http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company

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Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company
Posted by
11 September

Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company

RAYMOND – Four Hinds Community College students who interned with Continental Tire over the summer have even more of a reason to cherish their nine weeks of paid training at the company’s tire plant in Mount Vernon, Ill.

Continental has covered tuition for the fall 2017 semester for Dylan Canant, Mack Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell. The students had been placed at Continental’s maintenance department for on-the-job experience in electrical, electronic, mechanical and hydraulic systems.

Hinds students Dylan Canant, from left, Mackie Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell spent their summer as interns for Continental Tire in Mount Vernon, Ill. (Submitted to Hinds Community College)

Hinds students Dylan Canant, from left, Mack Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell spent their summer as interns for Continental Tire in Mount Vernon, Ill. (Submitted to Hinds Community College)

The students’ enthusiasm and aptitude for their budding careers with the company building a $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County near Clinton that’s planned to open in 2019.

“During my visit to Mount Vernon, I heard nothing but positive feedback about our interns from Mississippi. They obviously did a great job and were great ambassadors,” said Michael Egner, project manager with Continental. “The student’s success is proof that we’ve found a strong partner in Hinds Community College. Together, we can build a great workforce and future for Continental in Mississippi.”

Pope, an Electronics student on the Raymond Campus, and Canant, an Electrical Technology student on the Raymond Campus, counted the exposure to new people and faces as a plus to go along with the diversified workforce training.

“Being an electronics tech I came here expecting to do electronics,” Pope said. “However I was hired as a multi-tech, meaning that I would also do electricians and mechanics work on top of that. It has been a wonderful experience meeting new people.”

“My experience has been really great and I am really proud of myself and the people who pushed me to do this,” Canant said. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime thing for anybody who gets this opportunity. It is one of the best experiences I have ever had in my life.”

Waddell, an Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology student at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus, took note during his internship of the vibrant culture that existed in the plant as he learned to troubleshoot, install and repair tire components in the mixing department.

“This company cares about their employees and it’s obvious to anyone who works here,” Waddell said. “And that alone is most interesting thing to me about this experience.”

Maintenance technicians will be some of the first positions filled when hiring begins in the commercial vehicle tire plant in late 2018. As one of the key roles in Continental’s daily operations, maintenance technicians are responsible for both reactive and preventive maintenance of equipment throughout the facility.

Williams, an Industrial Maintenance Technology student at the Rankin Campus, hopes to fill one of those roles thanks to the unique opportunity he had this past summer.

“I’ve learned new things I didn’t think were possible,” Williams said, adding he learned correct workplace safety tips through the use of Personal Protective Equipment. “This has been one of the best opportunities of my life and I am truly blessed to be a part of it.”

[tweetable alt=””]Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company[/tweetable]

 

0 284 11 September, 2017 News more
Grads of workforce development programs shine bright on big day
Posted by
19 December

Grads of workforce development programs shine bright on big day

PEARL — Just two years ago, Ronald Humes had dropped out of high school and was seemingly out of options.

Today, he has credential and a job offer in hand – and he feels on top of his world.

Ronald Humes, center, of Vicksburg, was among nearly 900 students who received credentials from Hinds Community College in three ceremonies Dec. 16. Humes earned a Career Certificate in Welding Technology and, earlier this year, had earned his High School Equivalency after completing the MI-BEST program at Hinds. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Ronald Humes, center, of Vicksburg, was among nearly 900 students who received credentials from Hinds Community College in three ceremonies Dec. 16. Humes earned a Career Certificate in Welding Technology and, earlier this year, had earned his High School Equivalency after completing the MI-BEST program at Hinds. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“It’s really a dream come true right now,” said Humes, of Vicksburg, among those in academic and technical areas of study who graduated from Hinds Community College Friday, Dec. 16 in ceremonies held at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Humes had earned his High School Equivalency certificate this past summer after completing the MI-BEST program at Hinds, a program that combines the high school equivalency curriculum with job training skills. Humes’ career certificate in Welding Technology was just the start of his big day Friday.

“I have a job offer right now where I’d make $32 an hour,” Humes said, surrounded by family and friends.

The college graduated nearly 900 students who received 1,263 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number 554 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday.

Among the graduates, nine achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 46 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 110 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Jimmy Phillips and Thomas Scoggins graduated Hinds Community College on Friday, Dec. 16 with more than their credentials in hand.

Jimmy Phillips, left, of Copiah County, and Thomas Scoggins, of Richland, were among nearly 900 graduates from Hinds Community College who received credentials in three ceremonies Dec. 16, 2016. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jimmy Phillips, left, of Copiah County, and Thomas Scoggins, of Richland, were among nearly 900 graduates from Hinds Community College who received credentials in three ceremonies Dec. 16, 2016. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Each has a job offer after completing the Industrial Maintenance program, which prepares students for modern-day manufacturing facilities.

“I’ve got two offers now, in service and technical work,” said Phillips, of Copiah County, who grew up on a cattle farm and, on Friday, earned technical and career certificates in the field. Scoggins, of Richland, whose family owns an industrial equipment business, earned an Associate of Applied Science degree and graduated cum laude.

“I have some offers I’ll be going after, with this degree,” Scoggins said.

Coursework in the program combines previously separate disciplines into a single concept dubbed mechatronics, a multifaceted field of engineering, telecommunications, control and computer engineering.

Keila Adams, of Jackson, grew up with a few family members unable to hear the world around them.

Now, with an Associate of Applied Science degree in Interpreter Technology in hand, Adams will be able to help her and countless others interact with their own loved ones.

Keila Adams, of Jackson, was among nearly 900 graduates at ceremonies held Dec.16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. She earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Interpreter Technology, graduating summa cum laude. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Keila Adams, of Jackson, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec. 16. She earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Interpreter Technology, graduating summa cum laude. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“Sign language is a totally different language,” Adams said before walking across the stage as a summa cum laude graduate. “It’s a world not only of language, but of facial expressions.”

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse noted that many students want to make a better life for them and their families.

“The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life.  And, while the graduates who sit upon this stage today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life,” Muse said.

Dr. Bobby Glenn, director of the Veterinary Technology program at Hinds since 1976, spoke to academic and technical graduates on the value of their education in multiple measures.

“Twenty-five percent of first-semester college students do not return for their second semester,” Glenn said. “You did return. And you returned again. And you finished.

“Your degree will open doors that otherwise would not have opened. Wear your degree with pride – you’ve earned it.”

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC workforce program grads shine bright on big day[/tweetable]

Dr. Bobby Glenn and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse

Dr. Bobby Glenn and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse

Darylle Buckley, right, was among nearly 900 nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec.16. Buckley earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Landscape Managment Technology. With her is Martha Hill, who directs the program of study. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Darylle Buckley, right, of Jackson, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec.16. Buckley earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Landscape Management Technology. With her is Martha Hill, who directs the program of study. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jamie Johnson, center right, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec. 16. Johnson earned an Associate of Arts degree in general studies and plans to pursue a nursing degree. With her is her father, Jimmy Johnson, left, her daughter, Carlie Blok, and her mother, Beverly Johnson. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jamie Johnson, of Vicksburg, center right, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec. 16. Johnson earned an Associate of Arts degree in general studies and plans to pursue a nursing degree. With her is her father, Jimmy Johnson, left, her daughter, Carlie Blok, and her mother, Beverly Johnson. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Curtis Hicks, left, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec. 16. Hicks earned an Associate of Arts degree in kinesiology. With him are friends Kayla Thompson, Imani Adams and Tylesha Davis. All were classmates at Northwest Rankin High School. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Curtis Hicks, left, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec. 16. Hicks earned an Associate of Arts degree in kinesiology. With him are friends Kayla Thompson, Imani Adams and Tylesha Davis. All were classmates at Northwest Rankin High School. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

0 946 19 December, 2016 News more
Student goes from layoff to payoff thanks to Hinds CC MI-BEST program
Posted by
30 November

Student goes from layoff to payoff thanks to Hinds CC MI-BEST program

RAYMOND – Only 18 months ago, Felix Davis found himself laid off from his job and still without a high school diploma.

Fast forward to today, and all his minuses have turned to pluses – to the tune of 26 hours of college credit and a 4.0 GPA thanks to the MI-BEST program at Hinds Community College.

“I was laid off from a job in manufacturing because of downsizing,” Davis said. “I’m a single parent, so I had to get out and do something.”

Felix Davis

Felix Davis

Davis, of Jackson, a 34-year-old father of two girls, met the program’s point person at Hinds, Dr. Robin Parker, at a job fair at Metrocenter Mall not long after he was laid off.

“I didn’t know there was a place you could go to get your GED at the same time as going to college,” Davis said. “I didn’t know that college was even an option, because in the past, not having my high school diploma prevented that.

MI-BEST is Mississippi’s version of the nationally recognized Integrating Basic Education and Skills Training program, or I-BEST. It allows adult students to train for a job skill while earning their GED high school equivalency certificate at the same time.

Students are prepared to be job-ready in six months to a year, train in high-demand areas and earn national certifications.

“Students can earn a high school equivalency while learning a skill,” said Parker, who is district director of Integrated Pathways and coordinator of Adult Basic Education at Hinds. She is also assistant dean of Career/Technical Education on the Raymond Campus.

Parker ties the program’s impact on the state’s workforce to U.S. Census data on skill levels of working-age adults. A 2014 survey of Mississippi adults 25 to 64 years of age showed nearly 30 percent had only a high school diploma, while another large chunk, nearly 24 percent, had some college credit, but didn’t finish.

“And that’s fertile ground in the state of Mississippi because we have a lot of low-skilled adults who really want an opportunity to enter a career to provide for them and their families,” Parker said.

After just eight weeks in the program, Davis landed a job at PCA, a packaging products manufacturer, in Pearl. He’s earned two pay raises and is now making $20 an hour.

In the classroom, Davis has completed those 26 semester hours in the burgeoning Industrial Maintenance area of study, where he’s successfully put past and present together.

“He entered the program focused and determined and quickly used his past manufacturing experience to validate the principles and concepts he was learning in class,” said David Creel, district director of Manufacturing Training at Hinds.

He’s also earned a silver-level Career Readiness Certificate, a credential used by industry to track basic job skills in potential employees. He’s on track to graduate soon with an Associate of Applied Science degree.

“My plan is to reach back into my community and help others who have the same need I had a year ago,” Davis said.

[tweetable alt=””]Student goes from layoff to payoff thanks to Hinds CC MI-BEST program[/tweetable]

3 2447 30 November, 2016 News more
Industrial Maintenance program at Hinds CC training tomorrow’s factory workers
Posted by
22 February

Industrial Maintenance program at Hinds CC training tomorrow’s factory workers

Programs like Hinds’ Industrial Maintenance program on the Raymond, Rankin, Vicksburg-Warren and Utica campuses are at the heart of workforce training efforts for Continental Tire, which plans a $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County.

“Hinds’ specific role is to develop and deliver workforce training to individuals in our state who will ultimately fill jobs that Continental Tire will bring to our area,” said Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development, about the project, two years in the making. “We’ve been working closely with the Mississippi Development Authority, the Mississippi Employment Security Commission and the Mississippi Community College Board to come up with the specific training needs for Continental Tire.”

The global company, in partnership with Gov. Phil Bryant, a Hinds graduate, and the Mississippi Development Authority announced on Feb. 8 the location of the facility on more than 900 acres off Norrell Road, off I-20 West in Hinds County. Construction of the facility is slated to begin in January 2018, with tire production to begin in 2019. The plant will employ 2,500, company officials have said. Gov. Bryant has mentioned Jackson, Bolton, Vicksburg and Edwards as areas that should benefit from jobs created by the plant.

“I really believe that this has the greatest possibility to revolutionize western Hinds County of anything I’ve seen since I’ve been here. It has that possibility,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. “It’s an opportunity the college has got to show people we can be successful and really be a player. In the final analysis, they wouldn’t be here unless we could train the workforce.”

Hinds Community College students Reed Scoggins, left, of Brandon, and Christolein Simmons, of Yazoo City, are enrolled in the Industrial Maintenance program at the Raymond Campus. Recently added technology in the program lab combines functions in the electrical and mechanical disciplines to integrate training for modern-day factory jobs. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hinds Community College students Reed Scoggins, left, of Richland, and Christolein Simmons, of Yazoo City, are enrolled in the Industrial Maintenance program at the Raymond Campus. Recently added technology in the program lab combines functions in the electrical and mechanical disciplines to integrate training for modern-day factory jobs. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Industrial Maintenance is among several other workforce training courses that offer career certificates that can enhance a resume’ and open educational doors for students who might not otherwise attend college.

Christolein Simmons, a Yazoo County native, was steered by his academic advisers to take introductory class in mechatronics, an emerging multidisciplinary field of engineering that combines mechanical, electrical, telecommunications, control and computer engineering. He works in a factory and attends school, though the training at Hinds could be a key to career advancement, Simmons said.

“I just love working with my hands,” he said. “And every day, it brings something new. We’re learning to troubleshoot and just doing the framework before we get hands-on. I think I can go on to a four-year college, enhance myself, then go on to work somewhere and continue to go to school.”

Reid Scoggins, of Richland, is also a student in his first course in Industrial Maintenance. His family has run an industrial equipment business for decades, but his father encouraged him to further his education.

“He said it never hurts to have a degree,” Scoggins said. “And with this degree, you can make good money. I’ve liked machines and working on things with my hands. When I got into the program, they showed us all the machines they’d work on and the things we’d learn to do. It piqued my interest.”

Visits to the state’s two-year colleges by company officials cemented the role they’ll play in supplying the workforce.

“It was key for the program for them to see what Hinds Community College and other community colleges offer,” said David Creel, district director of Manufacturing Training. “The programs here at Hinds will complement the processes that Continental will have.”

Stocks had the responsibility of showing the college had the expertise and capacity to train the workers needed.

“[tweetable alt=””]What attracted Continental was our college being a 100-year-old institution with a proven track record of training [/tweetable]and flexibility plus availability of the consortium,” Stocks said. “We were able to demonstrate all that.”

Paul Williams, executive vice president for Continental Commercial Vehicle Tires in the Americas, said after the formal announcement a lot of locations were toured but the capacity for growing skilled workers was a key factor. “We toured the schools; we toured the technical colleges. Our greatest asset is always our people. It’s the skill level, the technical capability of the population.”

Students in the Industrial Maintenance program begin with safety courses, then move on to more involved electrical and mechanical maintenance courses that involve the latest technology that can simulate a factory setting. Completion of advanced coursework in mechatronics can earn a student an Associate of Applied Science degree.

 

0 1523 22 February, 2016 News more
Eagle Experience 2016 recruiting event draws crowd
Posted by
05 February

Eagle Experience 2016 recruiting event draws crowd

For Tonesha Smith, it was all about seeing her daughter succeed in school and in life.

“I want to see her get interested in the classes she’s really interested in,” she said, escorting daughter Jazmine Hathorn and her friend, Tamera Lofton. The two Callaway High School students plan to room at Hinds together once their high school days are over.

Jazmine Hathorn, left, and Tamera Lofton, center, get information on Hinds' 2+2 Program in Elementary Education with Delta State University with the program's Terry Parrish, right, at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016 (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Jazmine Hathorn, left, and Tamera Lofton, center, get information on Hinds’ 2+2 Program in Elementary Education with Delta State University with the program’s Terry Parrish, right, at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016 (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hathorn checked out music and art programs, as did Lofton, plus her most palpable passions.

“Singing, definitely, and dance and theater,” Hathorn said.

They were among about 1,000 high school seniors who attended this year’s Eagle Experience at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus, which features exhibits highlighting all the academic and career-tech programs Hinds has to offer as well as activities ranging from student publications to the Hi-Steppers dance team to Honors.

The event is a come-and-go expo-style spread of exhibits and displays that gives high school seniors and their parents an opportunity to find out everything they need to know about enrolling at Hinds.

Eagle Experience offered Raymond Campus tours, interaction with current students and all the college basics a new student needs to know about including admissions, scholarships, majors, housing, student life and more. Participants can also enjoy food and prizes.

Lofton and Courtney Jamison, of Florence, were among those who looked into activities that go into college life at Hinds, such as cheering.

Courtney Jamison, right, a Florence High School student, checks out exhibits at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. With her is her mother, Kym, left. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Courtney Jamison, right, a Florence High School student, checks out exhibits at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. With her is her mother, Kym, left. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“I’ve been cheering all my life, really,” Jamison said. “But I’m also interested in music, Hinds Connection and doing the yearbook.”

Some attendees made this year’s event into a road trip.

“I’m into helping others, and having new experiences in new places,” said Takishia Lee, who made the trip with her mother, Tanesheia Lee, who is a certified nursing assistant, and other friends from Scott County. Lee sought information from the associate degree nursing program, as did her fellow seniors Tyunna Odom and Ambriyana Roberts.

Kimberlyn Cager, left, Tyunna Odom, center foreground, and Ambriyana Roberts, right foreground, check out lists of programs featured at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Kimberlyn Cager, left, Tyunna Odom, center foreground, and Ambriyana Roberts, right foreground, check out lists of programs featured at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Career-tech options ranged from welding to graphic design. A simulator at the Industrial Maintenance table kept prospective students combined the elements of real-world welding with a bit of virtual reality.

“It simulates welding two steel plates, which teaches body positioning, angle and distance to hold welding rods in a clean, non-waste environment,” said Industrial Maintenance Technology Instructor Geoffrey Horne as he helped Rodrick Snow, of Raymond, get the hang of a virtual welding shield through which participants could see their handiwork. For the real thing, the Welding & Cutting Technology table offered a view of neatly-sealed metal hinges, among other items.

Rodrick Snow, left, a Raymond High School senior, takes a turn in a welding simulator while Industrial Maintenance Instructor Geoffrey Horne gives some assistance at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Rodrick Snow, left, a Raymond High School senior, takes a turn in a welding simulator while Industrial Maintenance Instructor Geoffrey Horne gives some assistance at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Creating cool logos and designs using the latest graphic design programs caught the eyes of Erica Adams, Talia Sweezer and Dazieyette Jackson, a trio of Vicksburg High School seniors who made the trip as part of the school’s campus tour.

“I just have a passion for designing things like that,” Sweezer said.

Graphic Design Technology Instructor Beth Messina points out the latest design features to Erica Adams, left, Dazieyette Jackson, center, and Talia Sweezer, right, during Eagle Experience 2016 at the Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Graphic Design Technology Instructor Beth Messina points out the latest design features to Erica Adams, left, Dazieyette Jackson, center, and Talia Sweezer, right, during Eagle Experience 2016 at the Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 11,500 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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0 1277 05 February, 2016 News more