http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Open house planned for Simulation Center Thursday

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Open house planned for Simulation Center Thursday
Posted by
08 January

Open house planned for Simulation Center Thursday

Hinds Community College has a ribbon-cutting and open house for the new Nursing and Allied Health Simulation Center at 1820 Hospital Drive in Jackson, which is near the college’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center on Chadwick Drive. The ribbon-cutting is 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 9.

Because of limited parking, guests are asked to park at the Medical Arts Complex across the street from the Simulation Center.

“This new Nursing and Allied Health Simulation Center offers four simulation labs that will help our nursing and allied health students develop important clinical skills as they are being prepared to care for patients in local health care agencies. Simulation provides an opportunity to enhance professional competencies, experience specific clinical situations, and implement interdisciplinary care,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, Nursing and Allied Health dean.

nursing simulation_5111

 

The building was donated to the college by brothers and physicians Dr. Christopher Ball and Dr. Kyle Ball. The building formerly housed their obstetrics and gynecology practice. The renovation and equipping of the Nursing Simulation Center was made possible by a $2.5 million U.S. Department of Labor Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant.

The Nursing/Allied Health Center enrolls about 900 students each semester. While most of the simulation activities will focus on patient care experiences, all nursing and allied health programs are expected to use the Nursing and Allied Health Simulation Center for some simulated activities.

These programs include associate degree nursing, dental assisting technology, diagnostic medical sonography, emergency medical sciences, health care assistant, health information technology, medical laboratory technology, physical therapy assistant, practical nursing, radiologic technology, respiratory care technology and surgical technology.

For information on Hinds’ programs see health-related professions under http://www.hindscc.edu/departments/careertech.aspx

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Posted by on 08 January

Degree leads alum to professional fashion marketing

DeShaun Williams, a December 2012 graduate of the Raymond Campus Fashion Marketing Technology program, recently participated in working New York’s Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, Sept. 5-12, featuring the Spring 2014 Collections of major fashion designers.

“My life will never be the same again,” he said after the experience, expressing his appreciation to department chair Dana Bailey for “pushing me to work harder.”

Williams assisted the Daily Front Row online magazine with coordination of its events for New York Fashion Week.

10 alumni update Deshaun Williams Fashion_web

Williams, a 2009 graduate of Raymond High School where he also completed the high school marketing program under Emily Montgomery, learned of the opportunity through Laboratory Institute of Merchandising College’s media board. When the magazine learned of Williams’ Hinds degree, he was immediately offered a position.

He is enrolled in the Manhattan school, working on a bachelor’s degree in Fashion Marketing with a concentration in Fashion Journalism.  About three-fourths of his degree program is made up of transfer hours from his Hinds Community College program.

“My degree from Hinds Community College has allowed me to visit heights that I only once dreamed of,” he said. “After telling individuals in the fashion industry that I have a degree, I have been allowed to navigate past others and get hands-on experience in this very competitive industry.”

He credits his Hinds instructors with his success so far. “They saw the best in me when I did not, when I felt like giving up they encouraged me to continue, and lastly, they provided me with information that was more than useful to get into this industry,” he said.

His instructors on the Raymond Campus were Bailey, district coordinator and Raymond Campus chair, Leslie Staring, Barbie Ferguson, Lynn Holliday, Jo Ponder and the late Clayton Marble.

For more information, on the Hinds Fashion Marketing program, see the website at http://catalog.hindscc.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=4&poid=244

 

 

 

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Posted by on 08 January

Spring registration continues this week

Hinds Community College continues spring class registration with extended hours this week. Classes begin on Monday, Jan. 13. Students can late register through Jan. 17, after classes start, with an additional fee.

Extended registration hours are as follows:

Jan. 8-9 – 8:15 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Jan. 10 – 8:15 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Jan. 13-16 – 8:15 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Jan. 17 – 8:15 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The Rankin Campus bookstore has lots of items for sale.

New students must complete the application process and see an adviser before they can register for classes, either in person at one of six Hinds locations or online.

For information and schedules, see the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu.

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Posted by on 20 December

Mother, daughter among nearly 800 Hinds CC graduates

 The mother and daughter duo of Charlene Allen and Carla Johnson, both of Vicksburg, are particularly pleased they graduated together from Hinds Community College on Friday, Dec. 20. 

“I took extra classes so we could graduate together,” said Johnson, a business office technology major. “We’re both pretty excited.”

 Hinds CC_grad_day 2_photo01_6268_web

Carla Johnson, Charlene Allen

Allen, Johnson’s mother, an early childhood major, was already scheduled to graduate during the fall 2013 ceremony.

On the same day, Tammie Norwood, 53, received a certificate in business office technology. She will receive another certificate next semester and then graduate with an associate degree in accounting in December 2014.

 Hinds CC_grad_day 2_Photo02_6495a_web

Tammie Norwood

She started out, however, getting a General Education Development high school equivalency certificate after dropping out her senior year in high school because of family issues.

Now married with three grown children and three grandchildren, Norwood decided to return to school after an 18-year career as a floral designer. She lost her job and discovered she didn’t have the skills to get another.

“I decided it wasn’t too late to finally go to college and do what I wanted to do when I was younger,” she said. “At times it has been difficult but my family has been extremely supportive. I have been blessed. My approach has been that anything I do, I do the best I possibly can.”

Norwood decided to get the career certificates on the way to a degree because “I feel like it would look good on my resume and help my employer see the skills I have,” she said.

Hinds CC_grad_day 2_photo07_6205_web

Jane Flowers, Jackie Jackson

Graduation speaker Jane Flowers challenged graduates to behave like eagles, Hinds’ mascot, instead of chickens. She drew on a Blackfoot Indian story about an eagle that was raised by chickens in her remarks.

“Honored graduates, you are now eagles, and you are responsible for recognizing the potential in yourself,” said Flowers, Work-Based Learning coordinator at Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus as well as the faculty honoree for the legislative HEADWAE program in February.

Nearly 800 Hinds Community College students graduated over the two days in four ceremonies.  

Of those, a little more than 500 chose to participate in a ceremony. Twenty-eight graduates have perfect 4.0 grade point averages for summa cum laude, 63 have 3.60 to 3.99 grade point averages, magna cum laude and 160 have 3.20 to 3.59 grade point averages, cum laude.

For more information, see the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu.

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Posted by on 20 December

Hinds CC receives grant, forges partnership to train deckhands

Students in the Hinds Community College barge deckhand training course gather around to study more about safety in their line of work. They are, from left to right, Brock Perry of Pelahatchie, Ryan Watts of Oxford, Justin Burns of Crystal Springs and Logan Heineck of Starkville. Burns and Perry are employees of Magnolia Marine, Heineck is with Golding Barge Lines and Watss with Yazoo River Towing.

Students in the Hinds Community College barge deckhand training course gather around to study more about safety in their line of work. They are, from left to right, Brock Perry of Pelahatchie, Ryan Watts of Oxford, Justin Burns of Crystal Springs and Logan Heineck of Starkville. Burns and Perry are employees of Magnolia Marine, Heineck is with Golding Barge Lines and Watss with Yazoo River Towing.

When his mother was diagnosed with cancer, Justin Burns of Crystal Springs dropped out of high school at age 16 to help his family make ends meet. Working odd jobs, from cleaning deer to landscaping, Burns figured out through the years that he needed something more stable to provide for his family, including his new wife and child. That’s how Burns found himself graduating with a certificate from Hinds Community College, and heading to work full-time for Magnolia Marine, one of Mississippi’s leading barge companies.

Burns and nineteen other young men spent a week in December learning the safety hazards, terminology and expectations of working as a deck hand on a barge. This college’s involvement was made possible by a $2.3 million U.S. Department of Labor grant as part of a larger nine-college, eight-state consortium for community colleges along the Mississippi River. It’s part of the Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) Community College and Career Training grant program, a multi-year nearly $2 billion initiative. The grant project is aimed at expanding targeted training programs for unemployed workers, especially those impacted by foreign trade.

Working with the college is Maritime Services Group of Louisiana, a company that provides hands-on experience and promotes safety, team building and educational training. Together, Hinds Community College and Maritime are training employees of three leading Mississippi barge companies, Magnolia Marine, Yazoo River Towing and Golding Barge Line.

“These companies are not required to send their employees to this training,” said Tom McWhorter, CEO and instructor for Maritime. “They pay out of pocket to house and train these guys because they see how important it is. We are teaching these students about safety hazards, how to prevent injury and what to expect when they get out onto the water. They’re ready to jump right in as soon as they’re done, and that’s a benefit to both the employee and the company.”

So far, the program has graduated 20 employees, who all received their certificate of River Inland Decking Skills from Hinds Community College, and are ready to report for duty to their employers. Over the next three years, the college and Maritime will be providing one to two classes per month, graduating more than 300 trained employees, prepared to enter the field.

Some of the things they learn over the course of the week are how to properly wear safety devices such as respirators and protective clothing, which substances are potentially carcinogenic, how to do basic tow work, including soft lines and wire rope skills, and, most importantly, what to expect when they leave home for work.

The seven-day long training is conducted at a hotel in Vicksburg. Once trainees arrive, they are to conduct themselves as though they are on a real vessel; they must sign in with ID, wear appropriate safety attire, maintain the cleanliness of their quarters and spend hours working with equipment. The students are not allowed to leave to go home and have limited contact with their loved ones, all a simulation of what the real job will be like.

According to Casey Stubbs, crew manager for Golding Barge Line, the training is a huge bonus for the company.

“Back before we did training like this, we would hire a new crew and they would show up not really knowing what was expected of them,” he said. “They would spend hours each day trying to figure out the process of how things work. Now, our guys come on board already knowing the majority of what they will be doing. That saves us a lot of time and effort, but, most importantly, it prevents injuries and fatalities. Keeping our crew safe is a high priority.”

Breaking into the barge industry has a huge benefit for the employees, as well. After the training, all the students report to their companies as deckhands with salaries in the $20-30,000 per year range. After a period of only four years, deckhands can work their way up the ladder to become what’s called a pilot, making around $100,000 per year.

According to Dr. John Woods, Hinds Community College’s vice president of economic development and work force training, the college recognizes the great growth potential in river barge jobs. “This TAA grant will allow the college to train entry level deckhands for great, well-paying jobs,” he said.

This particularly enticed one student, Brock Perry of Pelahatchie.

“I knew when I graduated from high school that college wasn’t for me,” he said. “I wanted to find a career that didn’t necessarily require a degree, but offered a chance for me to advance, which is definitely a possibility in this industry.”

Logan Heineck of Starkville and Ryan Watts of Oxford both came into the barge industry after finding they needed more stable income. Heineck drove a delivery truck and Watts worked in fast food. Now they both have goals of becoming successful in a lucrative industry.

Burns says his ultimate goal has less to do with money and more to do with setting an example.

“I don’t want my kid to go through what I did; having to sacrifice to help your family. I want to be successful so that I can set an example of what it means to work hard and provide.”

For more information about the Department of Labor’s TAACCCT grant program, view the latest release here: http://www.dol.gov/opa/media/press/eta/ETA20130737.htm. For more information on Hinds Community College’s programs of study, including career technical programs and certificates, visit www.hindscc.edu.

 

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Posted by on 20 December

Hinds CC recognizes exceptional employees with Hinds Heroes

Hinds Community College recently named the fall 2013 group of winners in the Hinds Heroes employee recognition program at the November Board of Trustees meeting.

Hinds Heroes are chosen because they represent the college well, provide exceptional customer service to internal and external customers and constantly promote the Hinds mission of service. Winners received a lapel pin, a token of appreciation and one free day off from work.

The fall 2013 Hinds Heroes are:

Norma Jean Scrivener of Clinton, who serves as an assistant registrar in the Admissions and Records department on the Raymond Campus. She is responsible for the online catalog, athletic eligibility, building programs and courses approved by the college. She has been with Hinds for five years.

Scrivnener

Scrivnener

Randy Wilson of Utica has been with Hinds for nine years. As an instructor for the Raymond Campus, Wilson teaches electrical classes and is an authorized OSHA Outreach Trainer for 10 and 30 hours training.

Wilson

Wilson

Margaret Ann Bell of Clinton, an English instructor on the Utica Campus, has been with Hinds for 11 years. She also has worked at Hinds as a librarian.

Bell

Bell

Catherine McGill of Utica is the director of Housing at the Utica Campus and  manages three residence halls on the Utica Campus. She has been with the college for 10 years.

McGill

McGill

Amber King of Raymond teaches Beginning English, Intermediate English, Composition I and is an adviser for Associated Student Government and Phi Theta Kappa on the Raymond Campus.  She has been with Hinds for five years.

King

King

Timothy Rush of Jackson, a 13-year employee, is the dean of Students for the Utica and Vicksburg -Warren campuses.

Rush

Rush

Ernest Dixon of Raymond has been with Hinds for seven years.  Dixon is a residence hall director for the Raymond Campus and oversees the hall and staff.

Dixon

Dixon

Jean Williamson of Mendenhall has been with Hinds for more than 14 years. Williamson serves as the administrative secretary for the vice president’s office on the Rankin Campus and coordinates day-to-day operations.

Williamson

Williamson

Eric Smith of Florence, director of the Career Technical Center on the Rankin Campus, has been at Hinds for 15 years. He is responsible for the high school career and technical center on the Rankin Campus.

Smith

Smith

Jan Carraway of Utica has been with Hinds for 14 years. Carraway is the district supply buyer for the Raymond Bookstore and is also responsible for ordering supplies and gifts for all six Hinds bookstores.

Carraway

Carraway

Patricia Grantham of Brandon has been with Hinds for 27 years. Grantham is a Child Development Tech instructor on the Rankin Campus.  She also advises and implements state objectives for Child Development Technology.

Grantham

Grantham

Libby Mahaffey of Raymond, dean of the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, has been with Hinds for 31 years.  She oversees all nursing and allied health programs.

Mahaffey

Mahaffey

The next group of Heroes will be named at the April 2014 Board of Trustees meeting. The program is sponsored by the Hinds Community College Foundation and coordinated by the foundation office. To nominate someone deserving of recognition, visit the Hinds web page at www.hindscc.edu or contact the foundation office and submit a nomination by paper. Nominations can be submitted at any time.

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Posted by
19 December

Nursing, allied health students graduate Dec. 19

Medora McNair of Brandon, who describes herself as “22 times 2,” said getting her associate degree in nursing at Hinds Community College Thursday was “a long time in coming.”

The 44-year-old wife and mother, whose daughter is a pre-law student at Mississippi College, had one degree as a certified nursing assistant and decided to return to become a nurse. Having two college students in the household at the same time made life interesting, she said.

 

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Medora McNair

“I guess it was just my time,” said McNair, who plans to return to her former employer, Premier Medical Group in Jackson. “I’ve always wanted to do it.”

Nearly 800 Hinds students graduate Thursday and Friday, Dec. 20, in a series of four ceremonies on the Raymond Campus.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse said those are record numbers for a fall ceremony. “We are pleased with the fact that we are continuing to graduate more students each year,” he said.

Of those, a little more than 500 chose to participate in a ceremony. Twenty-eight graduates have perfect 4.0 grade point averages for summa cum laude, 63 have 3.60 to 3.99 grade point averages, magna cum laude and 160 have 3.20 to 3.59 grade point averages, cum laude.

 “Only you can define your success,” said Charlotte Dupre’, chief executive officer for Central Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, who spoke Thursday to graduates of Hinds Community College’s nursing and allied health programs.

Dupre’ quizzed her staff members about what she should tell the nursing and allied health graduates about post-graduation and came up with a 12-point message

Those include learning how to handle difficult patients and family members, looking professional learning compassion and empathy.

“It is a never-ending story. As we continue to grow our services, we learn new methods and gain new experiences,” she said.

Jane Flowers, Work-Based Learning coordinator at Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus as well as the faculty honoree for the legislative HEADWAE program in February, is the speaker on Dec. 20 for students whose last names begin with A to J at 10 a.m. and those whose last names begin with K to Z at 2 p.m.

For more information, see the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu

 

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Posted by on 16 December

Utica Campus inducts PTK members

The Utica Campus Alpha Beta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) held its 39th induction ceremony recently that included five student and five honorary inductees. The ceremonial theme was “The Culture of Competition.”

PHI THETA KAPPA PHOTO 2013 A_web

 

Honorees and advisers include, front from left, Christine Councell of Vicksburg, an early childhood education major; Kimwanna Terry of Utica, a general studies/medical assistant technology major; Beverly Trimble, PTK adviser; Kenjamin Newsome of Hazlehurst, an electronics technology major; Mildred Davis of Raymond, an early childhood education major; Von Shinnie of Jackson, Alpha Beta Xi president, a computer technology major; PTK adviser Denise Taylor and LeKeyo Tyler of Port Gibson, an electronics technology major; back, honorary members Dr. Bobby Cooper, Humanities Division chair; Deborah Danner, computer science instructor; Dr. Mae C. Jackson, Math and Science Division chair, Dr. Debra Mays-Jackson, vice president for Utica and Vicksburg-Warren campuses/Administrative Services, and former PTK president Ollie Riley Jr.

Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society serves to recognize and encourage the academic achievement of two-year college students and provide opportunities for individual growth and development through honors, leadership and service programming. Today, Phi Theta Kappa is the largest honor society in American higher education with more than 2.5 million members and 1,275 chapters worldwide. In 1929, the American Association of Community Colleges recognized Phi Theta Kappa as the official honor society for two-year colleges.

For more information, see http://www.hindscc.edu/studentlife/activities/clubs/ptk/default.aspx

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