http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC nursing students assist at diabetes conference

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Hinds CC nursing students assist at diabetes conference
Posted by
17 April

Hinds CC nursing students assist at diabetes conference

Associate Degree Nursing students from Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center assisted recently at a diabetes conference geared to those in the community that have diabetes as well as parents of diabetes.

Pictured are, kneeling from left, Brittnie Towes of Clarksdale and Mary Caldwell of Clinton; in the row directly behind them, Bailey Russell of Canton, Haley Herrod of Vicksburg and Nickeysha Nathanie of McComb; at the table, Cain and Kimberly Jones-Brewster of Pearl; back row, Sabrina Givens of Madison, Paul Coe of Jackson, Daemion Cooper of Jackson, Mya Brown of Jackson, Myra Hayes of Byram, Kyisha Mayfield of Vicksburg, Raegan Pope of Houston,Texas, Breland Sullivan of Brandon, Stephanie Roach of Vicksburg, Johnathon Lowery of Louisville, Elizabeth Easterling of Tupelo, Sarah Chandler of Utica, Kennedy Wellington of  Greenville; back right, Jessica Perry of Vicksburg.

“Students had a very enjoyable time learning about diabetes as well as assisting adults and children with diabetes. They had educational meeting as well as vendors-so it was a wonderful community service for our students,” said instructor Yvonne Cain.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 148 17 April, 2018 News more
Lawrence County student receives prestigious Hinds nursing scholarship
Posted by
11 April

Lawrence County student receives prestigious Hinds nursing scholarship

 

Jennifer Watson of Monticello is the recipient of the annual Carla McCulloch Scholarship at Hinds Community College. The scholarship is awarded each year to a Hinds second semester nursing student to help pay for the second year of school.

Jennifer Watson of Monticello, left, was awarded the Hinds Community College Carla McCulloch Scholarship by Larry McCulloch, a former Simpson County resident. The scholarship is named for his late daughter. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Watson, 24, has a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology from Mississippi State University but, like the namesake of the scholarship she is receiving, she felt a calling to become a nurse.

“It’s an honor to receive this scholarship. I’ve got some pretty big shoes to fill,” said Watson, who attends classes at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. “But I believe I’m in the right profession. It’s always been in my blood to be compassionate, so I decided to choose nursing as a career.”

Watson plans to work as a labor and delivery nurse when she graduates in 2019. “I love babies. I’m a big ‘baby’ person,” she said. “I want to be with the mother and the kids during that time.”

This year is the 26th year the Carla McCulloch Scholarship has been awarded. It was created by Larry and Carol McCulloch, formerly of Magee but now residents of Roanoke, Va., in memory of their daughter Carla, a Simpson Academy graduate who was a Hinds nursing student at the time of her death in an April 1991 accident.

The award is made annually to a second semester nursing student who demonstrates the caring and enthusiasm for nursing that Carla embodied. She was a dedicated nursing student who took care of loved ones but also had a fun-loving streak.

The McCulloch family requests that the scholarship be awarded to a student who demonstrates the care and compassion that their daughter did.

“You are going to learn nursing, the medical techniques. I don’t know of any textbook that you can learn caring and compassion from. That’s what makes great nurses,” Larry McCulloch told Hinds nursing students. “We feel like, and we’re told, that Carla was like that when she was working part-time at the hospital. Whether it be emptying bedpans, getting ice, whatever it took for the patient – that’s what she would do.

“That’s what nursing is all about – taking care of people and having compassion,” he said. “It’s a calling.”

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

1 1212 11 April, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Carla McCulloch nursing scholarship awarded to Richland resident
Posted by
05 April

Hinds CC Carla McCulloch nursing scholarship awarded to Richland resident

Tanner Gray of Richland is following in his mother’s footsteps, with the help of the Carla McCulloch Scholarship from Hinds Community College.

Tanner Gray of Richland is the recipient of the annual Carla McCulloch nursing scholarship at Hinds Community College. With him are family members, from left, Michael Gray, Angie Gray, Tanner Gray and sister Brooklyn Gray.

Tanner Gray of Richland is the recipient of the annual Carla McCulloch nursing scholarship at Hinds Community College. With him are family members, from left, Michael Gray, Angie Gray, Tanner Gray and sister Brooklyn Gray.

Gray, 19, a second semester Associate Degree Nursing student at Hinds’ Rankin Campus, is the recipient of the annual Carla McCulloch Scholarship. The scholarship is awarded each year to a Hinds second semester nursing student to help pay for the second year of school.

“My mom (Angie Gray) has been a nurse for over 20 years. It has encouraged me to want to help people too. We still get Christmas cards from people she has helped. I’d like to do that for my ministry,” said Gray, who wants to be a nurse anesthetist.

The scholarship was created by Larry and Carol McCulloch, formerly of Magee but now residents of Roanoke, Va., in memory of their daughter Carla, a Simpson Academy graduate who was a Hinds nursing student at the time of her death in an April 1991 accident.

The award is made annually to a second semester nursing student who demonstrates the caring and enthusiasm for nursing that Carla embodied. She was a dedicated nursing student who took care of loved ones but also had a fun-loving streak.

“She was all of those things. She was very funny and didn’t mean to be. I called her the resident blonde in our family. She didn’t get why she was funny sometimes,” Carol McCulloch told Hinds Community College Rankin Campus nursing students in making the presentation to Gray. “You don’t just get up one morning, as Carla said, and decide to be a nurse and, oh boom, it comes. You’ve already been there and seen that and done that.”

The McCulloch family presented the annual Carla McCulloch nursing scholarship to Tanner Gray of Richland. Pictured are family friend Carla Smith of Madison, left, Carol McCulloch, Gray and Larry McCulloch.

The McCulloch family presented the annual Carla McCulloch nursing scholarship to Tanner Gray of Richland. Pictured are family friend Carla Smith of Madison, left, Carol McCulloch, Gray and Larry McCulloch.

Larry McCulloch said Gray embodies many of the qualities of his daughter. “He excels academically and believes that a dedicated work ethic is a must. He doesn’t think he has all the answers and works very closely with others. And really importantly, he believes that the field of nursing is a calling,” he said.

Gray said his parents “have raised me to be an encourager. I do like to encourage people. It gives me a sense of fullness when I can make someone’s day or make someone smile.”

To the McCulloch family, he said, “it seems your Carla had a lot of those qualities.”

[tweetable alt=””]Tanner Gray awarded Carla McCulloch Scholarship.[/tweetable]

 

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 890 05 April, 2017 News more
Hinds CC nursing, allied health students graduate
Posted by
16 December

Hinds CC nursing, allied health students graduate

On Friday, Hinds graduated nearly 900 students who received 1,263 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number 554 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Among the graduates, nine achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 46 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 110 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse noted that many students want to make a better life for them and their families.

“The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life.  And, while the graduates who sit upon this stage today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life,” Muse said.

Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board, was the speaker for the nursing and allied health graduate ceremony on Friday, Dec. 16.

“Some of you who have scratched, scraped and clawed to get this degree;  juggling the responsibilities, trying to find enough time to study, making sure that you had your tuition and funds to get to class,” Holloway said. “Congratulations – because you made it! These trials and tribulations will help you with challenges to come. Cherish this tremendous accomplishment. You have so very much to be proud of, and be assured that all of us here celebrating with you today are very proud of you.”

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. The college opened in September 2017 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. Hinds has six locations in central Mississippi. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC graduated nearly 900 students on Friday, Dec. 16.[/tweetable]

 

Hinds Community college nursing and allied health graduates gather in front of the Muse Center at the Rankin Campus after their Dec. 16 ceremony.

Hinds Community college nursing and allied health graduates gather in front of the Muse Center at the Rankin Campus after their Dec. 16 ceremony.

Students who graduated with honors receive cords before proceeding across the Muse Center stage during Hinds Community College graduation ceremonies on Dec. 16. Among the graduates, nine achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 46 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 110 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Students who graduated with honors receive cords before proceeding across the Muse Center stage during Hinds Community College graduation ceremonies on Dec. 16. Among the graduates, nine achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 46 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 110 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Students prepare to walk across the stage at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Hinds Community College graduate nearly 900 students in three ceremonies on Dec. 16.

Students prepare to walk across the stage at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Hinds Community College graduate nearly 900 students in three ceremonies on Dec. 16.

Cantrell Anderson of Benton receives his Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. With him are, from left, sister Maesha Luckett, niece Bailey and his mom Julia Luckett.

Cantrell Anderson of Benton receives his Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. With him are, from left, sister Maesha Luckett, niece Bailey and his mom Julia Luckett.

Sabrina Foucher of Ridgeland celebrates receiving her Practical Nursing degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with her dad Wallace Foucher.

Sabrina Foucher of Ridgeland celebrates receiving her Practical Nursing degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with her dad Wallace Foucher.

Rachel Junkin of Clinton, left, and Roxi Odom of Terry received Associate Degrees in Nursing on Dec. 16 from Hinds Community College in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Rachel Junkin of Clinton, left, and Roxi Odom of Terry received Associate Degrees in Nursing on Dec. 16 from Hinds Community College in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Texas native Ivan Muniz of Clinton plans to return to Texas for a job in a hospital emergency room after receiving his Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16. He is standing in front of a carved eagle at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Texas native Ivan Muniz of Clinton plans to return to Texas for a job in a hospital emergency room after receiving his Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16. He is standing in front of a carved eagle at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Amanda Lumm of Terry, left, is engulfed in a hug by her best friend Brittany Ross after receiving her dental assisting degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16.

Amanda Lumm of Terry, left, is engulfed in a hug by her best friend Brittany Ross after receiving her dental assisting degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16.

Shameeka Williams of Jackson, center, graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a Practical Nursing degree. With her are Maya Bostic, left, and Vernita Johnson, right.

Shameeka Williams of Jackson, center, graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a Practical Nursing degree. With her are Maya Bostic, left, and Vernita Johnson, right.

Sydne Allee of Pearl graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a Practical Nursing degree. With her are husband Aaron and sons Caiden, left, and Grayson.

Sydne Allee of Pearl graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a Practical Nursing degree. With her are husband Aaron and sons Caiden, left, and Grayson.

Hannah Wells of Pearl graduated in dental assisting from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. She is with Paul Bennett, left, and Caleb Bennett. Taking the photo is Stephanie Morgan.

Hannah Wells of Pearl graduated in dental assisting from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. She is with Paul Bennett, left, and Caleb Bennett. Taking the photo is Stephanie Morgan.

Emily Herring of Flowood graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a certificate in dental assisting. Celebrating with her are, from left, Natalee Long, Olivia Etheridege and, right, Laurel McLeland.

Emily Herring of Flowood graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a certificate in dental assisting. Celebrating with her are, from left, Natalee Long, Olivia Etheridege and, right, Laurel McLeland.

Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board, addresses nursing and allied health graduates on Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus.

Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board, addresses nursing and allied health graduates on Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus.

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse addresses nursing and allied health graduates at the Dec. 16 ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse addresses nursing and allied health graduates at the Dec. 16 ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Ivan Muniz of Clinton receives an Associate Degree in nursing on Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College graduation ceremonies held at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Ivan Muniz of Clinton receives an Associate Degree in nursing on Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College graduation ceremonies held at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Vice President Dr. Theresa Hamilton of Raymond hands out diplomas at the Dec. 16 graduation ceremony for nursing and allied health graduates at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus.

Vice President Dr. Theresa Hamilton of Raymond hands out diplomas at the Dec. 16 graduation ceremony for nursing and allied health graduates at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus.

Rachel Spell of Terry, left, Ciera Stephens of Pearl receive Associate Degrees in Nursing from Hinds Community College at a ceremony on Dec. 16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Rachel Spell of Terry, left, Ciera Stephens of Pearl receive Associate Degrees in Nursing from Hinds Community College at a ceremony on Dec. 16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Jessica Pierce of Morton, left, and Ametra Enochs of Jackson graduated from the Health Care Assisting program at Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Jessica Pierce of Morton, left, and Ametra Enochs of Jackson graduated from the Health Care Assisting program at Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Practical nursing graduates Khadijah Anderson of Vicksburg; left, Shamone Byest of Belzoni and Tammy Barrett of Vicksburg take a selfie before their ceremony on Friday, Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College’s Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Practical nursing graduates Khadijah Anderson of Vicksburg; left, Shamone Byest of Belzoni and Tammy Barrett of Vicksburg take a selfie before their ceremony on Friday, Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College’s Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Hinds Community College held three graduation ceremonies on Dec. 16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. From left are graduation speaker Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board; Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. Joyce Jenkins, retired Hinds Community College dean for Raymond Campus Career-Technical Education, who was the grand marshal and mace bearer for the nursing and allied health graduation ceremony.

Hinds Community College held three graduation ceremonies on Dec. 16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. From left are graduation speaker Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board; Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. Joyce Jenkins, retired Hinds Community College dean for Raymond Campus Career-Technical Education, who was the grand marshal and mace bearer for the nursing and allied health graduation ceremony.

Dr. Joyce Jenkins, retired Hinds Community College dean for Raymond Campus Career-Technical Education was the grand marshal and mace bearer for the nursing and allied health graduation ceremony on Dec. 16

Dr. Joyce Jenkins, retired Hinds Community College dean for Raymond Campus Career-Technical Education was the grand marshal and mace bearer for the nursing and allied health graduation ceremony on Dec. 16

0 1507 16 December, 2016 News more
Hinds CC nursing/allied health dean, retired dean inducted into professional academy
Posted by
16 November

Hinds CC nursing/allied health dean, retired dean inducted into professional academy

Dr. Libby Mahaffey, left, and Bobbie Anderson

Dr. Libby Mahaffey, left, and Bobbie Anderson

A current Hinds Community College dean and a retired dean were recently inducted into a prestigious national professional academy at its inaugural event.

Dr. Libby Mahaffey of Raymond, dean, Nursing and Allied Health, and Bobbie Anderson of Vicksburg, retired dean of the same programs, were inducted into the newly established Academy of Associate Degree Nursing by the Organization for Associate Degree Nursing (OADN) on Nov. 5 in Dallas, Texas.

The two were among 10 inductees. The Academy of Associate Degree Nursing (AADN) program recognizes associate degree nursing educators, and others committed to associate degree nursing education, who model exemplary dedication to nursing education and practice.  Appropriately, Mrs. Anderson was the first person inducted into the Academy as a full member.

Anderson began teaching in Hinds Community College’s Associate Degree Nursing program in fall 1969 and in 1973 was named the program director. In 1984, after the program moved to the Chadwick Drive location as Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, Anderson became the first dean. In 1993 the first building at NAHC was named Anderson Hall in her honor upon her retirement. Anderson continued to teach including at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

During a time of uncertainty for Associate Degree Nursing programs, Anderson was a state and national advocate, holding numerous leadership positions. This included serving as the chair of the organizational steering committee and later a president of the National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing (N-OADN), now recognized as OADN.

“Associate Degree Nursing Education is a part of the fiber of my life,” Anderson said. “I willingly gave of myself because of my strong belief in associate degree nursing education. My goal in any leadership position was to lead with integrity and to role model leadership for others.”

Dr. Elizabeth “Libby” Mahaffey, became dean, Nursing and Allied Health in 2005. Mahaffey began teaching at Hinds in 1982 and served as a team leader and sophomore coordinator before transitioning to the dean role.  Following in the steps of her mentor, Mahaffey served on the N-OADN Board for six years, including two years as president.  She also served for six years on the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission Board of Directors, including four years as chairperson.

“I still strongly believe in nursing education at the community college where access, affordability, and graduate success continue to make a difference in the lives of students and in the healthcare of our communities,” she said.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

[tweetable alt=””]Dr. Libby Mahaffey, Bobbie Anderson inducted into prestigious academy.[/tweetable]

2 2672 16 November, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Physical Therapist Assistant students volunteer for Little Light House
Posted by
31 October

Hinds CC Physical Therapist Assistant students volunteer for Little Light House

web_hinds-cc_second-year-pta-students_8376Hinds Community College second-year Physical Therapist Assistant students volunteered for the Oct. 22 Laps for Little Ones event benefitting The Little Light House of Central Mississippi.

The Little Light House offers a tuition-free early intervention program for children birth to six years consisting of intensive therapeutic care and cognitive remediation. Addressing a child’s physical ability, wellness, mind and community the year-round program promotes systematic, long-term, healthy change.

Hinds Community College’s Physical Therapist Assistant curriculum is a two-year program of study that prepares a PTA to perform interventions under the supervision of a physical therapist in an ethical, legal, safe and effective manner.

PTAs enhance the delivery of physical therapy services by providing delegated interventions, assisting the PT with data collection, communicating with other members of the health care delivery team, interacting with members of the patient’s family and caregivers, and working cooperatively with other health care providers.

Upon graduation the student is eligible to take the National Physical Therapy Examination for licensure. For more information about the program contact chair Pam Chapman at ptchapman@hindscc.edu.

The second-year students who participated are, front from left, Brooke Gunn of Utica, Aleasha Haver of Eupora, Kristen Shelton of Winona, Wade Rogers of Flowood; second row, Heather Johnson of Chunky, Desiree Roos of Kosciusko, Natalie Brady of Pelahatchie, Jessica Whitehead of Madison, Kelsey Robertson of Winona, Sandy Wren of Raymond; back row, Tim Marshall of Vicksburg, Ashlee Lee of Forest, Harrison Shuerman of Clinton, Olivia King of Vicksburg, Ben Hood of Pearl, Aubrey Kimball of Pass Christian, Matt Smith of Wesson, Dawn Little of Florence and program director Pam Chapman of Flora.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC second-year Physical Therapist Assistant students volunteered.[/tweetable]

0 949 31 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Physical Therapist Assistant students attend conference
Posted by
31 October

Hinds CC Physical Therapist Assistant students attend conference

Hinds Community College first year Physical Therapist Assistant students from the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center attended the fall meeting of the Mississippi Physical Therapy Association in Tupelo on Oct. 22. Those attending include, front from left, Chelsey Howington of Delhi, La., Courtney Vosika of Byram, Ladrekia Culbert of Fayette, Kara Patterson of Richland, Stephanie Ricks of Brandon, Josh Farley, president of the Mississippi Physical Therapy Association; back row, Hailey Stacy of Brandon, Sam Peacock of Jackson, Kelsey Nowell of Louisville, BJ Breelon of Byram, Tavi Toles of Ridgeland, Dakota Medina of Brandon and Alex Hayden of Brandon.

Hinds Community College first-year Physical Therapist Assistant students from the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center attended the fall meeting of the Mississippi Physical Therapy Association in Tupelo on Oct. 22.

Those attending include, front from left, Chelsey Howington of Delhi, La., Courtney Vosika of Byram, Ladrekia Culbert of Fayette, Kara Patterson of Richland, Stephanie Ricks of Brandon, Josh Farley, president of the Mississippi Physical Therapy Association; back row, Hailey Stacy of Brandon, Sam Peacock of Jackson, Kelsey Nowell of  Louisville, BJ Breelon of Byram, Tavi Toles of Ridgeland, Dakota Medina of Brandon and Alex Hayden of Brandon.

The Physical Therapist Assistant curriculum is a two-year program of study that prepares a PTA to perform interventions under the supervision of a physical therapist in an ethical, legal, safe and effective manner. PTAs enhance the delivery of physical therapy services by providing delegated interventions, assisting the PT with data collection, communicating with other members of the health care delivery team, interacting with members of the patient’s family and caregivers, and working cooperatively with other health care providers.

Upon graduation the student is eligible to take the National Physical Therapy Examination for licensure.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds Community College first-year Physical Therapist Assistant students[/tweetable]

0 1089 31 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Nursing program to be showcased Sept. 6
Posted by
02 September

Hinds CC Nursing program to be showcased Sept. 6

RAYMOND – [tweetable alt=””]The Hinds Community College Nursing & Allied Health Showcase is set for 5 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday[/tweetable], Sept. 6 at the Nursing/Allied Health Center in Jackson.

Prospective students and others will get a chance to tour the campus’ learning labs, speak with faculty, explore the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and find out about requirements and deadlines.

The nursing showcase at Hinds is open to anyone interested in pursuing a career in healthcare. Free food and prizes will be offered.

“We would love to introduce you to one of our nursing and allied health programs which all focus on preparing competent, caring healthcare professionals,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean of Nursing and Allied Health. “Graduates of our programs are employed at rates of 90 to 100 percent within a year of graduation and consistently meet national benchmarks for licensure/registry pass rates.”

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emergency Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Health Care Assistant, Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Nursing Assistant and Phlebotomy.

“This event is a great opportunity for prospective students to meet our faculty and get first-hand information about our programs and how to get admitted,” District Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole said.

The Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center is at 1750 Chadwick Drive. For more information on the event, call 601-376-4807 or visit http://www.hindscc.edu.

0 1281 02 September, 2016 News more
Hinds CC nursing, allied health graduates share stories
Posted by
12 August

Hinds CC nursing, allied health graduates share stories

Zachary Lilley of Florence couldn’t let his wife one-up him. Last year Ashley Lilley finished her Associate Degree in Nursing at Hinds Community College so this year it was Zach’s turn.

“I’ve been an LPN (licensed practical nurse) for five years now,” said Lilley, 29, who, along with his wife, works at the Mississippi State Hospital at Whitfield. “I couldn’t let her be ahead of me.”

Zachary Lilley of Florence graduated from Hinds Community College on July 29 with an Associate Degree in Nursing.

Zachary Lilley of Florence graduated from Hinds Community College on July 29 with an Associate Degree in Nursing.

Lilley commuted back and forth to Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus for the Transition to RN program and has already begun the RN to BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) at University of Mississippi Medical Center. The couple has three children ages 10 months, 3 and 10.

“It’s stressful. It’s very stressful – but it’s only for a year and you can get through anything for a year,” he said.

But his wife was a true partner. “She could tell me her past experiences what she thought was important and was not so important,” Lilley said. “Getting the kids off when I had clinicals. They had babysitters so I didn’t have to worry about babysitters. She handled all that.”

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds Community College conferred 467 degrees and certificates to 405 graduates in two graduation ceremonies Friday, July 29 [/tweetable]

at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. “A good number of our graduates are earning more than one community college credential,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse.

Of the total number of graduates, 56 graduated summa cum laude, which is a perfect 4.0 grade point average; 36 graduated magna cum laude, which is a 3.60 to 3.99 grade point average and 66 graduated cum laude, which is a 3.20 to 3.59 grade point average.

 

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse

“I suspect if we polled each graduate, nearly all would say they went to college to make things better — for themselves and for their families,” Muse said. “The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life.  And, while the graduates here today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life.”

The speaker for both graduation ceremonies was Dr. Ed Davis, director of the doctoral program for Rural Community College leaders at Mississippi State University.

“The good thing about the job I have had for the past few years is I have had the chance to go across the nation and work with other community

Dr. Ed Davis, director of the doctoral program for Rural Community College leaders at Mississippi State University, was the graduation speaker.

Dr. Ed Davis, director of the doctoral program for Rural Community College leaders at Mississippi State University, was the graduation speaker.

college programs in a lot of states and in a lot of regions,” Davis said. “There are two things they know when you go to other states: They know Dr. Muse, and they know Hinds Community College. I think that’s a testament to the work and dedication of administrators, the faculty and staff of Hinds Community College and the leadership of Dr. Muse. The quality of programs at Hinds Community College is known nationwide.”

Jeffery Walters of Jackson received a certificate in the paramedic program. At age 49, he already works for AMR in Jackson.

Jeffery Walters of Jackson received a certificate in the paramedic program. At age 49, he already works for AMR in Jackson. Celebrating with him are his daughter, Lacey Walters and granddaughter Karri Walters.

Jeffery Walters of Jackson received a certificate in the paramedic program. At age 49, he already works for AMR in Jackson. Celebrating with him are his daughter, Lacey Walters and granddaughter Karri Walters.

“It is difficult — difficult but rewarding would be the best way to describe it,” he said. “It was difficult finding time to study because I did work fulltime at the same time.

“I told myself that, as old as I am, that after I got out of EMT school I am done with school, too old. But family, friends and coworkers finally talked me into coming back and stepping on up,” Walters said.

One of the happiest people at summer graduation had to be Lotoya Patterson of Vicksburg, who received her practical nursing degree at age 30.

“This was an emotional roller coaster but I thank God because if it wasn’t for him I wouldn’t be here,” she said. “When they say rigorous it was very rigorous. But I thank God because they prepared us to get ready for the world, to be in the hospital showing us what we have got to be prepared for. I’m really thankful to have come to Hinds Community College because their program is very rigorous.”

Lotoya Patterson of Vicksburg received her practical nursing degree at age 30 from Hinds Community College on July 29.

Lotoya Patterson of Vicksburg received her practical nursing degree at age 30 from Hinds Community College on July 29.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

 

Chelsi Pearce and Lauren Sikorski, both of Brandon, holding flowers received their degrees in medical lab technology from Hinds Community College on July 29. With them are their instructors, LaJuanda Portis, far left, and Amber Reulet, far right.

Chelsi Pearce and Lauren Sikorski, both of Brandon, holding flowers received their degrees in medical lab technology from Hinds Community College on July 29. With them are their instructors, LaJuanda Portis, far left, and Amber Reulet, far right.

Kathryn Beckham of Brandon received a degree from Hinds Community College in dental assisting on July 29. With her are dad Vernon Beckham and stepmom Leslie Beckham.

Kathryn Beckham of Brandon received a degree from Hinds Community College in dental assisting on July 29. With her are dad Vernon Beckham and stepmom Leslie Beckham.

Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus, assisted with July 29 summer graduation ceremonies at Hinds Community College.

Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus, assisted with July 29 summer graduation ceremonies at Hinds Community College.

Ashley McIlroy of Jackson graduated from Hinds Community College on July 29 with a practical nursing degree. With her are aunts, JoAnn Johnson, left, and Dorothy Dupree, right.

Ashley McIlroy of Jackson graduated from Hinds Community College on July 29 with a practical nursing degree. With her are aunts, JoAnn Johnson, left, and Dorothy Dupree, right.

Hinds Community College retiree Dr. Mary Ann Greene of Clinton was the grand marshal and mace bearer at the July 29 summer graduation ceremonies.

Hinds Community College retiree Dr. Mary Ann Greene of Clinton was the grand marshal and mace bearer at the July 29 summer graduation ceremonies.

 

Kimberly Denny of Vidalia, La., commuted across the Mississippi River to attend classes at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus. At age 47 she received her Associate Degree in Nursing, a journey she started when she was 18. Now with two daughters, 21 and 26, she decided it was “my time. I can do it for me, not for them,” she said.

Kimberly Denny of Vidalia, La., commuted across the Mississippi River to attend classes at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus. At age 47 she received her Associate Degree in Nursing, a journey she started when she was 18. Now with two daughters, 21 and 26, she decided it was “my time. I can do it for me, not for them,” she said.

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0 1188 12 August, 2016 News more
Disciple of nursing icons credits Hinds ADN program’s ‘hands-on’ approach
Posted by
15 July

Disciple of nursing icons credits Hinds ADN program’s ‘hands-on’ approach

JACKSON – A stellar career for Becky Tustain teaching aspiring nurses in Hinds’ Associate Degree Nursing program began with just a small request of her husband.

“When I came here in 1975, I asked my family for two years to go to school,” she said. “I didn’t think I could ask my family to give me but two years. I’ve gone on to a lot since then, but [tweetable alt=””]in my heart, I’m an associate degree nurse.”[/tweetable]

Becky Tustain, a retired former instructor in the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College, shows equipment in the learning lab at the college's Nursing Allied Health Center. She and fellow instructors designed the lab when the center was built in 1982. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Becky Tustain, a retired former instructor in the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College, shows equipment in the learning lab at the college’s Nursing Allied Health Center. She and fellow instructors designed the lab when the center was built in 1982. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

A decade out of Central High School in Jackson and already a mother of one of her three children, Tustain grabbed ahold of an education in nursing that morphed quickly into a profession. She earned her ADN credential from Hinds in 1977, then moved on to William Carey College for her bachelor’s five years later, all the while working as an instructor in Hinds’ program and a staff nurse at Mercy Regional Medical Center in Vicksburg, where she settled and still resides.

She completed her master’s in Nursing Education from the University of Mississippi in 1986. She retired from Hinds in 1995 to pursue a Nurse Practitioner’s credential, which she earned from Mississippi University for Women in 1998.

Such a quick turnaround from learning to teaching in the program meant she was with ladies she still calls the “icons” of the nursing program, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.

“Eunice Pace was our first dean at NAHC, then it was Bobbie Anderson,” she said. “We had Mildred Hearn, Dixie Keyes, Kay Stubblefield Jones, Linda Hughes, Sherry Avenmarg, Patty Baker.

“I knew I had a good core,” she said. “My mother had a stroke and my father had a heart attack during the few weeks between graduation and boards, so I didn’t get to study. I walked into boards, and passed them. That was because of that faculty.”

Tustain’s timeline teaching in the college’s nursing program runs closely with that of the Nursing/Allied Health Center itself, into which the program moved in 1982 from smaller venues on the Raymond Campus.

“When I started teaching, I volunteered to come in before my contract began because I wanted to start out doing it right,” she said. “Back then, the program was all done in this little-bitty room in the science building. But, we were much more functional than when it was in the old house and it had supplies. And we had some great faculty teaching me.”

There was no down time between the move to the new facilities and the teaching schedule.

“Dr. Muse said we will teach on that Friday and Monday, and we’d just move over the weekend,” Tustain said. “The moving company moved the heavy conference tables and other equipment, but they didn’t know how to set it up. It took about 20 of us women faculty, but we got the beds in and set them up. We moved Friday afternoon, we worked all day Saturday and Sunday, and we all taught Monday. Now, is that not teamwork?”

Moving into it might have been a group project, but her mark on the learning lab remains, down to the positioning of electrical outlets and mirrors above the beds so students could see what they’re doing – commonplace now, but unique among nursing programs at the time.

“The learning lab is my baby,” Tustain said. “I designed it to where student and instructor could see what they were doing, with the mirrors overhead.”

In 1985, Tustain, Anderson and ADN instructors in a handful of neighboring states organized what is today the Organization for Associate Degree Nursing. Anderson was its first president.

“The group was formed in order to protect AD nursing as an entry-level program for registered nursing as a whole,” Tustain said.

“It allowed people who couldn’t give four years of a financial contribution outside of work to do it.”

The ADN program’s brand is strong in Mississippi and in medical circles because of its tradition of quality instruction, she said.

“We were one of the larger and productive programs, and our pass rates were good, so everybody wanted Hinds nurses,” she said. “It’s because we did direct care. The faculty went with the student and did direct care. We didn’t just send them out to observe. It was hands-on learning.”

 

0 1277 15 July, 2016 News more