http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC academic, technical graduates thrived upon return to school

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Hinds CC academic, technical graduates thrived upon return to school
Posted by
18 December

Hinds CC academic, technical graduates thrived upon return to school

PEARL – Justice Munn is a third-generation member of his family’s business, Munn Enterprises, but found himself at a crossroads just a year ago in his young, adult life.

His skills as a mechanic were being tested mightily by the evolving technology of today’s diesel engines. “You can’t even diagnose today’s engines without a computer,” Munn said.

Justice Munn (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’m a mechanic and I wanted to return to school for better pay and a chance to open my own shop,” said Munn, of Sumrall, as he prepared to earn career and technical certificates from Hinds Community College during graduation ceremonies held Dec. 15 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Being in the Diesel Equipment Technology program helped him hone his skills and opened doors to earning further credentials down the road – all the while setting him up to earn more money now.

“I enjoyed it at Hinds,” he said. “I would do it again in a heartbeat.”

Hinds Community College graduated more than 1,000 students in the three ceremonies.

“The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life. And, while the graduates who sit upon this stage today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life and to contribute to the communities in which we live,” said Hinds president Dr. Clyde Muse in his address to graduates.

Student diplomas this year included a gold seal celebrating the college’s 100th anniversary.

Among the graduates, 129 achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 74 achieved magna cum laude, a 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 21 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Lychanda Brown, left, and Jennifer Burnett (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

The spirit of achievement also reached Hinds faculty who returned to the classroom to build skills.

“In cosmetology, we have to market ourselves anyway,” said Lychanda Brown, of Raymond, an instructor of Cosmetology at the Utica Campus. Brown earned an Associate of Applied Science in marketing, as well as career and technical certificates.

For Jennifer Burnett, a custodian on the Utica Campus, it was a chance to get into computer programming, in which she earned a career certificate. “It was time to move on up,” Burnett said.

Speaking to academic and career and technical education graduates was Joy Rhoads, a history and geography instructor at the Rankin Campus and coordinator of the campus’ Honors Institute.

Rhoads told graduates to be open to all the challenges life might bring after graduation, using her own experience as a master’s student as an example.

“I realized, very quickly, that being Joy the student was a vastly different experience than being Ms. Rhoads the instructor,” Rhoads said. “Discerning how to effectively balance my family, my job, and my schoolwork was another challenge to an already challenging degree path. It truly was an epiphany – my light bulb moment – when I understood that all my students face many of these very things and more. So, when you are navigating what comes next, be open to being humbled.”

From left, Ashlyn Cole, Tomaz Buckley and Crisanthony Frazier, all of whom earned degrees Dec. 15 with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing program (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

LaKendra Cork, right, of Louise, prepares for graduation ceremonies Dec. 15 at Hinds Community College. Cork earned an Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Education Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left, Meagan Frey and Tia Fortenberry,
both of whom completed the Paralegal Technology program (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jonathan Graham was among more than 1,000 who graduated Dec. 15 from Hinds Community College. Graham earned an Associate of Applied Science degree and was part of the M2M program at Hinds. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left, Jason Holman, Taylor Houston and Cortland Hay, all of whom earned credentials after completing computer technology programs at the college (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Bethany C. Johnson, center, of Vicksburg, was among more than 1,000 who graduated from Hinds Community College in ceremonies held Dec. 15. She earned an Associate of Arts degree in Veterinary Technology. With her, from left, is her boyfriend Douglas Vice, her sister Ashley Johnson, her mother Beverly Johnson, her brother-in-law Richard Berryman, her father Jimmy Johnson and sister Jamie Johnson. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left, Madison Spell, of Raymond, and Martha McPhail, of Kosciusko (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, Rico West and Richard Newell, both of Jackson and earned credentials in Welding Technology (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left, Secrett Winters and Denitta White, both of Jackson and earned degrees in Business Technology (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

0 344 18 December, 2017 News more
Grandmother’s pursuit of passion highlights Hinds CC fall graduation
Posted by
08 December

Grandmother’s pursuit of passion highlights Hinds CC fall graduation

JACKSON – Kneedra Bell grew up watching TV’s original food personality, Julia Child, explain the finer points of cooking and saw herself in the down-to-earth, sometimes mistake-prone host of “The French Chef.”

Kneedra Bell, of Clinton, a culinary arts student at Hinds Community College, moves some marinated shrimp from one pan to another during the third annual Fall FEASTival at Township at Colony Park in Ridgeland on Oct. 26, 2017. Teams of Hinds culinary students from the Jackson Campus competed against each other at the event, which was presented by the Partnership for a Healthy Mississippi. (Hinds Community College/Danny Barrett Jr.)

“Watching Julia made me feel good about mistakes because that taught viewers like me that it was OK to make a mistake,” Bell said. “She showed us that mistakes can teach us to do it better or correctly the next time we try.”

Bell, 51, who was born in Edwards and grew up in Los Angeles where her family moved, later attended college in California and majored in chemical engineering, which at the time she viewed as an adequate career path for a single, unwed mother who needed to support an infant daughter. “But, engineering was not my passion – cooking was, which made it easier for me to simply chose to stop going to college and work full-time to support my family. I promised I would “one day” return to college to complete my college education.”

Nearly 30 years, two marriages and five grandchildren later, she’s about to make good on that promise. On Dec. 15, she joins more than 1,000 other students who will earn their credentials from Hinds Community College in three ceremonies at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

In addition to the Associate of Applied Science degree and career and technical certificates she’ll have, she will have also earned the respect of peers and instructors on many fronts. She’s worked five days a week as a bus driver for the Clinton Public School District while attending classes and study groups at Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

“She is the first to arrive, last to leave and is completely giving of herself, her time, and her talents,” said Chef Austin Lee, director of the Culinary Arts Institute at Hinds. “And she is more interested in the team crossing the finish line than making it herself.”

For Bell, it’s a team that includes her “culinary family” of classmates in the kitchen, her “student-children” on her bus each morning and, of course, her own three children and five grandchildren.

“Being a single mom made juggling my job, school and my home life a demanding challenge,” she said. “My schoolwork became my social life. I established a committed relationship with my books. I had a date-night seven nights a week with my homework. I embraced the struggle of my doing my homework in tandem with helping my children with their homework.

“Hinds Community College will always be a historic landmark in my heart that marks a successful chapter in my life’s journey.”

0 404 08 December, 2017 News more
Hinds CC partnership with industry plays key role in state’s first apprenticeship registry
Posted by
02 November

Hinds CC partnership with industry plays key role in state’s first apprenticeship registry

RICHLAND – Empire Truck Sales and Stribling Equipment, who partner with Hinds Community College on the Diesel Equipment Technology Academy in Richland, have signed an agreement with the college to become the first businesses to participate in the Mississippi Apprenticeship Program.

From left, Glenn McCullough, executive director of the Mississippi Development Authority, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Dr. Andrea Mayfield, executive director of the Mississippi Community College Board, Jerry Swanson, CEO of Empire Truck Sales and Stribling Equipment and Gov. Phil Bryant (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

The program aims to develop new and diverse sponsors for registered apprenticeship and expand the state’s capacity to support them. MAP, an initiative led by Gov. Phil Bryant’s office, the Mississippi Community College Board in partnership with community colleges and their partners in business, industry and other sectors, the Mississippi Department of Employment Security and the Mississippi Development Authority, will provide resources to industries across the state to support employee on-the-job training.

Principals in the effort signed the agreement Oct. 31 at the Hinds Diesel Equipment Technology Academy in Richland. They included Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Jerry Swanson, president of Empire Truck Sales and Stribling Equipment, Woodrow Middleton, state director for the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Apprenticeship and Dr. Andrea Mayfield, executive director of the Mississippi Community College Board.

“It’s been a great partnership with Hinds and you see a number of the students here today as evidence of the support they’re receiving from those two companies,” Muse said during a brief program before the signing. He also noted the experienced assistance, scholarships and up-to-date equipment available to students in the program.

Bryant credited the Legislature for allocating about $50 million for workforce training programs and the U.S. Department of Labor for being a valuable partner for the MAP, specifying a “unified and cooperative federalism” between the state and the federal Cabinet department.

Students and instructors in the Diesel Equipment Technology program at Hinds Community College gather with state officials including Gov. Phil Bryant during a ceremony Oct. 31 to become part of the Mississippi Apprenticeship Program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“The Mississippi Apprenticeship Program and the partnership between Empire Truck Sales, Stribling Equipment and Hinds Community College will allow individuals at these two businesses to learn real-world job skills necessary for them to be successful employees,” Bryant said.

The trucking industry, specifically the field of modern-day diesel mechanic work, was an appropriate backdrop for the signing ceremony. Gov. Phil Bryant’s father was a diesel mechanic and worked at Empire during his professional career. The host facility for the ceremony is a state-of-the-art complex where students train on the latest technology in the ever-evolving field of diesel mechanics. The accelerated career pathway allows students to earn technical and career certificates with a chance to earn a full Associate of Applied Science degree. Once in the field, diesel technicians can work their way up to certifications that pay up to $73,000 annually.

“As a workforce strategy, with on-the-job training experience, the apprentice has the opportunity to earn and learn,” Mayfield said. “And they also make connections in the workplace.”

“Everybody here is a stakeholder in this adventure,” Swanson said, crediting Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president of Workforce Development at Hinds, for his role in helping turn the college’s already vibrant partnership into Tuesday’s event. “With his leadership, this has happened and we’re very proud of it.”

1 389 02 November, 2017 News more
Hinds CC instructor drafts new career as Fab Lab director
Posted by
26 September

Hinds CC instructor drafts new career as Fab Lab director

Note: The following story appears in the fall issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

RAYMOND – Phil Cockrell has struck when the iron was hot, so to speak, many times in his professional career.

These days, the material he works with is more plastic than iron and his equipment is actually the “coolest” on campus.

Phil Cockrell, inside the Fab Lab (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Phil Cockrell, inside the Fab Lab (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Cockrell, a Magee native and Brandon resident, instructs courses in the Engineering and Drafting Design Technology program. He’s also the director of the Fab Lab on the Raymond Campus, which opened in August. He says it’s a place where students, faculty, industry and the public alike can, as Cockrell puts it, “Imagine, design and build.”

“It’s for prototyping products for any number of purposes, and it’s open to students, faculty and the public,” Cockrell said. “Theoretically, you could come up with an idea for a product and patent it, as teenagers in similar labs in other states have done.”

Located in the Vocational Technical Building A, the lab is outfitted with 3-D printing machines, laser cutters and related equipment capable of etching designs or cutting flat sheet material such as acrylic and metal. The resulting prototypes are limitless – from small trinkets such as a cartoon character’s crown to a full 3-D reproduction of parts used in heavy industry and the human form itself.

Printing in 3-D involves programming a set of instructions into a central control panel or a separate computer, then loading the appropriate material – often forms of polyvinyl plastic – into a feeder line where the material is melted and flows through mechanical arms to “print” an object based on the instructions.

The lab was financed through the Predominantly Black Institutions Formula grant and is the first member lab in Mississippi of the U.S. Fab Lab Network, a group of 76 high schools, colleges, universities and businesses nationwide. An introductory non-credit course launched the lab in August 2017  for students while Cockrell began training instructors to become certified on the equipment.

A mechanical arm inside a 3D printer prints an object in the Fab Lab. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

A mechanical arm inside a 3D printer prints an object in the Fab Lab. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

All the heady technology has transformed what was once simply called drafting, said Cockrell, a former Simpson County sheriff’s deputy who switched careers to return to school at age 28.

“I was getting married and I wanted to make a career change,” he said. “I did some research, and drafting and design was getting to be a hot field. Hinds’ program had a really good reputation, so I got out of law enforcement and came back to school.”

Cockrell’s wife, Rebecca, graduated from the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds and is Learning Lab/Clinical Placement coordinator at the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

He earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Drafting and Design Technology, graduating summa cum laude. It was a line of work that was changing along with the world itself, as the Internet opened new possibilities.

“Technology made things easier,” he said. “Instead of working out a set of house plans by hand, I could sit at a computer and do a set of house plans in a fraction of the time. I could manipulate it a lot easier on a computer than by hand.

“As a student, I was well-prepared for the industry, as I worked part-time doing small parts for air conditioning systems and in construction,” he said. “Eventually, I was able to take a building, design it, estimate it and project-manage it. Hinds prepared me to do that.”

His instructors took note of his skill set when the time came to launch his second career.

“Phil was always a class leader, the first to volunteer for outside projects and excelled in his coursework,” said Cindy West, dean of Career and Technical Education for the Raymond Campus and Cockrell’s instructor for Drafting and Design. “Phil’s name was always at the top of my ‘short list’ of former students to call in the event there was ever an open instructor position.”

While the Cockrells vacationed in late 2007, and after he contemplated going to nursing school, a position indeed came open and his teaching vocation began.

“I enjoy the classroom setting, especially watching students as they start to get the concept. That’s a joy.”

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC instructor drafts new career as Fab Lab director[/tweetable]      

0 379 26 September, 2017 News more
Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company
Posted by
11 September

Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company

RAYMOND – Four Hinds Community College students who interned with Continental Tire over the summer have even more of a reason to cherish their nine weeks of paid training at the company’s tire plant in Mount Vernon, Ill.

Continental has covered tuition for the fall 2017 semester for Dylan Canant, Mack Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell. The students had been placed at Continental’s maintenance department for on-the-job experience in electrical, electronic, mechanical and hydraulic systems.

Hinds students Dylan Canant, from left, Mackie Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell spent their summer as interns for Continental Tire in Mount Vernon, Ill. (Submitted to Hinds Community College)

Hinds students Dylan Canant, from left, Mack Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell spent their summer as interns for Continental Tire in Mount Vernon, Ill. (Submitted to Hinds Community College)

The students’ enthusiasm and aptitude for their budding careers with the company building a $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County near Clinton that’s planned to open in 2019.

“During my visit to Mount Vernon, I heard nothing but positive feedback about our interns from Mississippi. They obviously did a great job and were great ambassadors,” said Michael Egner, project manager with Continental. “The student’s success is proof that we’ve found a strong partner in Hinds Community College. Together, we can build a great workforce and future for Continental in Mississippi.”

Pope, an Electronics student on the Raymond Campus, and Canant, an Electrical Technology student on the Raymond Campus, counted the exposure to new people and faces as a plus to go along with the diversified workforce training.

“Being an electronics tech I came here expecting to do electronics,” Pope said. “However I was hired as a multi-tech, meaning that I would also do electricians and mechanics work on top of that. It has been a wonderful experience meeting new people.”

“My experience has been really great and I am really proud of myself and the people who pushed me to do this,” Canant said. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime thing for anybody who gets this opportunity. It is one of the best experiences I have ever had in my life.”

Waddell, an Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology student at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus, took note during his internship of the vibrant culture that existed in the plant as he learned to troubleshoot, install and repair tire components in the mixing department.

“This company cares about their employees and it’s obvious to anyone who works here,” Waddell said. “And that alone is most interesting thing to me about this experience.”

Maintenance technicians will be some of the first positions filled when hiring begins in the commercial vehicle tire plant in late 2018. As one of the key roles in Continental’s daily operations, maintenance technicians are responsible for both reactive and preventive maintenance of equipment throughout the facility.

Williams, an Industrial Maintenance Technology student at the Rankin Campus, hopes to fill one of those roles thanks to the unique opportunity he had this past summer.

“I’ve learned new things I didn’t think were possible,” Williams said, adding he learned correct workplace safety tips through the use of Personal Protective Equipment. “This has been one of the best opportunities of my life and I am truly blessed to be a part of it.”

[tweetable alt=””]Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company[/tweetable]

 

0 394 11 September, 2017 News more
Deaf student starts new career thanks to Hinds CC, KLLM Driving Academy
Posted by
08 September

Deaf student starts new career thanks to Hinds CC, KLLM Driving Academy

RICHLAND – Byron Davis decided last year it was time for a change of life and career after years spent in low-paying jobs.

Byron Davis, center, completed the KLLM Driving Academy program this past summer and is now a lead solo driver with the company. With him are Charli Vos, an interpreter with the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, left, and Loretta Sutton, an interpreter and coordinator in Disability Support Services with Hinds Community College, right. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Byron Davis, center, completed the KLLM Driving Academy program this past summer and is now a lead solo driver with the company. With him are Charli Vos, an interpreter with the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, left, and Loretta Sutton, an interpreter and coordinator in Disability Support Services with Hinds Community College, right. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

What made his decision different from most was a challenge he’d been overcoming for years – but with the help of a partnership between Hinds Community College and KLLM Driving Academy, he motored right past it and plans to keep on trucking.

Davis, 38, Southaven native, lost his hearing during childhood as a result of an illness. Since high school, he’d worked a series of jobs in shipping and receiving and in auto body work. “I wasn’t happy doing it,” Davis said through an interpreter. “The pay wasn’t enough for me and wasn’t enough of a challenge.”

After a friend recommended the KLLM Driving Academy at Hinds, Davis sought and qualified for a waiver from the state allowing him to apply for a commercial driver’s license. With the help of two interpreters provided by the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, he completed the program this past summer and is now employed as a lead solo driver with the Richland-based transport company.

In the program, housed at KLLM’s facility in Richland, Davis learned the ins and outs of properly driving a big rig – upshifting, downshifting, proper lane changes and turning, space management and correct mirror usage. The curriculum also trains people to safely transport hazardous materials. Overall, it’s geared to help new drivers achieve the industry’s top priority, which is safety.

“You really have to focus with it, and you can’t play around,” he said. “I feel good about myself for having passed the course.”

Hinds’ partnership with KLLM to train truck drivers at the company’s Richland headquarters and boost their ranks began in fall 2012. KLLM handles the training. Hinds handles the coursework. The facility itself opened in March 2014.

Byron Davis completed the KLLM Driving Academy program this past summer and is now a lead solo driver with the company. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Byron Davis completed the KLLM Driving Academy program this past summer and is now a lead solo driver with the company. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Byron was determined to provide for his family and fulfill his dream of becoming a truck driver,” said Josh Denson, manager of the KLLM Driving Academy and former disability examiner with MDRS. “He was able to accomplish all of these things through the opportunity provided by Hinds Community College and KLLM Transport Services.”

Davis credited the company and the Disability Support Services department at Hinds for taking care of the little things – such as the company paying for his bus ticket to town, helping to learn his schedule, and other things to “help get settled in”, he said.

“It’s been quite the partnership between Hinds, the Department of Rehabilitation and KLLM,” said Loretta Sutton, interpreter and coordinator in the college’s program that assists people with various physical challenges achieve their educational goals. “The three of us have been working together to make sure he’s very successful in this program.”

That success figures to have him on a fast track to a solid new career.

“My instructors have had a positive effect on me,” he said. “Some of them didn’t know anything about working with deaf students, but one of my instructors rode with me and learned some basic sign language so he can communicate with me.

The next major mile marker for Davis is obvious.

“I’d like to become an independent driver and own my own truck,” he said.

[tweetable alt=””]Deaf student starts new career thanks to #Hinds CC, KLLM Driving Academy [/tweetable]

 

3 1997 08 September, 2017 News more
Hinds CC academic, technical grads thrived upon return to school
Posted by
15 May

Hinds CC academic, technical grads thrived upon return to school

PEARL – Barbara Evans and Lattie Erving didn’t know each other before Friday, but already had a lifetime of work experience under their respective belts when they decided to pursue college degrees.

Barbara Evans, left, and Lattie Erving, share a moment before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Evans, of Vicksburg, and Erving, of Jackson, both returned to school to earn college degrees after having been retired for years. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Barbara Evans, left, and Lattie Erving, share a moment before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Evans, of Vicksburg, and Erving, of Jackson, both returned to school to earn college degrees after having been retired for years. Evans graduated summa cum laude. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’d always wanted to go to culinary school, so I said why not?” said Evans, 64, of Vicksburg, dressed in her cap and gown accented with marks of honors. The self-described retired cook now has a credential to go with her years spent in the kitchen.

Erving, 62, Jackson, had retired years ago from factory work but always yearned for a chance to earn a college degree – something that seemed out of reach when she was growing up.

“I didn’t have an opportunity to go to college years ago,” Erving said. “I want to study social work with my degree.”

Both were among those who graduated from Hinds Community College over two days of ceremonies Friday and Sunday.

Students received 1,534 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number, almost 800 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus in Pearl or a Sunday ceremony at the Utica Campus.

April Galjour, of Jackson, prepares to line up to enter the stage before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Galjour earned a Technical Certificate and graduated cum laude. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

April Galjour, of Jackson, prepares to line up to enter the stage before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Galjour earned a Technical Certificate and graduated cum laude. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Also earning a long-awaited degree was April Galjour, 55, of Jackson, who returned to school to pursue new skills in a changing economy.

“I was laid off the nonprofit I was working for, and I didn’t know anything about computers,” Galjour said. “Even small jobs nowadays, you have to keep up with that. I’m just delighted I was able to come back at my age.”

Speaking at the 11 a.m. ceremony was state Sen. Briggs Hopson III, of Vicksburg.

“You’re receiving a piece of paper that is your license to a successful career,” Hopson told graduates. “It will make you competitive in the marketplace. You’re ready to go out right now and begin your careers.

“I have many friends who’ve gotten their associate’s degree and gone on to do incredibly well in their professions. They make good livings, are able to care for their families, built careers and established a nest egg.”

Of all graduates, 97 achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 165 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 255 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

“This is a time we as educators enjoy celebrating,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. He noted that student diplomas this year will include a gold seal commemorating the college’s 100th anniversary. Hinds opened in 1917 and is celebrating the Centennial with a host of activities throughout the calendar year.

[tweetable alt=””]Students return to school, thrive, graduate from Hinds CC[/tweetable]

 

Photo 11 – Elizabeth Coleman smiles as Laura Stevens adjusts her cap before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Coleman, of Madison, earned an Associate of Applied Science in Medical Data Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Elizabeth Coleman smiles as Laura Stevens of Hinds Community College adjusts her cap before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Coleman, of Madison, earned an Associate of Applied Science in Medical Data Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Photo 12 – Felix Davis, left, of Jackson, shares a moment with Dr. Robin Parker graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Davis earned technical and career certificates this past semester after earning his High School Equivalency through the MI BEST program at Hinds. Parker is assistant dean for Career and Technical Education on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Felix Davis, left, of Jackson, shares a moment with Dr. Robin Parker before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Davis earned technical and career certificates this past semester after earning his High School Equivalency through the MI BEST program at Hinds. Parker is assistant dean for Career and Technical Education on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bailey Ainsworth, of Brandon, poses with the Associate of Arts degree in Radiologic Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Bailey Ainsworth, of Brandon, poses with the Associate of Arts degree in Radiologic Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Semaj Brown, of Clinton, holds the Associate of Arts degree in Physical Therapist Assistant Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Erica Brown, her mother, left, and James Brown, her father. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Semaj Brown, of Clinton, holds the Associate of Arts degree in Physical Therapist Assistant Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Erica Brown, her mother, left, and James Brown, her father. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kennedy Garner, of Brandon, holds the Associate of Arts degree presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Kyle Garner, left, a brother, Scott Garner, her father, Rhonda Garner, her mother, and Kreg Garner, a brother. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Kennedy Garner, of Brandon, holds the Associate of Arts degree presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Kyle Garner, left, a brother, Scott Garner, her father, Rhonda Garner, her mother, and Kreg Garner, a brother. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Wayne Dang, of Pearl, holds the Associate of Applied Science degree in Computer Network Technology presented to him during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With him is Brianne Blair, left, his fiancé, and Jacqueline Blair, Brianne’s mother.

Wayne Dang, of Pearl, holds the Associate of Applied Science degree in Computer Network Technology presented to him during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With him is Brianne Blair, left, his fiancé, and Jacqueline Blair, Brianne’s mother. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

0 581 15 May, 2017 News more
Grandmother of four among academic, technical grads at Hinds CC
Posted by
15 May

Grandmother of four among academic, technical grads at Hinds CC

PEARL – Vicki Colbert had already lived a full life taking care of people when she decided to pursue a second career.

“I’m still the same lady from that little old town of Raymond,” Colbert said. “But, this is surely like a second life for me.”

Vicki Colbert

Vicki Colbert

The 57-year-old grandmother of four was among more than 1,200 graduates from ceremonies held by Hinds Community College over two days. She graduated Friday, May 12 with others who completed academic and technical programs at the college.

Students received 1,534 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number, almost 800 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus in Pearl or a Sunday ceremony at the Utica Campus.

Among them was Colbert, who retired not long ago after 33 years in the medical field, mainly at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. A love of old-fashioned country cooking and staying busy, she enrolled in the Culinary Arts program and excelled.

“I’m happy about finishing school after nearly 40 years,” Colbert said. “It was about letting myself know that it’s never too late to complete something.”

Vicki Colbert, left, shares a laugh with Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse after an awards ceremony April 28, 2017 honoring outstanding students and faculty from programs offered at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Vicki Colbert, left, shares a laugh with Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse after an awards ceremony April 28, 2017 honoring outstanding students and faculty from programs offered at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

In April, she led a team of culinary students from several schools whose fried fish and hush puppies won second place in competition at the Collegiate DECA International Career Development Conference in Anaheim, Calif. She and team members picked up third place honors at the state competition.

“She spearheads so many projects here,” said Austin Lee, district director of the Culinary Arts program at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. “She headed up the DECA fundraising to make it to California, where her team raised over $1,000 to help with their expenses by selling chicken on a stick and Kool-Aid for $6.”

Next on her heady list of plans is to open an eatery in Raymond that’ll feature all the staples of down-home country fare.

“I love country cooking, with roast beef and gravy with veggies,” she said. “And I’ll do farm-to-table with it. It’ll be good for people coming from church on Sundays.”

Speaking at the 11 a.m. ceremony was state Sen. Briggs Hopson III, of Vicksburg.

“You’re receiving a piece of paper that is your license to a successful career,” Hopson told graduates. “It will make you competitive in the marketplace. You’re ready to go out right now and begin your careers.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse with state Sen. Briggs Hopson III (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse with state Sen. Briggs Hopson III (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I have many friends who’ve gotten their associate’s degree and gone on to do incredibly well in their professions. They make good livings, are able to care for their families, built careers and established a nest egg.”

Of all graduates, 97 achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 165 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 255 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

“This is a time we as educators enjoy celebrating,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. He noted that student diplomas this year will include a gold seal commemorating the college’s 100th anniversary. Hinds opened in 1917 and is celebrating the Centennial with a host of activities throughout the calendar year.

[tweetable alt=””]Grandmother of four among academic, technical grads at Hinds CC[/tweetable]

 

Vicki Colbert, left, and Chef Sally Porter of the Culinary Arts program at Hinds show awards Colbert won this past semester. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Vicki Colbert, left, and Chef Sally Porter of the Culinary Arts program at Hinds show awards Colbert won this past semester during a program April 28, 2017 at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

0 652 15 May, 2017 News more
Hinds CC agrees with industry partners to train diesel equipment professionals
Posted by
29 September

Hinds CC agrees with industry partners to train diesel equipment professionals

Hinds celebrated a new partnership Sept. 26 with Empire Truck Sales and Stribling Equipment to train students in the college’s growing Diesel Equipment Technology program.

Key to that partnership is a state-of-the-art training facility, the Diesel Technology Academy, provided by Hinds’ industry partners on Highway 49 in Richland.

Public officials, including Gov. Phil Bryant, heavy equipment industry officials and Hinds employees were among those on hand Sept. 26 for the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy on Highway 49 in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Public officials, including Gov. Phil Bryant, heavy equipment industry officials and Hinds employees were among those on hand Sept. 26 for the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy on Highway 49 in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“The Hinds Diesel Academy is another example of the ability of Hinds Community College to work directly with business and industry and carefully craft a workforce development pipeline that develops students to fill not only the skills gap that exists in the diesel Industry, but also combat the shortage of technicians in Mississippi,” said Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development and Adult Education at Hinds.

Gov. Phil Bryant, a Hinds graduate and himself the son of a diesel mechanic who worked at Empire as his last job, said the academy represented both job creation and better quality of life in the state.

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales, Hinds alumnus Gov. Phil Bryant and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse greet one another Sept. 26 at the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales, Hinds alumnus Gov. Phil Bryant and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse greet one another Sept. 26 at the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Today, the men and women who will go through this Diesel Technology Academy will have a bright future,” Bryant said. “They will be able to live the American dream. And what they will make per hour making these advanced technology machines we see here, they may be able to buy a home…make sure that their children can go to Hinds Community College and over to a great university. Living the American dream will be the responsibility of those who will teach here.”

At a signing ceremony, Stocks referred specifically to the program’s role in[tweetable alt=””] filling middle-skill jobs in Mississippi[/tweetable] – those that require an education beyond high school but not a four-year degree. He also touched on other jobs in the truck and heavy equipment maintenance industry that could benefit from those who complete the program, such as parts, body work, sales and logistics.

Getting to that point, however, required numerous meetings with industry partners to revamp curriculum.

“We brought this curriculum out of the 1980s and into the 21st century,” Stocks said, referring to the nearly three-year effort with industry partners. “Once we started with that curriculum, we modified about six or seven other curricula and got them into the 21st century as well.”

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse sign the official memorandum of understanding between the college and the companies as Cindy West, dean of Career/Technical Education on the Raymond Campus, Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Career/Technical Education and Adult Education, and Sherry Franklin, associate vice president for Career/Technical Education, look on. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse sign the official memorandum of understanding between the college and the companies as Cindy West, dean of Career/Technical Education on the Raymond Campus, Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Career/Technical Education and Adult Education, and Sherry Franklin, associate vice president for Career/Technical Education, look on. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Under the agreement, a new cohort of 15 students enters the program every eight weeks if they meet minimum requirements in core subjects either on the ACT or college placement tests. The first year of classes is held on the Raymond Campus; the second year at the Diesel Technology Academy.

“We know there is a huge need in Mississippi for programs like this one that train people for skilled jobs that are there waiting to be filled in industries that are critical to business growth,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. “And these are good jobs that offer wages and benefits that can sustain a family. Thanks to this partnership and this impressive facility, we can satisfy both the needs of the industry and the desire of our people for good jobs.”

Jerry Swanson, the CEO of Empire Truck Sales LLC and Stribling Equipment, said Hinds’ partnership with KLLM Transport Services to form the KLLM Driving Academy in 2014, also in Richland, was the inspiration behind putting together the Diesel Technology Academy.

“We are very excited to see a vision of improving job opportunities for our young people become a reality,” Swanson said. “This effort has been more than two years in the making and, with Dr. Muse’s and Dr. Stocks’ leadership, is now a vibrant testimony to industry and education partnerships.”

Broken out, the program offers an accredited transition pathway of 15 semester credit hours, a career certificate at 30 credit hours, and an Associate of Applied Science degree at 60 credit hours. Two options are offered for technical certificates, at 45 credit hours transportation (medium to heavy trucks) and another for heavy equipment.

0 901 29 September, 2016 News more
Hinds CC partnership with industry grows workforce on Mississippi River
Posted by
11 August

Hinds CC partnership with industry grows workforce on Mississippi River

VICKSBURG – Tossing a heavy, 12-foot mooring rope off a barge on the Mississippi River is a calling for some and simply a rough-sounding job for others.

Chad Vickers and Garrett Williams each have trained to do this now, and, though they took different paths to the “marine life,” they have specialized deckhand training through Hinds Community College and Golding Barge Line.

Chad Vickers turns equipment on a barge used for training purposes at Golding Barge in Vicksburg. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Chad Vickers turns equipment on a barge used for training purposes at Golding Barge in Vicksburg. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“It runs in my family,” said Vickers, 24, a Vicksburg native and Level 2 deckhand with the River City-based barge company. “They’ve been on the water all my life. My grandfather owned a ferry on the Yazoo River and we all fished.”

This past winter, he completed a 7 ½- day [tweetable alt=””]deckhand training course[/tweetable] offered since 2014 and paid for by the Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant to nine members of the Mississippi River Transportation, Distribution and Logistics consortium, of which Hinds is a part. Although the grant ends in October, the college and its industry partners have worked together to keep the training available to those who want to enter the marine transport industry.

“The transportation sector is one of the largest industries in our service area.” said Chad Stocks, vice president of Career, Technical, and Workforce Education. “With the expansion of the Panama Canal and more manufacturing companies locating or expanding in the college’s service area, the ability to move goods up and down the river is essential. This training program provides qualified workers to do this work and I am thrilled that we were able to set the program up with the grant and sustain it with industry partnerships.”

Deckhands in the industry make in the $20,000 to $30,000 range annually. As a trained tankerman, Vickers stands to get a significant raise in life – to about $65,000. And he’s all in for the gig.

“I’ll be doing tankerman training next – working my way up the ladder like everyone else,” he said. “Hopefully, I’ll make it to the top soon.”

Garrett Williams reads measurements on a barge used for instructional purposes at Goldling Barge in Vicksburg. The equipment allows workers to check the level of liquid product inside the barge. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Garrett Williams reads measurements on a barge used for instructional purposes at Goldling Barge in Vicksburg. The equipment allows workers to check the level of liquid product inside the barge. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Williams is climbing the same ladder. The Rolling Fork native already had a bachelor’s degree in Education from Delta State University, but switched careers due to the earnings potential on the water.

“I found out about the program from a friend after being laid off from a job in oilfield services,” said Williams, a tankerman trainee. “Other people had talked to me about how good a company and job it is, and wanted to put myself in a position to follow behind them.”

Hinds and industry veterans with Maritime Services of Louisiana are training employees of Golding, Yazoo River Towing and Magnolia Marine.

Students are evaluated and certified accordingly after completing the training, in which they touch on every aspect of working on a barge – from throwing and securing a line, operating a johnboat, rigging, among other practical skills. Hands-on sessions are conducted after classroom sessions each morning and testing. The effect it’s had has been companies getting job-ready workers without interrupting workflow.

From left, Chad Vickers, Garrett Williams, and Golding Barge vice president of Human Resources Stirlin Hancock. (April Garon/ Hinds Community College)

From left, Chad Vickers, Garrett Williams, and Golding Barge vice president of Human Resources Stirlin Hancock. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“Experienced industry veterans instruct the training,” said Stirlin Hancock, vice president of human resources at Golding Barge. “So, we fully intend for the training to go forward after the grant is up. We’re working with Hinds to make that happen.”

For information about enrolling in the deckhand training program offered in Vicksburg through Hinds Community College, contact Marvin Moak, dean of Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus, at 601-629-6805.

0 815 11 August, 2016 News more