http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC announces speakers for spring graduation ceremonies

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Hinds CC announces speakers for spring graduation ceremonies
Posted by
18 April

Hinds CC announces speakers for spring graduation ceremonies

RAYMOND – Hinds Community College will have four graduation ceremonies for spring 2017, starting with three on Friday, May 12 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus, at 8 a.m., 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. The fourth is 2 p.m. Sunday, May 14 at the Utica Campus, inside J.D. Boyd Gymnasium.

More than 1,000 students are expected to graduate over the two days. Brenda Castleberry, director of education at Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, will speak to nursing and allied health graduates at the first ceremony May 12. State Sen. Briggs Hopson III, of Vicksburg, will speak to half the academic and career-technical graduates at 11 a.m. Former state school superintendent Dr. Tom Burnham will speak to the balance of the academic and career-technical graduates at 3 p.m. Dr. William Bynum Jr., president of Mississippi Valley State University, will speak to graduates in Utica on May 14.

Brenda Castleberry

Brenda Castleberry

Castleberry has served her current role at Baptist for 17 years and has worked at the facility for 50 years altogether. She earned a Diploma Degree in Nursing from the Gilfoy School of Nursing in 1963 and worked in a variety of positions in multiple hospitals for more than a decade before returning to school. Her career at Baptist began in 1965 as a charge nurse and became a head nurse in the coronary care unit within five years. Prior to her current position, she served as clinical nursing director. She holds an Associate of Arts degree from Hinds and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from Mississippi College. Her master’s degree in nursing is from the University of Mississippi School of Nursing.

She is a past president of the Mississippi Organization of Nurse Executives and Nurse Managers and for more than 40 years has helped coordinate the Mississippi Student Nurse Externship program. She received the State Nightingale Nursing Excellence Awards as a Mentor of the Year and Hall of Fame. She attends Morrison Heights Baptist Church in Clinton.

State Sen. Briggs Hopson III

State Sen. Briggs Hopson III

Hopson represents District 23 in the Mississippi State Senate, covering Warren, Issaquena and Yazoo counties. First elected in 2007, he chairs the Energy Committee and is vice chair of the Appropriations Committee. He also sits on the Education, Judiciary A, Public Health, Tourism, Accountability, Efficiency and Transparency, Environmental Protection, Conservation and Water Resources, and Universities and Colleges committees in the chamber.

He is president of The Mississippi Bar and is also a member of the Louisiana State Bar Association, the International Association of Defense Counsel and the Southeastern Admiralty Law Institute. He holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree and Juris Doctor degree from the University of Mississippi. A partner in the Vicksburg law firm of Teller, Hassell & Hopson LLP, he holds a peer-review rated “AV Preeminent” Martindale-Hubbell lawyer rating agency. He is a past chairman of the United Way Board of Directors and Good Shepherd Community Center, and has served in several roles for the American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, Mission Mississippi and the Mississippi River Trail, among other organizations.

Dr. Tom Burnham

Dr. Tom Burnham

Burnham, of Oxford, serves currently as interim director of the Mississippi Principal Corps. Prior to that, he served a second tenure as state school superintendent of education from 2010 to 2012. The Puckett native had first held the position from 1992 to 1997. Prior to serving as state superintendent of education the second time, he served as dean of the School of Education at the University of Mississippi from 2004-2009. He has served as superintendent of Henderson County Public Schools, in North Carolina, and of Biloxi Public Schools.

He is a past member of several state and national education organizations, including the Council of State School Officers, the American Association of School Administrators, the Association of Curriculum Development and Supervision and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, among others. In 2015, he was recognized as Alumnus of the Year at Hinds. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and a master’s degree in School Administration from Mississippi College and a doctorate in Curriculum and Instruction from Delta State University.

Dr. William Bynum

Dr. William Bynum

Bynum was named president of MVSU in 2013. Prior to his appointment, he was vice president for Enrollment Management & Student Services at Morehouse College, in Atlanta, for four years, vice president in a similar role at Lincoln University, in Pennsylvania, for nine years, and associate vice president and dean of students at Clark Atlanta University for seven years. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology at Davidson College, in North Carolina, and was later certified to teach Social Studies and Mathematics and North Carolina and Georgia. His master’s and doctorate degrees in Sociology were earned at Duke University.

A Rocky Mount, N.C. native, Bynum has served as a Covington Distinguished Professor of Sociology in his research and teaching career, which has included positions at Georgia Tech, Duke University and Durham and Edgecombe community colleges. His publications include a co-authored article with colleagues at Duke in the sociological journal Social Forces and a chapter in the book “Exploring the African American Experience.” His career in education began as a teacher, football and wrestling coach in Rocky Mount, N.C. and DeKalb County, Ga.

Hinds CC announces speakers for spring graduation ceremonies
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Reluctant Hinds CC scholar makes education a life’s work
Posted by
29 September

Reluctant Hinds CC scholar makes education a life’s work

Dr. Tom Burnham in the McLendon Library on the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College. Hinds Community College will honor Alumnus of the Year Dr. Tom Burnham of Oxford; Alumni Service Award recipient Valley Services Inc., headquartered in Flowood, and Sports Hall of Fame Inductees Linda Alford of Jackson, the late Johnny Bishop of Pelahatchie, Morris Currie of Bolton, Rob Fyke of Starkville and Jackson native Paul Jamison at the Oct. 15 Alumni Recognition Dinner. The reception is 4:30 p.m. with the dinner to begin at 5 p.m. at Mayo Gymnasium on the Raymond Campus. For information on purchasing tickets call 601.857.3363.

Dr. Tom Burnham in the McLendon Library on the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College. Hinds Community College will honor Alumnus of the Year Dr. Tom Burnham of Oxford; Alumni Service Award recipient Valley Services Inc., headquartered in Flowood, and Sports Hall of Fame Inductees Linda Alford of Jackson, the late Johnny Bishop of Pelahatchie, Morris Currie of Bolton, Rob Fyke of Starkville and Jackson native Paul Jamison at the Oct. 15 Alumni Recognition Dinner. The reception is 4:30 p.m. with the dinner to begin at 5 p.m. at Mayo Gymnasium on the Raymond Campus. For information on purchasing tickets call 601.857.3363.

Note: This story is from the fall 2015 Hindsight alumni magazine. To become a member of the Alumni Association, click here.

Dr. Tom Burnham’s higher education career at Hinds Junior College got off to a rough start.

A scared young kid from rural Rankin County without a lot of real-world experience, Burnham (1967) didn’t object to the idea of a college education — it was being away from home in an unfamiliar environment that troubled him.

But Burnham, the 2015 Alumnus of the Year, not only finished his education at Hinds, he continued at Mississippi College where he received bachelor and master’s degrees and Delta State University where he earned a specialist degree and a doctorate. And, in a twist of irony considering his reluctance, his entire career has been spent in the field of education.

He is now the director of the Principal Corps based at the University of Mississippi where he recruits great teachers to become public school principals and visionary leaders.  Among his many other jobs, he has been dean of the College of Education at the University of Mississippi, 2004-2009, and state superintendent of education twice, 1992-1997 and 2010-2012, crafting education policy for the state’s more than 500,000 public school children.

Early in his own educational career, such possibilities didn’t occur to him. He came from Puckett, in rural east Rankin County, and was the first person in his family to attend college. It was a priority for his dad, Paul Burnham, who worked shift work at Marquette Cement in Brandon and had farm land.

“My dad brought me over here and dropped me off in the circle. When he dropped me off, he gave me $5. And he said, ‘Son, you better spend this carefully because I don’t know when there will be any more,’ ” he recalled.

About two weeks later, in the days when hitchhiking was safe, he caught a ride back home to Puckett. He thought he was home to stay but his dad had other ideas. About the time Burnham made it home, his dad was getting up to work the midnight shift.

“He was livid,” Burnham said, chuckling. “And he put me in the car and drove me back over here. And then went to work that night.

“My dad later joked with me, ‘You know, when I took you back to Hinds, I didn’t know you were going to go to school the rest of your life.’ It was always amusing to him that he had to bring me back to Hinds, and then I just wouldn’t stop going to school,” Burnham said.

Coming to Hinds, though, was “a logical decision. I came out of a small high school. I didn’t know very much. I think I had been on one university campus my entire elementary and high school experience. And it was also the economics of it.”

Burnham lived in Shangri-la and Central dormitories, spending his mornings in class and his afternoons either participating in intramurals or working at a Standard Oil station.  He continued on at Mississippi College with a business administration major but also took as many of the history courses he loved as he could. When he finished, he was advised to student teach in social sciences even though he didn’t have a lot of education courses.

“My plan was to go to work with Standard Oil when I finished, but I just fell in love with teaching,” he said. “After doing student teaching I was pretty much comfortable that was what I wanted to do. I never thought about doing anything else.”

His first job was teaching history at Pearl High School, and his career continued from there, until he eventually became a local principal and superintendent.

A defining moment in his life, however, was about three weeks after he finished his doctorate at Delta State University in 1985. His son, Tom, just shy of 10 years old, was killed in Rankin County when he walked in front of a car.

It took him years to come to terms with his son’s death, ultimately using it to fuel his passion for doing the right thing for children. “The only thing I could do at this point was to make things better for all children, to create a legacy for Tom through what I could do for children. I survived that period by just working to the point of sheer exhaustion,” he said.

Now at the Principal Corps, he tries to take what he’s learned over the years about leadership and education and pass that on to aspiring young school administrators, continuing to mentor them after they are Principal Corps graduates.

He was a mentor for Dr. Norman Session, former Pisgah High School principal who became vice president for the Rankin Campus and Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center on July 1.

“The first time I met Dr. Burnham he was state superintendent, and I attended a state Board of Education meeting. We became close during an 18-month training at Ole Miss. After the training he was assigned to me as my personal mentor, but he was advising me long before that,” Session said. “Dr. Burnham is one of my mentors, and I consider him a friend. He is very knowledgeable about education issues and just about life in general. He is a very strong leader and a mentor to many.”

Burnham is married to Terri, who has also had a life-long career in education. His sister, Cathy Allen, is a retired Rankin County teacher, his daughter, Cassondra Vanderford (1989) married to Craig Vanderford (1990), is now assistant principal at Brandon High School. One of his two grandsons attended Hinds. Both Brett and Ty are now Ole Miss students.

 

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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