http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC helps Farr dance her way to Mrs. Mississippi title

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Hinds CC helps Farr dance her way to Mrs. Mississippi title
Posted by
02 January

Hinds CC helps Farr dance her way to Mrs. Mississippi title

Note: The following story appears in the winter issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website. To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here.

RAYMOND – Getting back into shape after her daughters were born meant dusting off the old tiara for Marisa Lepard Farr.

“I wanted to set a goal for myself to get back in shape, so I decided to go for it this past January,” Farr said of her decision to compete in the 2017 Mrs. Mississippi United States pageant in Tunica in June, as Mrs. Rankin County.

Marisa Lepard Farr

It was quite the splashy return to the stage for Farr, a Terry native who won this past year’s state title and took it to Orlando, where she competed for Mrs. United States a month later. Though the run ended there, the former Montage Theatre of Dance member at Hinds Community College looks forward to big things during her yearlong reign as the state’s top married beauty queen.

Her platform as this year’s title-holder stems from an experience she had while about a year ago driving along Highway 18 in Brandon. She came upon a terrible wreck scene that resulted in the deaths of two children, aged just three and five years old.

“They were not in proper car seats at all,” she said. “I have always believed in car seat safety for my own children, so seeing the wreck and the negative impact of not using proper car seats took it to a different level for me.”

Farr, who now lives in Flowood, is pursuing certification as a Child Passenger Safety Technician and plans to lobby state lawmakers to strengthen child seat safety laws.

It’ll be a chance to do what she’s done a fair amount of since her college days – teaching.

She was part of the first Montage Theatre of Dance troupe, started by current program director Tiffany Jefferson. After Hinds, she moved on to the University of Southern Mississippi, where she majored in Elementary Education. She taught middle school briefly and still teaches dance, at Northwest Rankin Middle School. Currently, she is a sales agent for Younique, a cosmetics maker. She and husband, Coleman, have two daughters, Sarah and Ava.

She had done Miss Teen Mississippi USA and competed in the Eagle Beauty Revue as a Hinds student. “After I got married, a friend suggested I do Mrs. Mississippi,” she said. “I didn’t know they had pageants for married women.”  She won first runner-up in a few of them before having her two daughters.

Jefferson choreographed a solo routine in one of those pageants.

“Marissa had a strong interest in dance and pageantry even while she was here at Hinds,” Jefferson said. “A course she studied with me was Jazz/Hip Hop, and during that time we studied the Bob Fosse style. She gravitated toward it with fondness and decided to do ‘All That Jazz’ for her talent.”

Her dancing feet led her to what is now the state’s community college system’s only full dance program.

“We had no dance class in high school, so when I came to Hinds I randomly signed up for a jazz dance class,” she said. “It happened to be Tiffany Jefferson’s very first dance class that eventually became Montage.”

“We did a few competitions that first year, and traveled to San Antonio and danced. She’s really taken off since then and helped get opportunities for her dancers.”

Hinds has a special place in her heart, as she and Coleman met while members of the Baptist Student Union and their career paths fell into place after some initial stress.

“It was a blessing to me at that time in life,” she said. “After high school, I had planned to go into fashion merchandising at another university in the state. But the program wasn’t there anymore once I went to apply. I didn’t know what I was going to do. Thankfully, I got a full scholarship to Hinds, which was helpful to my parents at the time. Hinds was like my little sanctuary, where everything fell into place with what I wanted to do with my life, which was to teach.

“My husband and I talk about it all the time, about how if just one thing been different, we’d have never known each other or had our beautiful children. We have Hinds and the BSU to thank for that.”

0 909 02 January, 2018 News more
Deadline for Hinds CC Foundation scholarships is Feb. 15
Posted by
02 January

Deadline for Hinds CC Foundation scholarships is Feb. 15

New or current students who want to apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation Scholarship for the 2018-2019 academic year have until Feb. 15, 2018, to turn in their complete application packets. 

About 85 percent of students at Hinds receive financial aid of some kind. Through the generosity of donors, the Hinds Community College Foundation awards scholarships to more than 600 students each year ranging from $300 to $2,400. The Foundation manages nearly 300 scholarship funds.

The application process for Foundation Scholarships is easy. Students can access the required forms on the college web site. Go to www.hindscc.edu and click on the Admissions tab.

Unless otherwise indicated, Foundation Scholarships are awarded to full-time students who enroll in a minimum of 15 credit hours. Minimum grade point average varies per Foundation scholarship; however all applicants must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above. Students wishing to be considered for scholarships on the basis of financial need should have the results of their Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) sent to Hinds CC prior to the Feb. 15 deadline.

Foundation scholarship candidates must submit all required documentation to the Office of Enrollment Services, P.O. Box 1100, Raymond, MS 39154 for consideration. Scholarship decisions are generally made in early April and are awarded for the fall semester. For questions, please call 601.857.3744 or email scholarships@hindscc.edu.

Persons interested in providing scholarships may contact Robyn Burchfield, Foundation specialist, at 601.857.3800.

Another scholarship opportunity for high school seniors is the ACT scholarship. ACT scholarships range from $1,000-$3,000 per semester. Students who attend Hinds as their first college after high school graduation will automatically receive an ACT scholarships if they have a 21 or above on the ACT. Eligible recipients must also be a Mississippi resident.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 2234 02 January, 2018 News more
Hinds CC academic, technical graduates thrived upon return to school
Posted by
18 December

Hinds CC academic, technical graduates thrived upon return to school

PEARL – Justice Munn is a third-generation member of his family’s business, Munn Enterprises, but found himself at a crossroads just a year ago in his young, adult life.

His skills as a mechanic were being tested mightily by the evolving technology of today’s diesel engines. “You can’t even diagnose today’s engines without a computer,” Munn said.

Justice Munn (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’m a mechanic and I wanted to return to school for better pay and a chance to open my own shop,” said Munn, of Sumrall, as he prepared to earn career and technical certificates from Hinds Community College during graduation ceremonies held Dec. 15 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Being in the Diesel Equipment Technology program helped him hone his skills and opened doors to earning further credentials down the road – all the while setting him up to earn more money now.

“I enjoyed it at Hinds,” he said. “I would do it again in a heartbeat.”

Hinds Community College graduated more than 1,000 students in the three ceremonies.

“The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life. And, while the graduates who sit upon this stage today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life and to contribute to the communities in which we live,” said Hinds president Dr. Clyde Muse in his address to graduates.

Student diplomas this year included a gold seal celebrating the college’s 100th anniversary.

Among the graduates, 129 achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 74 achieved magna cum laude, a 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 21 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Lychanda Brown, left, and Jennifer Burnett (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

The spirit of achievement also reached Hinds faculty who returned to the classroom to build skills.

“In cosmetology, we have to market ourselves anyway,” said Lychanda Brown, of Raymond, an instructor of Cosmetology at the Utica Campus. Brown earned an Associate of Applied Science in marketing, as well as career and technical certificates.

For Jennifer Burnett, a custodian on the Utica Campus, it was a chance to get into computer programming, in which she earned a career certificate. “It was time to move on up,” Burnett said.

Speaking to academic and career and technical education graduates was Joy Rhoads, a history and geography instructor at the Rankin Campus and coordinator of the campus’ Honors Institute.

Rhoads told graduates to be open to all the challenges life might bring after graduation, using her own experience as a master’s student as an example.

“I realized, very quickly, that being Joy the student was a vastly different experience than being Ms. Rhoads the instructor,” Rhoads said. “Discerning how to effectively balance my family, my job, and my schoolwork was another challenge to an already challenging degree path. It truly was an epiphany – my light bulb moment – when I understood that all my students face many of these very things and more. So, when you are navigating what comes next, be open to being humbled.”

From left, Ashlyn Cole, Tomaz Buckley and Crisanthony Frazier, all of whom earned degrees Dec. 15 with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing program (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

LaKendra Cork, right, of Louise, prepares for graduation ceremonies Dec. 15 at Hinds Community College. Cork earned an Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Education Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left, Meagan Frey and Tia Fortenberry,
both of whom completed the Paralegal Technology program (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jonathan Graham was among more than 1,000 who graduated Dec. 15 from Hinds Community College. Graham earned an Associate of Applied Science degree and was part of the M2M program at Hinds. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left, Jason Holman, Taylor Houston and Cortland Hay, all of whom earned credentials after completing computer technology programs at the college (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Bethany C. Johnson, center, of Vicksburg, was among more than 1,000 who graduated from Hinds Community College in ceremonies held Dec. 15. She earned an Associate of Arts degree in Veterinary Technology. With her, from left, is her boyfriend Douglas Vice, her sister Ashley Johnson, her mother Beverly Johnson, her brother-in-law Richard Berryman, her father Jimmy Johnson and sister Jamie Johnson. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left, Madison Spell, of Raymond, and Martha McPhail, of Kosciusko (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, Rico West and Richard Newell, both of Jackson and earned credentials in Welding Technology (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left, Secrett Winters and Denitta White, both of Jackson and earned degrees in Business Technology (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

0 630 18 December, 2017 News more
Hinds CC nursing, allied health graduates celebrate with family, friends
Posted by
15 December

Hinds CC nursing, allied health graduates celebrate with family, friends

PEARL – Lakashia Robinson already had a servant’s heart, having earned a degree from Hinds Community College a few years ago, in surgical technology, and caring for patients at Merit Health River Oaks.

But, she wanted to take her life and career higher. As she pursued her Associate of Applied Science degree in nursing, Robinson, 26, of Jackson, felt it was imperative to share that heart with classmates and the community.

Lakashia Robinson

“Every year, we go out into the community and do one big event,” Robinson said. “As vice president of the Mississippi Organization of Associate Degree Nursing Student Association, I organized a group of students to participate in the benefit walk for breast cancer and we raised $1,900 – which is amazing since as students we don’t have to donate – but we did!”

As an OB-tech, her caregiving skills are tested daily.

“You don’t know caring for someone until you have a pregnant woman sitting there in tears and the only thing you can do to comfort her is say, ‘It’s going to be OK,’” she said.

Robinson will be a second-generation nurse once she completes her degree at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, as her mother is a nurse. Among her many sources of inspiration was the family and service-oriented atmosphere at Hinds.

“I didn’t want to just be a nursing student,” she said. “I wanted to be a nursing student who served the community. Our college embodies that very thing.”

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse delivers an address to one of three graduation ceremonies Dec. 15 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Robinson was among more than 1,000 students who graduated in three ceremonies Dec. 15 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus, beginning with the nursing and allied health students at 8 a.m.

“The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life. And, while the graduates who sit upon this stage today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life and to contribute to the communities in which we live,” said Hinds president Dr. Clyde Muse in his address to graduates.

Student diplomas this year included a gold seal celebrating the college’s 100th anniversary.

Among the graduates, 129 achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 74 achieved magna cum laude, a 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 21 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Also among honors graduates was Derrick Williams, a classmate of Robinson’s who switched careers.

Derrick Williams, left, and Lakashia Robinson

“I was driving a furniture truck for a living when my sister suggested I get into this,” Williams said before walking across the stage a cum laude graduate. “I gave it a shot and now I want to be a nurse practitioner working with mental health patients.”

Speaking to nursing and allied health graduates was Joy Rhoads, a history and geography instructor at the Rankin Campus and coordinator of the campus’ Honors Institute.

Rhoads told graduates to be open to all the challenges life might bring after graduation, using her own experience as a master’s student as an example.

“I realized quickly, that being Joy the student was a vastly different experience than being Ms. Rhoads the instructor,” Rhoads said. “Discerning how to effectively balance my family, my job, and my schoolwork was another challenge to an already challenging degree path. It truly was an epiphany – my light bulb moment – when I understood that all my students face many of these very things and more. So, when you are navigating what comes next, be open to being humbled.”

Joy Rhoads, a history and geography instructor and coordinator of the Honors Institute at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, delivers an address to graduates in one of three ceremonies Dec. 15. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Zach Hamm, second from left, was among more than 1,000 who received credentials Dec. 15 from Hinds Community College. With him, from left, is friend Robbie Hayes, sister Tina Hamm and friend Brianne Johnston. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presley McCord, right, shares a hug from a family member after earning a Career Certificate in Practical Nursing Dec. 15 from Hinds Community College (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Raenica Phillips, center, of Meridian, was among more than 1,000 graduates of Hinds Community College during ceremonies held Dec. 15. She earned a Career Certificate in Practical Nursing. With her, from left, is her mother, Earthie Fluker, and grandmother, Evelyn Martin. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left, Allyson Tramel and Cynthia Killen, who earned degrees by completing the Dental Hygiene Technology program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Marion Wade, left, helps adjust a pin on the collar worn by Jessica Fitzgerald, right, during graduation ceremonies Dec. 15 at Hinds Community College. Each completed the Associate Degree Nursing program. ( Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 2694 15 December, 2017 News more
Hinds CC honors Foundation scholarship recipients
Posted by
14 December

Hinds CC honors Foundation scholarship recipients

The Hinds Community College Foundation recognized its 2017-18 scholarship recipients, donors and honorees at a reception Oct. 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

The Hinds Community College Foundation awarded more than 600 scholarships in the 2017-2017 academic year. The deadline to apply for a scholarship for the 2018-2019 academic year is Feb. 15, 2018. For more information, visit www.hindscc.edu.

Hinds Community College, celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017, is a comprehensive institution with six convenient locations in the central Mississippi area. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. Today, Hinds stands as the largest community college in Mississippi and offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Among those recognized was Katherine Wyndam of Brandon, who received the George M. McLendon Scholarship. With her is Tom Bowen of Madison.

Among those recognized was Hannah Sendelweck of Brandon, who received the Toby and Nancy Tenhet Scholarship. With her is Nancy Tenhet of Utica.

Among those recognized was Cameron Blackwell of Ovett, who received the Martha Hill Endowed Scholarship. With her is Martha Hill of Clinton.

Among those recognized was Daniel Trussell, center, of Clinton, who received the Edith Ballard Scholarship. With him is Bart Ballard, left, and Tammie Ballard of Puckett.

Among those recognized was Brinkley Branch of Raymond, right, who received the Hinds Community College Education Association Scholarship. With her is Lisa Davis of Raymond.

Among those recognized was Derrick Williams of Clinton, who received the Lorene Martin Nursing Scholarship. With him are Melissa Seward of Byram, left, and Frankie Pinon of Pearl.

Among those recognized was Carson Weaver of Terry, center, who received the Dr. Roger Jones and Lamar Currie Scholarship. With him are Dr. Roger Jones of Raymond, left, and Lamar Currie of Utica, right.

Among those recognized was Victoria Ross of Vicksburg, right, who received two scholarships, the Clarence and Lura Scales Scholarship and the Kay Cliffe Memorial Scholarship. With her is Haley Hartfield of Brandon.

Among those recognized was Peyton Atkinson of Waynesboro, right, who received the Jerry Agent and Mary Etta Naftel Scholarship. With her is Jerry Agent of Raymond.

Among those recognized was Myia Harris of Clinton, who received the Jesse McLendon Thrash Scholarship. With her is Tom Bowen of Madison.

Among those recognized was William Rodgers of Brandon, who received the Vito Daniel Patti Memorial Scholarship. With him is Michael Patti of Jackson, left, and Daniel Patti of Brookhaven, right.

Among those recognized was Gena Barlow of Byram, center, who received the Excellence in Career-Technical Education. With her is Sherry Franklin of Brandon, left, and Dr. Chad Stocks of Port Gibson, right.

Among those recognized was Madison Roberts of Clinton, right, who received the AT&T Endowed Scholarship. With her is Mike Walker of Clinton.

Among those recognized were front from left, Hannah Reihl of Vicksburg, Jakiyah Stirgus of Utica, Ariana Sirgew of Jackson, Jerry Thornhill of Raymond, representing Trustmark Bank; Taneesha Blount of Jackson, KaliAnn Green of Pearl, Breanna Green of Pearl, Wasia Shabbier of Pearl; back, Tristan Carson of Raymond, Paxton Files of Brandon, Jarrod Robinson of Terry, Alandria Ferguson of Terry and Kyra Carroll of Jackson. The students received the Trustmark Scholarship.

Among those recognized were Antwayne Fisher of Jackson, left, and Davis Soto of Forest, right, who received the Jobie Martin Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Lee Blackwell of Mendenhall, right, who received the Charles Jones Technical Scholarship. With him is Jerry Agent of Raymond.

Among those recognized was James Graham of Braxton, who received the Eugene Schubert Memorial Agricultural Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Jaterrica Amos of Courtland, who received the Dennis and Leola Cowart Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Charmaine Andrews-Grant of Ridgeland, who received the Lynn Garvey Memorial Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Dolyn Dillard of Vicksburg, who received the Sandy Reddit Cain Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Alexis Spiller of Vicksburg, who received the Cooper Industries Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Andrew Beesley of Natchez, who received the Chase Wroten Memorial Scholarship.

Among those recognized were, front from left, Tarri Williams of Clinton, Kierra Meadious of Foxworth, Cassie Hardacre of Goodman, Mallory Fisher of Utica and Thomas Harris of Bolton; back, Candace McKenzie of Raymond, Caleb Pitre of Jackson, Michael Thompson of Clinton , William Tyer of Yazoo City and Kali Martin of Terry. They received the Dr. Nell Ann Pickett Scholarship.

Among those recognized were students, second from left, Jalexus Walker of Prentiss, who received the Jane Pickett and Robert C. Harrell Scholarship; third from left, Emily Griffing of Byram, who received the Marian Pickett Carmichael Scholarship; back, Casey Hutson of Raymond, who received the Jimmy L. and Grace Pickett Long Scholarship and Dustin Raby of North Carrollton, who received the Harry Partin Scholarship. With them are, far left, Grace Pickett Long of Utica; second from the right, Jane Pickett Harrell of Utica and, far right, Nancy Tenhet of Utica.

Among those recognized was Amber Williams of Brandon, who received the Liles and Ruth Ann Williams Scholarship. With her is Liles Williams of Raymond.

Among those recognized were, from left, Daygon Williams of Brandon, Amaris Edwards of Byram, Holley Moore of Selmer and Evan Ratcliff of Brandon. They received the Ed, Mattie and Douglas Woolley Scholarship.

Among those were William Lum of Port Gibson, who received the Lurline Stewart Memorial Scholarship.

Among those was Brooke Patterson of Vicksburg, center, who received the Dr. Troy Lee Jenkins Scholarship. With her are Shelby Lewis, left, and Lisa Whatley, right, both of Utica.

Among those were Carley Pettway of Vicksburg, left, and Monique Weimer of Vicksburg. They received the Street Medical Foundation Scholarship.

Among those was Elizabeth Loflin of Vicksburg, second from left, who received the Bill Derden Memorial Scholarship. With her are, from left, Beverly Fatherree of Clinton, Mavis Derden of Clinton, Melissa Black and Harry Black, both of Brandon.

Among those was Garrett Hutchins of Utica, who received the A.P. and T.B. Fatherree Scholarship. With him is Beverly Fatherree of Clinton.

Among those was Stephanie Traweek of Raymond, who received the Dr. Ben Fatherree and Beverly Fatherree Scholarship. With her is Beverly Fatherree of Clinton.

Among those was Dayana Hernandez of Walls, left, who received the Yosef Patel Scholarship. With her is Rosemary Barbour of Jackson.

Among those were Laryn Winkler of Jackson, front from left, Jalyn Thomas of Shaw, Madison Curtis of Raymond; back, Zane Warren of Raymond and Caleb Pace of Terry. They received the Charlie Griffin Scholarship.

Among those was Patricia Parker of Jackson, who received the Alden McNair Scholarship.

Among those was Bobby Cavett of Jackson, who received the Student Government Association Scholarship.

Among those were Cassey Warren of Vicksburg, front from left, Erykah Wilson of Utica, Haley Frazier of Florence, Julie Thompson of Brandon, Vivi Tran of Brandon and Taylor Morgan of Raymond; back, Noah Crow of Utica, Kerri Neely of Raymond, Katie Baldwin of Brandon and Ethan Decker of Brandon. They received the Vicksburg Medical Foundation Scholarship.

Among those were Sarah Chandler of Utica, Kyisha Mayfield of Vicksburg, Michelle Spann of Brandon, Marion Lee of Louise, Ashley Polk of Crystal Springs; back, Dorothy Summers of Jackson, Ashley Levy of Jackson, Elise Ades of Clinton and Elizabeth Peale of Brandon. They received the Vicksburg Medical Foundation Scholarship.

Among those were Bari Berry of Pearl, Jamye Davis of Edwards, Morgan Bruff of Jackson, Brandi Barber of Florence, Elason Kelly of Raymond; back, Robert Batton of Mendenhall, Kristin Bates of Sandhill, Michael Gray of Richland, Taylor McMurtrey of Forest and Emily Hebert of Brandon. They received the Vicksburg Medical Foundation Scholarship.

Among those was Chloe Longley of Jackson, who received the Edward D. and Rebecca J. Brown Scholarship.

Among those was Che’Derica Samuel of Shreveport, who received the Evelyn H. (Ziefle) Byers Scholarship.

Among those were, front from left, Landon Little of Vicksburg, Jessica Hasty of Vicksburg; third from right, Sarah Smith of Redwood, who received the Marie and John Pervangher Scholarship; Aailya Johnson of Vicksburg, who received the Carroll E. “Buddy” and Grace Clark Woods Scholarship; and Lawanda Trimble of Vicksburg, who received the Marie and John Pervangher Scholarship; back, Charles Katzenmeyer of Vicksburg, Gage Ederington of Vicksburg, Fred Butler of Vicksburg, who received the Marie and John Pervangher Scholarship; Amanda Even of Clinton, who received the C. Leonard and Jane Woods Katzenmeyer Scholarship; Brandy Katzenmeyer of Vicksburg and Tristan Lowry of Vicksburg, who received the Marie and John Pervangher Scholarship. Third from left is Joan Katzenmeyer of Madison.

Among those was Emily Walker of Puckett, who received the Tommie Stroud Scholarship.

Among those was Laney Butts of Brandon, who received the Carlo and Cathy Martella Scholarship.

Among those was Colton Pierce of Brandon, who received the Thomas H. Smith Memorial Scholarship.

Among those was Alainna Newmann of Redwood, who received the Walter B. Hallberg Jr. Scholarship. With her are Walter Hallberg III, left, and Walter Hallberg Jr., right, both of Vicksburg.

0 772 14 December, 2017 News more
Hinds CC a key player in Warren County’s drive to become certified Work-Ready
Posted by
14 December

Hinds CC a key player in Warren County’s drive to become certified Work-Ready

VICKSBURG – Economic development in Vicksburg and Warren County in 2018 and beyond could hinge on an effort to become certified a Work-Ready Community by the nation’s premier academic testing standard.

Earlier this year, employers in the Hinds Community College attendance district agreed in principle to begin recognizing the National Career Readiness Certificate and have their respective counties certified as an ACT Work Ready Community. The national credential is a portable, industry-recognized standard of achievement that identifies proficiency in three key areas for landing jobs of today – reading for information, applied math and locating information. The national initiative is headed up by ACT, the nation’s leading college admissions testing company. Hinds administers the NCRC exam to Adult Basic Education and Career-Technical Education students as well as to current employees from industry partners.

Dr. Robin Parker, assistant dean for Career and Technical Education, speaks before the Vicksburg Warren County Chamber of Commerce about the ACT Work-Ready Community effort during a luncheon Dec. 13, 2017. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

On Wednesday, members of the Vicksburg Warren County Chamber of Commerce heard of the potential pluses of adopting tangible assessments for hiring employees from college officials and industries using it or thinking seriously about using it.

“You know when you enter a new city or county and see the signs that say ‘certified retirement community?’,” said Dr. Robin Parker, assistant dean for Career and Technical Education at Hinds, asked chamber members during a program and panel discussion during the group’s monthly luncheon. “Well, we want a sign in Warren County that when someone drives in, they say, ‘This community values work and has a group of people that’s ready to do what’s best for the community.’”

Issued at four levels – bronze, silver, gold, and platinum – the NCRC helps take the guesswork out of hiring, training, and promotion decisions. WIN Job Centers in Hinds, Warren, Rankin and Claiborne counties, as well as in Madison County, administer it to clients in each community who are applying for jobs.

“This can be very beneficial toward your recruiting purposes and retention goals,” said Pablo Diaz, executive director of the Warren County Port Commission, to chamber members. The commission is among several partners on the effort in central Mississippi.

Pablo Diaz, left, executive director of the Warren County Port Commission, speaks before the Vicksburg Warren County Chamber of Commerce during a luncheon Dec. 13, 2017. Seated for the discussion, which dealt with ACT Work-Ready Community efforts, are, from left, Carl Hearn, quality manager at Batesville Casket, Maggie Cane, human resource manager at International Paper, and Dr. Robin Parker. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

“But, I want you to think about this, too – this will be a standard that any community’s going to be held up to in terms of economic development projects,” Diaz said. “We are going to be asked, ‘Are you a certified community?’ And if you say no, then for a potential project it means we don’t have the data on the workforce to demonstrate how good or not good they are.”

Panelists for the luncheon included human resources professionals with companies using or thinking about using the NCRC in their hiring process. They, along with Parker, fielded questions about the test from chamber members, many of whom run their own small businesses or hold positions involved in making hiring decisions.

0 489 14 December, 2017 News more
Grandmother’s pursuit of passion highlights Hinds CC fall graduation
Posted by
08 December

Grandmother’s pursuit of passion highlights Hinds CC fall graduation

JACKSON – Kneedra Bell grew up watching TV’s original food personality, Julia Child, explain the finer points of cooking and saw herself in the down-to-earth, sometimes mistake-prone host of “The French Chef.”

Kneedra Bell, of Clinton, a culinary arts student at Hinds Community College, moves some marinated shrimp from one pan to another during the third annual Fall FEASTival at Township at Colony Park in Ridgeland on Oct. 26, 2017. Teams of Hinds culinary students from the Jackson Campus competed against each other at the event, which was presented by the Partnership for a Healthy Mississippi. (Hinds Community College/Danny Barrett Jr.)

“Watching Julia made me feel good about mistakes because that taught viewers like me that it was OK to make a mistake,” Bell said. “She showed us that mistakes can teach us to do it better or correctly the next time we try.”

Bell, 51, who was born in Edwards and grew up in Los Angeles where her family moved, later attended college in California and majored in chemical engineering, which at the time she viewed as an adequate career path for a single, unwed mother who needed to support an infant daughter. “But, engineering was not my passion – cooking was, which made it easier for me to simply chose to stop going to college and work full-time to support my family. I promised I would “one day” return to college to complete my college education.”

Nearly 30 years, two marriages and five grandchildren later, she’s about to make good on that promise. On Dec. 15, she joins more than 1,000 other students who will earn their credentials from Hinds Community College in three ceremonies at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

In addition to the Associate of Applied Science degree and career and technical certificates she’ll have, she will have also earned the respect of peers and instructors on many fronts. She’s worked five days a week as a bus driver for the Clinton Public School District while attending classes and study groups at Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

“She is the first to arrive, last to leave and is completely giving of herself, her time, and her talents,” said Chef Austin Lee, director of the Culinary Arts Institute at Hinds. “And she is more interested in the team crossing the finish line than making it herself.”

For Bell, it’s a team that includes her “culinary family” of classmates in the kitchen, her “student-children” on her bus each morning and, of course, her own three children and five grandchildren.

“Being a single mom made juggling my job, school and my home life a demanding challenge,” she said. “My schoolwork became my social life. I established a committed relationship with my books. I had a date-night seven nights a week with my homework. I embraced the struggle of my doing my homework in tandem with helping my children with their homework.

“Hinds Community College will always be a historic landmark in my heart that marks a successful chapter in my life’s journey.”

0 622 08 December, 2017 News more
Hinds CC honors alumni from 1917 to 1967 at 50 + event
Posted by
05 December

Hinds CC honors alumni from 1917 to 1967 at 50 + event

As part of Homecoming and the Centennial celebration, Hinds Community College invited alumni who attended the college from 1917 to 1967 back for a 50+ brunch on the Raymond Campus.

Those who attended Hinds in the 1950s are Oliver V. Shearer of Raymond, Mark Chaney of Vicksburg, Liles Williams of Raymond, Bea Hemphill Sarrett of Pearl, Betty Taylor Ox of Bolton, David Barton of Raymond, Margaret Morris Stanford of Clinton, Rosa Taylor Russell of Raymond and Martha Gillespie Ferguson of Raymond; back, Carol King of Pinola and Ron Melancon of Poplarville.

Those from the 1960s included, from left, Joe Loviza of Vicksburg, Eugene Osborn of Utica, Bill Ferguson of Learned, Warrene Hand Holliday of Terry, Alice Shuff Conley of Raymond, Kay Hathorn Haven of Mt. Juliet, Tenn., Betty Hitt Hood of Nashville, Ruth Ann Carter-Osborn of Utica, Becky Bryant Holbrook of Raymond and Paulette Cook of Raymond.

Hi-Stepper alumnae who attended included, from left, Warrene Hood Holliday of Terry, Alice Shuff Connelly of Raymond, Becky Bryant Holbrook of Raymond, Ruth Ann Carter-Osborn of Utica, Kay Hathorn Haven of Mt. Juliet, Tenn., Betty Hitt Hood of Nashville, Rosa Taylor Russell of Raymond and Martha Gillespie Ferguson of Raymond.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 466 05 December, 2017 News more
Hinds CC announces speaker for fall graduation
Posted by
27 November

Hinds CC announces speaker for fall graduation

RAYMOND – Fall graduation ceremonies are set for Dec. 15 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus as students earn credentials from Hinds Community College.

The college will confer 940 credentials to 1,058 students set to graduate in three ceremonies. All nursing and allied health graduates will receive their degrees at 8 a.m., with commencement for academic and career-tech graduates to follow in separate ceremonies at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Joy Rhoads

Joy Rhoads, an instructor of history and geography and coordinator of the Honors Program at the Rankin Campus, is the speaker for all three ceremonies.

Rhoads, of Brandon, a 24-year employee of Hinds, holds master’s degrees in geography and history from the University of Southern Mississippi and Mississippi State University, respectively. Her bachelor’s degree in history is also from MSU. She has directed the Honors Program since 2016 and is a faculty advisor for the Alpha Omicron Omega chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the honor society for two-year colleges in the United States.

While at Hinds, she has been named a Hinds Hero and a Teacher of the Year for the campus PTK chapter and the Mississippi Humanities Council. Rhoads is a member of the National Council for Geographic Education and the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers.

Rhoads has been named the college’s faculty honoree for the Legislature’s HEADWAE (Higher Education Appreciation Day – Working for Academic Excellence) program for 2018.

1 1016 27 November, 2017 News more
Hinds CC legislative delegation learns about worthy college programs
Posted by
27 November

Hinds CC legislative delegation learns about worthy college programs

About a dozen legislators, mostly from Hinds County, were treated to stories about programs that get students trained and into the workforce at Hinds Community College’s annual legislative luncheon on Nov. 8.

Hinds Community College students and legislators include, front from left, Sen. Albert Butler, Rep. Credell Calhoun, Rep. Christopher Bell, Rep. Kathy Sykes, Rep. Alyce Clark, Hinds student Shaqwon Roberts, Rep. Debra Gibbs and Rep. Jarvis Dortch; second row, Sen. Sollie Norwood, Sen. Hillman Frazier, Raymond Campus MIBEST Navigator Kenya Johnson and Sen. David Blount; back, Hinds students Alexis Sizer of Ridgeland and Sam Williams of Jackson; Audra Canoy of Terry, Navdeep Kaur of Clinton and Joanna Stevens of Terry.

Afterward, four legislators toured two Hinds career-tech labs, the Fab Lab and the Mechatronics lab. The Fab Lab, under the direction of Phil Cockrell, is outfitted with 3-D printing machines, laser cutters and related equipment capable of etching designs or cutting flat sheet material such as acrylic and metal. The machines are programmed by a control panel or computer. Mechatronics, under David Creel, is a blend between electronics and mechanical and was specifically added to the curriculum because of the new Continental Tire plant going up in Hinds County.

Among the students who spoke was Shaqwon Roberts, 22, a culinary arts student at Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center who is in the M2M program that mentors and tutors minority males.

“These first 21 years as a young African-American man were not promising. Since losing my father, my family has struggled paying bills and barely made it through. I worked 12 hours a day to help – without sleeping or studying for tomorrow’s test. Let’s state the fact, I nearly failed all my classes that semester,” he told legislators. “I’ve gone from academic probation to being in good standing and my grades are an A and two Bs.”

Misti Lopez, 37, of Hazlehurst, is a MIBEST student studying welding on the Raymond Campus.

“It doesn’t matter how old you are or what you’ve been through – you can accomplish anything you put your mind to,” she said. “I plan on getting a welding certificate and going to work. To me, it’s a type of art. I love to draw and I’m good with my hands, so I’m doing both.”

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse also outlined the three major priorities of the 15 state community colleges: 1. Fair and equitable  funding, which includes restoration of $37 million cut from community college budgets during the past two years and $25 million for teacher salaries; 2. Workforce programs, which includes MI-BEST funding; and 3. Capital improvement dollars.

Fab Lab Director Phil Cockrell demonstrates one of the machines to Jackson legislators Rep. Kathy Sykes, Sen. Hillman Frazier, Rep. Debra Gibbs and Sen. Albert Butler.

Hinds Community College’s Fab Lab machines can be programmed to design and cut out a die for use as a mold.

Among the statistics Muse shared with legislators:

  • One in five working age adults in Mississippi is a high school dropout.
  • High school dropouts have a 29 percent unemployment rate.
  • Our workforce participate rate is only 54 percent

“We need to put in new programs that meet the needs of business and industry,” he said. “We’re the bridge to a better life.”

Sen. Albert Butler, D-Jackson, agreed with Muse’s assessment. “Workforce development is the key to Mississippi moving forward. All of us are aware that there is a need to move the lower class to the middle class. And the only way we can do that is to start training individuals so they will be able to earn the type of salaries that were presented to us by Continental Tire and other companies,” Butler said.

Muse referenced a story in The Clarion-Ledger that the University of Southern Mississippi has made $8 million in cuts because of financial difficulties.

“Hinds is in the same boat. As the state appropriation for community colleges goes down, the student part goes up. For the first year, our local contributions from tuition and our counties are more than the state’s contribution,” he said.

David Creel, director of Workforce Manufacturing Training, explains the Mechatronics lab to Jackson legislators Rep. Debra Gibbs, Sen. Hillman Frazier, Rep. Kathy Sykes and Sen. Albert Butler.

Sen. David Blount, D-Jackson, said the tax cuts made in 2016 have meant the Legislature doesn’t have the money to fund priorities like education. And, the tax cut in future years will snowball to $33 million next year, $92 million the year after and so on.

“We’re in this position because of the decisions that have been made in the past two years by the majority in the legislature … and bad decisions by the political leadership,” he said.  “We’ve got to revisit some of those decisions so you can continue to do the outstanding work that you’re doing.”

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

0 910 27 November, 2017 News more