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Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC
Posted by
09 June

Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC

RAYMOND – A person’s inner dialogue can be helpful or hurtful, depending on what that little voice inside says.

It was a strong enough message to lead off this summer’s leadership summit for students involved in the Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds Community College.

Adonis Lenzy, of Paradigm Shift, speaks to high school students and others at an M2M Leadership Summit June 5 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Adonis Lenzy, of Paradigm Shift, speaks to high school students and others at an M2M Leadership Summit June 5 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“No matter what people say to you, it’s what you say to yourself that really matters,” said Adonis Lenzy of Paradigm Shift as the group helped kick off a two-day series of programs and exercises for M2M members and mentors June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. The Oklahoma-based nonprofit connects ministers and other volunteers with poor communities to foster economic and social change.

“There’s nothing wrong with looking at yourself in the mirror and saying ‘You can’,” Lenzy said.

Joining Lenzy for the summit was minister Heady Coleman and community leaders Ryan Eller, Derrick Sier and Mikey Manghum to present programs on various team-building exercises, such as setting goals, time management, copying practices seen in successful people, and changing up routines to prevent life from becoming stale. Lenzy likened that to releasing a caged bear into the woods, only to have the bear still be stuck in a cage in its mind.

“We’ve got to be bigger than a routine,” he said. “You’ve got to make sure you steer clear of any ruts.”

High school students who attended the summit wrote down short- and long-term goals on sticky notes to foster active communication, said M2M Director Aleisha Escobedo.

Wingfield High School students Paul James Curry, a junior, Dequavious Guice, a senior and James Stubb, a junior, attended the M2M Leadership Summit held June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Wingfield High School students Paul James Curry, a junior,
Dequavious Guice, a senior and
James Stubb, a junior, attended the M2M Leadership Summit held June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus.
(Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“This summit provided an opportunity for our students to engage with their peers and serve as active leaders and forward thinkers,” Escobedo said. “I especially loved that Paradigm Shift challenged our students to focus on attainable goals and helped them to recognize that having strong social and community support will foster success.”

Becoming a success in life often involves the answer to a key question of those whom students see as successful, Lenzy said.

“The number one question you need to ask them is, if you can get in their circle, what was it like for you before you became successful?” he said. “That’s the story you’ll want to hear about.”

The M2M program is based at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. For more information, call 601.987.8129 or visit www.hindscc.edu/go/M2M.

Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC
Front row, from left, April Reynolds, M2M English instructional guide, Aleisha Escobedo, M2M Director, Derrick Sier, Adonis Lenzy, both of Paradigm Shift, Robert Smith, M2M Academic Success coach, Felicia Garner, M2M administrative assistant; back row, from left, Keith Williams, M2M Academic Success coach, Ryan Eller, Mikey Manghum, Gregory “Heady” Coleman, all of Paradigm Shift, Ahmad Smith, M2M Recruitment and Outreach coordinator (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Front row, from left, April Reynolds, M2M English instructional guide, Aleisha Escobedo, M2M Director, Derrick Sier, Adonis Lenzy, both of Paradigm Shift, Robert Smith, M2M Academic Success coach, Felicia Garner, M2M administrative assistant; back row, from left, Keith Williams, M2M Academic Success coach, Ryan Eller, Mikey Manghum, Gregory “Heady” Coleman, all of Paradigm Shift, Ahmad Smith, M2M Recruitment and Outreach coordinator (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

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Retiring Hinds CC Vice President Woods: ‘It has been a great ride’
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15 June

Retiring Hinds CC Vice President Woods: ‘It has been a great ride’

After a long career in fostering economic development in Mississippi, especially through his work at Hinds Community College, Vice President Dr. John Woods of Clinton is retiring on June 30.

“It has been a wonderful opportunity to be a member of this college’s family,” said Woods, vice president for Economic Development and Training.

Dr. John Woods is speaking at a April 19 Mississippi River Transportation, Distribution and Logistic Consortium meeting held at Eagle Ridge Conference Center.

Dr. John Woods is speaking at a April 19 Mississippi River Transportation, Distribution and Logistic Consortium meeting held at Eagle Ridge Conference Center.

Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development, will assume Woods’ duties. Stocks also leads all workforce training, career-technical education and adult education efforts.

“In the early years of our workforce division, Dr. Woods brought a level of workforce knowledge and expertise to the college that helped to established Hinds as an institution that understood the needs of business and industry. His contribution to the successful opening of the Nissan plant in Canton, and more recently the Mississippi River Consortium in Vicksburg, are among the largest projects that he directed,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse.

Woods arrived at Hinds in 1991 but even before that he worked with the college’s workforce efforts when he was employed at Mississippi State University. He retires with 34 years of total service to the State of Mississippi and is the longest serving workforce specialist currently in the state.

“We will definitely miss his leadership. It has been a great experience to work for him and with him while at Hinds,” said Jim Harper, director of the Small Business Development Center.

Woods is also the longest serving vice president of Economic Development and Training at the college and overseer of Eagle Ridge Conference Center, still a cornerstone meeting facility in the state.

“Dr. Woods has been a great asset to our division at Hinds,” said Peggy Lofton, director of Eagle Ridge Conference Center. “He has always been very supportive of what we do to make our business run smoothly. He has truly taught me to be a better leader, and for that I am thankful.”

Under Woods’ leadership, the Eagle Ridge Conference Center has been a centerpiece for some of the college’s most important efforts and most prestigious events. The facility has drawn national organizations and state leaders to its doors because of its unique setting and capable staff.

The Professional Development Institute (PDI) is another important aspect of Woods’ division. That program is the in-house foundation for training Hinds employees and provides a wide array of personal and work-related programs. In addition, his division oversees the awarding of continuing education certificates (CEUs) for local school districts and other professional organizations.

Among his colleagues, Woods is recognized as a prolific writer and avid outdoorsman. Visitors to his Eagle Ridge office have been able to see an eclectic assortment of memorabilia that reflects his diverse interests and talents.

Among his recent accomplishments are the refurbishment of the Eagle Ridge Challenge Course and the institution of the River Barge Deckhand Training project in Vicksburg.web_John Woods

“Along the way there were many successes, some failures, a few revelations and disappointments. It has been a great ride,” Woods said.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Gov. Bryant speaks on leadership qualities at leadership conference at Hinds CC
Posted by
15 April

Gov. Bryant speaks on leadership qualities at leadership conference at Hinds CC

A packed luncheon hall of student leaders Thursday, April 14 from Mississippi’s 15 community colleges was a perfect venue from the state’s top leader – and community college grad – to address the topic of leadership.

“I think leaders are very credible,” Bryant told the 2016 Mississippi Community College Student Leadership Conference during a keynote address to the annual session, held this year at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. “The leaders I have met always have been. It’s impossible for you to be a leader if you do not have a positive attitude about life.”

Gov. Phil Bryant speaks Thursday at the 2016 Mississippi Community College Student Leadership Conference. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Gov. Phil Bryant speaks Thursday at the 2016 Mississippi Community College Student Leadership Conference. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Bryant, a 1975 graduate of Hinds, addressed a conference themed “Guiding the way into the 21st Century.” Study sessions amongst student leaders attending this year’s conference, many of them members of each college’s student government associations, included education in the future, organizational change management, strategic philanthropy, and encouraging student involvement on campus, among other topics.

The second-term governor spoke of recent economic and workforce development projects in the state, including Yokohama Tire Corp., which opened plant in West Point in 2015, and Continental Tire, which plans to complete a $1.45 billion facility in western Hinds County in 2019.

He also mentioned the kinds of skills current student leaders need to become leaders after they graduate.

“Life is full of difficulties for leaders,” he said. “You have to have that faith you can do remarkable things. But, remarkable things come with tough decisions. I will tell you, leaders, that you will have to make difficult decisions that a lot of people will not like.

“If you’re going to be a leaders, you’ve got to understand the pioneers take the arrows. The guys out front are going to be the point of the spear. You’ve got to take criticism, because nothing gets done without other people being critics.”

Student leaders said they’re already applying their own experiences in top roles on campus to what they want to do in their chosen area of study.

Kadaymen Johnson, of Florence, district president of Hinds’ Associated Student Government and president of the organization for the Rankin Campus, applauds during the 2016 Mississippi Community College Student Leadership Conference. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Kadaymen Johnson, of Florence, district president of Hinds’ Associated Student Government and president of the organization for the Rankin Campus, applauds during the 2016 Mississippi Community College Student Leadership Conference. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“The speech was very inspirational to me, for how I can change of the minds of my peers and the minds of people older than me,” said Kadaymen Johnson, of Florence, district president of Hinds’ Associated Student Government and president of the organization for the Rankin Campus. Johnson is an Exercise Science major and aspires to be a personal trainer and own his own business.

“It reminds me I can do different things that make this world and country we live in a whole lot better,” he said. “Opportunities presented to me, I have to take advantage of them.”

Taylor Pace, of Vicksburg, president programs for Associated Student Government and president of Alpha Omega Chi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus, listens to a speaker at the 2016 Mississippi Community College Student Leadership Conference. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Taylor Pace, of Vicksburg, president programs for Associated Student Government and president of Alpha Omega Chi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus, listens to a speaker at the 2016 Mississippi Community College Student Leadership Conference. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Taylor Pace, of Vicksburg, plans to major in criminal justice at Delta State University after his leadership days at Hinds are over.

“I really think he made a good impact on the leaders in the room here today,” said Pace, president of programs for Associated Student Government and president of Alpha Omega Chi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

“He spoke to how Mississippi how it’s grown from what it used to be, in that companies who are choosing between other countries to put in a business and they choose Mississippi over other countries and other states. That’s saying something. It’s very impressive.”

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Posted by on 29 September

Valley Services wins Hinds CC Alumni Service Award

It’s possible to change with the times and be a model of consistency – so says the leadership team that runs Valley Services, the Mississippi-based company that feeds students and faculty at Hinds’ cafeterias but also caters many of the college’s special events.

This year’s Alumni Service Award recipient plans to keep delivering champion service to the college, based on a commitment that dates to 1971. This is the first time Hinds has named a company, instead of an individual, as the recipient.

“It’s an honor for Valley Services to receive this award,” CEO Jim Walt said. “We’re certainly humbled.”

The most recent event Valley Services catered was the Winter-Reed Partnership Award ceremony that honored Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. Valley Services was the title sponsor, also announcing a new Hinds scholarship to be given to a member of Hinds Connection, the student public relations and recruiting group that helps facilitate many Hinds events catered by Valley.

Jim Walt, CEO of Valley Services, left, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, center, and George Ardelean, Valley Services' executive vice president for dining and health services, stand during a break at the Winter-Reed Partnership Award ceremony. Valley catered the event Sept. 1 that honored Dr. Muse.

Jim Walt, CEO of Valley Services, left, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, center, and George Ardelean, Valley Services’ executive vice president for dining and health services, stand during a break at the Winter-Reed Partnership Award ceremony. Valley catered the event Sept. 1 that honored Dr. Muse.

“We’ve had the distinct pleasure of working with the exemplary students in Hinds Connection at many events,” Walt said. “Valley, in support of Dr. Muse’s educational vision, each year will recognize a student of the Hinds Connection for the annual scholarship.”

Founded in 1960 by the late Bill Hogg, the company is the sixth-largest contract food service company in the U.S. and the single-biggest contractor that specializes in meals for seniors. It has been the contract food products provider for Hinds since 1971. Valley provides food products at nine other community colleges in the state, but its contract with Hinds is the longest-held in the education sector.

“We try to keep food to the students’ liking, and that means fresh,” said George Ardelean, the company’s executive vice president for dining and health services and chair of Hinds’ Golf Fun Fest. “Freshness is a big part of it, and it’s where the momentum has shifted in the industry.”

A commitment to keeping only the freshest romaine lettuce in the salad bar and catfish worthy of a Mississippian’s lunch plate began with the founder’s friendship with Muse.

“Dr. Muse had a business relationship with Bill for many, many years and were friends,” Walt said. “It’s been a very long and tenured relationship with the college.”

Valley’s service to Hinds extends beyond student and employee cafeterias at the Raymond and Utica campuses. The company’s products grace tables at the Eagle’s Nest Grille and at Eagle Ridge Conference Center.

The company also caters for fundraisers and other functions at the college. That includes being the title sponsor of the golf fest and Employee Appreciation Day, both annual events, providing breakfast monthly for President’s Cabinet meetings and donating food for many other Hinds events as well as state-level events Hinds participates in. In the community, Valley sponsors fundraising breakfasts for local Boy Scout troops.

Staying ahead of market trends is simply standard practice for Valley.

“Each year, we evaluate our program to keep up with trends in our industry,” Walt said. “We’ve made changes through the years to keep up with the different taste preferences of students, faculty and guests.”

Valley maintains a Hinds presence with administrative office space and Vince Randazzo as the manager and has a distribution center in Flowood.

Vice President for Advancement Jackie Granberry, who oversees all district-wide special events for the college, can testify to the company’s standard of service.

“I depend on Valley quite a bit, and they have never let me down,” Granberry said. “Whether it is a very dignified dinner for a few at the president’s home, a dinner for 500, a reception for dignitaries or anything in between, they always provide the best service and the best food.”

The company views technological or logistical changes in the industry as chances to keep serving up good service.

“It’s such a well-oiled machine, so I think there’s been a consistency that we’ve been able to maintain from a culinary feature,” Ardelean said. “We’ve had at least two recent executive chefs come from the (Hinds) culinary program. It’s been a good flow, and it’s indicative of the management staff we have.”

Walt reminds that it all started with Hogg, who died in 2008. He started the business by selling foods to grocery stores out of his pickup truck. It’s a simplicity and consistency that still resonates with the current chief.

“The company, along with Bill Hogg if he was still alive, feels it’s a great honor for our organization,” he said. “A lot of hard work and dedication by a lot of different people through the years went into this.”

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GED graduates credit persistence after ceremony Friday at Hinds CC
Posted by
16 June

GED graduates credit persistence after ceremony Friday at Hinds CC

RAYMOND – Fay Lundy was an honors student in high school but she knew nothing about the real world.

That was more than 50 years ago. Between then and now, her education had been in the workplace, but she also felt something was missing.

“I didn’t need school then, because I knew it all,” Lundy said. “But, after a while I realized what I didn’t know. But, by then, I was married and had kids.”

Lundy was among 16 people of varying ages who were recognized during a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus for achieving their General Education Development certificate this academic term.

Being the oldest person in the group didn’t faze the 68-year-old Bolton resident and grandmother of eight who worked in convenience stores, big-box retailers and restaurants as she raised a family.

“I keep telling my grandchildren, ‘Grandma worked hard but didn’t make any money because she didn’t have an education.’”

Thomas Ealey, center, celebrates his earning a General Education Development certificate following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. Also pictured are his daughter, McKenzie, and Dianna Jones, McKenzie’s mother.

Thomas Ealey, center, celebrates his earning a General Education Development certificate following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. Also pictured are his daughter, McKenzie, and Dianna Jones, McKenzie’s mother.

Thomas Brandon Ealey, 30, one of three honors students among those recognized and among four GED recipients who received $500 from the Education Pays program, hopes to learn those lessons early. He works retail in Flowood these days and has his sights set higher after years of making “a lot of bad decisions.”

“My motivation is my three children, nieces and nephews and the people around me,” Ealey said. “I’m really contemplating law school.”

Thomas Brandon Ealey, right, lends a helping hand to Fay Lundy, left, as they make their way into Eagle Ridge Conference Center on Friday for a ceremony to recognize those who received General Education Development certificates this academic term. following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus.

Thomas Brandon Ealey, right, lends a helping hand to Fay Lundy, left, as they make their way into Eagle Ridge Conference Center on Friday for a ceremony to recognize those who received General Education Development certificates this academic term. following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus.

Hinds student and noted fashion and costume designer Nina Ghaffari spoke to this year’s recipients on a message of not giving up despite background and circumstances. Ghaffari, 34, a sociology and human rights major at the Jackson Campus – Academic/Technical Center, was born in Mississippi and received a GED in 1998 from Hinds but was taken to live in her father’s native Iran for 12 years before finding her way back to the United States.

Nina Ghaffari, guest speaker at Friday’s ceremony to recognize those who received a General Education Development certificate this academic term, receives a plaque from Carla Causey, district director of Adult Education at Hinds Community College.

Nina Ghaffari, guest speaker at Friday’s ceremony to recognize those who received a General Education Development certificate this academic term, receives a plaque from Carla Causey, district director of Adult Education at Hinds Community College.

“Risks are all about uncertainty and building a more confident you,” Ghaffari said. “If we take risks on a daily basis, we become confident to take bigger risks. Life is too short to live small.”

Recipients of GED certificates and their stated hometowns included:

  • Lela Bryant, of Flora
  • Ashley Byrd, of Jackson
  • Angela Constancio, of Vicksburg
  • Thomas Brandon Ealey, of Jackson
  • Amber Hohlt, of Jackson
  • Jared Landry, of Clinton
  • Fay Lundy, of Bolton
  • Charles Leager III, of Byram
  • William Liggins, of Vicksburg
  • Malcolm Mobley, of Clinton
  • Tanu Narula, of Clinton
  • Andrew Robinson, of Vicksburg
  • Jessica Roberts, of Vicksburg
  • Curtis West, of Clinton
  • Tauras Williams, of Clinton
  • Victoria Williams, of Clinton

Ealey, Landry and Mobley were Honor Students, with Ealey, Bryant, Byrd and Liggins also recipients of $500 scholarships from the Education Pays program. Begun in 2009, the program is a partnership between Hinds and the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation and awards checks to all Hinds CC Warren GED recipients over the age of 21.

Mobley received a $500 scholarship from Hinds’ Adult Education Advisory Committee.

Hinds offers a tuition free class to all first time college students who are admitted with a GED. The college also offers a $1,000 academic scholarship that is equivalent to the ACT Scholarship for high scoring GED achievers. For more information, visit www.hindscc.edu.

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