructs a chemistry course Thursday, Aug. 16 during the first week of classes at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Brandon Brown, left, of Florence, take notes Thursday, Aug. 16 during Amanda Blair’s Chemistry course during the first week of classes at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Brown is planning to study occupational therapy. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Freshman students Jordan Fortenberry, left, of Brandon and Abigale Williams of Flowood take notes Thursday, Aug. 16 during Amanda Blair’s Chemistry course during the first week of classes at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Maya Miller, of Florence, prints materials at the Hinds Community College Rankin Campus library on Aug. 16. Miller plans to study biology. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Freshman student Estefania Armendariz, of Brandon, utlilizes the Hinds Community College Rankin Campus library on Thursday, Aug. 16. Armendariz plans to study biology. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Freshman student Kyshawn Smith, of Jackson, sits outdoors at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus on Thursday, Aug. 16. Smith plans to study kinesiology. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

From left, Benjamin Chaffins, of Flowood; Maugra Luna, of Pearl; and Logan Hogue, of Brandon, hang out between classes Thursday, Aug. 16 at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Kathy Jones of Raymond, manager of the Hinds Community College Rankin Campus Bookstore, stocks shelves with textbooks on Thursday, Aug. 16. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Book store employee Sheryl Mounger helps Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus students buy their books the first week of class. The students are Elizabeth Tucker, left, and D’Andra Chambers, both of Vicksburg.

 

Bookstore employee Stephanie Langley, right, helps sophomore student Alliyah McNair with her textbook list on Thurs, Aug. 16. Langley, of Sand Hill, plans to study nursing. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Michyla Adams, left, and Andrea Gaines, both of Jackson, walk to class Monday, Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. They are pursuing degrees in nursing and criminal justice, respectively. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Kylan Osborn, of Sardis, stops to ask for directions on Monday, Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. Osborn plans to take general studies classes this fall with the hopes of later majoring in engineering. (Evelyn Stewart/Hinds Community College)

Student Support Services Administrative Assistant Letoya Allen, of Utica, assist Freshmen students Takia Jenkins, of Belzoni (left) and Ernestine Chin of Vicksburg with job placement applications on Aug. 13. at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. (Evelyn Stewart/Hinds Community College)

Freshman student Nicholas Rogers, of Gluckstadt, walks to class Monday, Aug. 13, 2018 at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. Rogers plans to study business. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

17 August, 2018 News more
Once a Jubilee, always a Jubilee: Hinds CC’s Cooper retires, leaving legacy of excellence
Posted by
24 July

Once a Jubilee, always a Jubilee: Hinds CC’s Cooper retires, leaving legacy of excellence

Dr. Bobby Cooper didn’t plan to stay at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus for 45 years. Goodness knows, he had plenty of opportunity to go to his alma mater Tougaloo College, Jackson State University, Alcorn State University or other places.

As the longest serving employee this year, with 45 years of service, Dr. Bobby Cooper was presented with a special momento – a framed 45 record of the song ‘Amen, Amen” and a paper copy of the musical score. The song is one performed many times by Cooper’s Jubilee Singers over the years. Cooper retired at the end of June 2018.

He was lured to what was then Utica Junior College in 1972 as a music instructor by the college’s participation, along with Jackson State and Tougaloo, in Opera/South, a now-defunct black opera company based in Jackson.

“Utica was looking for someone to work with their opera chorus for Opera/South,” he recalled. “I didn’t come to stay – not to be there forever. Things changed when I got there. I really liked what I was doing.

“I was mainly just a one-person music department. I taught piano, I taught voice, I taught theory. You name it, I did it. I enjoyed it very, very much,” he said.

Then he had a life-changing experience. He read “Black Man’s Burden” by Utica Institute founder Dr. William Holtzclaw, learning about the all-male Jubilee Singers group formerly used as a fund-raising tool to keep the historically black college afloat. The group was active from 1922 to 1941.

“I said, ‘Wow, this is something I would like to do.’ When I was at Tougaloo College, I was in a male group. I wanted to continue it so I said, ‘I’m going to start this back.’ It took off.”

Cooper resurrected the Jubilee Singers in 1982, right around the time Utica Junior College and Hinds Junior College merged because of a federal higher education desegregation court order.

Cooper retired at the end of June as the current longest serving Hinds employee. Along the way, he was recognized many times for his work. His awards include Outstanding and Distinguished Academic Instructor of the Year, Hinds Humanities Teacher of the Year, Life Star, Hinds Hero, HEADWAE recognition and the college’s most prestigious recognition, the 3E Award. The Fine Arts Center on the Utica Campus bears his name.

Two scholarships have been established in his honor, the Dr. Bobby Cooper’s Jubilee Singers Scholarship in 2012 and the Daughters of Bobby Cooper Singers Scholarship in 2015. He established the Dr. Bobby Cooper Endowed Scholarship in 2002.

He plans to stay productive in his retirement. He has applied for a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to write the story of the Jubilee Singers and embark on a book tour. As the motto goes, “Once a Jubilee, always a Jubilee.”

Dr. Bobby Cooper directs the Jubilee Singers at the May 2018 graduation ceremony on the Utica Campus.

Cooper leaves behind a legacy of excellence in his music program but will always be best known for the Jubilee Singers and their rebirth.

Dr. Clyde Muse, who became Hinds president July 1, 1978, before the merger of the two institutions, recognized the jewel the college had in Cooper and the Jubilee Singers.

“I’ve been pleased to support them over the years. They truly are great ambassadors for us,” he said.

Muse recalls attending a national community college convention in New Orleans a few years ago when the Jubilee Singers performed. “I’ve been going to those meetings for years. Very seldom does anybody get a standing ovation, but theirs was automatic when they performed,” he said.

Retired Utica Campus Vice President Dr. George Barnes, who worked at the campus from 1962 to 2013, counts Cooper as a friend.

“He’s done a lot of things for people. He’s done a lot of things for me. He is just a fine person who has worked hard,” Barnes said. “I have a great respect for him.

“He was tough. He was kind and friendly but he wasn’t always soft,” Barnes said. “If something needed tightening down, he knew when he needed to do it. He was firm and fair. Students had a lot of faith in him. They loved him.”

Cooper’s Jubilee Singers started small – four young men, three of them from Illinois where he had gone to graduate school. Now the groups average about 12 to 15 singers. “These were my better singers. Just because you were a part of the choir did not mean you would be one of my Jubilee Singers,” he said.

The Jubilee Singers traveled extensively and performed widely. One of Cooper’s favorite performances was at the Vatican in Rome in 1999 where they sang “Ave Maria” and the group’s trademark “Amen” for Pope John Paul II.

“It was so exciting to sing at the Vatican. People came and talked to us and talked to the fellows. We were really celebrities. We enjoyed it so much,” he said.

Things haven’t always been smooth. There have been a few trials along the way. And he and his wife have been awakened more than once by a student calling at midnight after getting into a difficult situation.

“Kids who were not quite sure about themselves and what they can do –you get a chance to work with them because enrollment was small. You your own kids,” he said. “I always had a house full of my students.

But I enjoyed it and still hear from those kids today about their experiences. It was an environment that you could help the kids, and they wanted to do better. I’ve got former students everywhere.”

One of those is James Adams (1996, 2001), senior program manager for a Dallas nonprofit called Big Thought. “I experienced some rough years while in college at Hinds, and Doc was always there to say it would be all right. He supported me however he could and taught me, as a choir member and Jubilee Singer, to be a gentlemen of honesty and excellence. I saw the best example in the life he walked before us all,” Adams said.

Tracy James, one of the first Utica Campus music graduates, has known Cooper since 1977. She’s a vocal music teacher at a middle school in Ohio. “Music became my livelihood, so I owe much to Dr. Cooper for his wisdom and inspiration he instilled in me,” she said. “One thing Dr. Cooper taught me was always bring your ‘A’ game to the classroom.”

Calvin Bogan Sr., a music major from fall 2009 to summer 2013, is youth pastor at West Point Baptist Church in Hattiesburg.

“Dr. Cooper is a voice of assurance, the portrait of grace and the epitome of kindness. One of his many wonderful attributes I’ve noticed is his timeliness. My most memorable moment with Dr. Cooper is testament to his impeccable timeliness,” he said.

Students had planned a birthday celebration for Cooper on Nov. 3, 2010, but Bogan wasn’t able to be there after his mother died of cancer and her funeral was on that day.

“I viewed my mother for the last time. As I stood there, I felt a firm, but gentle hand on my shoulder. That hand was that of Dr. Cooper. He spent his birthday with my family and I as we funeralized my mother,” Bogan said. “I can say for me and everyone else that Dr. Cooper has always been there for anyone who needed him and is always in time.”

 

Dr. Cooper Legacy Giving

The Humanities Department at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus is soliciting donations for two projects in honor of Dr. Bobby Cooper.

One is for a museum exhibit focused on his legacy that is being called the Utica Jubilee Experience.The plan is to display some of Dr. Cooper’s archival materials, along with historical information about the Jubilees – both the original group from the 1920s and 1930s, and Dr. Cooper’s Jubilees. The museum is to feature interactive exhibits allowing visitors the chance to experience one of Dr. Cooper’s Jubilee concerts, as well as educational materials for teachers bringing their classes to the exhibit.

The other option is a gift to the Dr. Bobby G. Cooper Scholarship Fund, which provides scholarships to deserving music education students at the Utica Campus. The recipients are selected each year based on their talent, financial need and potential to impact the world.

For more information on how to give to either project, contact Dan Fuller, 601.885.7097 or daniel.fuller@hindscc.edu or the Hinds Community College Foundation at 601.857.3363.

 

Editor’s Note: This story was originally published in the summer 2018 issue of Hindsight alumni magazine.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

24 July, 2018 News more
Joyner asks Utica Campus grads to ‘keep on pushin’ to goals, rewarding careers
Posted by
14 May

Joyner asks Utica Campus grads to ‘keep on pushin’ to goals, rewarding careers

UTICA – The man who’s known as the “Hardest Working Man in Radio” and “The Fly Jock” asked this year’s graduates of Hinds Community College Utica Campus to take a page from his own book and never rest on their laurels.

Tom Joyner, syndicated radio show host, speaks at the graduation ceremony at Hinds Community College Utica Campus on May 13, 2018. At left are Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. Tyrone Jackson, vice president for the Utica Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“You’ve all worked hard to get here today,” nationally syndicated radio and television show host Tom Joyner told about 130 who earned credentials inside J.D. Boyd Gymnasium on Sunday.

“So, turn to your neighbor and say, ‘the struggle is real.’ Some of you had financial issues. Some of you had academic issues. Some of you had problems at home. Some of you had school and jobs. Some had presentation issues – you name it. Some of you had all these issues at once. But, like the old song by The Impressions, you kept on pushin’.”

The Utica Campus, which is designated an HBCU (historically black college and universities), was selected by the Tom Joyner Foundation as its June 2018 School of the Month. The program is the signature such effort of his foundation in its support of HBCUs through fundraising efforts, scholarships, endowments and capacity-building enhancements.

The Utica Campus is one of two, two-year HBCUs selected for the honor, which is traditionally reserved for four-year institutions. Annually, the Tom Joyner Foundation selects 11 HBCUs with which to partner. During the partnership, funds are raised in support of student scholarships and other initiatives to help sustain the HBCU.

Joyner asked students to stay focused on the next step in their education and added a twist uncommon to most graduation ceremonies but common indeed for times when he delivers a keynote address at one – he gave $5 to each graduate with a tacit pledge from each that they’d make it grow as they continued their education.

“I’ll put it in your hand, and you’ll make it grow – with your good ideas,” he said. “I want to see you add to that $5, with some more zeroes and some commas. When I see you again, I want you to tell me you made your idea work, and how you helped someone else.”

From left, Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse, keynote speaker Tom Joyner and Dr. Tyrone Jackson, vice president for the Utica Campus

On Saturday, Joyner visited the Mississippi Job Corps Center in Crystal Springs and attended a special program on campus recognizing his foundation’s work to support HBCUs.

“I heard so many stories there of overcoming adversity,” Joyner said of the visit, adding he was impressed by his tour of the campus. Joyner shares a hometown – Tuskegee, Ala. – with that of William H. Holtzclaw, who founded the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute in 1903, which is the Utica Campus today.

“What I love most about Hinds Community College in Utica, is that it offers something for everyone,” he said. “There’s traditional students who come straight from high school who intend on changing their direction. Whatever the situation, whatever your goals, God brought you to Hinds at the right time. Take it from me, HBCUs are the right place to be.”

Joyner also urged students to participate in civic life to make sure their voices are heard.

“We can tweet about social injustice, we can even march about it, but nothing will happen until we vote out elected officials we don’t believe in. It won’t happen at all unless you go vote.”

Traditional students with honors credentials walked in the grand processional into the gym side-by-side with those who took a more circuitous route to starting college.

One, Antonio Green, beamed with happiness outside the gym with his mother, Leah.

“I wanted to play football coming out of high school in New Orleans, but I’ve gone into Electronics Technology to start a career there,” Green said.

Daphanie Bryant, left, of Jackson, and Lemontez Brown, of Edwards, line up with fellow graduates of Hinds Community College Utica Campus before the graduation ceremony May 13, 2018. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jennifer Burnett, a custodian at Hinds Community College Utica Campus, earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Computer Programming Technology during the graduation ceremony on campus May 13, 2018. Burnett earned a Career Certificate in the subject last summer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Bobby G. Cooper, director of the Jubiliee Singers at Hinds Community College Utica Campus, carries the mace en route to the graduation ceremony held on campus May 13, 2018. Cooper, who is retiring this year, is Hinds’ longest-tenured employee, with 45 years of service.

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse speaks during graduation ceremonies at the Utica Campus May 13, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Vanessa Wilson, reading instructor at Hinds Community College Utica Campus, sings the national anthem before graduation ceremonies on campus May 13, 2018.

Antonio Green, center, originally from Algiers, La., earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Electronics Technology during a graduation ceremony at Hinds Community College Utica Campus May 13, 2018. With him is friend and classmate Hosea Jackson Jr., left, and Antonio’s mother, Leah Green. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Jubiliee Singers perform during graduation ceremonies at Hinds Community College Utica Campus May 13, 2018.

Louis Perry Jr., center, earned a Career Certificate in Welding and Cutting Technology during graduation ceremonies held at Hinds Community College Utica Campus May 13, 2018. With him, from left, are his mother, Eddie Perry, sister Catina Perry, girlfriend Taylor Liggins, Utica Campus Chief of Police and family pastor Perry Terrell, niece Shay Miles, and cousin Maleek Bruce. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amber Sanders, second from right, of Jackson, earned an Associate of Arts degree from Hinds Community College Utica Campus during the ceremony held on campus May 13, 2018. With her are sisters Charlotte Sanders and Samantha Johnson, and brother Romeo Johnson. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

Students hold $5 bills distributed by keynote speaker Tom Joyner after the graduation ceremony at Hinds Community College Utica Campus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students hold $5 bills distributed by keynote speaker Tom Joyner after the graduation ceremony at Hinds Community College Utica Campus.

 

 

From left, Alexis Williamson, Jeffery Fairley, both of Jackson, and Brianna Watkins, of Summit, each of whom graduated from Hinds Community College with honors at ceremonies held at the Utica Campus May 13, 2018.

 

14 May, 2018 News more
Radio personality Tom Joyner to speak at Hinds CC Utica Campus May 13 graduation ceremony
Posted by
09 May

Radio personality Tom Joyner to speak at Hinds CC Utica Campus May 13 graduation ceremony

UTICA – Tom Joyner, a nationally syndicated radio and television host based in Dallas, Texas, is the speaker for the May 13 graduation ceremony at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. About 130 students from the Utica Campus will graduate.

The ceremony is at 2 p.m. in the Boyd Gymnasium.

The Utica Campus, which has a designation as an HBCU (historically black college and university), has been selected by the Tom Joyner Foundation as its June 2018 School of the Month.

The “School of the Month” program is the signature program of the foundation, which supports historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) through fundraising efforts, scholarships, endowments and capacity-building enhancements.

The designation is an opportunity for supporters of the HBCU campus to help raise money for student scholarships. The Utica Campus enrolls more than 800 students per semester. To donate online, supporters can go to the website: https://hub.hindscc.edu/tomjoyner. Additional fundraising opportunities will be available over the next few weeks.

Joyner’s show is the nation’s top syndicated morning show, airing in 105 markets and reaching nearly 8 million listeners.

The Utica Campus is one of two, two-year HBCUs selected for the honor, which is traditionally reserved for four-year institutions. Annually, the Tom Joyner Foundation selects 11 HBCUs with which to partner. During the partnership, funds are raised in support of student scholarships and other initiatives to help sustain the HBCU.

Fundraising efforts include a monthly day of giving by faculty, staff and students; church and community outreach programs; a donor reception; alumni support initiatives and a visit from Joyner.

All donations received during the campaign will be used for student scholarships at Hinds’ Utica Campus. Although selected for June, the campaign officially kicked off March 1 and will continue through Dec. 31.

Since 1998, Joyner’s foundation has provided support to HBCUs to help sustain and preserve their legacies through fundraising and donor development initiatives. More than $65 million has been raised to support more than 29,000 students attending selected colleges and universities. Additionally, the foundation has recommended internships, offered matching grant support and career development to deserving students.

Hinds Community College has four other graduation ceremonies on May 10 and 11 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Over the five ceremonies, Hinds is awarding 1,839 degrees and certificates to 1,319 people, with some people receiving multiple credentials in academic, career or technical programs. This is the largest number of credentials Hinds has ever awarded for one graduation season.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

09 May, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Utica Campus’ Early Childhood and Teacher Education Conference Covers the Past, Present and Future of Education
Posted by
10 April

Hinds CC Utica Campus’ Early Childhood and Teacher Education Conference Covers the Past, Present and Future of Education

Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus held its 2018 Early Childhood and Teacher Education Conference Friday, April 6. The conference welcomed students and industry leaders from around the country with an overall goal of establishing a platform for educators and perspectives students to exchange fresh ideas, usable classroom techniques and strategies for teaching and learning success.

Keynote speaker for the conference was Dr. Thea Williams-Black, dean of the College of Education at Tougaloo College. Williams-Black focused her presentation on respecting past trends and techniques of education, leading the present generation into the most beneficial and needed areas of education and securing the future in education.

Breakout sessions served as a backup to information obtained in the general session of the conference. Workshops were offered on why a prospective student should choose education as an employment field as well as how to obtain an educator’s licensure in the state of Mississippi. Other sessions include incorporating technology in early childhood settings, movement in the classroom and ways to introduce creative arts into a classroom setting.

“The purpose of this conference is to reach out to current and future teachers who would like to enhance their skills. Showing respect for the past, leading the present and securing the future of education is vital to our growing industry,” said Yolanda Houston, director of Early Childhood and Teacher Education on the Utica campus.

“Taking resources we learned as students and young teaching professionals and updating them to accompany innovative trends keeps us as educators relevant and relatable to our student population,” she said.

The conference also welcomed vendors from Mississippi Early Childhood Education, Mississippi Building Blocks, The University of Southern Mississippi Disability Studies, Jobs for Mississippi Grads, Jackson State University, Alcorn State University, Division of Medicaid, Kaplan Early Learning, and others.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Jobs for Mississippi Grads representative Elizabeth Blackshire of Greenwood has attended the Early Childhood and Teacher Education Conference four years running. Blackshire’s goal for attending the April 6 conference was to introduce her program to new graduates looking to gain employment in the teaching field.

Third year attendee and vendor Dr. Alice McGowan of Clinton represented Mississippi Early Childhood Inclusion Center at the Early Childhood and Teacher Education Conference held April 6. McGowan, shown with Utica campus librarian Jean Greene, provided information to guests on early intervention services her company offered children with exceptional needs.

Early Childhood Education students Audrey Ward of Claiborne County, Aneekia McKenny of Simpson County and Samantha Boyd of Jefferson County attended the April 6 conference hoping to gather information about the industry. Ward and Boyd both have plans of becoming teachers, while McKenny hopes to one day become a social worker.

Dr. Tyrone Jackson, vice president for the Hinds CC Utica campus, spent time greeting guests and attending workshops at the Early Childhood and Teacher Education conference held April 6. He is shown with Dr. Will Smith, principal of Utica Elementary/Middle School.

 

10 April, 2018 News more
Hinds CC, announces speakers for spring graduation ceremonies
Posted by
06 April

Hinds CC, announces speakers for spring graduation ceremonies

RAYMOND – The Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus will have four graduation ceremonies for spring 2018, starting Thursday, May 10 and continuing Friday, May 11 with three events in succession.

Phyllis Polk Johnson

Phyllis Polk Johnson, executive director of the Mississippi Board of Nursing, is the speaker at the first ceremony 2 p.m. May 10, for nursing and allied health graduates. Mike Morgan, president of the Hinds County Board of Supervisors, will speak to the first of three groups of academic and career-technical graduates, at 8 a.m. May 11. State Sen. Josh Harkins, of Flowood, speaks to the second group, at 11 a.m. Dr. Andrea Mayfield, executive director of the Mississippi Community College Board, will speak to the third, at 3 p.m.

Tom Joyner, a nationally syndicated radio and television show host, will speak to graduates at the Utica Campus during a ceremony 2 p.m. Sunday, May 13.

Johnson oversees about 68,000 registered nurses, practical nurses and advanced practice registered nurses in her role leading the board. She has also directed the licensure, compliance and discipline for more than 5,000 advanced practice registered nurses, which includes nurse practitioners, nurse midwives and certified registered nurse anesthetists. Prior to her work with the board, served in various administrative and clinical roles with the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Mike Morgan

Morgan, of Clinton, has represented District 4 on the county board since 2015. Previously, he was an alderman in Clinton for eight years. During that time, the city completed several major infrastructure projects including Quisenberry Library, completion of Brighton Park, a new Parks and Recreation Department facility at Traceway Park, a visitor center at the Natchez Trace, improvements to Arrow Drive and Pinehaven Road and to the city’s wastewater treatment plant.

Prior to being elected a county supervisor, he was CFO and, later, president of Ridgeland-based software company Bomgar Corporation, which won numerous awards for being among the fastest-growing tech firms in the U.S. He holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from the University of Mississippi and an MBA from Mississippi College. He has taught finance and economics classes at the University of Southern Mississippi, Holmes Community College and Mississippi College.

Josh Harkins

Harkins has represented District 20 in the Mississippi State Senate since 2012. He graduated from Mississippi State University in 1997 and is a member of the Flowood Chamber of Commerce, ACI Real Estate and Home Builders Association. He is chair of the Universities and Colleges Committee in the state Senate, as well as vice-chair of the Energy Committee.

Among other committees he sits on include Business and Financial Institutions, Finance, Highways and Transportation, Public Health and Welfare, Public Health and Welfare, Public Property, Rules and Tourism.

Dr. Andrea Mayfield

Mayfield has been executive director of MCCB since 2015. Previously, she was vice president at East Mississippi Community College, for the Scooba Campus. She had risen through the ranks there as an instructor of biological sciences, e-Learning coordinator and later e-Learning dean, dean of instruction, vice president for instruction, vice president for institutional research and effectiveness, then vice president for the Scooba Campus.

Her service as an education leader has included membership to the Board of Trustees for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. She also serves on Gov. Bryant’s cabinet, the board of directors for Mississippi Public Broadcasting, State Health Insurance Board, Mississippi College Savings Board, State Workforce Investment Board, State Longitudinal Data System, Innovate Mississippi and the Education Achievement Council. She is also a member of Mississippi State’s Education Leadership Advisory Committee.

She holds a doctorate from Mississippi State University, in educational leadership with a special emphasis in the administration of higher education. She earned her undergraduate degree from the University of West Alabama, where she also earned a master’s degree.

Tom Joyner

Joyner’s show is the nation’s top syndicated morning show, airing in 105 markets and reaching nearly 8 million listeners. The Utica Campus has been selected by the Tom Joyner Foundation as its June 2018 School of the Month, as part of his organization’s signature program that supports historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) through fundraising efforts, scholarships, endowments and capacity-building enhancements.

06 April, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Utica Campus named Tom Joyner Foundation’s June 2018 School of the Month
Posted by
03 April

Hinds CC Utica Campus named Tom Joyner Foundation’s June 2018 School of the Month

Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus has been selected by the Tom Joyner Foundation as its June 2018 School of the Month.

The “School of the Month” program is the signature program of the foundation, which supports historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) through fundraising efforts, scholarships, endowments and capacity-building enhancements.

The designation is an opportunity for supporters of the HBCU campus to help raise money for student scholarships. The Utica Campus enrolls more than 800 students per semester. To donate online, supporters can go to the website: https://hub.hindscc.edu/tomjoyner. Additional fundraising opportunities will be available over the next few weeks.

“We are so very proud that the Tom Joyner Foundation has selected Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus as its June 2018 School of the Month. We are also proud to have Mr. Joyner as our 2018 Commencement speaker,” said Dr. Tyrone Jackson, vice president for the Utica Campus.

“The Joyner Foundation has made tremendous strides assisting students in their quest for academic achievement. This partnership will allow so many deserving students the opportunity to obtain the education they so rightfully deserve,” Jackson said.

Joyner, a nationally syndicated radio and television host, will speak at the Utica graduation, set for 2 p.m. Sunday, May 13. His show is the nation’s top syndicated morning show, airing in 105 markets and reaching nearly 8 million listeners.

The Utica Campus is one of two, two-year HBCUs selected for the honor, which is traditionally reserved for four-year institutions. Annually, the Tom Joyner Foundation selects 11 HBCUs with which to partner. During the partnership, funds are raised in support of student scholarships and other initiatives to help sustain the HBCU.

Fundraising efforts include a monthly day of giving by faculty, staff and students; church and community outreach programs; a donor reception; alumni support initiatives and a visit from Joyner.

All donations received during the campaign will be used for student scholarships at Hinds’ Utica Campus. Although selected for June, the campaign officially kicked off March 1 and will continue through Dec. 31.

Since 1998, Joyner’s foundation has provided support to HBCUs to help sustain and preserve their legacies through fundraising and donor development initiatives. More than $65 million has been raised to support more than 29,000 students attending selected colleges and universities. Additionally, the foundation has recommended internships, offered matching grant support and career development to deserving students.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

03 April, 2018 News more
Award a time for reflection for trailblazing physician, Utica Institute alum
Posted by
28 March

Award a time for reflection for trailblazing physician, Utica Institute alum

 Note: The following story appears in the spring issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website. To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here.

A life spent at the forefront of battles for social justice and affordable health care has come full circle for local physician Dr. Robert Smith.

Dr. Robert Smith

In November, the American Medical Association awarded Smith the Medal of Valor Award for fighting social injustice and providing health care to Mississippians during the civil rights era.

“In riotous and dangerous times, Dr. Smith placed himself repeatedly in harm’s way and made it his mission to stand up for the health care rights of African-Americans,” said AMA president David O. Barbe, M.D. “He is a man of compassion and courage who has and continues to fulfill his Hippocratic Oath by providing medical care to the poor, uninsured and underserved citizens of Mississippi.”

Smith’s academic career began at the Utica Institute, which later became Hinds Agricultural High School, part of Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus.

His education flourished beginning when he was a precocious teen at the Utica high school, where he graduated as valedictorian.

“It was one of the best things that happened to me,” Smith said of his time there starting in 1949. “In today’s terms, I would be considered ADHD. I had the opportunity to go to high school very early.

“We didn’t have a public high school in the county at the time. But, this was around the time of Brown vs. Board of Education, so the county bought a small, struggling school modeled after Booker T. Washington’s school. It was just a blessing for me,” Smith said.

The Utica school was both a boarding school and day campus.

“My folks didn’t want me to leave home for schooling, so I became one of the first teens to get up at 4:30 in the morning and ride a little old bus 45 miles nearly all through dirt roads to get to school. In the winter, I’d leave home at night, and I’d get home at night. Many times the bus broke down, but luckily my daddy had a car that would come and find us and retrieve us all.

“But, going to Hinds AHS was like going to heaven,” Smith said. “I found a great bunch of people, and it was the first time I had people around me who had gone to college and were degreed.”

Once there, Smith found “mentors, father figures, mother figures, the whole nine yards – and people who believed in discipline,” as he put it, once again remembering his teen years.

“I had a math teacher who’d tell me, ‘Robert Smith, sit down! You’re not going to take over my class!’ There were other teachers like Maggie Dunson who told me, ‘Just wait till you get to college. They’ll fix you.’”

Dr. Robert Smith speaks during the Summer 2014 graduation ceremony for Nursing/Allied Health students.

Where he found a niche was in agriculture, then taught by A.D. Williams. “I had been in the 4-H Club before I went to Utica,” Smith said. “I was 4-H champion and among the first to show Polled Hereford cattle in a livestock show. I transferred my experience to being in New Farmers of America, where I was the first Mississippian of record to hold office in it.”

Smith credits Williams with teaching him the basics of communication and formal self-expression. “He taught me how to develop and present a talk,” Smith said. “He left, and A.D. Boykins came in. He had the same personality. I ended up winning state and regional speaking contests and going to Washington D.C.”

Another source of pride is having been taught by Dr. Walter Washington, who later presided over Utica Junior College and Alcorn State University. “His speeches about achievement and educational preparing were inspirational,” he said.

In 1963, the Terry native founded Mississippi Family Health Center in Jackson. The facility later became Central Mississippi Health Services and has locations in south Jackson and at Tougaloo College, where Smith had earlier earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry. His medical degree was earned at Howard University School of Medicine.

Smith witnessed the civil rights movement in Mississippi from a perspective few other people could, given his profession.

“I’d been a member since college of the NAACP, and I got to know Medgar Evers in college at Tougaloo when he was invited to talk,” Smith said. “I had attended a reception for him the night he was killed.

“The outgrowth of it all is that, through other memberships such as the Freedom Democratic Party, I became the unpaid physician to the movement.”

He was assisted in establishing a clinic in Bolivar County’s Mound Bayou by doctors from the Northeast, who, a year later, were part of 1964 Freedom Summer in Mississippi. The clinic served the poorest of the poor for basic medical needs.

“I was concentrating on how to get black folks into health care,” he said. “I helped prepare reports for Congress that brought about regional medical programs that brought advances in the care of heart, cancer, strokes and renal disease to local communities.

Both Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. Robert Smith were honored with the Whitney Young Service Award from the Andrew Jackson Council of the Boy Scouts of America in 2015.

“It’s about education, education, education. The best way to lower costs is to teach prevention. That has to come from grade school. It ought to be like English,” he said.

Two friendships he treasures are with the living giants who helped shape the modern-day Hinds Utica Campus and the college as a whole – Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. George Barnes, former vice president for the Utica Campus who retired in 2013 after 51 years.  Both men were instrumental in the merger between the Utica Campus and the Hinds Community College district.

“When they talked about merging those institutions, obviously there were concerns. But, I don’t know anything that could have done better since then,” Smith said.

He credited both men with the Utica Campus keeping “its traditional value system,” such as its colors and annual events such as the Coronation, while “providing opportunities for the least of these in education.”

Muse has known Smith for many years. He met him through his brother, George, who served on the Hinds County Board of Supervisors. Both had gone to the Utica Institute.

“Early in his life and career, he had a burning desire to see that all people had good medical attention and services,” Muse said, noting his work to establish the Mound Bayou clinic. “He was a pioneer in providing or getting medical services to people. And it was not the popular thing to do in those days. He had the courage to step out there and do it.”

Smith sees the American Medical Association honor as a benchmark not just for himself, but African-American membership in the organization.

“It was a national problem,” Smith said of the scarcity of full-member black doctors when his nearly six-decade medical career began. “In Mississippi, it was magnified. Even in a place like New York City or in Chicago, there was only a handful of black physicians – maybe five people – who were full members of the AMA.”

Among Smith’s numerous staff appointments through the years was at Central Mississippi Medical Center, now Merit Health Central.

“The contributions Dr. Smith has made in the healthcare field, not just in our community, but throughout our state cannot be lauded enough,” Merit Health Central CEO Barry Moss said. “We are grateful for his continuing leadership in his field, and I am proud he is a part of our Merit Health Central medical staff.”

In the spirit of gratitude, Smith has given back to the Utica Campus and Hinds, speaking at graduations several times and at the Utica Campus annual Founder’s Day celebration. He spent six years on the Hinds Community College Foundation Board, where he and his brother started a scholarship aimed at helping eligible Utica Campus students pay for college. He is a frequent presence at important Hinds events.

And, his service also continues in the medical community.

“He is a great person with a great medical mind that is still providing wonderful service to people in need of medical help,” Muse said.

Barnes literally owes his life to Smith. “About 29 years ago, he recommended me to Johns Hopkins University to treat pancreatic cancer,” Barnes said. “So I can’t really say enough about him. Any awards he has gotten, he deserves.”

Smith is quick to say that his path to success started in Utica.

“My education at Hinds prepared me for the opportunity to become the first black physician of record and board-certified physician, a fellow in family medicine, a teacher, a researcher, an author, and most of all, a family physician to the least of these that have come from many parts of the country.”

28 March, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Utica Campus’ ‘See Ya at the U’ Preview Day offers roadmap for success-minded students
Posted by
22 February

Hinds CC Utica Campus’ ‘See Ya at the U’ Preview Day offers roadmap for success-minded students

UTICA – Having a solid life plan is no easy task for high school seniors. For most, majors will change several times before their first day of college; but for some like Kevin Shuler, their roadmap is paved and they are ready to drive into the next chapter of their lives. Shuler, a Crystal Springs native, is a Raymond High School senior who plans to enter Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus in the fall.

Kevin Shuler, a senior at Raymond High School, shares his educational and life plans with Crystal Thomas, director of Student Housing at Hinds CC Utica campus during the “See Ya at the U” preview day Feb. 16.

“I plan to attend Hinds in the fall and would like to major in drone aeronautics or computer science,” Shuler said. “I then plan to enter into the National Guard so that they may pay for additional college credits after I graduate from Hinds.”

Shuler, along with hundreds of high school students from Jackson and surrounding areas, received information packets on classes and organizations offered at Hinds CC Utica Campus. Students also viewed live demonstrations, played games and received free lunch and door prizes while making their way from booth to booth at the “See Ya at the U” preview day Feb. 16.

Information booths representing financial aid, housing, admissions, student services and student intervention were just a few that were available to students. The annual recruiting day gives students an opportunity to see the college first hand, speak with staff and interact with current students on campus.  Some students were open to all facets of the process, but a few came more focused in their explorations.

Callaway High School senior and dual enrollment student Alexandria Baker of Jackson has hopes of attending Hinds in the fall and believes the Utica Campus’ unique STEM-UP program is the right path to take her to her next level.

“I’m planning a career in criminal justice,” Baker said. “I would like to be an FBI agent because there are so few women agents around. I like what Hinds’ STEM-UP program has to offer, so it’s at the top of my list. I also like Mississippi College and Louisiana State.”

Students were not alone in their quest for information. The event was also well attended by parents and educators looking to provide guidance to their students.  Murrah High School Interventionist Lisa Wilson attended the event with her students, hoping to provide assistance to those overwhelmed by the process.

“I felt it was important to be with my students during this time of transition. So many times students do not know exactly what to do in an environment such as this one and it can be a bit much to handle. I’m here to help them as needed,” Wilson said.

Hinds CC Utica Campus offers a recruiting day yearly and welcomes students from high schools statewide.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Job Corp students Kendall Morrow of West Hinds County and Tionne Howard of Gulfport chat with Hinds CC Building Trades Instructor, Leonard Knight about Carpentry options as a major at Hinds CC Utica’s “See Ya at the U” preview day held Feb. 16. Both students have an interest in working with their hands. Morrow would like to one day own a business in carpentry, while Howard prefers welding.

Murrah High School senior Key Keith tries is hand at Plinko during Hinds CC Utica’s “See Ya at the U” preview day held Feb. 16. Keith attended the event in hopes of narrowing his college search down to one. He would like to major in business and hopes to someday own is own business.

Dr.Tyrone Jackson, vice president of Hinds CC Utica campus takes time to meet and greet area high school students at the “See Ya at the U” preview day Feb. 16. Shown with Raymond High School senior Jimmy Smith, Jr. Smith has plans to attend Hinds in the fall of 2018 and would like to major in auto body collision and computer programming.

 

 

Jackson native and Murray High School senior Tionna Virgin, 17 attended the “See Ya at the U” recruiting event with her school’s Interventionist, Lisa Wilson. Wilson also of Jackson (shown on the right) felt it was important to bring her students so that they may experience college life first hand.

Callaway High School senior Alexandria Baker of Jackson is a dual enrollment student who attended “See Ya at the U” held Feb 16. on the Utica campus. Baker plans to major in criminal justice and one day become an FBI agent. Baker, shown at the STEM-UP table with freshman student worker Hezekiah Williams of Edwards, is motivated by a lack of female agents and would like to make her mark in the field.

 

22 February, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Utica Campus high school recruiting day set for Feb. 16
Posted by
12 February

Hinds CC Utica Campus high school recruiting day set for Feb. 16

UTICA – The Utica Campus of Hinds Community College has its annual recruiting day, dubbed “See Ya at the U,” on Friday, Feb. 16.

Beginning at 9 a.m., “See Ya at the U” is a way for high school seniors who are considering Hinds in fall 2018 to learn everything they need to know about Hinds Community College and, specifically, the Utica Campus, which has unique STEM programs and STEM scholarships that prospective students can learn about.

They can check out other programs of study, tour the Utica Campus and residence halls and meet faculty and staff. They can also learn about admissions, class registration and financial aid.

Participants will be treated to a free lunch and be eligible for door prizes.

For more information or to register for “See Ya at the U,” visit

Hub.hindscc.edu/TheU or call 601.885.7009

Other upcoming recruiting events include:

Feb. 23  9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Ag Expo 2018, Kendall Agricultural Complex, Raymond Campus

March 2  8 a.m. to noon  March Madness recruiting event, Vicksburg-Warren Campus

March 8 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.  Nursing and Allied Health Spring Showcase, Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center

March 23  8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Rankin Campus College Day recruiting event, Muse Center

April 6  9 a.m. to 1 p.m. College Carnival recruiting event, Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center

April 10  3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Spring Sign-Up Day recruiting event, Vicksburg-Warren Campus

Get all the details about these special events at hub.hindscc.edu/events.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.eduor call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

12 February, 2018 News more