http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Diplomas earned by 18 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus

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Diplomas earned by 18 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus
Posted by
08 June

Diplomas earned by 18 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus

PEARL – For Laura Marie Barrett, being on a stage she once thought herself unworthy of her presence meant thanking a few people first.

Laura Marie Barrett, center, with her father, William, and her mother, Marie (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Laura Marie Barrett, center, with her father, William, and her mother, Marie (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I just want to say thank you so much to three wonderful women,” Barrett said, referring to the trio who have coordinated the Gateway to College program at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. “They’ve helped me through hard times and difficult times these past two years.”

On Tuesday, June 6, she was among 18 students from Rankin County School District thankful for the opportunity to graduate high school and earn college credit this past semester thanks to the program.

Program director Chandra Frazier, along with program specialists Sherrie Daniels and Ouida Holland, were praised highly by students who told their stories to family and friends during a graduation ceremony held at the Muse Center.

“If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t have known about this program or learned how to push myself a lot harder than I used to,” said Barrett, of Florence High School, who earned 24 hours of college credits she’ll use to pursue a cosmetology career. “I thought since I had failed in regular high school, that was it.”

The program, in place since 2012-13 at the Rankin Campus, has involved students who have dropped out of high school or are at risk of doing so. Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds. The program expanded to the Vicksburg Warren Campus in 2015. The program, a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds and the two school districts, is ending for the 2017-18 term.

Students had to read on an eighth-grade level and pass the college’s placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

Nicholas Hydrick, center, with his father, Ryan, and his mother, Nancy Cobb (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Nicholas Hydrick, center, with his father, Ryan, and his mother, Nancy Cobb (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Being in the program taught me time management,” said Nicholas Hydrick, of Northwest Rankin High School, who earned 22 credits toward college. He was equally thankful to program officials he described as “three amazing women.”

“I’m truly thankful God put these three women in my life,” he said on stage as he, Barrett and fellow RCSD students Shelbie Cranfield and Maeghan Romo in sharing brief testimonials about their experiences in the program. “I never would have graduated without their help,” Hydrick said. “I want you to know that you three have reserved spots in my heart forever.”

The ceremony was again keynoted by Dr. Sue Townsend, superintendent of the Rankin County School District and member of the college’s Board of Trustees.

“There’s a freedom that you feel when you’ve accomplished a goal,” Townsend said. “When you walk out of here, you’re going to have a new sense of freedom and what it offers to you.”

Frazier thanked guidance counselors and others in the Rankin County School District for supporting the program from the start.

“We have walked this journey together,” Frazier said.

Rankin Gateway to College director Chandra Frazier

Rankin Gateway to College director Chandra Frazier

Beverly McClure, a guidance counselor at Northwest Rankin, told graduates they’d still be there for them as they continued their education at the college level.

“We’re here to support,” McClure said. “This is not work, this is easy. This is love. You still belong to your home school and every counselor in this district. And we want to help.”

Gateway graduates present Tuesday also included Zoe Armagost, 24 hours of college credits; Nicole Aucoin, 43 hours; Charlie Banks, 15 hours; Cranfield, 10 hours; Leanna Frazier, 42 hours; Kelsey Heard, 33 hours; Benjamin Heckman, 38 hours; Marcenia Holloway, 38 hours; Cody Holmes, 32 hours; Kaylee Jackson, 21 hours; Kinsley Parkman, 24 hours; Austin Scott, 19 hours; Romo, 29 hours; and Mary Ward, 32 hours. Also completing high school through the program for 2017 were Alexander Heintzelman and Peyton Love, who were not present Tuesday. All graduates were students in the Rankin County School District.

[tweetable alt=””]Diplomas earned by 18 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus[/tweetable]

3 681 08 June, 2017 News more
Diplomas earned by 25 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus
Posted by
09 June

Diplomas earned by 25 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus

PEARL – Janie Kovach felt like an extra in the movie of her life when she began high school a few years ago.

“It’s hard for those who need help to be noticed and for them to not be lost in the crowd,” Kovach said. “It’s very easy to be overlooked and to just hide in the shadows.”

Janie Kovach, center, in cap and gown, earned 24 college credit hours after earning her diploma from Northwest Rankin High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus. From left, Megan Ashmore, her cousin; Jameson Cardullo, her second cousin; Jordan Kovach, her sister; Janie Kovach, her mother; James Kovach, her father; Margaret Kovach, her grandmother; James Kovach Sr., her grandfather. (Apri Garon/Hinds Community College)

Janie Kovach, center, in cap and gown, earned 24 college credit hours after earning her diploma from Northwest Rankin High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. From left, Megan Ashmore, her cousin; Jameson Cardullo, her second cousin; Jordan Kovach, her sister; Janie Kovach, her mother; James Kovach, her father; Margaret Kovach, her grandmother; James Kovach Sr., her grandfather. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

On Tuesday, June 7, Kovach was no extra – she had earned what amounts to top billing as valedictorian among 25 high school students in Rankin County who received diplomas and earned college credit this past semester thanks to the Gateway to College program. [tweetable alt=””]Gateway involves students who have dropped out of high school or are at risk of doing so.[/tweetable]

 “I think I can speak for everyone and say high school wasn’t as easy for us as some of our peers,” Kovach said in an address during a graduation ceremony held at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. “For much of middle and high school, some of us were told we weren’t trying hard enough. Or that we just needed to apply ourselves. At times, it probably made us feel hopeless or that we wouldn’t amount to anything.

Janie Kovach addresses attendees at a graduation ceremony June 7 at the Muse Center for the Gateway to College program. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Janie Kovach addresses attendees at a graduation ceremony June 7 at the Muse Center for the Gateway to College program. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“But, coming to Gateway showed us we really do have a future. We were surrounded by three ladies who saw that potential in us and never let us forget it. They gave us helping hands, tough love and strong advice. They helped us exceed the expectations given to us so long ago held us to the same standards as any other high school student, if not a little bit higher.”

Kovach, of Northwest Rankin High School, finished the program with 24 hours of college credits she’ll use toward a pursuit of a psychology degree.

The ceremony was keynoted by Dr. Sue Townsend, superintendent of the Rankin County School District and member of the college’s Board of Trustees.

“Setting goals is a big part of life and success,” Townsend said. “Whether it’s continuing college or going into the workforce, it’s time to set your next goal.

“This group of 25 young people have earned between three and 62 college credit hours – that’s incredible. That means they’ve earned between a half-semester to two years of college credit.”

Lofty aspirations abounded among this year’s graduates, which included Raymond Flowers III, a first-generation high school graduate.

Raymond Flowers III, center, in cap and gown, earned three college credit hours by earning his high school diploma from Northwest Rankin High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus. Front row, from left, Allysyn Jones, a friend; Derek McIntyre, his stepfather; Tanya McIntyre, his mother; Flowers; Raymond Flowers II, his father; Dalton Ferguson, a friend; back row, from left, Chandler Coker, a friend; Tabitha Sims, his stepmother; Dylan Sims, a friend; Allie Crowley, a friend; Shelby Sims, a friend; and Claire Allen, his girlfriend. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Raymond Flowers III, center, in cap and gown, earned three college credit hours by earning his high school diploma from Northwest Rankin High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Front row, from left, Allysyn Jones, a friend; Derek McIntyre, his stepfather; Tanya McIntyre, his mother; Flowers; Raymond Flowers II, his father; Dalton Ferguson, a friend; back row, from left, Chandler Coker, a friend; Tabitha Sims, his stepmother; Dylan Sims, a friend; Allie Crowley, a friend; Shelby Sims, a friend; and Claire Allen, his girlfriend. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“I have Army National Guard on my mind,” said Flowers, also of Northwest Rankin, enjoying time post-ceremony with several family members and friends after earning three college credit hours. “I have being a history major on my mind.”

Christian Donaldson, of Brandon High School, looked back on how the program helped him get a foothold in his studies – a launching pad of sorts for his plans. He earned 26 college credit hours by finishing the program.

Christian Donaldson, right, earned 26 college credit hours by earning his high school diploma from Brandon High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus. At left is his mother, Priscilla. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Christian Donaldson, right, earned 26 college credit hours by earning his high school diploma from Brandon High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. At left is his mother, Priscilla. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“Gateway was the best thing for me,” Donaldson said. “In high school, I was distracted and really not focused on my work at all. When I got here, it was better for me that I didn’t know anyone and it was a better fit for me.

“I plan to go to Jackson State, major in criminal justice and become a security officer in the Air Force.”

Gateway began at Hinds in the 2012-13 academic term at the Rankin Campus and was expanded in 2015 to the Vicksburg-Warren Campus. It functions as a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds and the two respective school districts.

Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds.

Students entering the program must read on an eighth-grade level and pass HCC’s placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

At Rankin, the program is directed by Chandra Frazier and staffed by Ouida Holland, resource specialist, and Sherrie Daniels, administrative assistant.

From left, Sherrie Daniels, Ouida Holland, Jesse Swayze; first row, from left: Anna Claire Howard, Sarah Tristen Soelman, Janie Kovach, Shelby Hart, Alexa Hanna, Madison Brae Cook, Angel Funderburk, Raymond Garrett Flowers III; Brady Black, Tyler Smith and Chandra Frazier. Back row, from left: Miesha Smith, Christian Donaldson, James Wilson, Calvin Overton, Charles Wilson, Avery Whatley, Jalon Wilson. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

From left, Sherrie Daniels, Ouida Holland, Jesse Swayze; first row, from left: Anna Claire Howard, Sarah Tristen Soelman, Janie Kovach, Shelby Hart, Alexa Hanna, Madison Brae Cook, Angel Funderburk, Raymond Garrett Flowers III; Brady Black, Tyler Smith and Chandra Frazier. Back row, from left: Miesha Smith, Christian Donaldson, James Wilson, Calvin Overton, Charles Wilson, Avery Whatley, Jalon Wilson. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Additional Gateway graduates Tuesday included Brady Black, Northwest Rankin High School, 17 hours of college credits; Alexander Chepkevich, Northwest Rankin High School, 23 hours; Madison Cook, Northwest Rankin High School, 20 hours, Devin Cooper, Northwest Rankin High School, eight hours; Jalon Daniels, Brandon High School, 24 hours; Angel Funderburk, Brandon High School, 26 hours; Alexa Hanna, of Brandon High School, 20 hours; Shelby Hart, of Brandon High School, 25 hours; Virginia Harwell, of McLaurin High School, 27 hours; Anna Claire Howard, of Brandon High School, 27 hours; Alyssa McCullough, of Northwest Rankin High School, 50 hours; Michael Massey, of Brandon High School, 12 hours; Nicole Matthews, of Northwest Rankin High School, 41 hours; Calvin Overton, of Northwest Rankin High School, 21 hours; Miesha Smith, of Florence High School, 26 hours; Tyler Smith, of Northwest Rankin High School, 26 hours; Sarah Soleman, Pearl High School, 11 hours; Jessy Swayze, McLaurin High School, 62 hours; Kayla Tadlock, Pelahatchie High School, 11 hours; Avery Whatley, Puckett Attendance Center, 11 hours; Charles Wiggins, Northwest Rankin High School, three hours; James Wilson, Brandon High School, 18 hours.

0 1451 09 June, 2016 News more
Seven graduates of Gateway program at Hinds CC honored
Posted by
06 June

Seven graduates of Gateway program at Hinds CC honored

VICKSBURG – Seven graduates of the Gateway to College program this past semester at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus were honored during a luncheon May 20.

Receiving certificates of completion from Gateway coordinators were:

  • Jacob Barrett, Warren Central High School
  • Rita Freeman, Warren Central High School
  • Rickita Johnson, Vicksburg High School
  • Demetrick Shelvy, Vicksburg High School
  • Dylan Silverthorne, Vicksburg High School
  • Sharod Williams, Warren Central High School
  • Amy Willis, Warren Central High School

Each of the seven participated in graduation ceremonies at their respective high schools, which were held May 26-27 for this year’s senior class.

Seven graduates of the Gateway to College program this past semester at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus were honored during a luncheon May 20. Pictured are, from left, Sharod Williams, Dylan Silverthorne, Demetrick Shelvy, Rita Freeman, Amy Willis and Rickita Johnson. Also receiving a certificate of completion from the program was Jacob Barrett, who was not present for the luncheon. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

Seven graduates of the Gateway to College program this past semester at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus were honored during a luncheon May 20. Pictured are, from left, Sharod Williams, Dylan Silverthorne, Demetrick Shelvy, Rita Freeman, Amy Willis and Rickita Johnson. Also receiving a certificate of completion from the program was Jacob Barrett, who was not present for the luncheon. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

The [tweetable alt=””]Gateway to College involves students who have dropped out of high school or are at risk of doing so[/tweetable] because they have fallen behind in high school credits. Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds.

Students entering the program must read on an eighth-grade level and pass HCC’s placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

In brief addresses, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak lauded the merits of the program and this year’s graduates.

“Along the way, all of us needed help,” Muse said. “There’s not a person in this room that hasn’t in some way needed some help. They needed people who cared about them as individuals. They needed people who would listen to them.

“I’m pleased that these students have found a way, regardless of what life’s circumstances were and with the support of family, friends, teachers and others, to receive their high school diploma. The door of opportunity is open to you. Take advantage of that opportunity.”

“I’m just extremely proud for each one of these young men and women,” Moak said. “I hope to see them walking down the hallways in a college setting working on their associate degrees and then go on to four-year universities.”

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse addresses college officials, parents and others during a luncheon to recognize seven graduates of the Gateway to College program at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus this past semester. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse addresses college officials, parents and others during a luncheon to recognize seven graduates of the Gateway to College program at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus this past semester. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

The program debuted at Hinds in the 2013-14 term, at the Rankin Campus. It expanded to the Vicksburg-Warren Campus in 2015 and is directed by Denetra Taylor, who credited faculty and staff for guiding this year’s graduates.

“Gateway isn’t a fast-track program,” Taylor said. “Some of them can come in and finish in a semester or two, then for some it does take a little bit longer.

“This has been great group of students this semester. We’ve worked hard and been challenged.”

Seven graduates of the Gateway to College program this past semester at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus were honored during a luncheon May 20. Pictured are program staff, from left, Denetra Taylor, director, Nancy Robinson, administrative assistant, Tammi Sims, and Antonio Horton, both resource specialists. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

Seven graduates of the Gateway to College program this past semester at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus were honored during a luncheon May 20. Pictured are program staff, from left, Denetra Taylor, director, Nancy Robinson, administrative assistant, Tammi Sims, and Antonio Horton, both resource specialists. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

0 985 06 June, 2016 News more
Posted by on 22 March

Meeting on Gateway to College Program at Hinds CC set for March 29

The Gateway to College Program on the Vicksburg-Warren Campus will hold an Informational Meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 29 in the Annex Building, Room 23.

Students must be currently enrolled in the Vicksburg Warren School District, must be at least 16 years of age, behind in grade(s) or credits and want to obtain their high school diploma while earning college credits at the same time.

The Gateway to College program targets those in the school system who have dropped out or are at risk of doing so because they have fallen behind in high school credits. Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds.

Students entering the program must read on an eighth-grade level and pass a placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

For more information, contact Denetra Taylor, director of the program at the campus, at 601.629.6871 or Nancy Robinson, administrative assistant for the program, at 601.629.6875.

0 850 22 March, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Gateway to College provides path to passion for high school students
Posted by
05 June

Hinds CC Gateway to College provides path to passion for high school students

PEARL – Madison Nance smiled and celebrated with family and friends Thursday outside the Muse Center holding two symbols of pride and joy that came unexpectedly.

“What’s gotten me through is my child,” Nance said, as seven-month-old Cooper nibbled at the corner of his mother’s diploma from Northwest Rankin High School. “I wanted to succeed in life for him.”

Nance was among 27 high school students in Rankin County who received diplomas and earned college credit this past semester thanks to the Gateway to College program, which targets those in the school system who have dropped out or are at risk of doing so because they’ve fallen behind in their studies.

Madison Nance, center left, holds her son, Cooper, while Cooper holds his mother’s high school diploma following the Gateway to College graduation ceremony Thursday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Also pictured, from left, his father, Dillion Cooper, Jana Nance and Ken Nance.

Madison Nance, center left, holds her son, Cooper, while Cooper holds his mother’s high school diploma following the Gateway to College graduation ceremony Thursday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Also pictured, from left, his father, Dillion Cooper, Jana Nance and Ken Nance.

By her junior year, her algebra grades had put Nance on a fast track to summer school and possibly not graduating. A cousin had completed the program last year, which made Gateway a viable option, her mother, Jana, said.

Last November, program advisors took Nance to the hospital on a class day as Cooper came two weeks early. Support came from home and school when it came to keeping studies in line as she juggled motherhood and completing her education.

“She was worried she wouldn’t be able to complete algebra,” Jana Nance said. “I was encouraging her at home, but I’m mama. It’s something else when you’ve got ladies who say, ‘Oh, we know you can do this. You’ve just got to buckle down and study’.”

Nance ended up with 24 hours of college credits she’ll use toward her pursuit of a nursing degree.

“I’ve been adamant about nursing since ninth grade,” Nance said. “I want to work in a NICU, with babies.”

A ceremony marking this year’s Gateway graduates was keynoted by Kathy Smith, an English instructor at the Rankin Campus. Smith spoke on the importance of planning and setting goals.

“Nobody else in this world can make your dreams come true,” Smith said. “Your mama can’t, your daddy can’t, your boyfriend can’t, your girlfriend can’t. Are you willing to put in the planning, the time and the effort to make your dreams come true?”

You have just completed a major chapter in the book of your life that your are writing. But it’s not the end. Life is an endurance test. It’s for those who endure and put one foot in front of the other.”

Gateway began at Hinds in the 2012-13 academic term at the Rankin Campus and, this past term, expanded to the Vicksburg-Warren Campus. It functions as a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds and the two respective school districts.

Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled on at Hinds.

Students entering the program must read on an eighth-grade level and pass HCC’s placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

Gateway graduates included, front from left, Amanda Witherington, Northwest Rankin High School, 21 hours of college credits; Ashley Porter, Richland High School, 31 hours; Abbie Shanks, Richland High School, 32 hours; Savanah Kees, Florence High School, 16 hours; Chelsea Hughes, Brandon High School, 31 hours; Christina Hust, Northwest Rankin High School, 22 hours; Tiffany Rutland, Florence High School, 17 hours; Taylor Hollis, McLaurin High School, 17 hours; Logan Horton, Northwest Rankin High School, 21 hours; second row from left, Carley Huckeby, Northwest Rankin High School, 24 hours; Amber Flinta, Richland High School, 22 hours; Willesha Holloway, McLaurin High School, 41 hours; Mia Richards, Northwest Rankin High School, 26 hours; Meghan Shepherd, Florence High School, 21 hours; Ashley Edmondson, Brandon High School, 21 hours; Madison Nance, Northwest Rankin High School, 24 hours; Jacob Simpson Northwest Rankin High School, 17 hours; third row from left, Cheyanne Harper, McLaurin High School, 35 hours; Dylan Curtis, Brandon High School, 38 hours; Blake Blakeney, Brandon High School, 18 hours; Kirkland Ledbetter, Brandon High School, 13 hours; Jadland McCoy, Brandon High School, 28 hours; Jordan Young, Northwest Rankin High School, 22 hours; Sam Gabell, Brandon High School, 18 hours; not pictured, Jakavis Cavett, Brandon High School, seven hours; Deanna Thomas, Brandon High School, 20 hours; and Allyson Brennan, Brandon High School, 10 hours.

1 2044 05 June, 2015 News more
Posted by on 15 April

Hinds CC Gateway to College high school program turns interests into career paths

Colby Miller

Colby Miller

Michael Harris

Michael Harris

Colby Miller was losing interest in school and his grades reflected it, despite a zeal for all things tech. The same applied to Michael Harris, who yearned to emulate his father’s skills but just couldn’t make it happen in the classroom.

Each might have dropped out of school if not for a new program at Hinds Community College’s Vicksburg-Warren Campus that’s geared to keep students from giving up on their studies.

“In high school, I’d be lucky if I made a D in class, with all the students who are loud, talkative and don’t cooperate with the teacher. So, it’s hard to concentrate,” Miller said. “Here, you’re in classes with actual college students. They’re paying for it and they’re here to learn. And I’m making As, Bs and Cs.”

For Harris, it was test anxiety.

“I’d understand what the lessons were teaching, but when it came time for tests, I’d just get nervous,” he said.

The Gateway to College program targets those in the school system who have dropped out or are at risk of doing so because they have fallen behind in high school credits. Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students age 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds.

Students entering the program must read on an eighth-grade level and pass Hinds’ placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

Hinds began the program at the Rankin Campus in fall 2012 as the first Mississippi community college to become a part of the national Gateway to College network. In June 2014, the second full year, the Rankin program graduated 35 students.

“We were able to kick off the Vicksburg Gateway to College program this semester through great support from the Vicksburg Warren School District,” said Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak. “The principals and counselors were instrumental in helping us select the first group of Gateway participants. This program gives its students the opportunity to complete their high school education and receive college credit while doing that.”

Students who graduated from the Rankin program last year were able to earn an average of 22 college credits.

Moak says that is a big advantage. “These graduates will be able to seamlessly transition from high school to college. It is our hope that many of them will take advantage of our recently expanded career-technical programs for our campus,” he said.

Miller and Harris, both 19, are two of 28 students enrolled in the program this year, said Angela Davis, resource specialist for the program at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

“Students in the program are those where the high school environment just was not cutting it anymore,” Davis said.

Most often recommended are students who have trouble getting started in high school, said Program Director Denetra Taylor.

“We have the whole gamut,” Taylor said. “Right now, we’re looking at students who are maybe 17 and about to repeat the ninth grade for the third time.”

Kaylae Hartley

Kaylae Hartley

Kaylae Hartley, 18, said her grades have stabilized in the program after a rough start in high school.

“I made all As and Bs in elementary school, but when I got to junior high, I was slipping,” Hartley said.

She learned of the program through her high school counselor.

Harris and Miller say they already have future plans on what they want to do after they finish the Gateway to College program. Harris, also an expectant father, wants to learn the ins and outs of welding once his basic coursework is completed.

“My dad used to work at LeTourneau Technologies, so he’s pretty good at welding,” Harris said. “Last year, I took a welding class, but I just got to the grinding and torch-cutting part. It’s just something I think I could be interested in.”

Miller sees video games in his future, and not just playing them. “I want to go to a technical college for game development,” he said. “I want to create the characters and environments of video games.”

Without the Gateway to College program, their plans might just be pipe dreams.

For information about the program, contact Denetra Taylor at 601. 601.619.6881 for the Vicksburg-Warren Campus or Rebecca Tullos at 601.936.5580 for the Rankin Campus program.  Or see the Hinds website at http://www.hindscc.edu/programs-of-study/abe_ged/gateway-to-college/gateway-to-college#gsc.tab=0

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 1301 15 April, 2015 News more
Posted by on 11 July

Hinds CC Rankin Campus high school programs tap new directors

Valerie Barton

Valerie Barton

Rebecca Tullos

Rebecca Tullos

Current Hinds Community College employees Valerie Barton and Rebecca Tullos have changed positions at the Rankin Campus.

Barton, formerly the director of the Gateway to College program, is replacing Eric Smith as the director of the Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center on the Rankin Campus, the vocational center for high school students. Tullos, who was the resource specialist in the Gateway program, is replacing Barton as director.

Gateway to College, which began at Hinds in fall 2012, is a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds Community College and Rankin County and Pearl schools. The program enrolls high school students in danger of not graduating and allows them to finish high school at the college’s Rankin Campus while also earning college credits. At the Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center, high school students can take a variety of vocational courses and get a head start on preparing for a career or more post-secondary training.

“Valerie Barton brings much to the table as the new director for our secondary Career and Technical programs,” said Dr. Sue Powell, vice president for the Rankin Campus.

“Her background and education have prepared her well for the position. She demonstrated strong abilities for stimulating student success as the first Gateway to College director. I think she will continue ‘putting students first,’ which has been a tradition of the Pearl-Rankin Career Technical Center since its beginning in 1983.”

Barton was the founding director of the Gateway program in 2012. She has a Bachelor of Science in management and marketing from Union University, a master of education degree in guidance and counseling from Mississippi and is licensed as a K-12 administrator.

“I am thrilled to continue working with students from the Rankin County and Pearl school districts,” Barton said. “Hinds Community College offers opportunities for high school students to enroll in programs that, upon completion, allow students to easily transition into Career and Technical Education programs of study at the postsecondary level. It’s exciting to help prepare students to become productive citizens for tomorrow’s workforce.”

Tullos has an associate of arts degree from Hinds and a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education from Belhaven University.

“We are very fortunate that Rebecca Tullos has been working with the Gateway to College program for the past two years,” Powell said. “She knows the Gateway program and the characteristics of the students well. She also knows how to marshal the necessary resources and services the students need to help them successfully graduate with a high school diploma and college credit.”

Tullos has been with the Gateway program since 2012.

During the 20 years she taught middle school, “I developed a passion for helping students overcome external and academic challenges that were hindering their success,” she said.  “The nurturing, family-like support system that Gateway to College provides fosters a positive self-concept and attitude toward school. … .   I am looking forward to sharing much more success with my staff and students through this incredible partnership Hinds Community College has with the Rankin County and Pearl school districts.”

For more information about the Rankin Campus or either of the two high school programs, see the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu or http://www.hindscc.edu/Map_Locations/rn/default.aspx

1 3666 11 July, 2014 News more
Posted by on 05 June

Hinds CC Gateway to College offers second chance at high school

Annielyn Null_2256_web

Annielyn Null got not only a second chance to graduate from high school, she racked up 21 hours of college credit in the process.

Null was one of 31 Rankin County students who received high school diplomas from their home school through Hinds Community College’s Gateway to College program on June 3.

Last spring, for the first graduation ceremony, only five students graduated. Gateway to College, which began at Hinds in fall 2012, is a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds Community College and Rankin County and Pearl schools. The program enrolls high school students in danger of not graduating and allows them to finish high school at the college’s Rankin Campus while also earning college credits.

“Gateway to College changed my life,” said Null, whose diploma is from McLaurin High School.

She worked two jobs throughout high school, placing more importance there instead of on studying. She heard about Gateway to College and decided to apply.

“I saw myself falling off the deep end and Gateway to College wanted to change that,” she said. “The first week was the hardest but I soon realized I wasn’t alone in this. Everyone in the program was there for a reason, just like me. No one was judging anyone, and it was the nicest thing I’d ever seen.

“Every student accepted in Gateway has been given a second chance — a chance to prove everyone who has doubted them, wrong.  We have been given this chance to keep going and make something of ourselves,” she said.

Gateway graduates_2087_web

 

Gateway graduates include, front from left, Bianca Aguillar, Florence High, 13 hours of college credit; Taylor Shriver, Brandon High, 36 hours; Regan Clark, Brandon High, 36 hours; Caitlin Dempsey, Brandon High, seven hours; Harlie Jones, Brandon High, 19 hours; Emily Stevens, Richland High, six hours; Freda Washington, Brandon High, 30 hours; Gabrielle Whitesides, Northwest Rankin, 27 hours; Kaylie Teel, Northwest Rankin, 17 hours; middle row, Daniel Barber, Brandon High, 45 hours; Al Rawls, Brandon High, 25 hours; Kaitlyn Weeks, Brandon High, 21 hours; Ryan Greer, Northwest Rankin, 18 hours; Christen Harvey, McLaurin High, 42 hours; Bri’Chale Giles, Northwest Rankin, six hours; Nattilee Berch, Northwest Rankin High, 30 hours; Lori Copeland, Brandon High, 25 hours; Jacolybya Pittman, Northwest Rankin, 26 hours; Lan Le, Brandon High, 35 hours; back row, Taylor Jones, Northwest Rankin, 21 hours; Neely Gore, Northwest Rankin High, 17 hours; Parker Smith, Brandon High, 23 hours; Breanne Babbitt, Northwest Rankin High, 18 hours; Annielyn Null, McLaurin High, 21 hours; Austin Jenkins, Puckett Attendance Center, three hours and Larry Hackman, Brandon High, 45 hours.

For more information on Gateway to College see

http://www.hindscc.edu/gateway/GTC_FAQ.aspx

 

2 3855 05 June, 2014 News more
Posted by on 28 May

Hinds CC Gateway to College high school program plans graduation

 

Hinds Community College’s Gateway to College program will graduate 31 high school students in the second year of the program.

The ceremony is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, in the Lecture Hall of George Wynne Hall on the Hinds Community College Rankin Campus in Pearl.

Gateway to College, which began in fall 2012, is a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds Community College and Rankin County schools. The program enrolls high school students in danger of not graduating and allows them to finish high school at the college’s campus while also earning college credits.

Five students graduated in June 2013 at the first graduation ceremony.

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The speaker for this year’s ceremony is Eleanor Long of Florence, who is chair of the social sciences department at Hinds’ Rankin Campus.

For more about Gateway to College at Hinds Community College, see

http://www.hindscc.edu/gateway/GTC_FAQ.aspx

0 2545 28 May, 2014 News more
First ‘Gateway’ class graduates June 6
Posted by
30 May

First ‘Gateway’ class graduates June 6

Gateway to College LogoA graduation ceremony for high school students in Hinds Community College’s Gateway to College program is 9 a.m., Thursday, June 6 in the Lecture Hall of George Wynne Hall on the Rankin Campus in Pearl.Gateway to College, which began in fall 2012, is a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds Community College and Rankin County schools. The program enrolls high school students in danger of not graduating and allows them to finish high school at the college’s campus while also earning college credits.”We are thrilled to have five graduates of the Gateway to College program in its first year. Every student who graduates from this program receiving their high school diploma is a success story,” said Valerie Barton, Gateway to College director. “Not only do these students have their high school diploma, each of them also has college credit hours they have earned in the process.

“This joint effort between Hinds Community College and Rankin County School District is helping students who were once considered as ‘at risk’ to become productive citizens of our community,” she said.

Two of the students who are graduating are from Brandon High School and three are from Northwest Rankin High School.

“Our District is pleased with the results of our first-year partnership with Hinds’ Gateway to College program. The opportunity for students to complete high school and begin their college education at the same time is a great encouragement for these students,” said Rankin County school district Superintendent Dr. Lynn Weathersby, a member of Hinds Community College’s Board of Trustees.

The program has 85 enrolled for fall but is still taking applications throughout the summer, Barton said.

For more information, contact Barton at 601.936.5580 or at Valerie.barton@hindscc.edu or see the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu/gateway.

0 1855 30 May, 2013 News more