http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Do better when you know better, keynoter tells M2M summit at Hinds CC

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Do better when you know better, keynoter tells M2M summit at Hinds CC
Posted by
20 September

Do better when you know better, keynoter tells M2M summit at Hinds CC

PEARL – College is a time for traditional-age students when decisions can make or break their lives for years – and the time for discipline is now, said the keynote speaker at the M2M Education Meets Excellence summit Sept. 13.

 

Antonio Robinson, director of Upward Bound Math and Science program at Trident Technical College in Charleston, S.C., told about 250 students of Hinds, high schools from the region and others his talk wasn’t so much to preach, but to lay out the best life strategies for college and beyond.

 

His presentation was titled A Gentleman’s Guide to Personal Development.  

 

“When students spend a year with me, they will come out different,” he said. “If they’re the same person they were a year ago, then I’ve failed at my job.

From left, Ahmad Smith, Antonio Robinson, Dr. Aleisha Escobedo, Dwayne Jefferson, Colleen Hartfield, and Keith Williams, Jr. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I call it the gentleman’s guide because a gentleman doesn’t force stuff on you,” he said. “It’s here for you to take with you. You know how you know what’s right and you don’t always do what’s right? My mission in life is to close the gap between knowing and doing.”

 

Robinson, who holds master’s and bachelor’s degrees in counseling from Charleston Southern University and has counseled in high schools and colleges for 20 years, spoke of the importance of making good decisions in all facets of life, starting in college. Examples ranged from how diligently to study for tests to their choices of friends.

   

Your network will determine your net worth. Surround yourself with people who have a value of themselves. Hang out with people who force you to step it up. You’re always one decision away from a totally different life.” 

Students from Jackson Public School, Hinds County School District and The Piney Woods School attended this fall’s summit, held in the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.  

 

“I learned you have to be well-organized and be attentive,” said Steven Little, a junior at Murrah High School. “And have a good appearance, because people really do judge you on your appearance in life.”

Breakout sessions were conducted by Oklahoma-based Paradigm Shift, a nonprofit group specializing in motivating youth. 

Steven Little, a junior at Murrah High School, listens to a presentation during the M2M Leadership Summit held Sept. 12 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

“This summit provided an opportunity for our students to engage with their peers and serve as active leaders and forward thinkers,” M2M director Dr. Aleisha Escobedo said.

 

The grant-funded initiative on campus that has provided leadership training, career counseling and other services to help African-Americans succeed in college is building on a $1.6 million federal grant secured in 2016 under the Title III, Part A, Predominantly Black Institutions (PBI) Formula Program of the U.S. Department of Education. The two-year grant is $2.1 million.

 

The funds will enable the college to improve its instructional program and emerging technologies, plus augment student support services. The grant also provides innovative faculty and staff training efforts designed to close the achievement gap between African-American students and other student populations at the college. The five-year grant ends in 2021. 

20 September, 2018 News more
Phi Theta Kappa and Honors at Hinds CC a perfect place to start college life
Posted by
14 September

Phi Theta Kappa and Honors at Hinds CC a perfect place to start college life

PEARL – Being part of something greater than yourself is a common theme in school and is especially true for members of the Alpha Omicron Omega chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus.

Eric Kinan, left, and Ashlyn Rader, are members of the Alpha Omicron Omega chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“It gets me involved both with the community and other students,” said Eric Kinan, of Florence, a third semester student and PTK member studying Veterinary Technology. It has helped me develop my leadership skills. It made me see the importance of community service.”

The Alpha Omicron Omega chapter was chartered in 1989 and is part of the 1,200-chapter international honor society for community and junior college students. Students who have earned a 3.5 or higher cumulative GPA on 12 hours or more are eligible for PTK.

Rankin Honors was established on the campus in 2015. Generally, incoming freshman students may enter the program with a 3.5 high school GPA, composite ACT score of 25 or instructor recommendation. Honors at Hinds affords high-achieving students a chance at challenging coursework and community service opportunities.

One of those opportunities is an International Studies trip to Costa Rica where students engage in service learning projects while earning Hinds college course credits. Students have helped re-forest along biological corridors there, cleared trails in cloud forests, and dug trenches to prevent flooding along trails on a volcanic mountain.

Gabbi Walters is a member of the Alpha Omicron Omega chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’m looking forward to going to Costa Rica with Honors here,” said Gabbi Walters, of Pelahatchie, studying Veterinary Technology. “It’ll give me a broader view of the world than just what’s here and learn about different cultures. Overall, it’ll make me a better, well-rounded person.”

On campus, being in PTK and Honors offers the chance at forming some of the first working relationships in someone’s academic career.

“For me, the best part has been meeting a bunch of great, new people just like me,” Ashlyn Rader, of Puckett, who is studying nursing. “We meet on Tuesdays with people taking classes similar to ours, and find out if they need help. PTK is also a great resume-builder for college. When other colleges see that in your portfolio, they know you care a lot about your grades.”

14 September, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Utica Campus student selected as 2018 HBCU Competitiveness Scholar under White House Initiative
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13 September

Hinds CC Utica Campus student selected as 2018 HBCU Competitiveness Scholar under White House Initiative

UTICA – Hezekiah Williams, a Hinds Community College sophomore on the Utica Campus, is no stranger to hard work and public service.

Hezekiah Williams of Edwards has been selected as part of the 2018-19 HBCU Competitiveness Scholars class as part of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Williams, a sophomore at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus, was named one of 63 students from 54 HBCUs.

The 19-year-old Edwards native has put his best foot forward and made tremendous strides in his first two semesters at Hinds. Serving in a number of roles on campus including Mr. Utica, district president for the Hinds Student Government Association and formerly freshman class president, as well as having membership in Phi Theta Kappa, Williams continues to add achievements to his list of accomplishments.

Williams’ latest endeavor has positioned him among some of the most elite students in the United States – selection as part of the 2018-19 HBCU Competitiveness Scholars class as part of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Williams was named one of 63 students from 54 HBCUs.

The honor is the White House Initiative’s highest student recognition and serves to recognize undergraduate, graduate and professional students for successfully preparing to compete for top opportunities that improve long-term outcomes.

The Competitiveness Scholars will receive national recognition during the Initiative’s Excellence in Innovation and Competitiveness Awards ceremony scheduled for Sept. 17. Students will spend Sept.16-18 attending activities and events during the 2018 National HBCU Week in Washington D.C.

“I was ecstatic when I received the news that I was selected. This is such an honor. I’m proud to be representing the Utica Campus and hope to make my family and friends proud,” said Williams, who plans to major in biomedical engineering.

During the one-year appointment, the Competitiveness Scholars will learn and share proven and promising practices that support individual and HBCU competitiveness, with the goal of strengthening prospects for career and life success. Selectees are required to participate in workshops designed to improve leadership, encourage ongoing personal- professional development and discover areas of innovation and entrepreneurship.

“My goals in this program are to continue bridging gaps between cultures, unifying students and motivating the next person to go beyond the norm. I am no stranger to hard work and I look forward to this year of service. I want to inspire as many students as I can to go for their dreams. Sometimes that can truly be a task, but my faith keeps me grounded and gives me the strength to do all things I set out to do,” Williams said.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

13 September, 2018 News more
Hinds CC a perfect place to take next step in healthcare careers
Posted by
10 September

Hinds CC a perfect place to take next step in healthcare careers

JACKSON – Ter’Bria Hopkins works in the healthcare field as a phlebotomist and wants to build on her credentials.

Carla Gray-Taylor, Associate Degree Nursing instructor at Hinds Community College, gives a tour of the ADN lab during the Fall 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase Sept. 6 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. From center are Ter’Bria Hopkins, Andrea Ellis and Kira Harvey, all of Jackson. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

That desire is so great that she took her own photos during the fall 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase held Sept. 6 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

“I love taking care of my patients and people in general,” said Hopkins, 24, of Jackson, looking to add to the associate degree already under her belt.

Hopkins was among about 150 people who attended this fall’s event, which is held each semester at the Chadwick Drive complex. Prospective students and others toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty, explored the college’s 12 health-related and two short-term programs and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

“Guests spoke with our faculty one-on-one to learn about our programs of study and the promising careers in healthcare that Hinds graduates obtain,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

Programs showcased included Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emergency Medical Science, Health Care Assistant, Health Information Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Nursing Assistant and Phlebotomy.

Brandy Ruth, right, of Pearl, looks on as Hinds Community College student Allison Frock explains how X-rays are taken in the Radiologic Technology lab during the 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase Sept. 6 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“We are excited to offer nursing and allied health programs that provide excellent employment opportunities for our students,” said Nursing and Allied Health Dean Dr. Libby Mahaffey. “Graduates of our programs are employed at rates of 90 to 100 percent within a year of graduation and consistently meet national benchmarks for licensure/registry pass rates.”

The event draws potential students across a wide spectrum of professional experience, including working adults who seek a challenging career change.

“It’s good to get a feel for what the medical field involves,” said Brandy Ruth, 30, of Pearl. “I’m a secretary right now, so I’d be starting from scratch.”

Shaniqua Bush, 20, of Kosciusko, is hearing-impaired and sees her foray into healthcare as just another success. She checked out the Respiratory Care Technology lab, where a pig’s lung was used to show how the equipment worked.

“My goal is to show that deaf people can do the same things hearing people can do,” Bush said via her interpreter, Loretta Sutton, of the college’s Disability Support Services department. “I’m interested in looking at the ventilators because I’m curious to know.”

Shaniqua Bush, left, who is hearing-impaired, looks on as Loretta Sutton, an interpreter with Hinds Community College’s Disability Support Services department, explains with sign language how equipment in the Respiratory Care Technology program’s lab works during the Fall 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase Sept. 6 at the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Mikeyia Lewis, left, and Allison Humphries, both of Forest, look on as they tour the Radiologic Technology lab during the Fall 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase Sept. 6 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amber Garcia, of Pelahatchie, left, asks a question in the Practical Nursing lab at the Fall 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase at Sept. 6 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

10 September, 2018 News more
‘High-flyer’ Sherry Franklin named Hinds CC 3E Award winner
Posted by
10 September

‘High-flyer’ Sherry Franklin named Hinds CC 3E Award winner

Sherry Franklin, associate vice president for Career and Technical Education and Rankin Campus Career and Technical dean, received Hinds Community College’s highest award in an Aug. 24 ceremony.

Franklin, a Brandon resident, has worked at Hinds since 2004. She received the 3E Award, Emphasis on Excellence and Enrichment, at the annual Employee Appreciation event. The award is always kept as a closely guarded secret until it is announced at the event.

Franklin had been asked to sing and was last on the program after the 3E announcement. As she sat in the audience at Cain-Cochran Hall on the Raymond Campus, she was searching on her phone for the music to “I Believe I Can Fly.”

She originally planned to sing it cappella but decided, as she waited for her turn, to sing it with music.

But then she heard Jackie Granberry, executive director of the Hinds Community College Foundation, mention Pearl and Rankin County as part of the biography of the person named the 3E Award recipient. Franklin’s attention jerked up from the phone to the stage as she realized Granberry was talking about her.

“Winning 3E brought with it an overwhelming experience of emotions,” Franklin said. “I felt surprised, elated, honored and truly blessed. Today, I feel empowered to spread my wings even more to help others achieve their goals. I truly believe WE can fly!”

Granberry said Franklin embodies what the award stands for.

As the 3E Award recipient at Hinds Community College, Sherry Franklin received a custom-made rocking chair created by the Career-Technical Education Department. With her are, from left, Hinds Community College Foundation Executive Director Jackie Granberry, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Rankin Campus Vice President Dr. Norman Session and Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce and Economic Development and district coordinator of Career and Technical Education.

“She has excelled in every position she’s held at Hinds — five to be exact – during her almost 18-year tenure at Hinds. Each new position has given her increased responsibilities and, through those positions, she has enriched the lives of everyone in her path,” Granberry said.

“She is a hard worker, a problem-solver, a person you can depend on to get things done. She has never backed down from a challenge. She accomplishes what seems as insurmountable goals with her always positive outlook, her knowledge of all things career-tech and workforce, and her desire to make Hinds the best institution possible,” she said.

Franklin has been with Hinds since 2004. She was formerly the tech prep coordinator and joined the Rankin Campus staff as director of the Pearl-Rankin Career Center. Her stint at Hinds includes dean of students from 2011 to 2013. In 2015, Franklin was named associate vice president for Career and Technical Education and district director of Career and Technical Education. She is also Rankin Campus Career and Technical dean.

“I enjoy working at Hinds and put my heart into everything that I do. At Hinds, I focus on what is best for our students and the communities that we serve,” she said.

Franklin holds her undergraduate and graduate degrees in business education from Jackson State University. Before coming to Hinds she taught business and computer technology at the Jackson Career Development Center and then worked with the State Department of Education as program coordinator for business and computer technology.

Franklin said she chose the song “I Believe I Can Fly,” which she never got to sing at the award ceremony, “to congratulate the award recipients and give words of encouragement to others that we can achieve whatever we put our minds to. However, I believe that there must be a fundamental shift within ourselves to believe that we can do it.”

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

10 September, 2018 News more
Hinds CC, ERDC partner on Coding Academy, seek applicants
Posted by
04 September

Hinds CC, ERDC partner on Coding Academy, seek applicants

VICKSBURG – Hinds Community College has partnered with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center on a computer coding academy and is looking for applicants.

Classes begin Sept. 13 at ERDC’s facility on Halls Ferry Road and represents opportunities aplenty for the Vicksburg-Warren Campus and those looking to build a career in Information Technology. The classes will meet 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

“This is the first for-credit course we’ve done at Vicksburg, and it’s a great chance for the community to move toward the kinds of skills needed to compete in the workforce of the future,” said Marvin Moak, vice president of the Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

Students in the program will learn the most current computer coding skills in a mix of classroom and practical training. Students will focus on the practical application of technology in a hands-on work environment and learn the soft skills necessary for employment. Upon completion of the course, students will receive a certificate from HCC.

“The Vicksburg Coding Academy is a unique educational opportunity that will provide a hands-on immersive workplace environment that will provide a wide variety of coding instruction that will result in skills we need at ERDC and other employers in the region,” said Jerry Ballard, ERDC’s Information Technology Laboratory Computational Science and Engineering Division chief.

The program represents another opportunity to grow the local economy through cutting-edge workforce training.

“The future of technology developments in our community is tied to a highly capable coding workforce,” said Dr. Jeff Holland, chairman of the Warren County Economic Development Foundation and board member of the Vicksburg Warren Economic Development Partnership. “The Vicksburg Coding Academy is a critical step toward achieving that workforce. It sets our community up for success.”

For information on the program, contact Moak’s office at 601.629.6804.

04 September, 2018 News more
Hinds CC students begin first week of classes
Posted by
17 August

Hinds CC students begin first week of classes

Hinds Community College began fall classes on Aug. 13. Hinds offers more than 450 academic courses guaranteed to transfer to universities, plus more than 70 career and technical program options. Students can take classes day or night at any of our six locations, or take online classes from the convenience of their own home.Hinds also offers many different starting points, so students can begin college when they are ready.

On-campus classes:

  • 16-week (full term) classes – Aug. 13
  • Eight-week classes – Aug. 13 and Oct. 4
  • Six-week classes – Sept. 4 and Oct.15
  • Four-week classes – Aug. 13, Sept. 10, Oct. 9 and Nov. 5

Online classes

  • 15-week (full term) classes – Aug. 20
  • Eight-week classes –Aug. 20 and Oct. 15
  • 4-week classes – Aug. 20, Sept. 17, Oct. 15 and Nov. 12

“Hinds Community College takes pride in its mission of providing a quality, affordable education that fits the life needs of our students,” said Raymond Campus Dean of Academics Dr. Ben Cloyd.

For more information on programs of study and scheduling, see www.hindscc.edu.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Linda Holley of Natchez, left, a Hinds Community College student at Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, purchases books for the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program with the help of bookstore employee Cynthia Smith of Terry.

Dilan Sanchez SanJuan of Brandon, left, and Anthony Davis of Brookhaven, are in the Emergency Medical Science-Paramedic Program at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

Associate Degree Nursing students Elason Kelly of Raymond, left, and Jessica Helder of Utica get the semester started at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

New students in the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program Alexis Rader of Vicksburg, Shelby Carroll of Clinton, Linda Holley of Natchez, Kacie McCluskey of Carrollton, Lindsey Jeselink of Clinton and Kathleen Lott of Carrollton get to know each other on their first day of class together at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

Respiratory Care Technology students took a tour on their first day of class on Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. They are, from left, Kayla Moore of Jackson, Meagan Brazell of Brandon, Sydney Phillips of Raymond, Lonnie Caine of Pearl, Victoria McDonald of Richland, Shulette McBeth of Carthage and Keisha Hoover of Byram.

Industrial Maintenance instructor Geoffrey Horne at Hinds Community College’s Vicksburg-Warren Campus gets the first day of classes started. (April Garon/Hinds Community College0

Jalin McDonald, left, and Frantrell Windom, both of Jackson, shop for supplies on Monday, Aug. 13, at the bookstore at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. McDonald plans to study art and Windom to study music. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Sandra Mullins, of Raymond, shops for a bookbag on Monday, Aug. 13 at the bookstore at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. Mullins is in her second semester at Hinds Community College and plans to study nursing. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Bookstore employee David Cruse, right, assists sophomore Stanley Kelker, of Jackson, on Monday, Aug. 13 at the bookstore at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. Kelker is a sophomore pursuing a degree in Physical Therapy.  (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Freshman student Jessica Fant, of Clinton, visits the bookstore at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus on Monday, Aug. 13. Fant is pursuing a degree in Forensics. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

D’Ajah Miley, right, a sophomore Veterinary Technology student from Clinton, gets a helping hand finding her next class from Hinds CC Raymond Campus Police Captain LaTridia Chambers on Monday, Aug. 13.  (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Freshmen Tarrius Kirkwood-Burr, left, and Christian Trejo sit outdoors Monday, Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. Kirkwood-Burr, of Jackson, plans to study Diesel Technology; Trejo, of Clinton, plans to study music education. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Hinds Community College employee Leigh Sarrett, left, gives freshman student Jamiracle Williams, of Vicksburg, directions to her next class on Aug. 13, the first day of fall classes. Williams plans to study nursing. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hinds Community College employee Emily Mitchell, left, gives freshman student Nyjah Smith, of Greenwood, directions to her next class. Smith plans to study art.  (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Chester Price, left, and Michael Parks, both of Jackson, are students in the Industrial Maintenance Technology program on the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College. Parks, 54, said he came back to school to pursue opportunities for an enriching career. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Joy Lawson gets her student ID photo taken Monday, Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus by Hinds employee Ray Westerfield. Lawson, of French Camp, is a sophomore Graphic Design Technology student.  (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

From left, Katelyn Foster, of Byram; Kaelyn Jones, of Terry; Hannah Gatewood, of Jackson; and Hallie Clark, of Jackson gather together on the first day of classes at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Ayana Alexander, of Byram, receives assistance from Test and Lab coordinator Hazel McLaurin-Dunbar as she signs in to take the Accuplacer Placement test on Monday, Aug.13 at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. Alexander is a first semester freshman. (Evelyn Stewart/Hinds Community College)

 

Freshman student Dahkeem Williams, of Utica, visits with Dr. Tyrone Jackson, vice president of the Utica Campus on Monday, Aug.13, 2018 at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. Williams traveled to Utica from Pennsylvania in hopes of playing basketball. (Evelyn Stewart/Hinds Community College)

 

DeKindre Dixon, left, and Jamar Williams, both of Utica, gets help from Librarian Jean Greene on Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. Dixon, an incoming freshman, plans to study Engineering while Williams, a second semester freshman plans to become a Physical Therapist.  Classes for the fall are now in session.  Late registration continues through Aug. 17. (Evelyn Stewart/Hinds Community College)

 

Students at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center buy books and supplies the first week of school. Pictured are, from left, book store employee Jerrica Murray and students Sarah Brown and Michel Davis, all Jackson residents.

Hinds Community College Medical Data Technology instructorAngela Garrett of Monticello, standing left, gets class started at Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Students are, seated from left, Chavet Bryant of Jackson, Pakendra Hall of Jackson, Eboni Galtney of Clinton and Anastasia Ellis of Jackson.

Campus police Lt. Maurice Winford makes IDs for Hinds Community College students Sonya Watson of Canton, Alexus Jones of Jackson, Mayia Horton of Jackson and Katlyn Stokes of Jackson at Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

Hinds Community College student Ashlyn Rader, of Puckett, is studying in the Honors Center at the Rankin Campus where she attends classes. She is a member of the Honors program and Phi Theta Kappa, Alpha Omicron Omega Chapter at the Rankin Campus. Hinds students returned to classes on Aug. 13.

Hinds Community College students, from left, Destiny Little of Florence, Eric Kinan of Florence and Amber Williams of Brandon are all members of the Alpha Omicron Omega Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa on the Rankin Campus. Little, who is studying psychology, is the vice president for Scholarship and is the Mississippi/Louisiana Regional Central District Representative of Phi Theta Kappa. Kinan, who is studying Pre-Veterinary Science, and Williams, an accounting major, are both members of the Honors Institute.

Amanda Blair of Pearl instructs a chemistry course Thursday, Aug. 16 during the first week of classes at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Brandon Brown, left, of Florence, take notes Thursday, Aug. 16 during Amanda Blair’s Chemistry course during the first week of classes at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Brown is planning to study occupational therapy. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Freshman students Jordan Fortenberry, left, of Brandon and Abigale Williams of Flowood take notes Thursday, Aug. 16 during Amanda Blair’s Chemistry course during the first week of classes at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Maya Miller, of Florence, prints materials at the Hinds Community College Rankin Campus library on Aug. 16. Miller plans to study biology. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Freshman student Estefania Armendariz, of Brandon, utlilizes the Hinds Community College Rankin Campus library on Thursday, Aug. 16. Armendariz plans to study biology. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Freshman student Kyshawn Smith, of Jackson, sits outdoors at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus on Thursday, Aug. 16. Smith plans to study kinesiology. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

From left, Benjamin Chaffins, of Flowood; Maugra Luna, of Pearl; and Logan Hogue, of Brandon, hang out between classes Thursday, Aug. 16 at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Kathy Jones of Raymond, manager of the Hinds Community College Rankin Campus Bookstore, stocks shelves with textbooks on Thursday, Aug. 16. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Book store employee Sheryl Mounger helps Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus students buy their books the first week of class. The students are Elizabeth Tucker, left, and D’Andra Chambers, both of Vicksburg.

 

Bookstore employee Stephanie Langley, right, helps sophomore student Alliyah McNair with her textbook list on Thurs, Aug. 16. Langley, of Sand Hill, plans to study nursing. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Michyla Adams, left, and Andrea Gaines, both of Jackson, walk to class Monday, Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. They are pursuing degrees in nursing and criminal justice, respectively. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Kylan Osborn, of Sardis, stops to ask for directions on Monday, Aug. 13 at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. Osborn plans to take general studies classes this fall with the hopes of later majoring in engineering. (Evelyn Stewart/Hinds Community College)

Student Support Services Administrative Assistant Letoya Allen, of Utica, assist Freshmen students Takia Jenkins, of Belzoni (left) and Ernestine Chin of Vicksburg with job placement applications on Aug. 13. at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. (Evelyn Stewart/Hinds Community College)

Freshman student Nicholas Rogers, of Gluckstadt, walks to class Monday, Aug. 13, 2018 at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. Rogers plans to study business. Classes for the fall semester are now in session. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

17 August, 2018 News more
Hinds CC graduates more than 600 in summer ceremonies
Posted by
30 July

Hinds CC graduates more than 600 in summer ceremonies

PEARL – Hinds Community College graduated 611 students during the summer semester at its six locations.

Among 319 participating in two ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus was Tierra Williams, of Jackson, who earned an Associate in Arts degree from the college.  

In all, 391 credentials were conferred to the 611 who graduated from the college. 

Jasmine Coleman lost her mother several years ago and has dedicated each step in her education to her memory.

 “It was sudden to have lost her, just before my high school graduation,” Coleman said. “So, I’ve dedicated both my high school and college graduations to her.”

 Coleman, 22, of Jackson, earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Early Childhood Education, a field she’s eager to enter spread her caring sense and motherly instincts.

 “I have a son, Morgan, who is two, so he’s in that dedication as well,” Coleman said.

 Yolanda Houston, the college’s district director of Teacher Education, based on the Utica Campus, is a close confidant to Coleman and a family friend.

 “I taught her in grade school,” Houston said. “I’ve watched her mature and be strong through adversity and still be able to graduate.”

Of the total graduating, 197 did so with honors. That includes 85 who earned the cum laude designation, which is a 3.2 to 3.59 grade point average. Another 47 graduated magna cum laude, or a 3.6 to 3.99 grade point average, and 65 graduated summa cum laude, or a 4.0 grade point average. The total field of honor graduates equaled about one-third of the summer graduating class.  

Crystal Mays had waited a long time to celebrate a graduation in her family, which made her sister’s commencement from Hinds Community College all the sweeter.

“I’ve waited a long time for this,” Mays said amidst tears as she watched her sister, Eronda Graham-Daniels, walk across the stage after earning her Associate in Arts degree. “This is why I talk so much about finishing school.”

Peggy Hobson Calhoun, who represents District 3 on the Hinds County Board of Supervisors, spoke to graduates at both ceremonies. Calhoun implored graduates not to give up when adversity strikes when they enter the workforce.

“You may think your vision of becoming successful is too difficult to realize, but it can become real,” Calhoun said. “I don’t know what your aspirations and pursuits are, but don’t blind your vision. Hold on to your visions and your dreams. Your vision defines what it is you want to accomplish out of life.”

Shelby Blakenship, center-right, of Brandon, earned an Associate in Applied Science from Hinds Community College during summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. She completed the Transition to RN program and plans a healthcare career. With her are her brother, Bryce; her mother, Maria; her father, Kirk; and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, left, and Shelby Blankenship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tirzah Burt, center, of Brandon, earned an Associate in Applied Science degree in Practical Nursing from Hinds Community College during summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. From left are Hannah Burt, Lizzy Burt, Rachel Williams and Sarah Hartman, all her sisters, and Ella Kate Elmore, her cousin. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Andrea Felder, center, of Jackson, earned an Associate in Applied Science degree from Hinds Community College after having completed the Associate Degree Nursing program. With her during summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus are husband Karick, son Avery, and son Everette. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Javeon Green, of Brandon, left, and Deloris Greer, bookstore manager at Hinds Community College Utica Campus, pose before summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Green earned a Technical Certificate in Automotive Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jasmine Coleman, right, of Jackson, earned an Associate in Applied Science in Early Childhood Education during summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. With her is District Director of Teacher Education Yolanda Houston, left.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crystal Mays, of Louisville, sheds tears as she watches her sister, Eronda Graham-Daniels, graduate from Hinds Community College during summer graduation ceremonies at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Tierra Williams, of Jackson, was among more than 600 students who earned credentials during the summer semester at Hinds Community College. Williams earned an Associate in Arts degree during graduation ceremonies July 27. With her is friend Tamara Sullivan. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew Jiles, center-left, earned an Associate in Arts degee from Hinds Community College during summer graduation ceremonies at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. He plans to study aerospace technology. With him are Joseph Jiles, his father, Esther Jiles, his mother, and Joseph Jiles Jr., his brother. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Ignatius Fluker, right, earned a Technical Certificate and a Career Certificate from Hinds Community College in Diesel Equipment Technology during summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. With him is his grandmother, Christine Fluker. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sha’quitia Williams, center, of Vicksburg, earned a Career Certificate in business from Hinds Community College during summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. With her, from left, are friends Kimmer Williams, Chasity Jefferson, Kontonia Smith, and Janeshia Jefferson. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, Advancement Specialist Bethani England and Jackie Granberry, executive director of the Hinds Community College Foundation, who was the mace bearer for summer graduation ceremonies July 27.,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erin Rawson, left, of Brandon, and Kimberly Prater, of Yazoo City, await summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at Hinds Community College. Both earned Associate in Applied Science degrees after completing the Transition to RN program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

Christopher Hunsinger, right, of Clinton, earned an Associate in Arts degree from Hinds Community College during summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. With him is his girlfriend, Shantenicka Henry. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

30 July, 2018 News more
Hinds CC helps make career changes possible for nursing, allied health graduates
Posted by
27 July

Hinds CC helps make career changes possible for nursing, allied health graduates

PEARL – When Judye Braneff’s job in the banking industry was eliminated, it was time to come up with Plan B.

Judye Braneff, left, of Jackson, and Tamara Daniels, of Vaughan, share a pose before summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Each earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Health Information Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 “I lost my job in the industry and came to Hinds,” said Braneff, 60, of Jackson, who had her aptitude for getting into health data and statistics eyed early on by her instructors.

 “This was a perfect fit for me,” she said as she prepared to graduate among 319 people participating in two summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. In all, 391 credentials were conferred to 611 who graduated from the college. 

Braneff, who earned an Associate in Applied Science in Health Information Technology, was among about 130 who participated in the 8 a.m. ceremony for nursing and allied health graduates, many of whom switched careers to take advantage of Hinds’ stellar offerings in health-related areas of study. Graduates in academic and career-technical programs received credentials at a ceremony held at 11 a.m.

 “This was a wonderful opportunity to come to Hinds,” said Cherilyn Switzer, 45, of Pearl, who was a teacher’s assistant before moving over to healthcare.

Clyde Wilson, 45, of Jackson, was in a management position before pursuing his own Associate in Applied Science credential in the same field.

Peggy Hobson Calhoun speaks to graduates during summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“It’s been a change for me, but I’ve gotten a whole new career now,” Wilson said.

Wilson was among 197 who graduated with honors, in his case cum laude, which is a 3.2 to 3.59 grade point average. Another 47 graduated magna cum laude, or a 3.6 to 3.99 grade point average, and 65 graduated summa cum laude, or a 4.0 grade point average. The total of 197 honor graduates equaled about one-third of the summer graduating class.  

Peggy Hobson Calhoun, who represents District 3 on the Hinds County Board of Supervisors, spoke to graduates at both ceremonies.

“Evaluate needed areas of improvement, and keep your vision alive for your profession,” Calhoun said. 

Clyde Wilson, of Jackson, prepares for summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Wilson earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Health Information Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Cherilyn Switzer, of Pearl, adjusts a fellow graduate’s cap before summer graduation ceremonies July 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Switzer earned a Technical Certificate in Surgical Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

27 July, 2018 News more
Once a Jubilee, always a Jubilee: Hinds CC’s Cooper retires, leaving legacy of excellence
Posted by
24 July

Once a Jubilee, always a Jubilee: Hinds CC’s Cooper retires, leaving legacy of excellence

Dr. Bobby Cooper didn’t plan to stay at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus for 45 years. Goodness knows, he had plenty of opportunity to go to his alma mater Tougaloo College, Jackson State University, Alcorn State University or other places.

As the longest serving employee this year, with 45 years of service, Dr. Bobby Cooper was presented with a special momento – a framed 45 record of the song ‘Amen, Amen” and a paper copy of the musical score. The song is one performed many times by Cooper’s Jubilee Singers over the years. Cooper retired at the end of June 2018.

He was lured to what was then Utica Junior College in 1972 as a music instructor by the college’s participation, along with Jackson State and Tougaloo, in Opera/South, a now-defunct black opera company based in Jackson.

“Utica was looking for someone to work with their opera chorus for Opera/South,” he recalled. “I didn’t come to stay – not to be there forever. Things changed when I got there. I really liked what I was doing.

“I was mainly just a one-person music department. I taught piano, I taught voice, I taught theory. You name it, I did it. I enjoyed it very, very much,” he said.

Then he had a life-changing experience. He read “Black Man’s Burden” by Utica Institute founder Dr. William Holtzclaw, learning about the all-male Jubilee Singers group formerly used as a fund-raising tool to keep the historically black college afloat. The group was active from 1922 to 1941.

“I said, ‘Wow, this is something I would like to do.’ When I was at Tougaloo College, I was in a male group. I wanted to continue it so I said, ‘I’m going to start this back.’ It took off.”

Cooper resurrected the Jubilee Singers in 1982, right around the time Utica Junior College and Hinds Junior College merged because of a federal higher education desegregation court order.

Cooper retired at the end of June as the current longest serving Hinds employee. Along the way, he was recognized many times for his work. His awards include Outstanding and Distinguished Academic Instructor of the Year, Hinds Humanities Teacher of the Year, Life Star, Hinds Hero, HEADWAE recognition and the college’s most prestigious recognition, the 3E Award. The Fine Arts Center on the Utica Campus bears his name.

Two scholarships have been established in his honor, the Dr. Bobby Cooper’s Jubilee Singers Scholarship in 2012 and the Daughters of Bobby Cooper Singers Scholarship in 2015. He established the Dr. Bobby Cooper Endowed Scholarship in 2002.

He plans to stay productive in his retirement. He has applied for a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to write the story of the Jubilee Singers and embark on a book tour. As the motto goes, “Once a Jubilee, always a Jubilee.”

Dr. Bobby Cooper directs the Jubilee Singers at the May 2018 graduation ceremony on the Utica Campus.

Cooper leaves behind a legacy of excellence in his music program but will always be best known for the Jubilee Singers and their rebirth.

Dr. Clyde Muse, who became Hinds president July 1, 1978, before the merger of the two institutions, recognized the jewel the college had in Cooper and the Jubilee Singers.

“I’ve been pleased to support them over the years. They truly are great ambassadors for us,” he said.

Muse recalls attending a national community college convention in New Orleans a few years ago when the Jubilee Singers performed. “I’ve been going to those meetings for years. Very seldom does anybody get a standing ovation, but theirs was automatic when they performed,” he said.

Retired Utica Campus Vice President Dr. George Barnes, who worked at the campus from 1962 to 2013, counts Cooper as a friend.

“He’s done a lot of things for people. He’s done a lot of things for me. He is just a fine person who has worked hard,” Barnes said. “I have a great respect for him.

“He was tough. He was kind and friendly but he wasn’t always soft,” Barnes said. “If something needed tightening down, he knew when he needed to do it. He was firm and fair. Students had a lot of faith in him. They loved him.”

Cooper’s Jubilee Singers started small – four young men, three of them from Illinois where he had gone to graduate school. Now the groups average about 12 to 15 singers. “These were my better singers. Just because you were a part of the choir did not mean you would be one of my Jubilee Singers,” he said.

The Jubilee Singers traveled extensively and performed widely. One of Cooper’s favorite performances was at the Vatican in Rome in 1999 where they sang “Ave Maria” and the group’s trademark “Amen” for Pope John Paul II.

“It was so exciting to sing at the Vatican. People came and talked to us and talked to the fellows. We were really celebrities. We enjoyed it so much,” he said.

Things haven’t always been smooth. There have been a few trials along the way. And he and his wife have been awakened more than once by a student calling at midnight after getting into a difficult situation.

“Kids who were not quite sure about themselves and what they can do –you get a chance to work with them because enrollment was small. You your own kids,” he said. “I always had a house full of my students.

But I enjoyed it and still hear from those kids today about their experiences. It was an environment that you could help the kids, and they wanted to do better. I’ve got former students everywhere.”

One of those is James Adams (1996, 2001), senior program manager for a Dallas nonprofit called Big Thought. “I experienced some rough years while in college at Hinds, and Doc was always there to say it would be all right. He supported me however he could and taught me, as a choir member and Jubilee Singer, to be a gentlemen of honesty and excellence. I saw the best example in the life he walked before us all,” Adams said.

Tracy James, one of the first Utica Campus music graduates, has known Cooper since 1977. She’s a vocal music teacher at a middle school in Ohio. “Music became my livelihood, so I owe much to Dr. Cooper for his wisdom and inspiration he instilled in me,” she said. “One thing Dr. Cooper taught me was always bring your ‘A’ game to the classroom.”

Calvin Bogan Sr., a music major from fall 2009 to summer 2013, is youth pastor at West Point Baptist Church in Hattiesburg.

“Dr. Cooper is a voice of assurance, the portrait of grace and the epitome of kindness. One of his many wonderful attributes I’ve noticed is his timeliness. My most memorable moment with Dr. Cooper is testament to his impeccable timeliness,” he said.

Students had planned a birthday celebration for Cooper on Nov. 3, 2010, but Bogan wasn’t able to be there after his mother died of cancer and her funeral was on that day.

“I viewed my mother for the last time. As I stood there, I felt a firm, but gentle hand on my shoulder. That hand was that of Dr. Cooper. He spent his birthday with my family and I as we funeralized my mother,” Bogan said. “I can say for me and everyone else that Dr. Cooper has always been there for anyone who needed him and is always in time.”

 

Dr. Cooper Legacy Giving

The Humanities Department at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus is soliciting donations for two projects in honor of Dr. Bobby Cooper.

One is for a museum exhibit focused on his legacy that is being called the Utica Jubilee Experience.The plan is to display some of Dr. Cooper’s archival materials, along with historical information about the Jubilees – both the original group from the 1920s and 1930s, and Dr. Cooper’s Jubilees. The museum is to feature interactive exhibits allowing visitors the chance to experience one of Dr. Cooper’s Jubilee concerts, as well as educational materials for teachers bringing their classes to the exhibit.

The other option is a gift to the Dr. Bobby G. Cooper Scholarship Fund, which provides scholarships to deserving music education students at the Utica Campus. The recipients are selected each year based on their talent, financial need and potential to impact the world.

For more information on how to give to either project, contact Dan Fuller, 601.885.7097 or daniel.fuller@hindscc.edu or the Hinds Community College Foundation at 601.857.3363.

 

Editor’s Note: This story was originally published in the summer 2018 issue of Hindsight alumni magazine.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

24 July, 2018 News more