http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company

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Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company
Posted by
11 September

Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company

RAYMOND – Four Hinds Community College students who interned with Continental Tire over the summer have even more of a reason to cherish their nine weeks of paid training at the company’s tire plant in Mount Vernon, Ill.

Continental has covered tuition for the fall 2017 semester for Dylan Canant, Mack Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell. The students had been placed at Continental’s maintenance department for on-the-job experience in electrical, electronic, mechanical and hydraulic systems.

Hinds students Dylan Canant, from left, Mackie Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell spent their summer as interns for Continental Tire in Mount Vernon, Ill. (Submitted to Hinds Community College)

Hinds students Dylan Canant, from left, Mack Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell spent their summer as interns for Continental Tire in Mount Vernon, Ill. (Submitted to Hinds Community College)

The students’ enthusiasm and aptitude for their budding careers with the company building a $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County near Clinton that’s planned to open in 2019.

“During my visit to Mount Vernon, I heard nothing but positive feedback about our interns from Mississippi. They obviously did a great job and were great ambassadors,” said Michael Egner, project manager with Continental. “The student’s success is proof that we’ve found a strong partner in Hinds Community College. Together, we can build a great workforce and future for Continental in Mississippi.”

Pope, an Electronics student on the Raymond Campus, and Canant, an Electrical Technology student on the Raymond Campus, counted the exposure to new people and faces as a plus to go along with the diversified workforce training.

“Being an electronics tech I came here expecting to do electronics,” Pope said. “However I was hired as a multi-tech, meaning that I would also do electricians and mechanics work on top of that. It has been a wonderful experience meeting new people.”

“My experience has been really great and I am really proud of myself and the people who pushed me to do this,” Canant said. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime thing for anybody who gets this opportunity. It is one of the best experiences I have ever had in my life.”

Waddell, an Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology student at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus, took note during his internship of the vibrant culture that existed in the plant as he learned to troubleshoot, install and repair tire components in the mixing department.

“This company cares about their employees and it’s obvious to anyone who works here,” Waddell said. “And that alone is most interesting thing to me about this experience.”

Maintenance technicians will be some of the first positions filled when hiring begins in the commercial vehicle tire plant in late 2018. As one of the key roles in Continental’s daily operations, maintenance technicians are responsible for both reactive and preventive maintenance of equipment throughout the facility.

Williams, an Industrial Maintenance Technology student at the Rankin Campus, hopes to fill one of those roles thanks to the unique opportunity he had this past summer.

“I’ve learned new things I didn’t think were possible,” Williams said, adding he learned correct workplace safety tips through the use of Personal Protective Equipment. “This has been one of the best opportunities of my life and I am truly blessed to be a part of it.”

Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company

 

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Deaf student starts new career thanks to Hinds CC, KLLM Driving Academy
Posted by
08 September

Deaf student starts new career thanks to Hinds CC, KLLM Driving Academy

RICHLAND – Byron Davis decided last year it was time for a change of life and career after years spent in low-paying jobs.

Byron Davis, center, completed the KLLM Driving Academy program this past summer and is now a lead solo driver with the company. With him are Charli Vos, an interpreter with the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, left, and Loretta Sutton, an interpreter and coordinator in Disability Support Services with Hinds Community College, right. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Byron Davis, center, completed the KLLM Driving Academy program this past summer and is now a lead solo driver with the company. With him are Charli Vos, an interpreter with the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, left, and Loretta Sutton, an interpreter and coordinator in Disability Support Services with Hinds Community College, right. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

What made his decision different from most was a challenge he’d been overcoming for years – but with the help of a partnership between Hinds Community College and KLLM Driving Academy, he motored right past it and plans to keep on trucking.

Davis, 38, Southaven native, lost his hearing during childhood as a result of an illness. Since high school, he’d worked a series of jobs in shipping and receiving and in auto body work. “I wasn’t happy doing it,” Davis said through an interpreter. “The pay wasn’t enough for me and wasn’t enough of a challenge.”

After a friend recommended the KLLM Driving Academy at Hinds, Davis sought and qualified for a waiver from the state allowing him to apply for a commercial driver’s license. With the help of two interpreters provided by the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, he completed the program this past summer and is now employed as a lead solo driver with the Richland-based transport company.

In the program, housed at KLLM’s facility in Richland, Davis learned the ins and outs of properly driving a big rig – upshifting, downshifting, proper lane changes and turning, space management and correct mirror usage. The curriculum also trains people to safely transport hazardous materials. Overall, it’s geared to help new drivers achieve the industry’s top priority, which is safety.

“You really have to focus with it, and you can’t play around,” he said. “I feel good about myself for having passed the course.”

Hinds’ partnership with KLLM to train truck drivers at the company’s Richland headquarters and boost their ranks began in fall 2012. KLLM handles the training. Hinds handles the coursework. The facility itself opened in March 2014.

Byron Davis completed the KLLM Driving Academy program this past summer and is now a lead solo driver with the company. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Byron Davis completed the KLLM Driving Academy program this past summer and is now a lead solo driver with the company. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Byron was determined to provide for his family and fulfill his dream of becoming a truck driver,” said Josh Denson, manager of the KLLM Driving Academy and former disability examiner with MDRS. “He was able to accomplish all of these things through the opportunity provided by Hinds Community College and KLLM Transport Services.”

Davis credited the company and the Disability Support Services department at Hinds for taking care of the little things – such as the company paying for his bus ticket to town, helping to learn his schedule, and other things to “help get settled in”, he said.

“It’s been quite the partnership between Hinds, the Department of Rehabilitation and KLLM,” said Loretta Sutton, interpreter and coordinator in the college’s program that assists people with various physical challenges achieve their educational goals. “The three of us have been working together to make sure he’s very successful in this program.”

That success figures to have him on a fast track to a solid new career.

“My instructors have had a positive effect on me,” he said. “Some of them didn’t know anything about working with deaf students, but one of my instructors rode with me and learned some basic sign language so he can communicate with me.

The next major mile marker for Davis is obvious.

“I’d like to become an independent driver and own my own truck,” he said.

Deaf student starts new career thanks to #Hinds CC, KLLM Driving Academy 

 

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Hinds CC academic, technical grads thrived upon return to school
Posted by
15 May

Hinds CC academic, technical grads thrived upon return to school

PEARL – Barbara Evans and Lattie Erving didn’t know each other before Friday, but already had a lifetime of work experience under their respective belts when they decided to pursue college degrees.

Barbara Evans, left, and Lattie Erving, share a moment before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Evans, of Vicksburg, and Erving, of Jackson, both returned to school to earn college degrees after having been retired for years. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Barbara Evans, left, and Lattie Erving, share a moment before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Evans, of Vicksburg, and Erving, of Jackson, both returned to school to earn college degrees after having been retired for years. Evans graduated summa cum laude. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’d always wanted to go to culinary school, so I said why not?” said Evans, 64, of Vicksburg, dressed in her cap and gown accented with marks of honors. The self-described retired cook now has a credential to go with her years spent in the kitchen.

Erving, 62, Jackson, had retired years ago from factory work but always yearned for a chance to earn a college degree – something that seemed out of reach when she was growing up.

“I didn’t have an opportunity to go to college years ago,” Erving said. “I want to study social work with my degree.”

Both were among those who graduated from Hinds Community College over two days of ceremonies Friday and Sunday.

Students received 1,534 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number, almost 800 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus in Pearl or a Sunday ceremony at the Utica Campus.

April Galjour, of Jackson, prepares to line up to enter the stage before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Galjour earned a Technical Certificate and graduated cum laude. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

April Galjour, of Jackson, prepares to line up to enter the stage before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Galjour earned a Technical Certificate and graduated cum laude. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Also earning a long-awaited degree was April Galjour, 55, of Jackson, who returned to school to pursue new skills in a changing economy.

“I was laid off the nonprofit I was working for, and I didn’t know anything about computers,” Galjour said. “Even small jobs nowadays, you have to keep up with that. I’m just delighted I was able to come back at my age.”

Speaking at the 11 a.m. ceremony was state Sen. Briggs Hopson III, of Vicksburg.

“You’re receiving a piece of paper that is your license to a successful career,” Hopson told graduates. “It will make you competitive in the marketplace. You’re ready to go out right now and begin your careers.

“I have many friends who’ve gotten their associate’s degree and gone on to do incredibly well in their professions. They make good livings, are able to care for their families, built careers and established a nest egg.”

Of all graduates, 97 achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 165 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 255 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

“This is a time we as educators enjoy celebrating,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. He noted that student diplomas this year will include a gold seal commemorating the college’s 100th anniversary. Hinds opened in 1917 and is celebrating the Centennial with a host of activities throughout the calendar year.

Students return to school, thrive, graduate from Hinds CC

 

Photo 11 – Elizabeth Coleman smiles as Laura Stevens adjusts her cap before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Coleman, of Madison, earned an Associate of Applied Science in Medical Data Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Elizabeth Coleman smiles as Laura Stevens of Hinds Community College adjusts her cap before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Coleman, of Madison, earned an Associate of Applied Science in Medical Data Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Photo 12 – Felix Davis, left, of Jackson, shares a moment with Dr. Robin Parker graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Davis earned technical and career certificates this past semester after earning his High School Equivalency through the MI BEST program at Hinds. Parker is assistant dean for Career and Technical Education on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Felix Davis, left, of Jackson, shares a moment with Dr. Robin Parker before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Davis earned technical and career certificates this past semester after earning his High School Equivalency through the MI BEST program at Hinds. Parker is assistant dean for Career and Technical Education on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bailey Ainsworth, of Brandon, poses with the Associate of Arts degree in Radiologic Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Bailey Ainsworth, of Brandon, poses with the Associate of Arts degree in Radiologic Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Semaj Brown, of Clinton, holds the Associate of Arts degree in Physical Therapist Assistant Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Erica Brown, her mother, left, and James Brown, her father. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Semaj Brown, of Clinton, holds the Associate of Arts degree in Physical Therapist Assistant Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Erica Brown, her mother, left, and James Brown, her father. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kennedy Garner, of Brandon, holds the Associate of Arts degree presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Kyle Garner, left, a brother, Scott Garner, her father, Rhonda Garner, her mother, and Kreg Garner, a brother. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Kennedy Garner, of Brandon, holds the Associate of Arts degree presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Kyle Garner, left, a brother, Scott Garner, her father, Rhonda Garner, her mother, and Kreg Garner, a brother. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Wayne Dang, of Pearl, holds the Associate of Applied Science degree in Computer Network Technology presented to him during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With him is Brianne Blair, left, his fiancé, and Jacqueline Blair, Brianne’s mother.

Wayne Dang, of Pearl, holds the Associate of Applied Science degree in Computer Network Technology presented to him during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With him is Brianne Blair, left, his fiancé, and Jacqueline Blair, Brianne’s mother. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

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Grandmother of four among academic, technical grads at Hinds CC
Posted by
15 May

Grandmother of four among academic, technical grads at Hinds CC

PEARL – Vicki Colbert had already lived a full life taking care of people when she decided to pursue a second career.

“I’m still the same lady from that little old town of Raymond,” Colbert said. “But, this is surely like a second life for me.”

Vicki Colbert

Vicki Colbert

The 57-year-old grandmother of four was among more than 1,200 graduates from ceremonies held by Hinds Community College over two days. She graduated Friday, May 12 with others who completed academic and technical programs at the college.

Students received 1,534 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number, almost 800 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus in Pearl or a Sunday ceremony at the Utica Campus.

Among them was Colbert, who retired not long ago after 33 years in the medical field, mainly at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. A love of old-fashioned country cooking and staying busy, she enrolled in the Culinary Arts program and excelled.

“I’m happy about finishing school after nearly 40 years,” Colbert said. “It was about letting myself know that it’s never too late to complete something.”

Vicki Colbert, left, shares a laugh with Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse after an awards ceremony April 28, 2017 honoring outstanding students and faculty from programs offered at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Vicki Colbert, left, shares a laugh with Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse after an awards ceremony April 28, 2017 honoring outstanding students and faculty from programs offered at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

In April, she led a team of culinary students from several schools whose fried fish and hush puppies won second place in competition at the Collegiate DECA International Career Development Conference in Anaheim, Calif. She and team members picked up third place honors at the state competition.

“She spearheads so many projects here,” said Austin Lee, district director of the Culinary Arts program at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. “She headed up the DECA fundraising to make it to California, where her team raised over $1,000 to help with their expenses by selling chicken on a stick and Kool-Aid for $6.”

Next on her heady list of plans is to open an eatery in Raymond that’ll feature all the staples of down-home country fare.

“I love country cooking, with roast beef and gravy with veggies,” she said. “And I’ll do farm-to-table with it. It’ll be good for people coming from church on Sundays.”

Speaking at the 11 a.m. ceremony was state Sen. Briggs Hopson III, of Vicksburg.

“You’re receiving a piece of paper that is your license to a successful career,” Hopson told graduates. “It will make you competitive in the marketplace. You’re ready to go out right now and begin your careers.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse with state Sen. Briggs Hopson III (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse with state Sen. Briggs Hopson III (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I have many friends who’ve gotten their associate’s degree and gone on to do incredibly well in their professions. They make good livings, are able to care for their families, built careers and established a nest egg.”

Of all graduates, 97 achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 165 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 255 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

“This is a time we as educators enjoy celebrating,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. He noted that student diplomas this year will include a gold seal commemorating the college’s 100th anniversary. Hinds opened in 1917 and is celebrating the Centennial with a host of activities throughout the calendar year.

Grandmother of four among academic, technical grads at Hinds CC

 

Vicki Colbert, left, and Chef Sally Porter of the Culinary Arts program at Hinds show awards Colbert won this past semester. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Vicki Colbert, left, and Chef Sally Porter of the Culinary Arts program at Hinds show awards Colbert won this past semester during a program April 28, 2017 at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

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Hinds CC agrees with industry partners to train diesel equipment professionals
Posted by
29 September

Hinds CC agrees with industry partners to train diesel equipment professionals

Hinds celebrated a new partnership Sept. 26 with Empire Truck Sales and Stribling Equipment to train students in the college’s growing Diesel Equipment Technology program.

Key to that partnership is a state-of-the-art training facility, the Diesel Technology Academy, provided by Hinds’ industry partners on Highway 49 in Richland.

Public officials, including Gov. Phil Bryant, heavy equipment industry officials and Hinds employees were among those on hand Sept. 26 for the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy on Highway 49 in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Public officials, including Gov. Phil Bryant, heavy equipment industry officials and Hinds employees were among those on hand Sept. 26 for the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy on Highway 49 in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“The Hinds Diesel Academy is another example of the ability of Hinds Community College to work directly with business and industry and carefully craft a workforce development pipeline that develops students to fill not only the skills gap that exists in the diesel Industry, but also combat the shortage of technicians in Mississippi,” said Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development and Adult Education at Hinds.

Gov. Phil Bryant, a Hinds graduate and himself the son of a diesel mechanic who worked at Empire as his last job, said the academy represented both job creation and better quality of life in the state.

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales, Hinds alumnus Gov. Phil Bryant and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse greet one another Sept. 26 at the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales, Hinds alumnus Gov. Phil Bryant and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse greet one another Sept. 26 at the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Today, the men and women who will go through this Diesel Technology Academy will have a bright future,” Bryant said. “They will be able to live the American dream. And what they will make per hour making these advanced technology machines we see here, they may be able to buy a home…make sure that their children can go to Hinds Community College and over to a great university. Living the American dream will be the responsibility of those who will teach here.”

At a signing ceremony, Stocks referred specifically to the program’s role in filling middle-skill jobs in Mississippi – those that require an education beyond high school but not a four-year degree. He also touched on other jobs in the truck and heavy equipment maintenance industry that could benefit from those who complete the program, such as parts, body work, sales and logistics.

Getting to that point, however, required numerous meetings with industry partners to revamp curriculum.

“We brought this curriculum out of the 1980s and into the 21st century,” Stocks said, referring to the nearly three-year effort with industry partners. “Once we started with that curriculum, we modified about six or seven other curricula and got them into the 21st century as well.”

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse sign the official memorandum of understanding between the college and the companies as Cindy West, dean of Career/Technical Education on the Raymond Campus, Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Career/Technical Education and Adult Education, and Sherry Franklin, associate vice president for Career/Technical Education, look on. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse sign the official memorandum of understanding between the college and the companies as Cindy West, dean of Career/Technical Education on the Raymond Campus, Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Career/Technical Education and Adult Education, and Sherry Franklin, associate vice president for Career/Technical Education, look on. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Under the agreement, a new cohort of 15 students enters the program every eight weeks if they meet minimum requirements in core subjects either on the ACT or college placement tests. The first year of classes is held on the Raymond Campus; the second year at the Diesel Technology Academy.

“We know there is a huge need in Mississippi for programs like this one that train people for skilled jobs that are there waiting to be filled in industries that are critical to business growth,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. “And these are good jobs that offer wages and benefits that can sustain a family. Thanks to this partnership and this impressive facility, we can satisfy both the needs of the industry and the desire of our people for good jobs.”

Jerry Swanson, the CEO of Empire Truck Sales LLC and Stribling Equipment, said Hinds’ partnership with KLLM Transport Services to form the KLLM Driving Academy in 2014, also in Richland, was the inspiration behind putting together the Diesel Technology Academy.

“We are very excited to see a vision of improving job opportunities for our young people become a reality,” Swanson said. “This effort has been more than two years in the making and, with Dr. Muse’s and Dr. Stocks’ leadership, is now a vibrant testimony to industry and education partnerships.”

Broken out, the program offers an accredited transition pathway of 15 semester credit hours, a career certificate at 30 credit hours, and an Associate of Applied Science degree at 60 credit hours. Two options are offered for technical certificates, at 45 credit hours transportation (medium to heavy trucks) and another for heavy equipment.

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Hinds CC partnership with industry grows workforce on Mississippi River
Posted by
11 August

Hinds CC partnership with industry grows workforce on Mississippi River

VICKSBURG – Tossing a heavy, 12-foot mooring rope off a barge on the Mississippi River is a calling for some and simply a rough-sounding job for others.

Chad Vickers and Garrett Williams each have trained to do this now, and, though they took different paths to the “marine life,” they have specialized deckhand training through Hinds Community College and Golding Barge Line.

Chad Vickers turns equipment on a barge used for training purposes at Golding Barge in Vicksburg. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Chad Vickers turns equipment on a barge used for training purposes at Golding Barge in Vicksburg. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“It runs in my family,” said Vickers, 24, a Vicksburg native and Level 2 deckhand with the River City-based barge company. “They’ve been on the water all my life. My grandfather owned a ferry on the Yazoo River and we all fished.”

This past winter, he completed a 7 ½- day deckhand training course offered since 2014 and paid for by the Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant to nine members of the Mississippi River Transportation, Distribution and Logistics consortium, of which Hinds is a part. Although the grant ends in October, the college and its industry partners have worked together to keep the training available to those who want to enter the marine transport industry.

“The transportation sector is one of the largest industries in our service area.” said Chad Stocks, vice president of Career, Technical, and Workforce Education. “With the expansion of the Panama Canal and more manufacturing companies locating or expanding in the college’s service area, the ability to move goods up and down the river is essential. This training program provides qualified workers to do this work and I am thrilled that we were able to set the program up with the grant and sustain it with industry partnerships.”

Deckhands in the industry make in the $20,000 to $30,000 range annually. As a trained tankerman, Vickers stands to get a significant raise in life – to about $65,000. And he’s all in for the gig.

“I’ll be doing tankerman training next – working my way up the ladder like everyone else,” he said. “Hopefully, I’ll make it to the top soon.”

Garrett Williams reads measurements on a barge used for instructional purposes at Goldling Barge in Vicksburg. The equipment allows workers to check the level of liquid product inside the barge. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Garrett Williams reads measurements on a barge used for instructional purposes at Goldling Barge in Vicksburg. The equipment allows workers to check the level of liquid product inside the barge. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Williams is climbing the same ladder. The Rolling Fork native already had a bachelor’s degree in Education from Delta State University, but switched careers due to the earnings potential on the water.

“I found out about the program from a friend after being laid off from a job in oilfield services,” said Williams, a tankerman trainee. “Other people had talked to me about how good a company and job it is, and wanted to put myself in a position to follow behind them.”

Hinds and industry veterans with Maritime Services of Louisiana are training employees of Golding, Yazoo River Towing and Magnolia Marine.

Students are evaluated and certified accordingly after completing the training, in which they touch on every aspect of working on a barge – from throwing and securing a line, operating a johnboat, rigging, among other practical skills. Hands-on sessions are conducted after classroom sessions each morning and testing. The effect it’s had has been companies getting job-ready workers without interrupting workflow.

From left, Chad Vickers, Garrett Williams, and Golding Barge vice president of Human Resources Stirlin Hancock. (April Garon/ Hinds Community College)

From left, Chad Vickers, Garrett Williams, and Golding Barge vice president of Human Resources Stirlin Hancock. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“Experienced industry veterans instruct the training,” said Stirlin Hancock, vice president of human resources at Golding Barge. “So, we fully intend for the training to go forward after the grant is up. We’re working with Hinds to make that happen.”

For information about enrolling in the deckhand training program offered in Vicksburg through Hinds Community College, contact Marvin Moak, dean of Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus, at 601-629-6805.

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Hinds CC graduates academic, technical students
Posted by
16 May

Hinds CC graduates academic, technical students

PEARL — Earning her Career Certificate in Paralegal Technology was a snap compared to what Lesa Hutchens had to survive to walk across the stage May 13.

“I had a kidney transplant from my sister in 2014 after going through two years of dialysis,” said Hutchens, a Cullman, Ala. native who had moved to Morton, Miss. to be with her mother. “They lost me twice, so I’ve been given a miracle.”

Lesa Hutchins, of Moreton, graduated with a degree in paralegal studies during ceremonies at the Clyde Muse center on Friday, May 13. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Lesa Hutchins, of Morton, graduated with a degree in paralegal studies during ceremonies at the Clyde Muse center on Friday, May 13. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hutchens graduated magna cum laude after landing on the President’s List three times during her studies at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. She walked across the stage of the Muse Center, located on the college’s Rankin Campus, on Friday with other academic and technical students. In all, more than 1,200 graduated from the college over three days of ceremonies. 

Dr. Scot Edward Long’s resume’ of achievement stuck out long before he showed up to Friday’s ceremony with a gown that was a bit more decorated than the average two-year grad.

Dr. Scot Long, a professor at Mississippi College, received his Associate of Arts degree during graduation ceremonies at the Clyde Muse Center on Friday, May 13, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Dr. Scot Long, a professor at Mississippi College, received his Associate of Arts degree during graduation ceremonies at the Clyde Muse Center on Friday, May 13, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Long, an exercise trainer and professor of kinesiology at Mississippi College, has a Ph.D. in Human Performance from the University of Southern Mississippi and is a licensed personal trainer and strength and conditioning coach.

“I came here from 1983 to ’85, lived here, was the lifeguard at the pool,” Long said before walking across the stage to earn that nearly forgotten Associate of Arts degree. “I loved being at Hinds and I regretted never finishing up here.”

Graduates from Vicksburg had their sights set on the job market. Alexis Noble earned an Associate of Applied Science in Fashion Merchandising.

Alexis Noble, of Vicksburg, received an associate degree from Hinds Community College in Fashion Merchandising during graduation ceremonies at the Clyde Muse Center on Friday, May 13, 2016. At left is her mother, Rosetta Noble. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Alexis Noble, of Vicksburg, received an associate degree from Hinds Community College in Fashion Merchandising during graduation ceremonies at the Clyde Muse Center on Friday, May 13, 2016. At left is her mother, Rosetta Noble. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“I’ve always had an eye for it,” Noble said, soaking up the afternoon sun after graduation ceremonies May 13 with family members and others. “I have an opportunity in New York City and I’m taking it.”

Jennifer Ray earned a degree in Child Development and will be testing the job market soon.

“I’ll be job-hunting,” Ray said shortly after a photo with her brothers, Kenneth and Alex, and others.

Samantha Ables and Skylar Blades received associate degrees in Radiology and both plan to attend the University of Mississippi Medical Center to pursue medical careers – Ables in Nuclear Medicine, Blades in Sonography and Phlebotemy. Kirsten Dickard and Kristen Dunaway were another pair of medical field graduates on Friday, both having earned associate degrees in Physical Therapy.

Samantha Ables (left) and Skylar Blades, both of Vicksburg, graduated with degrees in radiology during ceremonies at the Clyde Muse center on Friday, May 13. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Samantha Ables (left) and Skylar Blades, both of Vicksburg, graduated with degrees in radiology during ceremonies at the Clyde Muse center on Friday, May 13, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

Kristen Dunaway and Kirsten Dickard, both of Vicksburg, graduated with degrees in Physical Therapy during ceremonies at the Clyde Muse center on Friday, May 13. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Kristen Dunaway and Kirsten Dickard, both of Vicksburg, graduated with degrees in Physical Therapy during ceremonies at the Clyde Muse center on Friday, May 13, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Samuel Porter, 51, knew how to cut meat, but was out of a job and the future looked uncertain.

“I got into Meat Merchandising because I like doing it,” said Porter, of Bolton, moments before Friday’s ceremony.

Samuel Porter, of Bolton, graduated with a degree in Meat Merchandising from Hinds Community College at the Clyde Muse Center on Friday, May 13. (April Garon/ Hinds Community College)

Samuel Porter, of Bolton, graduated with a degree in Meat Merchandising from Hinds Community College at the Clyde Muse Center on Friday, May 13, 2016. (April Garon/ Hinds Community College)

Porter earned technical and career certificates in the Meat Merchandising program, which trains students for entry-level employment in various phases of meat processing, merchandising, catering and value-added products.

“Now, I can cut 500 pounds of sausage in a day,” Porter said.

This semester’s graduates received more than 1,500 certificates and degrees since some graduates received more than one credential.

Of the total number of graduates, 127 are graduating summa cum laude, which is a perfect 4.0 grade point average; 130 are graduating magna cum laude, which is a 3.60 to 3.99 grade point average and 238 are graduating cum laude, which is a 3.20 to 3.59 grade point average.

 

 

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Opportunities at Continental Tire await career-tech students at Hinds CC
Posted by
15 April

Opportunities at Continental Tire await career-tech students at Hinds CC

Continental Tire executive Paul Williams knows his audience well when talking with students fresh out of high school and looking for careers.

He can’t help the familiarity, really – he was once one of them.

“I finished school at 16 in the UK (United Kingdom), then I went full-time to a technical community college doing mechanical and production engineering,” Williams said. “So, I started doing what you all are doing.”

Continental Tire executive Paul Williams addresses students April 12 at Hinds Community College's Raymond Campus. Williams presented details at the company's planned $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County and toured Hinds' career-tech facilties. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Continental Tire executive Paul Williams addresses students April 12 at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. Williams presented details at the company’s planned $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County and toured Hinds’ career-tech facilties. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Williams, an executive vice president for the global tire maker and automotive supplier’s commercial vehicle tire operation in the Americas, built his career in the industry from a classroom not unlike the lecture hall at Reeves Hall on Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus, where he spoke to students and others during a visit April 12 to Hinds’ career-tech facilities.

“My first employer came into the college and asked, ‘Who’s the best practical guy? Who’s your best welder and who’s your best machinist?’ Well, that was me,” Williams said.

 

Continental Tire executive Paul Williams addresses students April 12 at Hinds Community College's Raymond Campus. Williams presented details at the company's planned $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County and toured Hinds' career-tech facilties. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Continental Tire executive Paul Williams addresses students April 12 at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. Williams presented details at the company’s planned $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County and toured Hinds’ career-tech facilties. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

A four-year apprenticeship followed as he earned his associate’s, then a bachelor of science in engineering and then later an MBA. Williams began his career in the manufacturing industry as operations manager at Aerolux, moving on to the role of production and purchasing controller for Nissan Motors in the United Kingdom.

In 2001, he joined Continental AG as purchasing manager for the power and transmission group of ContiTech, a world-leading manufacturer of rubber and plastics technologies. In his current role at Continental, Williams is responsible for original equipment and replacement sales of truck tires in the Americas, encompassing the major markets of the United States, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil and Ecuador.

His visit to Hinds included stops at career-tech classrooms on the Raymond Campus, Eagle Ridge Conference Center, the Rankin Campus’ Career-Tech building on Greenfield Road and meetings with college and state officials.

Continental Tire executive Paul Williams addresses a meeting of Hinds Community College officials April 12 at the Raymond Campus. Williams presented details at the company's planned $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County and toured Hinds' career-tech facilties. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Continental Tire executive Paul Williams addresses a meeting of Hinds Community College officials April 12 at the Raymond Campus. Williams presented details at the company’s planned $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County and toured Hinds’ career-tech facilties. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“It was very productive to hear directly from the Continental executive who could articulate training expectations and a timeline,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. “We appreciated even more Mr. Williams’ desire to meet with our students and to encourage them to consider a career with Continental.”

Williams said the company will start clearing land this year, then begin major construction on a plant that is to be production-ready by 2019. Once completed, Williams said, the $1.45 billion plant will move quickly to a capacity of 1.1 million tires produced annually, and later to accommodate the company’s passenger car division.

“As that plant grows, you’ll have more and more career opportunities – supervisors, managers, team leaders, all that will encompass that plant,” he said.

Many of the 2,500 jobs the company has said will result from the plant’s construction are highly skilled, technical positions where training in modern-day factory equipment is a must, Williams said.

Students agreed having a big-time job creator in central Mississippi is a positive.

“I think it’s a good thing for the community and will bring a lot of money to the area,” said Wayne Lewis, a sophomore Heating & Air Conditioning student from Amite, La., now living in Mississippi.

“It seems like it would be a good opportunity to grow with a company with good benefits,” said Viory Frazier, of Terry, a carpentry student who already holds a bachelor’s degree in business management.

Advanced training for those hired would take place here in Mississippi and be supported by the company’s facility in Mount Vernon, Ill., Williams said.

“If you go into our curing room there, which is where you ‘cook’ tires in the press, it’s fully automated and all robotic,” he said.

Continental Tire executive Paul Williams, center foreground, listens as Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak explains the ins and outs of Hinds Community College's Electrical Technology classroom on the Raymond Campus during Williams' visit to Hinds on April 12. At left is Vice President for Workforce Development Chad Stocks. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Continental Tire executive Paul Williams, center foreground, listens as Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak explains the ins and outs of Hinds Community College’s Electrical Technology classroom on the Raymond Campus during Williams’ visit to Hinds on April 12. At left is Vice President for Workforce Development Dr. Chad Stocks. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Workforce development programs such as Industrial Maintenance and Electrical Technology are geared to move the best potential employees for industries in the state to jobs. Assessments of companies by the college’s workforce team are often “industry-specific” and flexible enough to pinpoint precisely what a company’s staffing solutions might be, said Vice President for Workforce Development Chad Stocks.

“We know what companies are looking for in an employee,” District Director of Manufacturing Training David Creel said. “They’re looking for a team player, someone who communicates, has above average dedication, has enthusiasm and has the right attitude for change.”

Williams met later in the day with Hinds vice presidents and workforce training staff.

“The meeting with Mr. Williams was very productive,” Muse said. “It was our opportunity to hear directly from the industry executive who is defining expectations for training and employees. I have great confidence in the Hinds team tasked with meeting those expectations.”

It’s a commitment to being the best possible employee that Williams imparted to the packed roomful of students.

“The most important job I have every day is to hire, train, develop, promote and retain the very best people I can. Having the very best people makes all the difference between being successful and not being successful,” Williams said.

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Job opportunities aplenty at Jobs for Eagles event at Hinds CC
Posted by
14 April

Job opportunities aplenty at Jobs for Eagles event at Hinds CC

Logan Wilson did more than pick up a few brochures from employers at Hinds Community College’s 2016 District Job Fair on April 13.

The Diesel Technology student from Jackson asked the kinds of questions he’ll likely want to file away for job interviews in the future – the hope many of the 300 or so Hinds students at the event, held in Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus.

Hinds Community College student Logan Wilson, of Jackson, a Diesel Technology major, speaks with recruiters at the Nissan booth at Jobs for Eagles, a job fair on the Raymond Campus for Hinds students, on Wednesday, April 13, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hinds Community College student Logan Wilson, of Jackson, a Diesel Technology major, speaks with recruiters at the Nissan booth at Jobs for Eagles, a job fair on the Raymond Campus for Hinds students, on Wednesday, April 13, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“I asked them questions about their retention rate and the number of employees they have,” Wilson said after chatting up representatives at the Nissan North America table at the expo-style event that featured about 40 public and private-sector employers.

Career and technical fields such as automotive, hospitality and sales were among booths, along with mainstays in the healthcare, foodservice, gaming and temporary employment service areas.

“I just want to get my foot in the door in my field,” said Garrett Adcock, a Diesel Tech student from Byram, gathered around the Goodyear table with fellow students in the program, including Bronson Devine, of Jackson.

“I’m going to all the ones in the field I can, like MDOT, UPS, Goodyear,” Devine said.

Students speak with Russell Branch, of Goodyear Commercial Tire, at Jobs for Eagles, a job fair on the Raymond Campus for Hinds students, on Wednesday, April 13, 2016. The Diesel Technology students are, from left, Garrett Adcock, of Byram; Hunter Tisdale, of Brandon; Trent Craft, of Magee; Noah Christy, of Byram; and Bronson Devine, of Jackson. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Students speak with Russell Branch, of Goodyear Commercial Tire, at Jobs for Eagles, a job fair on the Raymond Campus for Hinds students, on Wednesday, April 13, 2016. The Diesel Technology students are, from left, Garrett Adcock, of Byram; Hunter Tisdale, of Brandon; Trent Craft, of Magee; Noah Christy, of Byram; and Bronson Devine, of Jackson. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Rising through the ranks with enthusiasm is real for Ashlyn Ervin, of Brandon, marketing coordinator for MVP Sonic, which operates the fast-food chain’s location in Raymond. She told students at her table of her own rise from an hourly manager at the popular chain to marketer in less than two years.

From left, MVP Sonic Group marketing coordinator Ashlyn Ervin, and the franchise's Debbie Parker. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

From left, MVP Sonic Group marketing coordinator Ashlyn Ervin, and the franchise’s Debbie Parker. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“They were impressed with my enthusiasm for Sonic,” Ervin said. “My job is a combination of everything I love, Sonic, creativity, making people happy, and having fun.

Kalaishi Johnson, a Psychology major on the Raymond Campus, was drawn in by promos for United Brands, which manufactures foodservice equipment and needs welders and similarly-skilled labor.

Students speak with Dusty Gray, production manager for Unified Brands, at Jobs for Eagles, a job fair on the Raymond Campus for Hinds students, on Wednesday, April 13, 2016. From left: Princess Jones, an English Education major; Kalaishi Johnson, a Psychology major; and Cierrow Russell, a Communications major. All are from Jackson. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Students speak with Dusty Gray, production manager for Unified Brands, at Jobs for Eagles, a job fair on the Raymond Campus for Hinds students, on Wednesday, April 13, 2016. From left: Princess Jones, an English Education major; Kalaishi Johnson, a Psychology major; and Cierrow Russell, a Communications major. All are from Jackson. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“It caught my eye, with all the pictures of foodservice they have,” she said.

Dusty Gray, the company’s production manager, and Carolyn Bratton, its human resources manager, both Hinds alums, said the company participated in this semester’s fair because of the college’s workforce development programs.

“We’re seeing that we are having to rebuild those skills in the workforce that have gone away,” Gray said.

For more information on jobs for Hinds students, alumni and employers, visit www.collegecentral.com/hindscc or call Hinds’ Career Services at 601.857.3499.

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Hinds CC announces new vice president; reorganization of career-tech, workforce
Posted by
18 May

Hinds CC announces new vice president; reorganization of career-tech, workforce

Hinds Community College has reorganized three areas of the college overseeing Career and Technical programs, Workforce Development and Adult Education into one division under a new vice president.

The new division, approved on May 6 by the Hinds Community College Board of Trustees, is being headed by current Hinds employee Dr. Chad Stocks, whose new title is now vice president for Workforce Development and Coordination of Career/Technical Education and associate dean of Career and Technical Education for the Raymond Campus.

Sherry Franklin, Rankin Campus career and technical dean since 2013, has been tapped to oversee career-technical education for the entire district. She is being promoted to Associate Vice President for Career and Technical Education and district director of Career and Technical Education, along with her current role as Rankin Campus Career and Technical dean.

Chad Stocks

Chad Stocks

Sherry Franklin

Sherry Franklin

For the past year, Stocks has assumed an increasing role in working with area employers to develop partnerships that benefit our students and industry.

“Dr. Stocks has proven to be creative and innovative in providing programs that meet the needs of business and industry in our service area. He understands that developing and growing a skilled workforce is very important to employers. He’s the right person to lead those efforts,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse.

Stocks is a 1991 graduate of Hinds Community College. He earned a bachelor’s degree in agricultural and extension education in 1993, a master’s in genetics and animal breeding in 1995 and a doctorate degree in community college leadership and administration in 2012, all from Mississippi State University.

Stocks has been employed at the Raymond Campus since 2002, first as lead instructor and district program coordinator for agribusiness management. He became assistant dean for career and technical education in August 2006 and was promoted to associate dean in 2010. The title of associate vice president for Workforce Training was added in August 2014.

“Hinds Community College continues to provide quality education, training and service to constituents in its service district as well as the rest of the state. Hinds has a proven track record of working with students and employers to make sure the talent pipeline continues to keep our economy strong,” Stocks said.

Stocks said he is “looking forward to continuing the mission of training the state’s workforce through career and technical and workforce training. This is a rare opportunity to fully utilize all of the skill sets that my education, leadership and work experiences have prepared me for.”

Franklin holds her undergraduate and graduate degrees in business education from Jackson State University. Before coming to Hinds she taught business and computer technology at the Jackson Career Development Center and then worked with the State Department of Education as program coordinator for business and computer technology.

“Sherry Franklin is very qualified and will provide excellent leadership and coordination of career and technical education at the district level,” Muse said.

Franklin has been with Hinds since 2004. She was formerly the tech prep coordinator and joined the Rankin Campus staff as director of the Pearl-Rankin Career Center.  Her stint at Hinds includes dean of students from 2011 to 2013.

“Career and Technical Education provides the pathway for the education and training necessary for filling the ‘middle-skilled’ occupations currently in demand,” Franklin said. “The reorganization at Hinds Community College will have a positive impact on continuing to offer high-quality programs of study while promoting sustainable industry partnerships.

“As we move forward, I plan to coordinate career and technical programs of study with workforce training opportunities that will allow our students to obtain stackable credentials and leave Hinds CC with the necessary skills for positive placement,” she said.

The reorganization was set in motion by the impending June 30 retirement of Dr. Sue Powell, who has served for 12 years as vice president for the Rankin Campus, Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center and Occupational Programs.

On May 6, the college announced the hiring of Dr. Norman Session, currently principal of Pisgah High School in Rankin County, as the new vice president for the Rankin Campus and Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center, effective July 1, 2015.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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