http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC

Posts by tag: Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center

Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC
Posted by
09 June

Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC

RAYMOND – A person’s inner dialogue can be helpful or hurtful, depending on what that little voice inside says.

It was a strong enough message to lead off this summer’s leadership summit for students involved in the Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds Community College.

Adonis Lenzy, of Paradigm Shift, speaks to high school students and others at an M2M Leadership Summit June 5 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Adonis Lenzy, of Paradigm Shift, speaks to high school students and others at an M2M Leadership Summit June 5 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“No matter what people say to you, it’s what you say to yourself that really matters,” said Adonis Lenzy of Paradigm Shift as the group helped kick off a two-day series of programs and exercises for M2M members and mentors June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. The Oklahoma-based nonprofit connects ministers and other volunteers with poor communities to foster economic and social change.

“There’s nothing wrong with looking at yourself in the mirror and saying ‘You can’,” Lenzy said.

Joining Lenzy for the summit was minister Heady Coleman and community leaders Ryan Eller, Derrick Sier and Mikey Manghum to present programs on various team-building exercises, such as setting goals, time management, copying practices seen in successful people, and changing up routines to prevent life from becoming stale. Lenzy likened that to releasing a caged bear into the woods, only to have the bear still be stuck in a cage in its mind.

“We’ve got to be bigger than a routine,” he said. “You’ve got to make sure you steer clear of any ruts.”

High school students who attended the summit wrote down short- and long-term goals on sticky notes to foster active communication, said M2M Director Aleisha Escobedo.

Wingfield High School students Paul James Curry, a junior, Dequavious Guice, a senior and James Stubb, a junior, attended the M2M Leadership Summit held June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Wingfield High School students Paul James Curry, a junior,
Dequavious Guice, a senior and
James Stubb, a junior, attended the M2M Leadership Summit held June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus.
(Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“This summit provided an opportunity for our students to engage with their peers and serve as active leaders and forward thinkers,” Escobedo said. “I especially loved that Paradigm Shift challenged our students to focus on attainable goals and helped them to recognize that having strong social and community support will foster success.”

Becoming a success in life often involves the answer to a key question of those whom students see as successful, Lenzy said.

“The number one question you need to ask them is, if you can get in their circle, what was it like for you before you became successful?” he said. “That’s the story you’ll want to hear about.”

The M2M program is based at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. For more information, call 601.987.8129 or visit www.hindscc.edu/go/M2M.

Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC
Front row, from left, April Reynolds, M2M English instructional guide, Aleisha Escobedo, M2M Director, Derrick Sier, Adonis Lenzy, both of Paradigm Shift, Robert Smith, M2M Academic Success coach, Felicia Garner, M2M administrative assistant; back row, from left, Keith Williams, M2M Academic Success coach, Ryan Eller, Mikey Manghum, Gregory “Heady” Coleman, all of Paradigm Shift, Ahmad Smith, M2M Recruitment and Outreach coordinator (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Front row, from left, April Reynolds, M2M English instructional guide, Aleisha Escobedo, M2M Director, Derrick Sier, Adonis Lenzy, both of Paradigm Shift, Robert Smith, M2M Academic Success coach, Felicia Garner, M2M administrative assistant; back row, from left, Keith Williams, M2M Academic Success coach, Ryan Eller, Mikey Manghum, Gregory “Heady” Coleman, all of Paradigm Shift, Ahmad Smith, M2M Recruitment and Outreach coordinator (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

5 Comments Off on Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC 619 09 June, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Jackson Campus holds College Carnival
Posted by
12 April

Hinds CC Jackson Campus holds College Carnival

 RAYMOND – College Carnival at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center on April 7 brought out lots of raw talent, desire and ability from metro Jackson high schoolers.

Nakia Rodgers, a senior at Lanier High School, shows off part of her graphic novel during College Carnival April 7 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Nakia Rodgers, a senior at Lanier High School, shows off part of her graphic novel during College Carnival April 7 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I want to pursue art because people my age need an outlet for anxieties they’re having,” said Nakia Rodgers, a senior at Lanier High School and one of many high school students and others at the come-and-go campus recruiting event.

Rodgers toted her anime’-inspired graphic novel to show off to potential instructors in art programs at Hinds.

Pernell Branson, of Jackson, brought his curiosity and a desire to complete his high school equivalency and beyond, with Hinds’ help.

“I’m finding out about the different trades I can take here,” Branson said.

Held annually, these events held at all six Hinds locations give prospective students of all ages a chance to find out about everything they need to enroll at the college. At College Carnival, prospective students met with Jackson Campus faculty and staff, learn about admissions, majors, financial aid and registration – all while enjoying free food and prizes.

Pernell Branson, left, of Jackson, talks with Keeon Bell, a support specialist in Information Systems at Hinds Community College, during College Carnival April 7 at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Pernell Branson, left, of Jackson, talks with Keeon Bell, a support specialist in Information Systems at Hinds Community College, during College Carnival April 7 at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“We look forward to many of the hundreds of juniors and seniors from metro Jackson and the surrounding area enrolling at the Jackson Campus and taking advantage of what we have to offer.” said Dr. Norman Session, vice president of the Rankin Campus and the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

Khourtland Smith, an eighth-grader at Whitten Preparatory Middle School, and Nicholas Adams, a junior at Jim Hill High School, wasted no time finding out from the experts how to hone their skills in electrical engineering.

“The wiring and making things work excites me about it,” said Smith, who job-shadowed Electrical Engineering Technology instructor Thalamus Marshall during the event, trying his hand at a small-scale simple motor.

Jovonica Owens and Arielle Jones, both seniors at Callaway High School, are looking to continue family traditions of helping people once they enter college.

Khourtland Smith, an eighth-grader at Whitten Preparatory Middle School, handles a small-scale simple motor at College Carnival April 7 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Khourtland Smith, an eighth-grader at Whitten Preparatory Middle School, handles a small-scale simple motor at College Carnival April 7 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I want to do EMT training,” Owens said. “It’s such a rush, and it’s in my family. My sister is also becoming one, too.”

Nursing is in Jones’ blood, she said, as “it’s always what I wanted to do, because my aunt and sister are nurses.”

The same goes for Tacora Thomas, a junior at Jim Hill High School, who attended the event with her father, Cory Thomas.

“I want to do pediatric nursing and be able to work with babies,” she said.

Hinds CC Jackson Campus holds College Carnival

 

Areille Jones, center, a senior at Callaway High School, and Latasha Ramsey, the school's guidance counselor, talks with Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services at Hinds Community College, during College Carnival April 7 at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Areille Jones, center, a senior at Callaway High School, and Latasha Ramsey, the school’s guidance counselor, talks with Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services at Hinds Community College, during College Carnival April 7 at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Tacora Thomas, a junior at Jim Hill High School, grabs a ping-pong ball she tossed to win a prize at College Carnival April 7 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. With her is her father, Cory Thomas, and Ahmad Smith, recruitment and outreach coordinator with the M2M program on campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Tacora Thomas, a junior at Jim Hill High School, grabs a ping-pong ball she tossed to win a prize at College Carnival April 7 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. With her is her father, Cory Thomas, and Ahmad Smith, recruitment and outreach coordinator with the M2M program on campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

1 Comments Off on Hinds CC Jackson Campus holds College Carnival 423 12 April, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Early Childhood Education building renamed for former director, longtime educator
Posted by
04 April

Hinds CC Early Childhood Education building renamed for former director, longtime educator

JACKSON – For years, when people asked Dr. Mary Ann Greene what she did for a living, her answer spoke to the lives she helped to nurture to a solid footing in school and life.

“I always answered, ‘I work for the little children, and Hinds pays my salary’,” she said.

That selfless service to the children of the community was recognized Friday, March 31 when Hinds Community College honored Greene, of Clinton, who retired from Hinds in 2016 after 33 years in multiple roles in the college’s Early Childhood Education Technology program, by renaming the program’s building on the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center in her honor.

Dr. Mary Ann Greene

Dr. Mary Ann Greene

“This moment in time is much bigger than I am,” said Greene, during the program as she thanked Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Dr. Leroy Levy, dean of the campus, her husband, Dr. Roger Greene, a professor of Christian Studies at Mississippi College, family and friends. “This moment in time is for the Early Childhood faculty and staff, and, finally, our graduates, who are changing children’s lives forever.”

The event was held as part of Hinds’ yearlong celebration of the college’s 100th anniversary.

“I think it is most appropriate that we are here today during our Centennial naming this building after a lady who has dedicated her life to serving others,” said Jackie Granberry, executive director of the Hinds Community College Foundation. “Because of the love and devotion she has shown to the little children and to those teaching the little children, her legacy will live on.”

Dr. Mary Ann Greene, top left, share a smile with Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and children in the Early Childhood Education Technology program at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center during a program March 31 to name the program's building in her honor. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Dr. Mary Ann Greene, top left, share a smile with Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and children in the Early Childhood Education Technology program at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center during a program March 31 to name the program’s building in her honor. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Greene served the campus as an instructor, Early Childhood Education program chairperson and director of the Laboratory Child Development Center. The building that now bears her name was built in 1998 and houses all the program’s curriculum-specific classrooms and office space.

“She’s one of the pioneers in Early Childhood Education in the state of Mississippi,” said Muse. “She spent over 30 years building this program here, from scratch.”

She holds a bachelor’s degree in music from Mississippi University for Women and a master’s degree in early childhood education from Mississippi College. Her doctorate is from Jackson State University, where she was a summa cum laude graduate. She also holds a master’s of religious education from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Dr. Mary Ann Greene, seated at left, interacts with children from the Early Childhood Education Technology program at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center during a program March 31 to name the program's building in her honor. Also seated are Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, center, and JATC Dean Leroy Levy. At the podium is Dr. Ericka Davis, who succeeded Greene as program director. Standing with the children is Carolyn Watkins, an assistant in the Early Childhood Education Laboratory. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Dr. Mary Ann Greene, seated at left, interacts with children from the Early Childhood Education Technology program at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center during a program March 31 to name the program’s building in her honor. Also seated are Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, center, and JATC Dean Leroy Levy. At the podium is Dr. Ericka Davis, who succeeded Greene as program director. Standing with the children is Carolyn Watkins, an assistant in the Early Childhood Education Laboratory. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

 

 

 

Her influence on education programs for children in Mississippi and regionally is extensive, having led numerous workshops for the Mississippi Department of Education and coordinated programs for Early Education Week for the agency, as well as for state education departments in Alabama and Florida. Her civic life has included serving as president of the Friends of the Clinton Library and Clinton Music Club. She is a past vice president of the Mississippi College Faculty Wives Club.

“We cannot think of a much more deserving individual to have a building named after,” said Levy, during the program, held under the drive-up to the facility featuring Greene’s former coworkers and, in one case, a student who went on to work for her.

“Upon graduating from Hinds in 2009, I stated that one day, I would love to come back and work for you,” said Gayle Miles, a lab assistant at the Early Childhood Education Lab. “As you can see, the dream became a reality.”

The program featured several other lighthearted moments in honor of Greene, who “did things extraordinary,” said Dr. Ericka Davis, who succeeded Greene as director of the program at JATC.

During her address, Davis showed several items her coworkers knew her by, including a coffee mug and a short, stubby pencil.

Dr. Ericka Davis, director of the Early Childhood Education program at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center, shows a small pencil to attendees of a ceremony March 31 to name the program's building for her predecessor, Dr. Mary Ann Greene. Davis showed the pencil and other items as an example of items Greene used frequently during her 33 years at Hinds. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Dr. Ericka Davis, director of the Early Childhood Education program at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center, shows a small pencil to attendees of a ceremony March 31 to name the program’s building for her predecessor, Dr. Mary Ann Greene. Davis showed the pencil and other items as an example of items Greene used frequently during her 33 years at Hinds. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

“Every file folder in my office is a hand-me-down from when Dr. Greene was in my office,” she said. “These are the things she left behind, but it’s also things that move us forward as we continue to be a beam of light in our community and in the lives of students and children we serve.”

Greene was also honored by some of the children in the Early Childhood Technology program, who expressed their appreciation in the form of an oft-repeated quote from literature.

“Dr. Greene, I may forget what you said, but I will not forget how you made me feel…loved,” they said, after which she hugged her tiny bosses one more time.

Servant for children forever honored at Hinds CC Jackson Campus

 

 

Dr. Mary Ann Greene and Dr. Roger Greene

From left, Dr. Leroy Levy, Dr. Ericka Davis, Carolyn Watkins, Dr. Mary Ann Greene, Gayle Miles, Dr. Clyde Muse (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

From left, Jackie Granberry, Dr. Leroy Levy, Dr. Ericka Davis, Carolyn Watkins, Dr. Mary Ann Greene, Gayle Miles, Dr. Clyde Muse (Hinds Community
College/Tammi Bowles)

Dr. Mary Ann Greene and Dr. Roger Greene

Dr. Mary Ann Greene and her family near the sign of the renamed Early Childhood Education Building (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Dr. Mary Ann Greene and her family near the sign of the renamed Early Childhood Education Building (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

 

1 Comments Off on Hinds CC Early Childhood Education building renamed for former director, longtime educator 694 04 April, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Jackson Campus College Carnival offers fun, information
Posted by
22 March

Hinds CC Jackson Campus College Carnival offers fun, information

JACKSON – Prospective college students from local high schools and adults who want to continue their education are invited to Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center for College Carnival on April 7.

The come-and-go event is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. It gives all who want to attend the Jackson Campus a chance to find out about everything they need to enroll at the college. At College Carnival, prospective students can meet with Jackson Campus faculty and staff, learn about admissions, majors, financial aid and registration – all while enjoying free food and prizes.

For more information or to register, visit hub.hindscc.edu/jacksoncarnival or call 601.987.8758. Activities will be centered inside Bivins Hall on campus, as well as outside, weather permitting. The campus is located at 3925 Sunset Drive, just off Interstate 220.

College Carnival at Hinds CC Jackson Campus set for April 7
0 Comments Off on Hinds CC Jackson Campus College Carnival offers fun, information 398 22 March, 2017 News more
M2M program at Hinds CC expands with new services
Posted by
11 January

M2M program at Hinds CC expands with new services

JACKSON – Wilburn Holmes wants to manage a hotel someday. Jordan Brown sees himself troubleshooting that hotel’s computers. Both know they can’t get there without a little help.

Providing that network is the goal of an expanded Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

Wilburn Holmes, 19, of Jackson, fills out a membership form at a meet-and-greet Dec. 1 for the Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Holmes is a sophomore studying Hotel and Restaurant Management Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Wilburn Holmes, 19, of Jackson, fills out a membership form at a meet-and-greet Dec. 1 for the Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Holmes is a sophomore studying Hotel and Restaurant Management Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

The grant-funded initiative on campus that has provided leadership training, career counseling and other services to help African-Americans succeed in college is building on a $1.6 million federal grant secured earlier in the year under the Title III, Part A, Predominantly Black Institutions (PBI) Formula Program of the U.S. Department of Education. The funds will enable the college to improve its instructional program and emerging technologies, plus augment student support services.

“I’m signing up because it might mean more job opportunities and connections made,” said Holmes, 19, of Jackson, a sophomore studying Hotel and Restaurant Management Technology. Staff has increased to six, adding a recruiting and outreach coordinator and additional tutors for Math and English.

“We’re hitting the ground running and want to continue to build membership and a positive image in the community,” said Aleisha Coins, M2M director and assistant PBI formula grant director. “My goal with this leadership initiative is to continue to facilitate the academic growth and development of these students and provide them with the tools needed to be impactful citizens.”

The staff of M2M, from left, Robert Smith, Academic Success Coach, Ahmad Smith, Recruitment and Outreach Coordinator, April Reynolds, Instructional Guide-English, Colleen Hartfield, PBI Director, Aleisha Coins, Program Director, Felicia Garner, Administrative Assistant, Keith Williams Jr., Academic Success Coach.

The staff of M2M, from left, Robert Smith, Academic Success Coach, Ahmad Smith, Recruitment and Outreach Coordinator, April Reynolds, Instructional Guide-English, Colleen Hartfield, PBI Director, Aleisha Coins, Program Director, Felicia Garner, Administrative Assistant, Keith Williams Jr., Academic Success Coach.

The M2M program is just one component of the PBI-Formula Grant, said Colleen Hartfield, executive assistant to the President for special projects, who is directing the PBI grant.

Among emerging technologies, the added funding aims to make a reality at JATC a learning laboratory, Tech Nest, which is to be geared for independent and group study.

“Our primary goal is to help students persist and graduate,” Hartfield said. “The M2M program and other support services offered through this grant focus on student engagement and helping students broaden their life experience as it relates to being a successful college student.”

For this semester’s new recruits, a chance to learn more about the working world through simply meeting new friends is enticing enough.

“It’s a chance for someone like me, who’s from a rural community, to have new experiences with this program,” said Brown, of Flora, a freshman studying Computer Network Technology.

For more information on the program, contact Aleisha Coins at 601.987.8109.

M2M program at Hinds CC expands with new services
Jordan Brown, of Flora, fills out a membership form at a meet-and-greet Dec. 1 for the Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Brown is a freshman studying Computer Network Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jordan Brown, of Flora, fills out a membership form at a meet-and-greet Dec. 1 for the Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Brown is a freshman studying Computer Network Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

6 Comments Off on M2M program at Hinds CC expands with new services 847 11 January, 2017 News more
Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds CC to host Summer Fest
Posted by
14 June

Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds CC to host Summer Fest

JACKSON – The Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds Community College will host M2M Summer Fest on Friday, June 24 at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center to highlight the program’s services.

Attendees to the free event may sign up for M2M, register for classes and visit information booths while they enjoy free food, prizes and a video game truck. The outdoor fest runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

“Do you want to change your future by excelling academically, culturally, and socially? The time is now to join M2M,” said Dr. Shakira Cain, who directs the program at the campus.

The program aims to help African-American males succeed in college by providing leadership training, career counseling, mentoring and tutoring. Participants discover personal strengths, interests and motivation, all of which can spur an array of career interests and post-graduate options.

Those who want to register for classes at M2M Summer Fest are advised to do the following before arriving at the Fest:

  • submit a current admission application for the Summer or Fall 2016 semester
  • submit the official transcript from the last school attended
  • submit official ACT scores, OR take the Accuplacer, OR submit a college transcript showing the completion of at least one Math and English course.

To become a member of M2M, students must be enrolled at JATC and complete an application for the program. The college’s Enrollment Services team will be on hand for the event to help prospective students apply to the college online.

0 Comments Off on Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds CC to host Summer Fest 956 14 June, 2016 News more
Hinds CC students select homecoming queen
Posted by
16 October

Hinds CC students select homecoming queen

Jamellia Williams of Greenville was crowned homecoming queen at Hinds Community College festivities Oct. 15 on the Raymond Campus.

Jamellia Williams, center-left, of Greenville, was crowned homecoming queen at Hinds Community College festivities Oct. 15 on the Raymond Campus. With her are Zachary McCroy, from left, former queen Terika Ingram, and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Jamellia Williams, center-left, of Greenville, was crowned homecoming queen at Hinds Community College festivities Oct. 15 on the Raymond Campus. With her are Zachary McCroy, from left, former queen Terika Ingram, and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Williams, the daughter of Derick and Natasha Williams, is a graduate of Ignitium Christian Academy.

She is a sophomore nursing major at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. She was escorted by Zachary McCroy.

 

0 Comments Off on Hinds CC students select homecoming queen 1276 16 October, 2015 News more
Honoré ends M2M summit with challenge to ‘take on the impossible’
Posted by
16 September

Honoré ends M2M summit with challenge to ‘take on the impossible’

Doing the impossible is something retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré has made look easy in uniform and in post-military life.

In closing out this year’s Minority Male Leadership Initiatives Best Practices Summit, the three-star general stressed aiming high to succeed in life wasn’t merely possible – it’s imperative.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

“Don’t be afraid to take on the impossible,” Honoré said to a packed main arena Tuesday at Hinds’ Clyde Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. “I was the proverbial C-student. My mama couldn’t read, my daddy could only read a little bit.

“C-students like me, you gotta hustle,” Honoré said. “You’ve gotta use every gift God gave you to make it. There’s no reason or excuse not to make it. I made it because I didn’t let anyone around me outwork me. And I’m not going to settle for your excuses.”

Honoré, best known for his efforts to restore order in New Orleans as head of Joint Task Force Katrina following the devastating 2005 hurricane, spoke on the virtues of self-discipline and perseverance during the final hour of the summit, themed “Preparing African American Males for Success in the 21st Century”. A recurring theme in his address was preparing the current generation of high school and college students to be world leaders through basic skills.

“When I was growing up, people fought to be able to ride on a bus,” he said. “We won the right to get on the bus, and now we’re the people who drive all the buses. You know what job we want this century? We want to own the bus.”

Retired Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the crowd from floor level at the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

Retired Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the crowd from floor level at the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

Born in 1947 as the youngest of 12 children in Pointe Coupee Parish, La., Honoré, an African-American who identifies as Creole, enlisted in the Army in 1971. By 2004, he was a three-star general and oversaw deployment of National Guard divisions heading to Iraq and Afghanistan. Three years after leading the Katrina effort, he retired, and in 2009 authored the book, “Survival: How a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family from Disasters and Leadership in the New Normal.”

In 2012, a program similar to Hinds’ M2M Initiative was established in Louisiana by Honoré’s alma mater, Southern University. As with M2M, it is geared to increase college graduation rates of minority male students.

Literacy is the most vital basic skill the current generation has to tackle issues on the national and world stage, Honoré said, seasoning his remarks with the use of the Army’s oft-shouted cheer, “Hooah!”

“In the State of Louisiana, one of the largest concentrations of black men is in prisons,” he said. “There are cities in America that assess the reading level of fourth-grade, 10-year-old males to determine how many prisoners they’ll have in 20 years. They have the formula. Because if you can’t read by the time you’re 10 years old, you’ll have a 40 percent chance of having a run-in with the law by the time you’re 14. I didn’t make that up; it comes from the Children’s Defense Fund.

“We’ve got people graduating from high school now who can’t read. And they’re showing up in colleges. I challenge every teacher in here. I don’t care what the test says. These children need to know how to read. If they can’t read, I don’t care how many computers we give them. Life will mean nothing to them.”

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré accepts a copy of his 2009 book " “Survival: How a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family from Disasters and Leadership in the New Normal" for high school students in the Minority Male Initiative. Honoré gave the closing address at the M2M program's Best Practices Summit that ended Tuesday.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré accepts a copy of his 2009 book ” “Survival: How a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family from Disasters and Leadership in the New Normal” for high school students in the Minority Male Initiative. Honoré gave the closing address at the M2M program’s Best Practices Summit that ended Tuesday.

Slides during his address showed a Model of Excellence triangle and the iconic depiction of Gen. George Washington crossing the Delaware River during the American Revolutionary War, which he used as an example of winning the battles of life against long odds.

“Competence, confidence, discipline – that’s what creates excellence,” he said. “Discipline is what we do when nobody’s watching, and you do the right thing. It’s that little voice in the back of your head. Knowing what to do and having the initiative to do it when nobody’s looking is how we create excellence.”

“Twenty percent of the troops (with Washington) were slaves who weren’t free, and they’re fighting for freedom from the British. You got this? But think about this. You sit here today and think about how hard you got it. Think about how hard they had it – fighting for the freedom of a country, but themselves are slaves.

“But, we sit here today at Hinds talking about an enduring problem we’ve had for 239 years we’ve yet to resolve. The good news is we’re talking about it and we’ve given you an action plan for success. That action plan is you. The only one who will determine your success is you.”

“We need you to be prepared to take on the impossible,” he said. “Previous generations did it. They fought and won our freedom when they were not free themselves.”

The M2M Minority Male Initiative is a grant-funded project based at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center on Sunset Drive. The initiative provides leadership training, career counseling, tutoring, mentoring and opportunities for travel to senior level universities for program participants.

0 Comments Off on Honoré ends M2M summit with challenge to ‘take on the impossible’ 1144 16 September, 2015 News more
Norman Session named new Vice President at Hinds Community College
Posted by
06 May

Norman Session named new Vice President at Hinds Community College

web_Norman_Session_0012

Dr. Norman Session will be the new vice president of the Rankin Campus and Jackson Campus–Academic/Technical Center (JATC) at Hinds Community College, as of July 1, 2015. He is currently serving as principal of Pisgah High School in the Rankin County School District, where he won the distinction of being named the district’s Principal of the Year in 2007 and 2010.

Session’s selection was approved today (May 6, 2015) by the Hinds Community College Board of Trustees at its monthly meeting. He is replacing Dr. Sue Powell, who retires June 30 after 12 years as the vice president for the Rankin and Jackson campuses.

“Dr. Session is a graduate of Hinds and has also served as an adjunct instructor at the Rankin and Jackson campuses. As Pisgah High School principal, he led early efforts to make college more accessible and affordable to his students by offering dual enrollment courses at Pisgah,” said Dr. Clyde Muse, president of Hinds Community College.

“The knowledge and experience he has gained as a secondary education leader will serve the college and community very well, and we look forward to him joining our leadership team,” Muse said.

After earning an associate degree at Hinds in 1988, Session transferred to Mississippi College where he completed a bachelor’s degree in Secondary Education and a master’s degree in Social Science, as well as a master’s degree in Education, School Leadership and Administration. He completed the Educational Leadership program at the University of Mississippi, earning a Ph.D. in 2000.

“Hinds gave me the foundation that I needed to be successful at the university level,” Session said, adding, “Even though Hinds was a large institution, it maintained a small school feel with small class size and individual attention.”

Dr. Ben Fatherree, retired history department chair who still teaches at the Raymond Campus, gets the credit for Session’s pursuit of a career in education. “He was the catalyst – so intelligent, so energetic, and so knowledgeable. He never brought the first note or book to class. He knew it all.

“I was going to study accounting, but I knew if I could be a fraction of the educator he was, I could be successful,” Session said.

After earning his first master’s degree, Session was a 22-year-old adjunct instructor at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. About that experience, he said, “We have to be able to be flexible and meet the needs of all students, including adult learners. That is one thing that I learned teaching at the Jackson Campus.”

His professional career began as a teacher in Jackson Public Schools and Rankin County schools. He moved into administration at Forest Municipal Schools as high school assistant principal. He then served as a middle school assistant principal in Madison County schools and high school assistant principal in the Rankin County School District before becoming principal at Pisgah High School in 2002.

At Pisgah, school activities keep him busy most nights of the week, but he signed up again to be an adjunct instructor for Hinds, teaching Western Civilization I and II and Sociology in the dual enrollment/dual credit program at Pisgah High School.

“At a small school, we couldn’t offer everything to our students. Dual enrollment with Hinds was a way to let our kids know that college was within reach, especially for a first-generation college student,” Session said.

This year, one Pisgah senior will graduate with 38 college credits, and several will have more than 25 college credits. “The partnership has led to more scholarship dollars for our students,” he said.

When he reports to his new office at Hinds’ Rankin Campus, Session plans to meet with faculty and students and focus on building relationships with the community.  “I think that the college and community are intertwined; you can’t separate them. You have to pull in all the stakeholders,” he said.

The Hinds tradition carries on with his family. His wife Suzanna also attended Hinds. Their oldest son, Paxton, is a junior at the University of Mississippi who graduated from Pisgah High School with 29 dual enrollment college credits from Hinds. The couple’s other son, Sloan, graduates this month with 26 dual enrollment credits and will attend the Hinds Rankin Campus.

“Everybody recognizes that Hinds is a flagship institution in Mississippi,” he said, “I’m excited for this opportunity and ready to get to work.

 

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

7 Comments Off on Norman Session named new Vice President at Hinds Community College 2917 06 May, 2015 News more
Hinds CC sets ‘Terrific Tuesday’ summer registration events
Posted by
04 May

Hinds CC sets ‘Terrific Tuesday’ summer registration events

Hinds Community College will have “Terrific Tuesday” special registration events all summer at the six locations to draw students to campus earlier rather than later to register for classes.

“We want to prepare new students for the first day of classes by making sure they have financial aid or payment plans in place, make sure they understand their bill, show students how to login into My.Hinds, show them where the bookstore on their campus is located, and more,” said Kathryn Cole, dean of Enrollment Services.

During Terrific Tuesdays, each campus will offer extended registration hours, popcorn, drinks and a free t-shirt to all who register for classes.

Terrific Tuesday will be held at the following times and locations:

  • June 2, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center
  • June 9, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Vicksburg-Warren Campus
  • June 16 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., Utica Campus
  • June 23, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Rankin Campus
  • June 30, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Raymond Campus
  • July 7, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center
  • July 21, 1.p.m. to 7 p.m., Raymond Campus
0 Comments Off on Hinds CC sets ‘Terrific Tuesday’ summer registration events 1676 04 May, 2015 News more