http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students

Posts by tag: Associate Degree Nursing

Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students
Posted by
03 March

Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students

JACKSON – A career in healthcare is what Megan Irby wanted to pursue since she worked as a hospital secretary more than 20 years ago.

Now a mother of two teenagers, Irby, 40, of Vicksburg, can’t get started soon enough.

Megan Irby, center, places a stethoscope on a manikin during a demonstration inside the Associate Degree Nursing laboratory at the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At left is her daughter, Kaitlyn. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Megan Irby, center, places a stethoscope on a manikin during a demonstration inside the Associate Degree Nursing laboratory at the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At left is her daughter, Kaitlyn. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I can’t wait until I get into nursing school,” Irby said. “I’m in my second semester at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus taking pre-requisites and I hope to be in school next spring.”

Andrea Ellis, 18, of Jackson, plans to start a life of caring for others right away as well.

“I want to be a neonatal nurse,” said Ellis, a senior at Murrah High School whose desire to study nursing was formed by her experience as a patient. “I was in a car crash last summer and saw all the work they do.”

Both were among about 150 people who attended the Spring 2017 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Thursday, March 2 at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

Prospective students and others toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty, explored the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

Andrea Ellis, left, places a stethoscope on a manikin during a demonstration inside the Associate Degree Nursing laboratory at the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At right is Rebecca Cockrell, a clinical placement coordinator in the lab. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Andrea Ellis, left, places a stethoscope on a manikin during a demonstration inside the Associate Degree Nursing laboratory at the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At right is Rebecca Cockrell, a clinical placement coordinator in the lab. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Guests spoke with our faculty one-on-one to learn about our programs of study and the promising careers in healthcare that Hinds graduates obtain,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

Programs showcased included Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emergency Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Health Care Assistant, Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Nursing Assistant and Phlebotomy.

“Graduates of our programs are employed at rates of 90 to 100 percent within a year of graduation and consistently meet national benchmarks for licensure/registry pass rates,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean of Nursing and Allied Health.

The program’s solid reputation has Paula Palmertree, of Florence, back in school for a subject that’s all around her.

Paula Palmertree, center foreground, visits with nursing program coordinators during the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Paula Palmertree, center foreground, visits with nursing program coordinators during the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I want to go into pediatrics for sure,” Palmertree said. “I have friends and family with children who have special needs.”

Like Irby, whose first career she describes as simply being a mom, Yolanda Ellis, of Jackson, is anxious to build a healthcare career. In her case, it would be adding to her current credentials as a certified nursing assistant.

“I love working with patients, especially older people,” Ellis said. “I like to listen to them because they can teach us so much.”

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines. The Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center is at 1750 Chadwick Drive. For more information on individual programs, call 601.376.4807 or visit http://www.hindscc.edu. 

Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students
Yolanda Ellis, right foreground, visits with nursing program coordinators during the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At right is her daughter, Janavia. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Yolanda Ellis, right foreground, visits with nursing program coordinators during the Spring 2017 Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. At right is her daughter, Janavia. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Corey Lilley, a senior at Terry High School, observes a demonstation in the Respiratory Care Technology laboratory during the 2017 Spring Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Tilley is flanked by his parents, Loretta and Marvin Lilley. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Corey Lilley, a senior at Terry High School, observes a demonstration in the Respiratory Care Technology laboratory during the 2017 Spring Nursing Showcase on March 2 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Tilley is flanked by his parents, Loretta and Marvin Lilley. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

2 Comments Off on Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students 306 03 March, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Rankin College Day draws hundreds to Muse Center
Posted by
27 February

Hinds CC Rankin College Day draws hundreds to Muse Center

PEARL – Dwayne Draper was switched on to the idea of working with electrical systems while volunteering in the community and wants to hone his skills in college.

“I was around electrical work when I helped build churches with my church, and I just liked it,” said Draper, a junior at Puckett High School. “I’d like to get into some kind of electrical engineering.”

Casey Hudson, left, and Dwayne Draper, right, both Puckett High School juniors, check out the Information Systems Technology exhibit at Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Casey Hudson, left, and Dwayne Draper, right, both Puckett High School juniors, check out the Information Systems Technology exhibit at Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Draper was among about 300 high school juniors, seniors and others who attended Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus, which featured exhibits for all academic and career-tech programs, activities and organizations Hinds has to offer.

For those still studying for their high school diploma, it’s a time to find out how Hinds’ programs of study can build a successful career.

“My mom and grandmother are in the medical field,” said Ashlee Johnson, a senior at McLaurin High School, in Star, as she took part in an IV push demonstration at Hinds’ Associate Degree Nursing program table. She plans to pursue studies in pediatric nursing. “Plus, I’ve always enjoyed helping people.”

 

Ashlee Johnson, a senior at McLaurin High School, takes part in an IV push demonstration at the Associate Degree Nursing station during Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. At left, Katherine Robinson, an ADN student, looks on as Alicia Ishee, a Nursing instructor, oversees the demonstration. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Ashlee Johnson, a senior at McLaurin High School, takes part in an IV push demonstration at the Associate Degree Nursing station during Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. At left, Katherine Robinson, an ADN student, looks on as Alicia Ishee, a Nursing instructor, oversees the demonstration. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Prospective students interacted with faculty and Hinds students about admissions, scholarships, majors, student life and more.

“We look forward to many of the hundreds of juniors and seniors from Rankin County and the surrounding area enrolling at the Rankin Campus and taking advantage of what we have to offer.” said Dr. Norman Session, vice president of the Rankin Campus and the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

Brandon Theard, a Richland High School senior, has his sights set on helping people recover from injuries both on fields of play and off.

“I want to go into sports medicine,” Theard said. “If I can’t be part of the game, I want to help people in it.”

Lorron LaChance, and her mother, Regina, both of Madison, visited the come-and-go expo after finding out about it during a college fair for their homeschool group. The Biology program exhibit was an attraction for Lorron, who loves science and animals.

“I’ve worked with animals in a habitat, so I want to do something with animals, maybe even marine biology,” she said.

Hinds CC Rankin College Day draws hundreds
Brandon Theard, a Richland High School senior, drops a chip in a game of Plinko to win prizes at Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Theard wants to study exercise science and pursue a career in sports medicine. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Brandon Theard, a Richland High School senior, drops a chip in a game of Plinko to win prizes at Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Theard wants to study exercise science and pursue a career in sports medicine. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Regina LaChance, left, and Lorron LaChance, of Madison, talks to Biology program chair Daneice Williams at Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. The Biology program booth was outfitted with an "Under The Sea" theme, Williams said, with bubbles and balloons.

Regina LaChance, left, and Lorron LaChance, of Madison, talks to Biology program chair Daneice Williams at Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. The Biology program booth was outfitted with an “Under The Sea” theme, Williams said, with bubbles and balloons.

1 Comments Off on Hinds CC Rankin College Day draws hundreds to Muse Center 305 27 February, 2017 News more
Hinds CC named among top degree-producing colleges for nursing, health students
Posted by
19 October

Hinds CC named among top degree-producing colleges for nursing, health students

RAYMOND – Hinds Community College has been named as one of the top degree-producing community colleges in the United States in registered nursing and related fields by Community College Week, a national publication covering the nation’s more than 1,000 community colleges and technical schools.

“The Nursing and Allied Health programs have enjoyed the support of our College administrators as we continue to prepare students to be competent, caring health care practitioners,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean of the Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. “The faculty have a wealth and variety of clinical experiences that enhance the rigorous programs of study. These rankings validate our commitment to meet the needs of our community stakeholders which include students, health care agencies, and consumers of health care.”

The ratings involved statistics reported to the U.S. Department of Education for the 2014-15 academic year, the most recent year of nationally available data.

Hinds is ranked 17th in the Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing category. Degrees conferred totaled 246, for a 29 percent increase over 2013-14. Hinds’ Associate Degree Nursing program celebrates its 50th year in existence this year.

The college also ranked highly, 22nd, in the Health Professions & Related Programs category. Those degrees totaled 439, for a 14 percent increase. Hinds was the only Mississippi community college to make either list.

Prospective nursing student Taylor Williams listens as student Jennifer Lariccia talks about the learning lab during a tour at the Hinds Community College Nursing/Allied Health Center Showcase event on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. The event was an open house for prospective students interested in programs offered at the campus. Information booths and learning lab tours were available. 

Prospective nursing student Taylor Williams listens as student Jennifer Lariccia talks about the learning lab during a tour at the Hinds Community College Nursing/Allied Health Center Showcase event on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. The event was an open house for prospective students interested in programs offered at the campus. Information booths and learning lab tours were available.

Hinds offers the broadest selection of nursing and allied health programs in the state, including Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emergency Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Health Care Assistant, Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Nursing Assistant and Phlebotomy.

A full slate of nursing and allied health programs are offered at Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center off Chadwick Drive near Merit Health Central, formerly Central Mississippi Medical Center. The Rankin Campus in Pearl offers Practical Nursing, Associate Degree Nursing and Medical Assisting Technology. The Vicksburg-Warren Campus offers Practical Nursing and Transition to RN.

Hinds among top degree-producing colleges for nursing, allied health
0 Comments Off on Hinds CC named among top degree-producing colleges for nursing, health students 410 19 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students
Posted by
09 September

Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students

JACKSON – Careers in healthcare often come from life experiences that put people up close and personal with matters of life and death.

Tiffany Roberts and Al Brennan, both of Pearl and prospective students in programs offered at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, see nursing school as chances to repay or improve on gifts of life.

Tiffany Roberts, second from left, of Pearl, listens to a presentation in the Associate Degree Nursing Learning Lab at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Tiffany Roberts, second from left, of Pearl, listens to a presentation in the Associate Degree Nursing Learning Lab at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“When I was 15, my brother had an accident and spent several months in an ICU,” said Roberts, a mother of three who’s ready to go back to school in the medical field. “I knew at that point in time, standing in his room, what I wanted to do.”

Brennan used to work behind the camera making television commercials. A series of medical experiences led to a switch to healthcare. Now, he’s a mental health technician has his sights set on a career of service in nursing.

Al Brennan, of Pearl, speaks with Kim Neely, coordinator of Continuing Education for Short Term Programs at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Al Brennan, of Pearl, speaks with Kim Neely, coordinator of Continuing Education for Short Term Programs at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“My grandmother had Alzheimer’s, then my son and I have been to an ER in the past, and I’ve been through bad experiences,” he said. “It was just the insensitivity in patient care that really got my attention. I’d want to be the type of nurse that would want to reach out and show compassion, work with doctors and help the patient.”

Both were among about 120 people who attended the 2016 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 6 at NAHC.

Prospective students and others toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty, explored the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

“Guests spoke with our faculty one-on-one to learn about our programs of study and the promising careers in healthcare that Hinds graduates obtain,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

Programs showcased included Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emergency Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Health Care Assistant, Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Nursing Assistant and Phlebotomy.

“Graduates of our programs are employed at rates of 90 to 100 percent within a year of graduation and consistently meet national benchmarks for licensure/registry pass rates,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean of Nursing and Allied Health.

The program’s solid reputation brought Rachel Norton, of Clinton, back to earn additional credentials as she builds her career.

Rachel Norton, of Clinton, seeks information about continuing her education at the 2016 Fall Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Norton is a Hinds graduate who wants to return to complete the college's Physical Therapy Assistant program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Rachel Norton, of Clinton, seeks information about continuing her education at the 2016 Fall Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Norton is a Hinds graduate who wants to return to complete the college’s Physical Therapy Assistant program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’m already graduate of Hinds,” Norton said. “I’ve come back to complete the Physical Therapy Assistant program.”

Alexis Vaughn, 16, of Brandon, has graduated a year early from high school and already has the energy to serve. She’s considering Hinds for the program’s successes and its proximity to home.

Alexis Vaughn, center foreground, speaks about the George Ball Simulation Center with support staff member Lesa McFarland at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. From left, Vaughn's mother and sister, Marsha and Madison Vaughn. On the table is a manikin used to simulate various life functions in the simulation facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Alexis Vaughn, center foreground, speaks about the Dr. George Ball Simulation Center with support staff member Lesa McFarland at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. From left, Vaughn’s mother and sister, Marsha and Madison Vaughn. On the table is a manikin used to simulate various life functions in the simulation facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Nursing is something I’ve always wanted to do because I like helping people and the impact nurses have on people’s lives,” Vaughn said.

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

The Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center is at 1750 Chadwick Drive. For more information on individual programs, call 601-376-4807 or visit http://www.hindscc.edu. 

0 Comments Off on Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students 358 09 September, 2016 News more
Disciple of nursing icons credits Hinds ADN program’s ‘hands-on’ approach
Posted by
15 July

Disciple of nursing icons credits Hinds ADN program’s ‘hands-on’ approach

JACKSON – A stellar career for Becky Tustain teaching aspiring nurses in Hinds’ Associate Degree Nursing program began with just a small request of her husband.

“When I came here in 1975, I asked my family for two years to go to school,” she said. “I didn’t think I could ask my family to give me but two years. I’ve gone on to a lot since then, but in my heart, I’m an associate degree nurse.”

Becky Tustain, a retired former instructor in the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College, shows equipment in the learning lab at the college's Nursing Allied Health Center. She and fellow instructors designed the lab when the center was built in 1982. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Becky Tustain, a retired former instructor in the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College, shows equipment in the learning lab at the college’s Nursing Allied Health Center. She and fellow instructors designed the lab when the center was built in 1982. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

A decade out of Central High School in Jackson and already a mother of one of her three children, Tustain grabbed ahold of an education in nursing that morphed quickly into a profession. She earned her ADN credential from Hinds in 1977, then moved on to William Carey College for her bachelor’s five years later, all the while working as an instructor in Hinds’ program and a staff nurse at Mercy Regional Medical Center in Vicksburg, where she settled and still resides.

She completed her master’s in Nursing Education from the University of Mississippi in 1986. She retired from Hinds in 1995 to pursue a Nurse Practitioner’s credential, which she earned from Mississippi University for Women in 1998.

Such a quick turnaround from learning to teaching in the program meant she was with ladies she still calls the “icons” of the nursing program, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.

“Eunice Pace was our first dean at NAHC, then it was Bobbie Anderson,” she said. “We had Mildred Hearn, Dixie Keyes, Kay Stubblefield Jones, Linda Hughes, Sherry Avenmarg, Patty Baker.

“I knew I had a good core,” she said. “My mother had a stroke and my father had a heart attack during the few weeks between graduation and boards, so I didn’t get to study. I walked into boards, and passed them. That was because of that faculty.”

Tustain’s timeline teaching in the college’s nursing program runs closely with that of the Nursing/Allied Health Center itself, into which the program moved in 1982 from smaller venues on the Raymond Campus.

“When I started teaching, I volunteered to come in before my contract began because I wanted to start out doing it right,” she said. “Back then, the program was all done in this little-bitty room in the science building. But, we were much more functional than when it was in the old house and it had supplies. And we had some great faculty teaching me.”

There was no down time between the move to the new facilities and the teaching schedule.

“Dr. Muse said we will teach on that Friday and Monday, and we’d just move over the weekend,” Tustain said. “The moving company moved the heavy conference tables and other equipment, but they didn’t know how to set it up. It took about 20 of us women faculty, but we got the beds in and set them up. We moved Friday afternoon, we worked all day Saturday and Sunday, and we all taught Monday. Now, is that not teamwork?”

Moving into it might have been a group project, but her mark on the learning lab remains, down to the positioning of electrical outlets and mirrors above the beds so students could see what they’re doing – commonplace now, but unique among nursing programs at the time.

“The learning lab is my baby,” Tustain said. “I designed it to where student and instructor could see what they were doing, with the mirrors overhead.”

In 1985, Tustain, Anderson and ADN instructors in a handful of neighboring states organized what is today the Organization for Associate Degree Nursing. Anderson was its first president.

“The group was formed in order to protect AD nursing as an entry-level program for registered nursing as a whole,” Tustain said.

“It allowed people who couldn’t give four years of a financial contribution outside of work to do it.”

The ADN program’s brand is strong in Mississippi and in medical circles because of its tradition of quality instruction, she said.

“We were one of the larger and productive programs, and our pass rates were good, so everybody wanted Hinds nurses,” she said. “It’s because we did direct care. The faculty went with the student and did direct care. We didn’t just send them out to observe. It was hands-on learning.”

 

0 Comments Off on Disciple of nursing icons credits Hinds ADN program’s ‘hands-on’ approach 675 15 July, 2016 News more
From hamburgers to healthcare, Hinds CC alum has taken care of his customers
Posted by
15 July

From hamburgers to healthcare, Hinds CC alum has taken care of his customers

Note: The following story appears in the summer issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

JACKSON – Before Carl Mangum was certified to take a pulse, he could still take an order – either crispy or with fries, that is.

“In a former life, I was a restaurant manager,” Mangum said of his days working in chicken and burger outlets in the Jackson area. “I’m a graduate of Hamburger University – on the dean’s list.”

Dr. Carl Mangum, an instructor at the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing, demonstrates a piece of machinery in the school's learning lab. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Dr. Carl Mangum, an instructor at the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing, demonstrates a piece of machinery in the school’s learning lab. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Mangum, his wife, Christina, and three young sons came to the same crossroads where many young families find themselves. “I was looking for something else to do. I was working for 100-plus hours a week and making very little money. I needed to do something different.”

A boyhood fascination with emergency medical technicians, spurred by a TV series, turned into a life-altering decision. “I always wanted to be a paramedic, because of the TV show “Emergency!,” from the 1970s. The show followed two paramedics in Los Angeles and their station. And so I thought it was cool.

“But, why I went back into nursing school was to make a better life for me and my family.”

He enrolled at Hinds, and the family scraped by at first, with Mangum working part-time jobs. But he hasn’t looked back since graduating in 1994.

After completing the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds, he moved on to the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s School of Nursing, where he earned his bachelor’s and a master’s, in Psychiatric Mental Health/Nurse Practitioner. He also has a Ph.D. in leadership from the University of Southern Mississippi.

His work in mental health began during his time at a program with the Mississippi State Hospital in Whitfield. It paid Mangum a monthly stipend in exchange for working with the facility as he went through school, and it became a passion.

“When I graduated, I had a job waiting for me there,” he said. “I was on their educational leave program, which means I signed up with them for four years. “Mental illness is not the dragon people claim it to be. It’s a brain disease – no different than heart disease, cancer, diabetes, anything else. It just involves the brain instead of the heart or the pancreas.”

In keeping with his passion, Mangum, of Byram, teaches a Psychiatric Nursing course at UMMC, as well as the Assessment, Fundamentals and Health Promotion courses. He’s also a certified volunteer firefighter and a HAZMAT technician. Also, he commands the Mississippi-1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team, part of the National Disaster Medical System with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

“I’ve responded to Hurricane Sandy, in 2012, and was deployed for Hurricane Ike, in 2008, in the command center in Austin, Texas,” he said. “For Hurricane Katrina, I did a lot of stuff at the Fairgrounds and Coliseum. UMMC set up a clinic there a couple of days in, to help get them medicine if they were out.”

His life in the medical field has come alongside success for wife Christina and similar career paths in the family.

She teaches math at Murrah High School and now has three master’s degrees. All three of his daughters-in-law are also nurses.

From his days at Hinds, he remembers the unique personal touch, which along with his experiences in the working world, he channels into his own teaching style.

“Nursing school is quite difficult,” he said. “It’s one of the hardest things you can choose to do. Hinds was my way of getting into the profession. The faculty was great, caring people. But, I also use principles in the hospital that I learned in the food industry, because we’re a service industry, too. It’s just with healthcare, and not hamburgers.”

Colleagues say it’s a formula that works.

“As a professional, he never settles,” said Sherri D. Franklin, director of the RN-BSN program at UMMC School of Nursing and classmate of Mangum’s during their days at Hinds. “He always seeks opportunities for development and is a great mentor to students and less-experienced co-workers.”

And it’s a certain versatility with today’s students that’s the strongest vital sign in Mangum’s life in healthcare.

“Students want that recognition and want us to be proud of and pleased with them. So, I do the high-five type of stuff to say, ‘Hey, great job!’

“And, still, if they’re doing something wrong, you want to be stern with them since we’re dealing with people’s lives here.”

 

 

0 Comments Off on From hamburgers to healthcare, Hinds CC alum has taken care of his customers 464 15 July, 2016 News more
Hinds CC RN program celebrates 50 years of teaching quality care
Posted by
14 July

Hinds CC RN program celebrates 50 years of teaching quality care

Note: The following story appears in the summer issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

It’s been 50 years and a world away for early faculty of the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College.

The program was established on the Raymond Campus in one room of the Home Economics building in fall 1966. The first class had 26 students. The Hinds ADN program is celebrating its 50-year anniversary.

“At the time, we had no learning lab as we have today,” said Bobbie Anderson, who worked in the program for 24 years and was named the Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center’s first dean shortly after it was built. “They gave us one bed in the corner of the home ec lab (on the Raymond Campus) and one manikin.”

Long before computers and lifelike manikins that can sweat, it was strictly a world of chalk and slate for aspiring nurses.

 

Hinds-50YearsNursingHinds Community College’s Associate Degree Nursing program is recognizing its 50th anniversary this year beginning with a Sept. 9 celebration, said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean for Nursing and Allied Health.
“Sept. 9 is the inaugural event in our year-long celebration of 50 years of associate degree nursing at Hinds Community College. The program has a rich heritage of providing excellent nurses throughout the past 50 years. Other events will be scheduled throughout the year to focus on our current students and alumni,” Mahaffey said.
Sponsors and other invited guests will have a luncheon at noon. “This celebration lunch will highlight alumni as well as former and current leaders of the program,” she said.

A come-and-go reception open to the community is 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Both events will be in Room 9/10 of Anderson Hall at Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center at 1750 Chadwick Dr. in Jackson.

Sponsorships for these events are available and will assist in endowing the Hinds Community College Associate Degree Nursing Alumni Scholarship. Sponsor levels are Bronze, $100; Silver, $250 and Gold, $500. Other donations to the scholarship are also welcome and appreciated.

For more information about the sponsorships, please contact Alumni Coordinator Libby Posey at 601.857.3350, or by email at olivia.posey@hindscc.edu. For more information about the celebration events, please contact Libby Mahaffey at 601.376.4950, or by email at ehmahaffey@hindscc.edu.

 

“I started teaching at Hinds in 1975,” said Gloria Coxwell, who served as assistant dean of NAHC and director of division of ADN from 1993-2005. “Teaching tools consisted of a blackboard, a piece of chalk, and, on rare occasions, slides were available. Students furiously tried to write down every word that came out of the teacher’s mouth and memorize it for the test.”

Debra Spring, a 25-year instructor and Coxwell’s successor as assistant dean, remembers being the “sage on the stage” despite being only about eight years older than her first batch of students in August 1980.

“The students I taught early in my career accepted everything I said and tried their best to meet my every demand of them,” said Spring, now the dean of Alcorn State University’s nursing school. “Today’s student expects a rationale for all of the educational requirements and challenges faculty and administrators to review processes and procedures in keeping with achievement of educational outcomes. Not a bad thing, just different.”

The program’s first director was Eunice Pace. Regular academic courses were incorporated into nursing studies. By 1968, 18 had graduated from the original class.

In those days, Mississippi didn’t mandate nursing instructors have master’s degrees. Also, students had to practice their lessons with their own friends and relatives – even down to proper bathing techniques, Anderson said.

“When it came to injections, we had sterile equipment, so there was no infection involved with it, but we had to get volunteers from family members to allow students to give injections,” she said. “I was one of the volunteers, too. That was a big order for a faculty member to do.

“Once we did that, we went directly to the patient’s bedside and a faculty member would supervise each student.”

A warm atmosphere between instructor and student prevailed, but so too did a grueling course of study worthy only for serious students, said Terri Meadows (1980), a product of the ADN program and, currently, chief nursing officer at Merit Health Madison.

“During clinicals, when we’d apply our studies in a hospital setting, all students were required to have handwritten 3-by-5 cards with specific information on all drugs that would be administered to patients in the clinical setting,” Meadows said. “I recall one student arriving at clinical unprepared and was sent home due to lack of preparedness.

“No doubt, I had a fearful respect for the instructors. It was not an easy program. It required full commitment and dedication.”

Growing enrollment in the program’s second decade, coupled with stellar and qualified faculty, steadily built Hinds’ nursing program into a gold standard of sorts in the medical community. In 1978, the program was accredited nationally.

“Third year I was there, we doubled enrollment and doubled faculty. We were sitting in offices made for one person but had two or three faculty rotating in and out,” Anderson said.

In 1979, the Jackson Chamber of Commerce commissioned a study that revealed a shortage of nurses. It became obvious the program needed to have its own location. “It made sense for the college to take whatever offer they had, and that was the space at Hinds General (Hospital),” she said.

And up it went, in just two years following groundbreaking. The $4 million Nursing Allied Health Center, next to the hospital now called Merit Health Central, was completed in 1982 and at first featured a single, 51,000-square-foot facility for all nursing and allied health programs. In 1993, the main building was renamed Anderson Hall, for its longtime director and first dean of NAHC, and a 33,000-square-foot annex building was added to house a majority of allied health program courses and academic courses.

The program has continued to expand with the 2014 opening of the Ball Simulation Center, featuring cutting-edge technology in the way of video, audio and other equipment train more than 1,000 nursing and allied health students in five simulation labs, two medical surgical patient rooms, an emergency room, a childbirth simulation area, home care lab and four debriefing rooms.

More expansion is planned with the addition of 11.5 acres of nearby property and two buildings in a swap with the Hinds County Board of Supervisors. More teaching labs and programs are planned, plus additional parking space and a direct connection to the simulation center.

With that expansion has come enrollment growth. Freshman enrollment stood at 320 for 2015-16, with a total nursing and allied health student population of 1,114. Nursing faculty now numbers 45.

Through the physical expansions, the program’s architects and instructors point to a more valuable aspect to its standing in the community – trust.

“Hinds graduates had an excellent pass rate on the licensure exam and were highly recruited for employment by area hospitals,” Coxwell said. “Throughout the years this standard of excellence has not changed.

What has changed is that both graduate competencies and practice areas have expanded greatly. In addition to hospitals, graduates are now sought after for positions in a wide variety of settings such as home health, long-term care facilities and clinics.”

It’s a reputation built with demanding study that alums and instructors say still had room for lighthearted friendships.

“What I enjoyed most was our groups of 10 for clinicals,” Meadows said. “I was part of an awesome group of people. We were supportive of one another – studying together, eating together and enjoying a lot of laughter.”

For more information about Hinds’ nursing program see the website.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 11,500 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 Comments Off on Hinds CC RN program celebrates 50 years of teaching quality care 744 14 July, 2016 News more