http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Winners named in annual Hinds CC Rankin Campus Literary Festival

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Winners named in annual Hinds CC Rankin Campus Literary Festival
Posted by
06 April

Winners named in annual Hinds CC Rankin Campus Literary Festival

Winning first place and the scholarships to Hinds were, from left, Amber Rayne Jenkins of Pisgah High School; Katie Rester of Brandon, Hartfield Academy, short story and Kim Hill of Northwest Rankin High School, poetry. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Three Rankin County students won full tuition scholarships for a year to Hinds Community College after placing first place in the annual Rankin Campus Literary Festival on April 6.

The top winners also won cash prizes of $100 for first place, $50 for second place and $25 for third place.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

 

 

 

 

All poetry winners include, from left, Kim Hill, Northwest Rankin High School, first; Hayley Bounds, Pearl High School, second; Amber Roberts, Pearl High School, third and Alecia G. Woodford, Pisgah High School, honorable mention. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

All short story winners include, from left, Katie Rester of Brandon, Hartfield Academy, first; Jordan T. Hariel of Brandon, Hariel Homeschool, second; Amber Rayne Jenkins, Pisgah High School, third; Laura Wingo of Brandon, Hartfield Academy, honorable mention and, not pictured, Mackenzie Beth Crowell, Puckett High School, honorable mention. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

All essay winners include, from left, Amber Rayne Jenkins of Pisgah High School, first place; Madison Lauryl Newman of Brandon, East Rankin Academy, second; Lauren Nicole Parker of Lena, East Rankin Academy, third; Krissy Watkins of Lena, East Rankin Academy, honorable mention. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

1 465 06 April, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Rankin College Day draws hundreds to Muse Center
Posted by
26 March

Hinds CC Rankin College Day draws hundreds to Muse Center

PEARL – Justin Sanders, of Florence High School, wants to turn his interest in creating things into a career when he leaves high school.

Justin Sanders, left, of Florence High School, Andrew Shaw and Mick Kuhn, both of Brandon High School, look on as Andrea Blair, a chemistry instructor at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, conducts an experiment at Rankin College Day March 23 at the Muse Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’m thinking of doing graphic design or possibly even architecture,” Sanders said. “I have some family in architecture.”

Julie Harrison, of Pearl High School, already wants to help mold young lives or aid them back to health.

“It’s either nursing or early childhood education for me,” Harrison said. “It’s all about helping people.”

They were among about 250 high school juniors, seniors and others who attended Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus, which featured exhibits for all academic and career-tech programs, activities and organizations Hinds has to offer.

Carol McLaurin, dean of Student Services at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, explains programs at the campus to Julie Harrison, of Pearl High School, at Rankin College Day March 23 at the Muse Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

For those still studying for their high school diploma, it’s a time to find out how Hinds’ programs of study can build a successful career.

“I’ve wanted to do television production since I was a kid,” said Myrandis McGrone, of Northwest Rankin High School.

Prospective students interacted with faculty and Hinds students about admissions, scholarships, majors, student life and more.

“We look forward to many of the students from Rankin County and the surrounding area enrolling at the Rankin Campus and taking advantage of what we have to offer.” said Dr. Norman Session, vice president of the Rankin Campus and the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

Myrandis McGrone, foreground, of Northwest Rankin High School, looks at what’s being created in the Radio, Television Production and Broadcasting Program with instructor Randy Kwan during Rankin College Day at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus March 23. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Dr. Carl DeWitt, left, and Amanda Blair perform an experiment for prospective students at Rankin College Day March 23 at the Muse Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus, speaks with Charlie Parker, center-left, of East Rankin Academy, his mother, Melissa Parker and Maddie Morgan at Rankin College Day March 23 at the Muse Center (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

1 270 26 March, 2018 News more
MIBEST program at Hinds CC sets young lady on path to better life
Posted by
19 March

MIBEST program at Hinds CC sets young lady on path to better life

PEARL – Still waters have always run deep for Jessica Spann, in school and in life.

Now quiet in nature and quick with a smile, Spann, 20, has come a long way in a short time when it comes to completing her education.

Jessica Spann

“I kept telling myself I had to do it and that working fast food and at gas stations wasn’t going to be a career,” Spann said. “I just wasn’t a fan of high school. I was an aggressive person for a while as I tried to figure myself out. And now I’m just so happy.”

In January, Spann, of Brandon, became the first student in the MIBEST program at Hinds Community College to earn her High School Equivalency certificate through the Competency-Based option. The track involves the recognition of industry credentials as well as academic standards. She earned a silver rating on the National Career Readiness Certificate exam, a nationally-recognized career-readiness skills test, and in May will walk across the stage a Hinds graduate with a career certificate in Medical Data Technology.

Spann credits the unique adult education and career-readiness program with honing her skills in more than just the basics.

“I speak up more in class when I’m not understanding something, instead of getting frustrated when I don’t understand something,” she said. “My attention span is better. I’m in accounting now. It’s hard, but I want to keep on learning about it.”

MIBEST is Mississippi’s version of the nationally recognized Integrating Basic Education and Skills Training program, or I-BEST, and originated in Washington state. The program kicked off a few years ago with federal funds and allows adult students to train for a job skill while earning their GED high school equivalency certificate at the same time. In Mississippi, MIBEST was implemented at each state community college in 2016 thanks to a $6 million grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Students are prepared to be job-ready in six months to a year, train in high-demand areas and earn national certifications.

Jessica Spann

Spann landed in the program thanks to Angie Miles, who works in the program as a navigator, tasked with helping its students find solutions for “life issues” such as transportation, child care and financial aid so they can focus squarely on academics.

Miles knew Spann from when she was homeroom mother for her own daughter’s fifth grade class – a group that also included Jessica. Over the years, she became familiar of a tough family life when it came to completing her education.

Seeing Spann enter her MIBEST orientation classroom was a surprise, Miles said, one that has produced a level of achievement neither thought possible.

“I was so excited to see the beautiful young woman she had grown up to be,” Miles said. “I was even more thrilled that she was wanting to pursue her high school equivalency and take college classes at Hinds Community College.”

Kristi Johnson, an instructor in the program, has watched Spann blossom since last summer into a successful, career-ready student.

“At that time, I met a very distant young lady that put up a lot of walls around her,” Johnson said. “She was quick to get angry, from frustration, because she didn’t believe that she was smart or capable. However, over time, she began to trust those who want the best for her and to believe in herself. Today, she is an excellent student and a confident young woman.”

For more information on the MIBEST program at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, contact Miles at 601-936-1834 or Johnson at 601-936-1850.

5 5122 19 March, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members
Posted by
08 March

Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members

PEARL – The Alpha Omicron Omega Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus inducted new members and officers Feb. 22.

Rankin PTK inductees for Spring 2018 include, front row, from left: Kassidy Irby, of Pearl; Noah McDaniel, of Richland; Amber Williams, of Brandon; Farrah Pitts, of Jackson; Tyler Hocutt, of Florence; Samantha Dinnella, of Brandon; Tywanna Millwood, of Pearl;Abby McCardle, of Brandon; Kaley Crotwell, of Brandon; Kate Busby, of Trenton; second row, from left, Carter Wagoman, of Florence; Richard Goodwin, of Monroe; Jessica Stamps, of Brandon; Victoria Lawrence, of Jackson; Mary Barton Rogers, of Brandon; Hope Jenkins, of Brandon; Rachel Nolan, of Brandon; Raleigh Havard, of Brandon; Madison Starks, of Brandon; third row, from left, Daniel Hill, of Madison; Jake Watts, of Pearl; Colton Pierce, of Sandhill; Karley Alexander, of Brandon; Abigail Cockerill, of Brandon; Antara Sharma, of Brandon; Anna Smith, of Brandon; Katie Brown, of Brandon; back row, from left, Joseph Crawford, of Pearl; Branden Hines, of Brandon; Caleb Ries, of Florence; Jessica Waldrop, of Brookhaven; Ray Ferguson, of Kosciusko; Preston McCue, of Richland.

Newly inducted members include Kassidy Irby, of Pearl; Noah McDaniel, of Richland; Amber Williams, of Brandon; Farrah Pitts, of Jackson; Tyler Hocutt, of Florence; Samantha Dinnella, of Brandon; Tywanna Millwood, of Pearl; Abby McCardle, of Brandon; Kaley Crotwell, of Brandon; Kate Busby, of Trenton; Carter Wagoman, of Florence; Richard Goodwin, of Monroe; Jessica Stamps, of Brandon; Victoria Lawrence, of Jackson; Mary Barton Rogers, of Brandon; Hope Jenkins, of Brandon; Rachel Nolan, of Brandon; Raleigh Havard, of Brandon; Madison Starks, of Brandon; Daniel Hill, of Madison; Jake Watts, of Pearl; Colton Pierce, of Sandhill; Karley Alexander, of Brandon; Abigail Cockerill, of Brandon; Antara Sharma, of Brandon; Anna Smith, of Brandon; Katie Brown, of Brandon; Joseph Crawford, of Pearl; Branden Hines, of Brandon; Caleb Ries, of Florence; Jessica Waldrop, of Brookhaven; Ray Ferguson, of Kosciusko; and Preston McCue, of Richland.

Officers this semester are Win Winstead, of Pelahatchie; Hannah Stovall, of Brandon; Madison Brunt, of Brandon; Claudia Nelson, of Brandon. Back row: Christina Hamilton, of Pelahatchie; Josh Williamson, of Brandon; Destiny Little, of Madison; James Flickner, of Pelahatchie; and Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett.

Rankin Campus PTK Officers Spring 2018 include, from left, front row: Win Winstead, of Pelahatchie; Hannah Stovall, of Brandon; Madison Brunt, of Brandon; Claudia Nelson, of Brandon; back row, from left, Christina Hamilton, of Pelahatchie; Josh Williamson, of Brandon; Destiny Little, of Madison; James Flickner, of Pelatchie; Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett.

 

 

 

 

 

Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society for community and junior college students. Membership in Phi Theta Kappa is extended to students who have a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or above on 12 or more transferrable credit hours. There are more than 1,200 Phi Theta Kappa chapters throughout the United States and abroad. For more information about Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds, go to http://www.hindscc.edu/admissions/studentlife/clubs/ptk/index, email Faculty Adviser Joy Rhoads at jdrhoads@hindscc.edu or follow the society’s Hinds chapter on Twitter at @HindsRankinPTK. The new Honors Institute program at the Rankin Campus may be followed at @HCCHonorsRankin.

 

1 310 08 March, 2018 News more
Hinds CC’s Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center named as state’s best
Posted by
27 November

Hinds CC’s Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center named as state’s best

The Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus is the state’s best for 2017.

Presented annually by the Mississippi Construction Education Foundation, the prestigious Career and Technical Center of Excellence Award recognizes commitment and innovation across all vocational construction programs.

Valerie Barton, center, director of the Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus, accepts her center’s selection as the state’s best from the Mississippi Construction Education Foundation. Joining her at the recent awards banquet are MCEF representatives, from left, Brent Bean, Gary Beeland, Barton, Dianna Zendejas and Lauren Hunt.

At the forefront of the Pearl/Rankin CTC mission is a passion to equip students with the skills they need for successful occupations. To make that happen, the center is building a foundation around a construction curriculum that connects throughout its 15 career programs of study.

“We have seen firsthand the strides that Pearl/Rankin CTC is making to increase opportunities for students,” said MCEF President Mike Barkett. “Their administration and instructors are to be commended for the many ways they are accelerating the pace of improvement to ensure that students gain the knowledge and skills necessary for future success.”

Valerie Barton, director of the Pearl/Rankin CTC, accepted the award on behalf of her center at the recent Mississippi Associated Builders & Contractor’s Merit Awards Banquet.

“If Mississippi is going to have the skilled workforce that’s needed for tomorrow, we must encourage and train those workers today,” said Barkett. “We congratulate Pearl/Rankin CTC for going above and beyond to prepare our students for career and technical professions and for ensuring that Mississippi has the resources required to support its growing construction and manufacturing industries.”

The mission of the non-profit MCEF is to promote careers, recruit capable individuals and train a quality workforce for the construction industry in the state of Mississippi. MCEF also offers workforce training and credentialing in construction, industrial maintenance and manufacturing trades.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

1 735 27 November, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Rankin Honors, science classes wow high school students
Posted by
23 October

Hinds CC Rankin Honors, science classes wow high school students

PEARL – “It’s really beyond cool!”

About 75 high school juniors and seniors from Rankin County had much the same reaction throughout Honors Day, held Oct. 20 at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. The event showcased the Honors program and areas of study typically needed to pursue advanced degrees in math and science.

Justice Stewart, a student at Brandon High School, works a pump for a homemade bazooka used in a physics experiment during Honors Day on Oct. 20 at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Justice Stewart, a student at Brandon High School, works a pump for a homemade bazooka used in a physics experiment during Honors Day on Oct. 20 at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Justice Stewart, of Brandon High School, played a vital role in a demonstration by physics instructor Dr. Carl DeWitt. In it, students took turns pumping air into a bazooka made of PVC, then shot a projectile made of gumballs taped together.

“It’s all really just cool,” Stewart said after her work to pump the device provided the proper air pressure to make it work. “I’m interested in science and animals, possibly zoology,” Stewart said.

DeWitt said the lesson shows work can be measured in terms of energy once certain formulas were applied. “Work equals change in energy,” he said. “We can measure the amount of work you did and put a number to it.”

Case Jordan, left foreground, of Brandon High School, prepares to fire a homemade bazooka as Dr. Carl Dewitt, right, physics instructor at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, looks on. The experiment was part of this year's Honors Day event on campus Oct. 20. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Case Jordan, left foreground, of Brandon High School, prepares to fire a homemade bazooka as Dr. Carl Dewitt, right, physics instructor at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, looks on. The experiment was part of this year’s Honors Day event on campus Oct. 20. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

In another room, prospective students to the Rankin Campus got to hold fire in their hands, literally, with chemistry instructor Amanda Blair as a moderator of sorts. Methane gas was pumped into dish soap, where students then took turns igniting the suds with a match. The bubbles burst into an impressive but manageable fireball in the air.

Jason Lin, of Brandon High School, and Charlie Hillman, of Richland High School, got quite the jolt from Blair’s experiment. “Strike it, light it,” Blair told them. “You can actually hold fire and water in your hands without getting burned.”

Students also toured the Honors Center lounge area in the George Wynne Building, as well as the most important details of the Honors program from coordinator Joy Rhoads. To qualify for the Honors program, entering freshman must have a high school GPA of 3.5 or a 25 on the ACT college entrance exam – but not both. Rhoads emphasized the program’s ability to bring learning to life outside the classroom, particularly trips to England and Costa Rica where students earn between three and seven hours of college credit.

Joy Rhoads, coordinator of the Honors Program at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, talks to students who attended this year's Honors Day held on campus Oct. 20. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Joy Rhoads, coordinator of the Honors Program at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, talks to students who attended this year’s Honors Day held on campus Oct. 20. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“It’s a great opportunity for students to learn outside the classroom,” she said. “Sometimes, you remember more about those activities and lessons where you actually get your hands dirty.”

Many students who qualify for the Hinds Honors program will also earn the grades to become members of the Phi Theta Kappa honor society for two-year college students. Those students are eligible for high-dollar transfer scholarships to the state’s four-year public and private universities.

Both featured instructors pointed out the Honors program isn’t the only draw to Hinds.

“We have smaller classes and we care about you,” Blair said. “We want you to visit us in our offices and ask us questions. It’s a great foundation.”

DeWitt reminded students hands-on physical science is the best way to get into most science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) careers.

“Any kind of engineering field you go into, you’ll have to take physics,” DeWitt said.

The same goes for those planning on taking core courses at Hinds on their way to healthcare jobs as well.

“I’ve liked and enjoyed the open house event,” said Kimberly Mills, a senior at Brandon High School. “I plan on going into chemistry, then trying to be a surgeon.”

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC Rankin Honors, science classes wow high school students[/tweetable]

 

Dr. Carl DeWitt, physics instructor at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, holds a small rubber pumpkin he used as the projectile for a small catapult during this year's Honors Day event held on campus Oct. 20. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Dr. Carl DeWitt, physics instructor at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, holds a small rubber pumpkin he used as the projectile for a small catapult during this year’s Honors Day event held on campus Oct. 20. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jason Lin, of Brandon High School, holds flaming soap suds in his hands as part of an experiment at Honors Day at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus Oct. 20. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jason Lin, of Brandon High School, holds flaming soap suds in his hands as part of an experiment at Honors Day at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus Oct. 20. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Case Jordan, of Brandon High School, dips his hands in water as chemistry instructor Amanda Blair looks on during an experiment at Honors Day at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus on Oct. 20. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Case Jordan, of Brandon High School, dips his hands in water as chemistry instructor Amanda Blair looks on during an experiment at Honors Day at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus on Oct. 20. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

1 569 23 October, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members, officers
Posted by
02 October

Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members, officers

PEARL – The Alpha Omicron Omega Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus inducted new members and officers Sept. 21.

From left, Angela Cole, Molly Graef, Summer Dunlap, Alexis Frederick; back row, MaKenzie Downs, Madison Brunt, Joshua Williamson, Trevor Williams, Corey Lovette, Dylan Smith, Rachel Clements and Camryn Willoughby, all of Brandon (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, Angela Cole, Molly Graef, Summer Dunlap, Alexis Frederick; back row, MaKenzie Downs, Madison Brunt, Joshua Williamson, Trevor Williams, Corey Lovette, Dylan Smith, Rachel Clements and Camryn Willoughby, all of Brandon (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Newly inducted members include Rachael Clements, biology; Angela Cole, graphic design, both of Brandon; MaKenzie Downs, of Brandon, biochemistry; Summer Dunlap, of Brandon, undecided; Lauren Ferguson, of Kosciusko, psychology; Alexis Frederick, radiologic technology; Molly Graef, physical therapy assistant; Taylor Hall, general studies, all of Brandon; Thomas Harkins, of Jackson, nursing; Eric Kinan, of Florence, mechanical engineering; Victoria Lawrence, of Pearl, pre-med; Lekitia Lee, of Pelahatchie, fashion merchandising; Destiny Little, of Madison, psychology; Corey Lovette, of Brandon, accounting; Courtney Lum, of Pelahatchie, nursing; Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, history; Breana McCord, nursing; Scarlett Mitchell, biochemistry, Shelby Moore, nursing, all of Pearl; Paula Morehead, of Morton, nursing, Sheridan Morris, of Puckett, interior design; Jordan Nowell, of Pearl, kinesiology; Faith Peterson, of Jackson, nursing; Ashlyn Rader, of Puckett, nursing; Keyana Robey, of Clinton, medical data technology; Dylan Smith, of Brandon, Spanish; Cristina Steinwinder, of Florence, nursing; Trevor Williams, poultry science; Josh Williamson, business administration; Camryn Willoughby, biological sciences, all of Brandon.

Also inducted were Corbin Billings, Michelle Brister, Benjamin Bristow, Jared Collum, McKenzi Crockett, Christopher Glass, James Hood, Khanya Ntoni, Karigan Teer, Shelby Trimm, Lindsee Washington, Brian Williams and Emily Yates.

New chapter officers, from left, Win Winstead, of Pelahatchie, Carlos Martinez, of Pearl, Madison Brunt, of Brandon, Hannah Stovall, of Brandon, Claudia Nelson, of Flowood; back row, from left, Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, Josh Williamson, of Brandon, James Flickner, of Pelahatchie, Eric Kinan, of Florence (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

New chapter officers, from left, Win Winstead, of Pelahatchie, Carlos Martinez, of Pearl, Madison Brunt, of Brandon, Hannah Stovall, of Brandon, Claudia Nelson, of Flowood; back row, from left, Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, Josh Williamson, of Brandon, James Flickner, of Pelahatchie, Eric Kinan, of Florence (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Officers include Madison Brunt, president, of Brandon; Hannah Stovall, of Brandon, president; James Flickner, of Pelahatchie, vice president of fellowship and MS/LA Regional Central District Representative; Josh Williamson, of Brandon, vice president of service; Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, vice president of leadership; Claudia Nelson, of Flowood, vice president of scholarship, Carlos Martinez, of Pearl, vice president of scholarship; Win Winstead, of Pelahatchie, vice president of public relations; Eric Kinan, of Florence, vice president of communications.

Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society for community and junior college students. Membership in Phi Theta Kappa is extended to students who have a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or above on 12 or more transferrable credit hours. There are more than 1,200 Phi Theta Kappa chapters throughout the United States and abroad. For more information about Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds, go to http://www.hindscc.edu/admissions/studentlife/clubs/ptk/index, email Faculty Adviser Joy Rhoads at jdrhoads@hindscc.edu or follow the society’s Hinds chapter on Twitter at @HindsRankinPTK. The new Honors Institute program at the Rankin Campus may be followed at @HCCHonorsRankin.

[tweetable alt=””]#Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members[/tweetable]

Front row, from left,  Breanna McCord, of Pearl, Ashlyn Rader, of Puckett, Victoria Lawrence, Jordan Nowell, both of Pearl, Courtney Lum, of Pelahatchie; back row, from left, Scarlett Mitchell, of Pearl, Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, Eric Kinan, of Florence, Lakitia Lee, of Pelahatchie, Cristina Steinwinder, of Florence, Shelby Moore, of Pearl (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Front row, from left, Breanna McCord, of Pearl, Ashlyn Rader, of Puckett, Victoria Lawrence, Jordan Nowell, both of Pearl, Courtney Lum, of Pelahatchie; back row, from left, Scarlett Mitchell, of Pearl, Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, Eric Kinan, of Florence, Lakitia Lee, of Pelahatchie, Cristina Steinwinder, of Florence, Shelby Moore, of Pearl (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Keyana Robey, left, and Faith Peterson, both of Jackson (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Keyana Robey, left, and Faith Peterson, both of Jackson (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lauren Ferguson, left, of Kosciusko, and Paula Morehead, of Morton (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Lauren Ferguson, left, of Kosciusko, and Paula Morehead, of Morton (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

Destiny Little, left, of Madison, and Thomas Harkins, of Jackson (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Destiny Little, left, of Madison, and Thomas Harkins, of Jackson (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

1 589 02 October, 2017 News more
Scholarship a blessing for Hinds CC Rankin Campus student on long road to success
Posted by
27 September

Scholarship a blessing for Hinds CC Rankin Campus student on long road to success

Note: The following story appears in the fall issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website. To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here.

PEARL – From a difficult birth into the world to a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome, Sarabian Ross hasn’t had an easy life. His elementary school years, academically and socially, were a series of arduous steps toward a fulfilling life.

“I didn’t even think I was smart enough to be in college,” said Ross, of Jackson, known to his friends and family as Ray. “My mom (Arlisha) and I didn’t know where the money would come from.”

Sarabian Ross

Sarabian Ross

Thanks to a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, the student who’s now quick with a hello to his buddies on campus hopes to build on successes he didn’t ever think was possible.

“The scholarship is important to me because I had no idea how I would make it through college,” he said. “So, I’m just feeling very blessed.”

Ross is attending Hinds on the Oscar Richard Ainsworth & Edith Wetzel Ainsworth Scholarship and is on track to graduate in 2018. He’s mapping out his plans for future one day at a time, but he’s impressed by what he’s seen so far in the college’s Animation and Simulation Design Technology program.

“I’ve been interested in animation and how those things came to life since I was a kid,” he said. “Before computers, it was just pencil and paper. I thought that was cool right there. In animation, whenever you build certain characters in 3-D, it starts out with just basic shapes. They’re all made up of polygons. It’s really just like a sculpture, one you have to mold from the polygons into a face.”

Since starting Hinds, Ross is achieving things far beyond what his mom expected. He has landed on the Dean’s List and became part of the Rankin Campus’ Phi Theta Kappa honor society chapter, Alpha Omicron Omega.

The classroom setting has been a welcoming sight for both mother and son. His mother works as a school crossing guard for the Jackson Police Department and is completing a degree at Mississippi College. Together, they’ve discovered new study strategies and feel relieved for the help in financing Ray’s education.

“The scholarship was a blessing because it took away the burdens and stress of him coming to school, the cost of the books, things like that,” Arlisha Ross said. “And he has excelled being here.”

Ray says young adults in his situation can make it, provided they have support and help from family, friends and peers.

“I want to encourage people who have autism and have Asperger’s that they can make it to college like I did,” he said. “I got here with the help of my mother, my godfather and my grandmother, who’s no longer with us. What I’d tell them is to have someone around who they can trust, like their mom or a counselor like I have, with whom they can open up about their feelings.”

[tweetable alt=””]Scholarship a blessing for #Hinds CC Rankin Campus student on long road to success[/tweetable]

1 630 27 September, 2017 News more
Rankin Campus celebrates Hinds CC Centennial, its 35th year
Posted by
15 September

Rankin Campus celebrates Hinds CC Centennial, its 35th year

A number of Rankin countians were among the 100 People Passionate about Hinds Community College. Attending the Rankin Campus Centennial celebration on Sept. 15 from among those honorees were, from left, Dr. Mike Vinson, Rep. Tom Weathersby, Dr. Wayne Stonecypher, Jimmy C. Smith, Jim Smith, Sen. Dean Kirby, Irl Dean Rhodes and Chancery Clerk Larry Swales, who is president of Hinds' Alumni Association.

A number of Rankin countians were among the 100 People Passionate about Hinds Community College. Attending the Rankin Campus Centennial celebration on Sept. 15 from among those honorees were, from left, Dr. Mike Vinson, Rep. Tom Weathersby, Dr. Wayne Stonecypher, Jimmy C. Smith, Jim Smith, Sen. Dean Kirby, Irl Dean Rhodes and Chancery Clerk Larry Swales, who is president of Hinds’ Alumni Association. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus celebrated the college Centennial as well as nearly 35 years of the campus’ existence with a meet-and-greet reception at the Muse Center on Sept. 12. A cornerstone of the celebration was a video tracing the history of the campus from the 1982 ground-breaking to the present.

The Rankin Campus opened in fall 1983 with vocational courses for high school students during the day and college students at night. The campus is the second largest of the Hinds six locations, enrolling more than 3,000 students.

Among those attending the event were former and current Rankin County supervisors, Rankin County legislators and other public officials including Chancery Clerk Larry Swales, who is president of Hinds’ Alumni Association.

“I take my hat off to the people who had the vision to want to build a community college in Rankin County. It’s a tribute to all of you. You have made this happen. It’s your tax dollars and your leadership that made this campus what it is today,” Swales said. “Hinds Community College is about opportunity. It’s an investment in our community by giving students of all ages an opportunity to better their lives by acquiring marketable skills and by increasing their educational attainment.”

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, left, with Sen. Dean Kirby of Pearl and  Rep. Ray Rogers of Pearl at the Rankin Campus Centennial celebration

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, left, with Sen. Dean Kirby of Pearl and Rep. Ray Rogers of Pearl at the Rankin Campus Centennial celebration (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse also reminisced about Rankin County leaders who deserve credit for the campus, especially supervisors.

“They recognized that this county had a very low percentage of citizens with opportunity for a post-secondary education. They wanted to do something about it,” he said. “This campus belongs to the people of Rankin County because you, along with the leadership of the board of supervisors, have in fact helped to develop this campus.”

Hinds Community College Rankin Campus student Jake Watts (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hinds Community College Rankin Campus student Jake Watts (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Speaking on behalf of students was freshman Honors program student Jake Watts. He graduated from Pearl High in May, was president of the student body and was named Mr. Pearl High School, among many other honors.

“When I thought about college, I wanted to go somewhere where I wouldn’t be just a number. I wanted to feel like I knew the instructors and my fellow classmates. Hinds was by far the best choice for me. I know my time here will prepare me for transferring to a four-year university,” he said. “The Honors program at Rankin gives me this opportunity. The Honors program allows me to push myself both inside and outside the classroom through rigorous classes and opportunities through community service.”

Watts is among about 500 students receiving a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, said Jackie Granberry, executive director of the Hinds Community College Foundation. “About 25 percent of the Foundation scholarships are given to Rankin County students,” she said.

Current Rankin Campus Vice President Dr. Norman Session, left, visits with retired Rankin Campus Vice President Jimmy C. Smith and Sen. Dean Kirby at the Sept. 12 Rankin Campus Centennial celebration. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Current Rankin Campus Vice President Dr. Norman Session, left, visits with retired Rankin Campus Vice President Jimmy C. Smith and Sen. Dean Kirby at the Sept. 12 Rankin Campus Centennial celebration. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Rankin Campus Vice President Dr. Norman Session said Watts is representative of the students the campus attracts.

“All of our students on the Rankin Campus have a wonderful opportunity to work on all the courses they need to then transfer to a university or straight to the workforce. Our excellent faculty and staff help prepare them for life after Hinds,” he said.

 

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC Rankin Campus celebrates Centennial.[/tweetable]

 

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

2 563 15 September, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Rankin Campus celebrates college Centennial
Posted by
07 September

Hinds CC Rankin Campus celebrates college Centennial

The Rankin Campus will celebrate Hinds Community College’s 100 years of Community Inspired Service and nearly 35 years of Hinds being a part of the Rankin community with a meet-and-greet from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 12 in the Muse Center. The public is invited.

Among the dignitaries present for the 1982 Rankin ground-breaking ceremony were, from left, Dr. Lynn Weathersby, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, then-Gov. Ray Mabus, George Wynne, Dr. George Moody, Albert Moore and Jimmy C. Smith.

Among the dignitaries present for a Rankin Campus ground-breaking ceremony were, from left, Dr. Lynn Weathersby, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Ray Mabus, George Wynne, Dr. George Moody, Albert Moore and Jimmy C. Smith.

The 5:30 p.m. program will feature a look back at the history of the campus, which opened in 1983 with high school career-tech classes during the day and college-level career- tech classes at night.

Growing the campus from a modest trailer and a $50 typewriter on a small plot of land took the efforts of the Rankin County Board of Supervisors, local legislators, city officials and many civic leaders who were committed to a quality higher education campus in Rankin County.

Today, the campus is the second largest of Hinds Community College’s six locations with eight buildings, including the Muse Center that opened in 2011. It has more than 100 acres over two locations, including the main campus off Highway 80 and the Rankin Career-Technical Building off Community College Boulevard, both in Pearl.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC Rankin Campus celebrates Centennial 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 12.[/tweetable]

 

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

1 490 07 September, 2017 News more