http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC Medical Lab Technology students place second in bowl competition

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Hinds CC Medical Lab Technology students place second in bowl competition
Posted by
18 April

Hinds CC Medical Lab Technology students place second in bowl competition

Hinds Community College students in the Medical Lab Technology program at Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center came in second place in the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science Mississippi-Louisiana Medical Lab Technology Student Bowl Competition.

As part of the competition, the students compete as a team answering question in a quiz-bowl type format.web_Hinds CC_MLT_ascls2017studentbowlteam

From left are instructor Amber Reulet of Flowood, students Josalyn Johnson of Jackson, Oscar Hundley of Waynesboro, Emily Limbaugh of Flowood and Shelby Whittington of Brandon, and far right, instructor LaJuanda D. Portis of Jackson.

Additionally, Portis received both a Regional Omicron Sigma and 2016-2017 Past-President Award for her service as ASCLS-Mississippi state president. The ASCLS-MS Board of Directors presented her with a plaque as well.

 

 

Hinds Medical Lab Technology students placed second in a regional bowl competition.

 

 

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students
Posted by
03 March

Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students

JACKSON – A career in healthcare is what Megan Irby wanted to pursue since she worked as a hospital secretary more than 20 years ago.

Now a mother of two teenagers, Irby, 40, of Vicksburg, can’t get started soon enough.

Megan Irby, center, places a stethoscope on a manikin during a demonstration inside the Associate Degree Nursing laboratory at the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At left is her daughter, Kaitlyn. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Megan Irby, center, places a stethoscope on a manikin during a demonstration inside the Associate Degree Nursing laboratory at the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At left is her daughter, Kaitlyn. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I can’t wait until I get into nursing school,” Irby said. “I’m in my second semester at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus taking pre-requisites and I hope to be in school next spring.”

Andrea Ellis, 18, of Jackson, plans to start a life of caring for others right away as well.

“I want to be a neonatal nurse,” said Ellis, a senior at Murrah High School whose desire to study nursing was formed by her experience as a patient. “I was in a car crash last summer and saw all the work they do.”

Both were among about 150 people who attended the Spring 2017 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Thursday, March 2 at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

Prospective students and others toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty, explored the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

Andrea Ellis, left, places a stethoscope on a manikin during a demonstration inside the Associate Degree Nursing laboratory at the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At right is Rebecca Cockrell, a clinical placement coordinator in the lab. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Andrea Ellis, left, places a stethoscope on a manikin during a demonstration inside the Associate Degree Nursing laboratory at the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At right is Rebecca Cockrell, a clinical placement coordinator in the lab. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Guests spoke with our faculty one-on-one to learn about our programs of study and the promising careers in healthcare that Hinds graduates obtain,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

Programs showcased included Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emergency Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Health Care Assistant, Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Nursing Assistant and Phlebotomy.

“Graduates of our programs are employed at rates of 90 to 100 percent within a year of graduation and consistently meet national benchmarks for licensure/registry pass rates,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean of Nursing and Allied Health.

The program’s solid reputation has Paula Palmertree, of Florence, back in school for a subject that’s all around her.

Paula Palmertree, center foreground, visits with nursing program coordinators during the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Paula Palmertree, center foreground, visits with nursing program coordinators during the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I want to go into pediatrics for sure,” Palmertree said. “I have friends and family with children who have special needs.”

Like Irby, whose first career she describes as simply being a mom, Yolanda Ellis, of Jackson, is anxious to build a healthcare career. In her case, it would be adding to her current credentials as a certified nursing assistant.

“I love working with patients, especially older people,” Ellis said. “I like to listen to them because they can teach us so much.”

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines. The Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center is at 1750 Chadwick Drive. For more information on individual programs, call 601.376.4807 or visit http://www.hindscc.edu. 

Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students
Yolanda Ellis, right foreground, visits with nursing program coordinators during the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At right is her daughter, Janavia. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Yolanda Ellis, right foreground, visits with nursing program coordinators during the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At right is her daughter, Janavia. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Corey Lilley, a senior at Terry High School, observes a demonstation in the Respiratory Care Technology laboratory during the 2017 Spring Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Tilley is flanked by his parents, Loretta and Marvin Lilley. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Corey Lilley, a senior at Terry High School, observes a demonstration in the Respiratory Care Technology laboratory during the 2017 Spring Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Tilley is flanked by his parents, Loretta and Marvin Lilley. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

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Hinds CC Nursing Allied Health Center inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members
Posted by
03 November

Hinds CC Nursing Allied Health Center inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members

JACKSON – The Alpha Iota Kappa Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center inducted new members Oct. 28.

nahc-ptk-fall-2016Newly inducted members include, front row, from left, Austin May, of Vicksburg, Emergency Medical Technology; Sabrina Givens, of Madison, Health Information Technology; Shelby Carroll, of Clinton, Radiologic Technology; second row, from left, Laura Buchanan, of Clinton, Practical Nursing; Candace Blanks, of Vicksburg, Health Information Technology; Rebecca Bradley, of Flowood, Health Information Technology; back row, from left, Summer Rodrigue, of Brandon, Associate Degree Nursing; Danielle Gipson, of Saginaw, Mich., Respiratory Care Technology; Amanda Even, of Clinton, Associate Degree Nursing.

Nursing and allied health PTK chapter inducts new members

 

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Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students
Posted by
09 September

Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students

JACKSON – Careers in healthcare often come from life experiences that put people up close and personal with matters of life and death.

Tiffany Roberts and Al Brennan, both of Pearl and prospective students in programs offered at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, see nursing school as chances to repay or improve on gifts of life.

Tiffany Roberts, second from left, of Pearl, listens to a presentation in the Associate Degree Nursing Learning Lab at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Tiffany Roberts, second from left, of Pearl, listens to a presentation in the Associate Degree Nursing Learning Lab at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“When I was 15, my brother had an accident and spent several months in an ICU,” said Roberts, a mother of three who’s ready to go back to school in the medical field. “I knew at that point in time, standing in his room, what I wanted to do.”

Brennan used to work behind the camera making television commercials. A series of medical experiences led to a switch to healthcare. Now, he’s a mental health technician has his sights set on a career of service in nursing.

Al Brennan, of Pearl, speaks with Kim Neely, coordinator of Continuing Education for Short Term Programs at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Al Brennan, of Pearl, speaks with Kim Neely, coordinator of Continuing Education for Short Term Programs at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“My grandmother had Alzheimer’s, then my son and I have been to an ER in the past, and I’ve been through bad experiences,” he said. “It was just the insensitivity in patient care that really got my attention. I’d want to be the type of nurse that would want to reach out and show compassion, work with doctors and help the patient.”

Both were among about 120 people who attended the 2016 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 6 at NAHC.

Prospective students and others toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty, explored the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

“Guests spoke with our faculty one-on-one to learn about our programs of study and the promising careers in healthcare that Hinds graduates obtain,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

Programs showcased included Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emergency Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Health Care Assistant, Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Nursing Assistant and Phlebotomy.

“Graduates of our programs are employed at rates of 90 to 100 percent within a year of graduation and consistently meet national benchmarks for licensure/registry pass rates,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean of Nursing and Allied Health.

The program’s solid reputation brought Rachel Norton, of Clinton, back to earn additional credentials as she builds her career.

Rachel Norton, of Clinton, seeks information about continuing her education at the 2016 Fall Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Norton is a Hinds graduate who wants to return to complete the college's Physical Therapy Assistant program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Rachel Norton, of Clinton, seeks information about continuing her education at the 2016 Fall Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Norton is a Hinds graduate who wants to return to complete the college’s Physical Therapy Assistant program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’m already graduate of Hinds,” Norton said. “I’ve come back to complete the Physical Therapy Assistant program.”

Alexis Vaughn, 16, of Brandon, has graduated a year early from high school and already has the energy to serve. She’s considering Hinds for the program’s successes and its proximity to home.

Alexis Vaughn, center foreground, speaks about the George Ball Simulation Center with support staff member Lesa McFarland at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. From left, Vaughn's mother and sister, Marsha and Madison Vaughn. On the table is a manikin used to simulate various life functions in the simulation facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Alexis Vaughn, center foreground, speaks about the Dr. George Ball Simulation Center with support staff member Lesa McFarland at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. From left, Vaughn’s mother and sister, Marsha and Madison Vaughn. On the table is a manikin used to simulate various life functions in the simulation facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Nursing is something I’ve always wanted to do because I like helping people and the impact nurses have on people’s lives,” Vaughn said.

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

The Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center is at 1750 Chadwick Drive. For more information on individual programs, call 601-376-4807 or visit http://www.hindscc.edu. 

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Disciple of nursing icons credits Hinds ADN program’s ‘hands-on’ approach
Posted by
15 July

Disciple of nursing icons credits Hinds ADN program’s ‘hands-on’ approach

JACKSON – A stellar career for Becky Tustain teaching aspiring nurses in Hinds’ Associate Degree Nursing program began with just a small request of her husband.

“When I came here in 1975, I asked my family for two years to go to school,” she said. “I didn’t think I could ask my family to give me but two years. I’ve gone on to a lot since then, but in my heart, I’m an associate degree nurse.”

Becky Tustain, a retired former instructor in the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College, shows equipment in the learning lab at the college's Nursing Allied Health Center. She and fellow instructors designed the lab when the center was built in 1982. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Becky Tustain, a retired former instructor in the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College, shows equipment in the learning lab at the college’s Nursing Allied Health Center. She and fellow instructors designed the lab when the center was built in 1982. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

A decade out of Central High School in Jackson and already a mother of one of her three children, Tustain grabbed ahold of an education in nursing that morphed quickly into a profession. She earned her ADN credential from Hinds in 1977, then moved on to William Carey College for her bachelor’s five years later, all the while working as an instructor in Hinds’ program and a staff nurse at Mercy Regional Medical Center in Vicksburg, where she settled and still resides.

She completed her master’s in Nursing Education from the University of Mississippi in 1986. She retired from Hinds in 1995 to pursue a Nurse Practitioner’s credential, which she earned from Mississippi University for Women in 1998.

Such a quick turnaround from learning to teaching in the program meant she was with ladies she still calls the “icons” of the nursing program, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.

“Eunice Pace was our first dean at NAHC, then it was Bobbie Anderson,” she said. “We had Mildred Hearn, Dixie Keyes, Kay Stubblefield Jones, Linda Hughes, Sherry Avenmarg, Patty Baker.

“I knew I had a good core,” she said. “My mother had a stroke and my father had a heart attack during the few weeks between graduation and boards, so I didn’t get to study. I walked into boards, and passed them. That was because of that faculty.”

Tustain’s timeline teaching in the college’s nursing program runs closely with that of the Nursing/Allied Health Center itself, into which the program moved in 1982 from smaller venues on the Raymond Campus.

“When I started teaching, I volunteered to come in before my contract began because I wanted to start out doing it right,” she said. “Back then, the program was all done in this little-bitty room in the science building. But, we were much more functional than when it was in the old house and it had supplies. And we had some great faculty teaching me.”

There was no down time between the move to the new facilities and the teaching schedule.

“Dr. Muse said we will teach on that Friday and Monday, and we’d just move over the weekend,” Tustain said. “The moving company moved the heavy conference tables and other equipment, but they didn’t know how to set it up. It took about 20 of us women faculty, but we got the beds in and set them up. We moved Friday afternoon, we worked all day Saturday and Sunday, and we all taught Monday. Now, is that not teamwork?”

Moving into it might have been a group project, but her mark on the learning lab remains, down to the positioning of electrical outlets and mirrors above the beds so students could see what they’re doing – commonplace now, but unique among nursing programs at the time.

“The learning lab is my baby,” Tustain said. “I designed it to where student and instructor could see what they were doing, with the mirrors overhead.”

In 1985, Tustain, Anderson and ADN instructors in a handful of neighboring states organized what is today the Organization for Associate Degree Nursing. Anderson was its first president.

“The group was formed in order to protect AD nursing as an entry-level program for registered nursing as a whole,” Tustain said.

“It allowed people who couldn’t give four years of a financial contribution outside of work to do it.”

The ADN program’s brand is strong in Mississippi and in medical circles because of its tradition of quality instruction, she said.

“We were one of the larger and productive programs, and our pass rates were good, so everybody wanted Hinds nurses,” she said. “It’s because we did direct care. The faculty went with the student and did direct care. We didn’t just send them out to observe. It was hands-on learning.”

 

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From hamburgers to healthcare, Hinds CC alum has taken care of his customers
Posted by
15 July

From hamburgers to healthcare, Hinds CC alum has taken care of his customers

Note: The following story appears in the summer issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

JACKSON – Before Carl Mangum was certified to take a pulse, he could still take an order – either crispy or with fries, that is.

“In a former life, I was a restaurant manager,” Mangum said of his days working in chicken and burger outlets in the Jackson area. “I’m a graduate of Hamburger University – on the dean’s list.”

Dr. Carl Mangum, an instructor at the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing, demonstrates a piece of machinery in the school's learning lab. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Dr. Carl Mangum, an instructor at the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing, demonstrates a piece of machinery in the school’s learning lab. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Mangum, his wife, Christina, and three young sons came to the same crossroads where many young families find themselves. “I was looking for something else to do. I was working for 100-plus hours a week and making very little money. I needed to do something different.”

A boyhood fascination with emergency medical technicians, spurred by a TV series, turned into a life-altering decision. “I always wanted to be a paramedic, because of the TV show “Emergency!,” from the 1970s. The show followed two paramedics in Los Angeles and their station. And so I thought it was cool.

“But, why I went back into nursing school was to make a better life for me and my family.”

He enrolled at Hinds, and the family scraped by at first, with Mangum working part-time jobs. But he hasn’t looked back since graduating in 1994.

After completing the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds, he moved on to the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s School of Nursing, where he earned his bachelor’s and a master’s, in Psychiatric Mental Health/Nurse Practitioner. He also has a Ph.D. in leadership from the University of Southern Mississippi.

His work in mental health began during his time at a program with the Mississippi State Hospital in Whitfield. It paid Mangum a monthly stipend in exchange for working with the facility as he went through school, and it became a passion.

“When I graduated, I had a job waiting for me there,” he said. “I was on their educational leave program, which means I signed up with them for four years. “Mental illness is not the dragon people claim it to be. It’s a brain disease – no different than heart disease, cancer, diabetes, anything else. It just involves the brain instead of the heart or the pancreas.”

In keeping with his passion, Mangum, of Byram, teaches a Psychiatric Nursing course at UMMC, as well as the Assessment, Fundamentals and Health Promotion courses. He’s also a certified volunteer firefighter and a HAZMAT technician. Also, he commands the Mississippi-1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team, part of the National Disaster Medical System with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

“I’ve responded to Hurricane Sandy, in 2012, and was deployed for Hurricane Ike, in 2008, in the command center in Austin, Texas,” he said. “For Hurricane Katrina, I did a lot of stuff at the Fairgrounds and Coliseum. UMMC set up a clinic there a couple of days in, to help get them medicine if they were out.”

His life in the medical field has come alongside success for wife Christina and similar career paths in the family.

She teaches math at Murrah High School and now has three master’s degrees. All three of his daughters-in-law are also nurses.

From his days at Hinds, he remembers the unique personal touch, which along with his experiences in the working world, he channels into his own teaching style.

“Nursing school is quite difficult,” he said. “It’s one of the hardest things you can choose to do. Hinds was my way of getting into the profession. The faculty was great, caring people. But, I also use principles in the hospital that I learned in the food industry, because we’re a service industry, too. It’s just with healthcare, and not hamburgers.”

Colleagues say it’s a formula that works.

“As a professional, he never settles,” said Sherri D. Franklin, director of the RN-BSN program at UMMC School of Nursing and classmate of Mangum’s during their days at Hinds. “He always seeks opportunities for development and is a great mentor to students and less-experienced co-workers.”

And it’s a certain versatility with today’s students that’s the strongest vital sign in Mangum’s life in healthcare.

“Students want that recognition and want us to be proud of and pleased with them. So, I do the high-five type of stuff to say, ‘Hey, great job!’

“And, still, if they’re doing something wrong, you want to be stern with them since we’re dealing with people’s lives here.”

 

 

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Hinds CC nursing expo draws all comers for medical field careers
Posted by
14 March

Hinds CC nursing expo draws all comers for medical field careers

Ke’Andrea Ringold wants to take advantage of her interest in science and turn it into a career in the medical field.

“It’ll be an opportunity to get out there and start helping other people,” Ringold said, checking out information on the college’s 13-health-related and two short-term programs at the 2016 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase held March 1 at the Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center.

Keandrea Ringold, left, and her mom, Victoria Parker, both of Vicksburg, visit with Chrissy King, program chair for Medical Assisting Technology at Hinds' Rankin Campus, at the 2016 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase held March 1 at the Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Keandrea Ringold, left, and her mom, Victoria Parker, both of Vicksburg, visit with Chrissy Clark, program chair for Medical Assisting Technology at Hinds’ Rankin Campus, at the 2016 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase held March 1 at the Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

About 200 prospective students, their families and others who attended the expo toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

“Guests were able to speak one-on-one with our faculty to learn about our programs, as well as tour our training labs,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services. “We also offered guests assistance with completing the admissions process for our programs.”

Ringold, a Vicksburg High School senior, attended with her mother, Victoria Parker.

“I’m excited for my baby,” Parker said. “I just want her to be all she can be.”

Programs of interest included Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emerging Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Healthcare Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Phlebotomy and Nursing Assistant.

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

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Five Hinds CC students selected for UMMC health initiative
Posted by
02 February

Five Hinds CC students selected for UMMC health initiative

Five students of Hinds Community College have been selected for a program aimed at building the ranks of males of color in healthcare.

Eddie V. Anderson, Utica Campus; Antonio McBeth and Christian Minor, Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center; Michael Pham, Raymond Campus and Zavier Smith, Utica Campus, will participate in the Health Equity and Leadership Initiative through the University of Mississippi Medical Center. The program provides those preparing for medical careers opportunities to develop skills from leaders in the healthcare workforce through in-person seminars and online sources.

“Males of color are underrepresented in our health profession schools and our goal is to offer an intimate experience for talented students such as those accepted to the Health Equity & Leadership Initiative,” said Dr. Juanyce D. Taylor, director of the program at UMMC. “The leadership development activities and shadowing experiences allow participants to learn the inner dynamics and clinical aspect of a large, complex academic health center. Essentially, we are building a stronger and more diverse health care workforce.”

Eddie V. Anderson

Eddie V. Anderson

Anderson, of Jackson, is a petty officer third class in the Navy and 2015 Hinds graduate who plans to attend nursing school. “I’m in the medical field to help people who aren’t knowledgeable about their health to do those things to improve their health,” he said.

Antonio McBeth

Antonio McBeth

Patient interaction is also important to McBeth, of Lena, in Leake County. “Interaction with the patient is an experience like no other,” said McBeth, who earned a degree in psychology from the University of Southern Mississippi before returning to Hinds to pursue eventually becoming a family nurse practitioner. “No two patients are the same, and I enjoy it.”

Applicants are recommended by faculty at their respective colleges, typically an instructor, adviser or community leader.

UMMC bases the program on research showing males of color are significantly underrepresented in most health professional programs. The program’s purpose is to support underrepresented males aged 17 to 25 enrolled in two-year colleges in Mississippi to become leaders in the healthcare workforce, while increasing access to health professional education, training, and career options. Funding for the program comes from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Dr. Mitchell Shears, academic dean for the Utica Campus, where Anderson and Smith attend class, sees the program as a chance to sell the medical field as a viable career option for an emerging pool of students.

“It is our desire on the Utica Campus to assist more students, particularly males of color, in finding opportunities like this to make them more marketable to four-year institutions and the workforce after their collegiate experiences,” Shears said.

Prospective medical careers have been shaped among this year’s participants by personal experiences.

Christian Minor

Christian Minor

“When my mother was in a car accident in 2002, I saw what the nurses in the hospital were able to do for her,” said Minor, of Jackson, a sergeant in the Mississippi National Guard who plans to be a registered nurse. “They asked about our spiritual lives and how we could get help financially.”

Michael Pham

Michael Pham

Pham, of Byram, plans to attend Mississippi State University in biochemistry before going to medical school. He doesn’t take for granted the opportunity he has. “My family left in Vietnam are farmers, so I wouldn’t have had the same opportunity to go to school there, learn something and give back to the community,” he said. “I’d have to drop out and help get money for my family, as my cousins do.”

Zavier Smith

Zavier Smith

Smith envisions being an orthopedic surgeon because of his personal experience. “I played football at Raymond High School, and I had a torn pec one time and had to have surgery. Going through that, I learned things, like how muscles contract,” he said.

The program fits with UMMC’s past support of expanding the health profession in more sectors of the community.

“The University of Mississippi Medical Center has a history of supporting pipeline programs designed to increase its diversity and create pathways to health profession careers,” said Taylor, who is assistant dean for Research and Innovation and chairs the Department of Health Sciences, where she is also an assistant professor. She is also program director for the Master of Health Sciences at UMMC’s School of Health Related Professions.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 11,500 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Posted by on 10 September

Hairdresser, daughter plan education together at Hinds CC nursing expo

Sharita Williams, who owns a beauty shop in Franklin County, had always wanted to go back to school. Her daughter, Taylor, a senior at Franklin County High School, is interested in becoming a nurse.

Together, they plan to achieve both goals at Hinds Community College.

“One of my 80-year-old hair clients graduated from community college last year,” Sharita Williams said. “She motivated me to go back.”

Sharita Williams, center, and Taylor Williams, center right, take a tour of facilities during the Hinds Community College Nursing/Allied Health Center Showcase event on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. The event was an open house for prospective students interested in programs offered at the campus. Information booths and learning lab tours were available. The Williamses are interested in the nursing and phlebotomy programs.

Sharita Williams, center, and Taylor Williams, center right, take a tour of facilities during the Hinds Community College Nursing/Allied Health Center Showcase event on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. The event was an open house for prospective students interested in programs offered at the campus. Information booths and learning lab tours were available. The Williamses are interested in the nursing and phlebotomy programs.

Mother and daughter were among about 200 people who attended the 2015 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase on Tuesday at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. Prospective students and others toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty, explored the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

“Our faculty spoke with people one-on-one to learn about our programs of study and the promising careers in healthcare that Hinds graduates obtain,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

Programs of interest included Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emerging Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Healthcare Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Phlebotomy and Nursing Assistant.

Taylor is already taking a class that is preparing her for a medical career.

“We practice checking vital signs and things,” she said. “I like helping people and making them feel better if I can.”

Annalese Burton, a senior at Philadelphia High School, made the trip from Neshoba County with her mother, Crystal, to find out more about a program that she says virtually runs in the family.

Annalese Burton, center, a senior at Philadelphia High School, and her mother, Crystal, talk with District Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole at the Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015 at Hinds' Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center.

Annalese Burton, center, a senior at Philadelphia High School, and her mother, Crystal, talk with District Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole at the Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015 at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center.

“I have several, several people in my family in the nursing field,” Burton said. “I’ve researched Hinds. It’s small and seems like a family. I feel like I’ll really excel here.”

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

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Hinds CC nursing program to be showcased Sept. 8
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21 August

Hinds CC nursing program to be showcased Sept. 8

RAYMONDThe Hinds Community College Nursing & Allied Health Showcase is set for 5 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 8 at the Nursing/Allied Health Center in Jackson.

Prospective students and others will get a chance to tour the campus’ learning labs, speak with faculty, explore the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and find out about requirements and deadlines.

The showcase is open to anyone interested in pursuing a career in healthcare. Free food and prizes will be offered.

“We would love to introduce you to one of our nursing and allied health programs which all focus on preparing competent, caring healthcare professionals,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean of Nursing and Allied Health. “Graduates of our programs are employed at rates of 90 to 100 percent within a year of graduation and consistently meet national benchmarks for licensure/registry pass rates.”

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

Programs of interest include Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emerging Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Healthcare Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Phlebotomy and Nursing Assistant.

“This event is a great opportunity for prospective students to meet our faculty and get first-hand information about our programs and how to get admitted,” District Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole said.

The Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center is at 1750 Chadwick Drive. For more information on the event, call 601-376-4807 or visit http://www.hindscc.edu.

 

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