http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Former beauty queen Lucas still smiling thanks to Hinds CC

Author Archives: Danny Barrett

Full Name: Danny Barrett Website:
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Danny Barrett Jr. is a 17-year journalist with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mass Communication from Nicholls State University in Thibodaux, La. Barrett covered county government and business at The Vicksburg Post for 10 years and came to Hinds Community College in 2015.

Former beauty queen Lucas still smiling thanks to Hinds CC
Posted by
10 July

Former beauty queen Lucas still smiling thanks to Hinds CC

Note: The following story appears in the summer issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

MAGEE – After graduating from Mendenhall High School, Gloria Patrick Lucas felt as many young people do when they leave the nest.

Confidence and a ready smile weren’t a problem. The fine points of academics and other means of self-expression were another matter. But she found help at Hinds as well as an identity.

Gloria Patrick Lucas

Gloria Patrick Lucas (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“When I graduated high school, I’d never heard of an essay,” Lucas said, crediting her freshman English instructor Anne Hardy with helping her double down on studies. “She taught us how to break it down and write paragraphs from note cards and just had us feeling good about it. Feeling good about yourself is just as important as anything you learn in a textbook.”

Challenging herself meant trying out for the Hi-Steppers precision dance team without prior experience. Still, she had no problem impressing the program’s legendary longtime director Anna Cowden Bee.

“I can remember being at marching practice early one morning when she came and patted me on the butt and told me, ‘Well, I can tell you were a majorette!’” she said, barely able to contain her laughter. “No! I wasn’t! I don’t know what it was, but I was trying hard to try to be one.”

Gloria Patrick Lucas' homecoming queen photo from 1966

Gloria Patrick Lucas’ homecoming queen photo from 1966

She also took the Homecoming Queen title for 1966 as well as winning Miss Hinds and the Eagle Beauty Revue pageants.

She completed her bachelor’s degree at Blue Mountain College, where she majored in elementary education. She taught math in Mississippi and Alabama for the better part of 30 years, along the way winning the Starkville Rotary Club’s Teacher of the Year honor in 1991. She had married longtime high school football coach Tommy Lucas after graduating from Hinds and had two children, Doug and Kara. Tommy Lucas died in 1999.

What’s endured from her Hinds days is numerous longtime friendships with former roomies and fellow former Hi-Steppers.

“Even today, she’ll light a room up and make you always feel like you’re her best friend,” said Bonny Burnham Tigrett, a former dorm roomie who often did the young beauty queen’s hair. “She likes making people feel special and has a servant’s heart.”

Years spent attending sports and academic dinners, banquets and parties produced a knack for hosting events, which helped set the tone for her life after teaching.

In 2002, Lucas purchased The McAlpin House, a quaint little manor tucked away off Highway 49 in Magee. Built in 1903, the home bears the name of Erman and Emma McAlpin, who for years ran a department store in town. Today, Lucas rents it out for wedding receptions and other special events.

“After hearing the house was for sale, I immediately fell in love with it and could see the potential of a new life back home,” she said. “With the help of my daughter, Kara, who’s an interior designer, the house was restored, making it a unique Southern venue for special events.”

More recently, Lucas has purchased a second venue for weddings and getaways – one that surely comes with a nod to Mississippians’ love for the outdoors.

Gloria Patrick Lucas, in front of the house her uncle built and she purchased in 2015

Gloria Patrick Lucas, in front of the house her uncle built and she purchased in 2015 (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Completed in 1971 and named for her uncle, the Johnny Knight tree house is situated in the middle of a thick patch of woods in Mendenhall. Knight, an Army veteran once stationed in Cheyenne, Wyo., developed a love for the mountains and the outdoors in general thanks to his stateside assignment, she said.

Sold upon his death in 2003 to artist Gail Hederman, the structure is supported by cypress trees and split logs and is essentially a domed postcard photo in the middle of a pine forest. Inside, exposed beams that meet at the roof’s peak support a heavy chandelier that illuminates a bedroom, bathroom, loft, kitchen and living areas all open to one another. A separate, smaller cottage on the property is a “dressing room” of sorts for prospective brides preparing to walk down the spiral staircase to the altar, which is just north of the main house.

The architectural wonder was put up for sale again in 2015, and Lucas and her children got it back in the family. It’s an added draw for couples desiring a new kind of “destination wedding,” she said.

“A lot of girls here want the barn wedding, the woodsy and rustic look,” she said. “Since I bought it, I’ve added a deck and the wedding site.”

These days, Patrick is satisfied seeing her clients all-smiles and happy, just as she was in her tiara and homecoming gown in 1967.

“Life needs to be all about happy, finding contentment and a reason for being,” she said. “What joy it is for me, seeing the happiness in the eyes of bride and groom as they prepare for their special day and their life together.”

[tweetable alt=””]Former beauty queen Lucas still smiling thanks to Hinds CC[/tweetable]

0 574 10 July, 2017 News more
Great-grandmother among 45 at High School Equivalency ceremony at Hinds CC
Posted by
06 July

Great-grandmother among 45 at High School Equivalency ceremony at Hinds CC

RAYMOND – Ruby Hardy came home to Jackson last year the way countless people make their way back home – to take care of family.

“I came back to take care my mother,” Hardy said. “It prompted me to go into the job center, but I didn’t qualify much since I didn’t have a GED. I was even thinking of working in foodservice because I have to take care of a family.”

Ruby Hardy

Ruby Hardy

Hardy, 70, was among 45 people of varying ages and stations in life recognized during a ceremony Friday, June 30 at Cain-Cochran Hall on the Raymond Campus for achieving their High School Equivalency certificate, formerly known as the GED, this academic term.

The great-grandmother of five had left Lanier High School before her senior year was up and went to California, where she took part in a jobs program established by the federal government during the Kennedy administration, then worked several years for Pacific Bell in various roles.

“Back then, if you passed an entry-level test, you could just get a job and after about five years, you could move around,” she said. “Nowadays, the first thing they’ll ask you for is a GED or a high school diploma.”

She plans to become a certified medical data technologist and open her own business.

“To reach this milestone, it’s an awesome feeling,” she said. “I never thought I’d be at a loss for words, so that’s the only thing I can say. It’s just awesome.”

Hardy was among eight participants in the MI BEST program at Hinds who received a GED during the ceremony. MI BEST is Mississippi’s version of the nationally recognized Integrating Basic Education and Skills Training program, or I-BEST. It allows adult students to train for a job skill while earning their GED high school equivalency certificate at the same time. Students are prepared to be job-ready in six months to a year, train in high-demand areas and earn national certifications.

Tommy Dotson, left, of Vicksburg, shakes hands with Dickie Scruggs following a ceremony June 30, 2017 at Cain-Cochran Hall at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus to recognize those who earned a High School Equivalency certificate this past academic term. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Tommy Dotson, left, of Vicksburg, shakes hands with Dickie Scruggs following a ceremony June 30, 2017 in Cain-Cochran Hall at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus to recognize those who earned a High School Equivalency certificate this past academic term. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Dickie Scruggs, former prominent lawyer and founder of the nonprofit Second Chance Mississippi, spoke to this year’s recipients on the value of their accomplishment down the road in life. The collaborative effort with the state’s community colleges raises awareness and funds for High School Equivalency and adult education.

“My charge to you today is simple,” Scruggs said. “If you will do one thing the rest of your life, you will succeed. Just three words – just show up. If you just show up, anything you undertake to do, chance are you will succeed.”

GED recipients who were honored Thursday and their stated hometowns included:

 

Brianna Allen, Vicksburg

LeDarius Anderson, Byram

Stephanie Bell, Vicksburg
Kadeem Bilal, Clinton
Michael Boyles, Clinton
Amy Bray, Raymond
Brittany Caldwell, Vicksburg
Willie Chapin, Utica
Jason Chapman, Jackson
Lateisha Chatman, Jackson
Tyler  Davenport, Jackson
Tommy Dotson, Vicksburg
Brandi Eucare, Jackson
Connor Evans, Vicksburg
William Everett Jr., Jackson
Bobby Hannah, Jackson
Ruby Hardy, Jackson
Malik Harvey, Byram
Mandy Hart, Raymond
Cherie Hayes, Jackson
Alease Hobson, Jackson
Courtney Holmes, Jackson
Melissa Irby, Jackson
Isreal Jenkins, Clinton
Darien Johnson, Jackson
Kyra King, Vicksburg
Javen Love, Brandon
Rachel Majoria, Vicksburg
Antoniesha McCoy, Jackson
Timothy Myles, Clinton
Khaaliq Nunn, Jackson
Jenny Pettis, Raymond
Chester Price, Jackson
KaDarius Price, Jackson
Valanta Pruitt, Vicksburg
Jarrett Riles, Byram
Octivitia Smith, Jackson
Chyrianne D Sterling, Jackson
Olivia Tarver, Vicksburg
Frank Jr Tullos, Edwards
Rosemary Washington, Clinton
Alexandria Watkins, Raymond
Candace Watson, Byram
Robert Watson, Vicksburg
Tanya White, Jackson

[tweetable alt=””]Great-grandmother of five among GED recipients at Hinds CC[/tweetable]

1 642 06 July, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Vicksburg-Warren Campus continues advanced river barge training course
Posted by
28 June

Hinds CC Vicksburg-Warren Campus continues advanced river barge training course

VICKSBURG – A career-building program on the Mississippi River has moved onto Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus to stay.

Specialized training to be tankermen on push boats that help move products up and down the river is filling a big need for skilled labor on the water. Completion allows deckhands on tank barges to move up to the job responsible for managing liquid cargo on the average barge tow and seeing it’s transferred safely to and from tank barges.

Garrett Williams reads measurements on a intructional replica of a barge at Goldling Barge. Williams was part of the river barge training program in 2016 at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Garrett Williams reads measurements on a replica of a barge at Golding Barge. Williams was part of the river barge training program in 2016 at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

A Coast-Guard approved course first hosted on campus last year has received support from local industries to continue for the fall 2017 semester. Industry partners Golding Barge Line, Magnolia Marine Transport and Smith Towing Company have supplied rope, steel and other equipment for the class, which is being expanded with staff instruction. Previously, an outside service taught the course.

“We’ve taken on the class and are having it here on campus because it’s the only program of its kind in Mississippi,” Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak said. “It’s a unique opportunity.”

A classroom course, which covers basic terminology on flammable or combustible materials and sources of fuel for potential hazards, is followed by fire safety and other hands-on courses held outdoors on campus.

Chad Vickers uses equipment on an instructional replica of a barge at Golding Barge. Vickers was part of the river barge training program in 2016 at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus. (April Garon/ Hinds Community College)

Chad Vickers uses equipment on an instructional replica of a barge at Golding Barge. Vickers was part of the river barge training program in 2016 at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus. (April Garon/ Hinds Community College)

Earnings potential on the water in the high five-figure range drives the current wave of entrants to deckhand school, which trains for the industry’s entry-level position. In 2014, the college and Golding partnered on the deckhand training course when it was made possible by a federal workforce grant.

After students attain second-level experience handling and rigging lines, they can choose to train for tankerman positions that can pay double the annual salary of entry-level deckhands. Students are evaluated and certified accordingly at the completion of each of the training courses.

Six months of experience and supervised transfers by licensed tankermen are necessary before a trainee can become similarly certified. In addition to class lecture and fire safety, formal training also covers rules and regulations, transfer procedures and emergency response,

For information about enrolling in the deckhand or tankerman training program offered in Vicksburg through Hinds Community College, contact Marvin Moak, dean of Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus, at 601.629.6804.

[tweetable alt=””]River barge training course at Hinds CC trains for top-dollar careers [/tweetable]

 

2 612 28 June, 2017 News more
Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC
Posted by
09 June

Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC

RAYMOND – A person’s inner dialogue can be helpful or hurtful, depending on what that little voice inside says.

It was a strong enough message to lead off this summer’s leadership summit for students involved in the Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds Community College.

Adonis Lenzy, of Paradigm Shift, speaks to high school students and others at an M2M Leadership Summit June 5 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Adonis Lenzy, of Paradigm Shift, speaks to high school students and others at an M2M Leadership Summit June 5 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“No matter what people say to you, it’s what you say to yourself that really matters,” said Adonis Lenzy of Paradigm Shift as the group helped kick off a two-day series of programs and exercises for M2M members and mentors June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. The Oklahoma-based nonprofit connects ministers and other volunteers with poor communities to foster economic and social change.

“There’s nothing wrong with looking at yourself in the mirror and saying ‘You can’,” Lenzy said.

Joining Lenzy for the summit was minister Heady Coleman and community leaders Ryan Eller, Derrick Sier and Mikey Manghum to present programs on various team-building exercises, such as setting goals, time management, copying practices seen in successful people, and changing up routines to prevent life from becoming stale. Lenzy likened that to releasing a caged bear into the woods, only to have the bear still be stuck in a cage in its mind.

“We’ve got to be bigger than a routine,” he said. “You’ve got to make sure you steer clear of any ruts.”

High school students who attended the summit wrote down short- and long-term goals on sticky notes to foster active communication, said M2M Director Aleisha Escobedo.

Wingfield High School students Paul James Curry, a junior, Dequavious Guice, a senior and James Stubb, a junior, attended the M2M Leadership Summit held June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Wingfield High School students Paul James Curry, a junior,
Dequavious Guice, a senior and
James Stubb, a junior, attended the M2M Leadership Summit held June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus.
(Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“This summit provided an opportunity for our students to engage with their peers and serve as active leaders and forward thinkers,” Escobedo said. “I especially loved that Paradigm Shift challenged our students to focus on attainable goals and helped them to recognize that having strong social and community support will foster success.”

Becoming a success in life often involves the answer to a key question of those whom students see as successful, Lenzy said.

“The number one question you need to ask them is, if you can get in their circle, what was it like for you before you became successful?” he said. “That’s the story you’ll want to hear about.”

The M2M program is based at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. For more information, call 601.987.8129 or visit www.hindscc.edu/go/M2M.

[tweetable alt=””]Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC[/tweetable]

Front row, from left, April Reynolds, M2M English instructional guide, Aleisha Escobedo, M2M Director, Derrick Sier, Adonis Lenzy, both of Paradigm Shift, Robert Smith, M2M Academic Success coach, Felicia Garner, M2M administrative assistant; back row, from left, Keith Williams, M2M Academic Success coach, Ryan Eller, Mikey Manghum, Gregory “Heady” Coleman, all of Paradigm Shift, Ahmad Smith, M2M Recruitment and Outreach coordinator (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Front row, from left, April Reynolds, M2M English instructional guide, Aleisha Escobedo, M2M Director, Derrick Sier, Adonis Lenzy, both of Paradigm Shift, Robert Smith, M2M Academic Success coach, Felicia Garner, M2M administrative assistant; back row, from left, Keith Williams, M2M Academic Success coach, Ryan Eller, Mikey Manghum, Gregory “Heady” Coleman, all of Paradigm Shift, Ahmad Smith, M2M Recruitment and Outreach coordinator (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

5 815 09 June, 2017 News more
Diplomas earned by 18 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus
Posted by
08 June

Diplomas earned by 18 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus

PEARL – For Laura Marie Barrett, being on a stage she once thought herself unworthy of her presence meant thanking a few people first.

Laura Marie Barrett, center, with her father, William, and her mother, Marie (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Laura Marie Barrett, center, with her father, William, and her mother, Marie (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I just want to say thank you so much to three wonderful women,” Barrett said, referring to the trio who have coordinated the Gateway to College program at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. “They’ve helped me through hard times and difficult times these past two years.”

On Tuesday, June 6, she was among 18 students from Rankin County School District thankful for the opportunity to graduate high school and earn college credit this past semester thanks to the program.

Program director Chandra Frazier, along with program specialists Sherrie Daniels and Ouida Holland, were praised highly by students who told their stories to family and friends during a graduation ceremony held at the Muse Center.

“If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t have known about this program or learned how to push myself a lot harder than I used to,” said Barrett, of Florence High School, who earned 24 hours of college credits she’ll use to pursue a cosmetology career. “I thought since I had failed in regular high school, that was it.”

The program, in place since 2012-13 at the Rankin Campus, has involved students who have dropped out of high school or are at risk of doing so. Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds. The program expanded to the Vicksburg Warren Campus in 2015. The program, a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds and the two school districts, is ending for the 2017-18 term.

Students had to read on an eighth-grade level and pass the college’s placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

Nicholas Hydrick, center, with his father, Ryan, and his mother, Nancy Cobb (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Nicholas Hydrick, center, with his father, Ryan, and his mother, Nancy Cobb (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Being in the program taught me time management,” said Nicholas Hydrick, of Northwest Rankin High School, who earned 22 credits toward college. He was equally thankful to program officials he described as “three amazing women.”

“I’m truly thankful God put these three women in my life,” he said on stage as he, Barrett and fellow RCSD students Shelbie Cranfield and Maeghan Romo in sharing brief testimonials about their experiences in the program. “I never would have graduated without their help,” Hydrick said. “I want you to know that you three have reserved spots in my heart forever.”

The ceremony was again keynoted by Dr. Sue Townsend, superintendent of the Rankin County School District and member of the college’s Board of Trustees.

“There’s a freedom that you feel when you’ve accomplished a goal,” Townsend said. “When you walk out of here, you’re going to have a new sense of freedom and what it offers to you.”

Frazier thanked guidance counselors and others in the Rankin County School District for supporting the program from the start.

“We have walked this journey together,” Frazier said.

Rankin Gateway to College director Chandra Frazier

Rankin Gateway to College director Chandra Frazier

Beverly McClure, a guidance counselor at Northwest Rankin, told graduates they’d still be there for them as they continued their education at the college level.

“We’re here to support,” McClure said. “This is not work, this is easy. This is love. You still belong to your home school and every counselor in this district. And we want to help.”

Gateway graduates present Tuesday also included Zoe Armagost, 24 hours of college credits; Nicole Aucoin, 43 hours; Charlie Banks, 15 hours; Cranfield, 10 hours; Leanna Frazier, 42 hours; Kelsey Heard, 33 hours; Benjamin Heckman, 38 hours; Marcenia Holloway, 38 hours; Cody Holmes, 32 hours; Kaylee Jackson, 21 hours; Kinsley Parkman, 24 hours; Austin Scott, 19 hours; Romo, 29 hours; and Mary Ward, 32 hours. Also completing high school through the program for 2017 were Alexander Heintzelman and Peyton Love, who were not present Tuesday. All graduates were students in the Rankin County School District.

[tweetable alt=””]Diplomas earned by 18 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus[/tweetable]

3 796 08 June, 2017 News more
Hinds CC English students assist in editing their own textbook
Posted by
26 May

Hinds CC English students assist in editing their own textbook

RAYMOND – Imagine being a student and having a say in what goes into the textbook used in your English class.

Sounds like a bookworm’s daydream? A staff of three students have lived that dream for a few semesters and will contribute to a text that English Composition students in all Mississippi community colleges can use.

From left, Victoria Mulqueen, Will Stribling and Navdeep Kaur

From left, Victoria Mulqueen, Will Stribling and Navdeep Kaur

“We deliberately wrote these books so they were aimed at a student audience – not a graduate student audience, not seniors who are English majors, but freshmen and sophomores in colleges, particularly in community colleges,” said Laura Hammons, an English instructor at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus and chief editor on “For Our Students.”

Hammons, of Brandon, an English instructor at Hinds for 16 years, and Beverly Fatherree, of Raymond, a retired 35-year English teacher, are chief editors and Hinds’ contributors to the book, first published in 2009. Editors and writers from seven of Mississippi’s 15 community colleges contributed to the book’s second printing, in 2011.

The book, which has retailed for about $36, stands as an equal to any Composition I or II textbook, with sections that prepare students for clear, professional pieces even before the first word is written. Early sections cover concepts of time management, considering who the readers might be and how to discern accurate information in a tech-driven world. Citation styles seen most often in college composition classes, such as APA and MLA, are covered in separate parts. Proceeds from sales of the book go to support Two-Year College English Association of Mississippi, which promotes collegiality and best practices with instructors on the junior and community college level.

A third edition is now underway with the help of some of the same students who used the text in class.

“The book has everything written in a conversational tone,” said Victoria Mulqueen, a sophomore from Clinton taking 26 credit hours of classes on her way to working at a major publishing house someday. She is the lead student editor on the project for book’s student team.

“I did a lot of grunt-work proofreading student essays for specific categories, like compare-contrast or cause-effect, and heavy editing of the chapters,” Mulqueen said.

Laura Hammons

Laura Hammons

Hammons leaned heavily on Victoria “to help me with day-to-day management of the book, such as the forms we look up and who’s doing what and why,” she said.

Will Stribling, a sophomore journalism student from Vicksburg, has sharpened his writing and editing skills while working on the textbook.

“The thing with writing is just practice, practice, practice,” Stribling said. “It’s a skill you’re always honing and evolving.”

Stribling’s desire to do just that outside the classroom has already resulted in a few real-world writing gigs, including internships at weekly and daily newspapers.

Navdeep Kaur, a sophomore from Clinton, isn’t going into literary field when she graduates. Still, editing the textbook with her instructors and two classmates has improved her command of language arts.

“It’s not related to the field I want to go into at all – I want to be a dentist,” Kaur said. “But Ms. Hammons read one of my papers and she invited me to come by and edit with her. I did it just for the sake of helping her. I realized it’s helped me as a writer and with other skills discussed in the book, such as writing resumes.”

An electronic version is possible with the third edition, due out this year. The textbook’s cost relative to other class texts – which can add up to nearly $1,000 for the average student who purchases brand-new editions of their materials – will remain low, they said.

“That was what drove us to write the book – the price,” Fatherree said. “Composition textbooks can cost almost $200. The two goals were to create a textbook that was reasonably priced and would speak to the kinds of composition that are generally taught in community colleges in Mississippi.”

Beverly Fatherree

Beverly Fatherree

Authors of the book added sections to reflect changes in the literary section and the two major citation styles, among other items. Fatherree is credited by her Hinds colleague for writing the glossary.

“This third edition just carries that further,” she said. “For example, MLA style has changed again. And technology has changed just since the second edition.”

It’s been a dream for student and instructor alike to put the book’s upcoming edition together.

“I had Comp I with Ms. Hammons and the new edition had to come out soon,” she said. “I took that opportunity since I wanted to edit books and novels for a living. She’s a great teacher and I wanted to help her.”

“This book has an impact upon thousands of people,” Hammons said. “You can’t get more wonderful than the three young people sitting here.”

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC English students assist in editing their own textbook[/tweetable]

0 804 26 May, 2017 News more
Hinds CC academic, technical grads thrived upon return to school
Posted by
15 May

Hinds CC academic, technical grads thrived upon return to school

PEARL – Barbara Evans and Lattie Erving didn’t know each other before Friday, but already had a lifetime of work experience under their respective belts when they decided to pursue college degrees.

Barbara Evans, left, and Lattie Erving, share a moment before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Evans, of Vicksburg, and Erving, of Jackson, both returned to school to earn college degrees after having been retired for years. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Barbara Evans, left, and Lattie Erving, share a moment before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Evans, of Vicksburg, and Erving, of Jackson, both returned to school to earn college degrees after having been retired for years. Evans graduated summa cum laude. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’d always wanted to go to culinary school, so I said why not?” said Evans, 64, of Vicksburg, dressed in her cap and gown accented with marks of honors. The self-described retired cook now has a credential to go with her years spent in the kitchen.

Erving, 62, Jackson, had retired years ago from factory work but always yearned for a chance to earn a college degree – something that seemed out of reach when she was growing up.

“I didn’t have an opportunity to go to college years ago,” Erving said. “I want to study social work with my degree.”

Both were among those who graduated from Hinds Community College over two days of ceremonies Friday and Sunday.

Students received 1,534 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number, almost 800 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus in Pearl or a Sunday ceremony at the Utica Campus.

April Galjour, of Jackson, prepares to line up to enter the stage before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Galjour earned a Technical Certificate and graduated cum laude. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

April Galjour, of Jackson, prepares to line up to enter the stage before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Galjour earned a Technical Certificate and graduated cum laude. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Also earning a long-awaited degree was April Galjour, 55, of Jackson, who returned to school to pursue new skills in a changing economy.

“I was laid off the nonprofit I was working for, and I didn’t know anything about computers,” Galjour said. “Even small jobs nowadays, you have to keep up with that. I’m just delighted I was able to come back at my age.”

Speaking at the 11 a.m. ceremony was state Sen. Briggs Hopson III, of Vicksburg.

“You’re receiving a piece of paper that is your license to a successful career,” Hopson told graduates. “It will make you competitive in the marketplace. You’re ready to go out right now and begin your careers.

“I have many friends who’ve gotten their associate’s degree and gone on to do incredibly well in their professions. They make good livings, are able to care for their families, built careers and established a nest egg.”

Of all graduates, 97 achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 165 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 255 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

“This is a time we as educators enjoy celebrating,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. He noted that student diplomas this year will include a gold seal commemorating the college’s 100th anniversary. Hinds opened in 1917 and is celebrating the Centennial with a host of activities throughout the calendar year.

[tweetable alt=””]Students return to school, thrive, graduate from Hinds CC[/tweetable]

 

Photo 11 – Elizabeth Coleman smiles as Laura Stevens adjusts her cap before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Coleman, of Madison, earned an Associate of Applied Science in Medical Data Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Elizabeth Coleman smiles as Laura Stevens of Hinds Community College adjusts her cap before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Coleman, of Madison, earned an Associate of Applied Science in Medical Data Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Photo 12 – Felix Davis, left, of Jackson, shares a moment with Dr. Robin Parker graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Davis earned technical and career certificates this past semester after earning his High School Equivalency through the MI BEST program at Hinds. Parker is assistant dean for Career and Technical Education on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Felix Davis, left, of Jackson, shares a moment with Dr. Robin Parker before graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Davis earned technical and career certificates this past semester after earning his High School Equivalency through the MI BEST program at Hinds. Parker is assistant dean for Career and Technical Education on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bailey Ainsworth, of Brandon, poses with the Associate of Arts degree in Radiologic Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Bailey Ainsworth, of Brandon, poses with the Associate of Arts degree in Radiologic Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Semaj Brown, of Clinton, holds the Associate of Arts degree in Physical Therapist Assistant Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Erica Brown, her mother, left, and James Brown, her father. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Semaj Brown, of Clinton, holds the Associate of Arts degree in Physical Therapist Assistant Technology presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Erica Brown, her mother, left, and James Brown, her father. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kennedy Garner, of Brandon, holds the Associate of Arts degree presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Kyle Garner, left, a brother, Scott Garner, her father, Rhonda Garner, her mother, and Kreg Garner, a brother. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Kennedy Garner, of Brandon, holds the Associate of Arts degree presented to her during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With her is Kyle Garner, left, a brother, Scott Garner, her father, Rhonda Garner, her mother, and Kreg Garner, a brother. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Wayne Dang, of Pearl, holds the Associate of Applied Science degree in Computer Network Technology presented to him during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With him is Brianne Blair, left, his fiancé, and Jacqueline Blair, Brianne’s mother.

Wayne Dang, of Pearl, holds the Associate of Applied Science degree in Computer Network Technology presented to him during graduation ceremonies May 12 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. With him is Brianne Blair, left, his fiancé, and Jacqueline Blair, Brianne’s mother. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

0 581 15 May, 2017 News more
Grandmother of four among academic, technical grads at Hinds CC
Posted by
15 May

Grandmother of four among academic, technical grads at Hinds CC

PEARL – Vicki Colbert had already lived a full life taking care of people when she decided to pursue a second career.

“I’m still the same lady from that little old town of Raymond,” Colbert said. “But, this is surely like a second life for me.”

Vicki Colbert

Vicki Colbert

The 57-year-old grandmother of four was among more than 1,200 graduates from ceremonies held by Hinds Community College over two days. She graduated Friday, May 12 with others who completed academic and technical programs at the college.

Students received 1,534 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number, almost 800 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus in Pearl or a Sunday ceremony at the Utica Campus.

Among them was Colbert, who retired not long ago after 33 years in the medical field, mainly at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. A love of old-fashioned country cooking and staying busy, she enrolled in the Culinary Arts program and excelled.

“I’m happy about finishing school after nearly 40 years,” Colbert said. “It was about letting myself know that it’s never too late to complete something.”

Vicki Colbert, left, shares a laugh with Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse after an awards ceremony April 28, 2017 honoring outstanding students and faculty from programs offered at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Vicki Colbert, left, shares a laugh with Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse after an awards ceremony April 28, 2017 honoring outstanding students and faculty from programs offered at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

In April, she led a team of culinary students from several schools whose fried fish and hush puppies won second place in competition at the Collegiate DECA International Career Development Conference in Anaheim, Calif. She and team members picked up third place honors at the state competition.

“She spearheads so many projects here,” said Austin Lee, district director of the Culinary Arts program at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. “She headed up the DECA fundraising to make it to California, where her team raised over $1,000 to help with their expenses by selling chicken on a stick and Kool-Aid for $6.”

Next on her heady list of plans is to open an eatery in Raymond that’ll feature all the staples of down-home country fare.

“I love country cooking, with roast beef and gravy with veggies,” she said. “And I’ll do farm-to-table with it. It’ll be good for people coming from church on Sundays.”

Speaking at the 11 a.m. ceremony was state Sen. Briggs Hopson III, of Vicksburg.

“You’re receiving a piece of paper that is your license to a successful career,” Hopson told graduates. “It will make you competitive in the marketplace. You’re ready to go out right now and begin your careers.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse with state Sen. Briggs Hopson III (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse with state Sen. Briggs Hopson III (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I have many friends who’ve gotten their associate’s degree and gone on to do incredibly well in their professions. They make good livings, are able to care for their families, built careers and established a nest egg.”

Of all graduates, 97 achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 165 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 255 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

“This is a time we as educators enjoy celebrating,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. He noted that student diplomas this year will include a gold seal commemorating the college’s 100th anniversary. Hinds opened in 1917 and is celebrating the Centennial with a host of activities throughout the calendar year.

[tweetable alt=””]Grandmother of four among academic, technical grads at Hinds CC[/tweetable]

 

Vicki Colbert, left, and Chef Sally Porter of the Culinary Arts program at Hinds show awards Colbert won this past semester. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Vicki Colbert, left, and Chef Sally Porter of the Culinary Arts program at Hinds show awards Colbert won this past semester during a program April 28, 2017 at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

0 652 15 May, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Art Show winners, scholarship recipients announced
Posted by
11 May

Hinds CC Art Show winners, scholarship recipients announced

RAYMOND – Winners of the Hinds Community College Student Art Show were announced during a ceremony May 8 at the Marie Hull Art Gallery on the Raymond Campus.

  • CERAMICS/3D DESIGN: Charity Lockridge, of Vicksburg, first place and honorable mention; Reginald Pickering, of Clinton, second place; Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs, third place; Vallye Russell, of Vicksburg, and Mary-Saphrona Grey, of Yazoo City, honorable mention
  • DRAWING: Susan Moore of Crystal Springs, first place; Michael Neal, of Vicksburg, second place; Raphael Spears, of Honolulu, Hi., third place
  • GRAPHIC DESIGN: Kimberly Surratt, of Vicksburg, first place; Gurkirt Cheema, of Clinton, second place; Anna Hite, of Raymond, third place; Dipannita Saha, of Jackson, honorable mention
  • PHOTOGRAPHY: Jonathan Braud, of Terry, first place; Bria Williams, of Clinton, second place; Angela Creekmore, of Clinton, third place; Susan Moore of Crystal Springs, honorable mention
  • PAINTING/MIXED MEDIA: Dipannita Saha, of Jackson, first place; Reginald Pickering of Clinton, second place; Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs, third place
  • 2D DESIGN/PRINTMAKING: Abbigayle Ainsworth, of Raymond, first place; Dipannita Saha, of Jackson, second place; Rashad Plumpp, of Byram, third place
  • BEST IN SHOW: Jonathan Braud, of Terry

About 130 works of art were considered for this year’s contest, which was judged by nationally acclaimed artist and Mississippi native Rick Anderson.

Faculty nominate students for reimbursement scholarships who have shown growth, a strong work ethic and positive attitude throughout the year. This year’s winners were:

  • Abbigayle Ainsworth, of Raymond
  • Gabriel Barnes, of Jackson
  • Lizzie Bethea, of Edwards
  • Gurkirt Cheema, of Clinton
  • Angela Creekmore, of Clinton
  • Jaylen Crump, of Chicago, Ill.
  • Mary-Saphrona Grey, of Yazoo City
  • Logan McVan, of Vicksburg
  • Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs
  • Sarah Beth Pardue, of Clinton
  • Reginald Pickering, of Clinton
  • Rashad Plumpp, of Byram
  • Dipannita Saha, of Jackson
  • Raphael Spears, of Honolulu, Hi.
CERAMICS/3-D DESIGN winners, from left,  Charity Lockridge, of Vicksburg, first place and honorable mention;  Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs, third place;  Vallye Russell, of Vicksburg, honorable mention;  Reginald Pickering, of Clinton, second place;  Mary-Saphrona Grey, of Yazoo City, honorable mention (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

CERAMICS/3-D DESIGN winners, from left,
Charity Lockridge, of Vicksburg, first place and honorable mention; Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs, third place; Vallye Russell, of Vicksburg, honorable mention; Reginald Pickering, of Clinton, second place; Mary-Saphrona Grey, of Yazoo City, honorable mention (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

DRAWING  winners, from left, Raphael Spears, of Honolulu, Hi., third place ; Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs, first place; not pictured is Michael Neal, of Vicksburg, second place  (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

DRAWING winners, from left, Raphael Spears, of Honolulu, Hi., third place; Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs, first place; not pictured is Michael Neal, of Vicksburg, second place (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRAPHIC DESIGN winners, from left, Kimberly Surratt, of Vicksburg, first place ; Anna Hite, of Raymond, third place;  Dipannita Saha, of Jackson, honorable mention ; Gurkirt Cheema, of Clinton, second place (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

GRAPHIC DESIGN winners, from left, Kimberly Surratt, of Vicksburg, first place; Anna Hite, of Raymond, third place; Dipannita Saha, of Jackson, honorable mention; Gurkirt Cheema, of Clinton, second place (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

PHOTOGRAPHY winners, from left, Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs, honorable mention;  Jonathan Braud, of Terry, first place;  Angela Creekmore, of Clinton, third place; not pictured is Bria Williams, of Clinton , second place  (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

PHOTOGRAPHY winners, from left, Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs, honorable mention;
Jonathan Braud, of Terry, first place;
Angela Creekmore, of Clinton, third place; not pictured is Bria Williams, of Clinton, second place (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PAINTING/MIXED MEDIA winners, from left,  Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs, third place ; Reginald Pickering, of Clinton, second place;  Dipannita Saha, first place  (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

PAINTING/MIXED MEDIA winners, from left,
Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs, third place; Reginald Pickering, of Clinton, second place;
Dipannita Saha, first place (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

2-D DESIGN/PRINTMAKING  winners, from left, Rashad Plumpp, of Byram, third place ; Abbigayle Ainsworth, of Raymond, first place ; Dipannita Saha, of Jackson, second place (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

2-D DESIGN/PRINTMAKING winners, from left, Rashad Plumpp, of Byram, third place; Abbigayle Ainsworth, of Raymond, first place; Dipannita Saha, of Jackson, second place (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BEST OF SHOW, Jonathan Braud, of Terry

BEST OF SHOW, Jonathan Braud, of Terry

REIMBURSMENT SCHOLARSHIP winners, back row from left, Angela Creekmore, of Clinton, Mary-Saphrona Grey, of Yazoo City, Reginald Pickering, of Clinton, Raphael Spears, of Honolulu, Hi., Rashad Plumpp, of Byram, Jaylen Crump, of Chicago, Ill., Gurkirt Cheema, of Clinton, Logan McVan, of Vicksburg; front row from left, Dipannita Saha, of Jackson, Sarah Beth Pardue, of Clinton, Abbigayle Ainsworth, of Raymond, Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs  (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

REIMBURSEMENT SCHOLARSHIP winners, back row from left, Angela Creekmore, of Clinton, Mary-Saphrona Grey, of Yazoo City, Reginald Pickering, of Clinton, Raphael Spears, of Honolulu, Hi., Rashad Plumpp, of Byram, Jaylen Crump, of Chicago, Ill., Gurkirt Cheema, of Clinton, Logan McVan, of Vicksburg; front row from left, Dipannita Saha, of Jackson, Sarah Beth Pardue, of Clinton, Abbigayle Ainsworth, of Raymond, Susan Moore, of Crystal Springs (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC Art Show winners, scholarship recipients announced [/tweetable]

 

0 495 11 May, 2017 News more
Hinds CC soccer coach, team leader honored by FCA
Posted by
05 May

Hinds CC soccer coach, team leader honored by FCA

RAYMOND – Hinds Community College men’s soccer coach Doug Williams and Hinds men’s tennis team leader Matthew Burkes have been awarded by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes.

Men's Soccer Coach Doug Williams, left, and Men's Tennis team leader Matthew Burkes.

Men’s soccer Coach Doug Williams, left, and Men’s tennis team leader Matthew Burkes.

Williams and Burkes have received the Bill Buckner Impact Award, given to outstanding coaches, athletes from the college, high school and middle school levels and volunteers from campuses throughout the state. Both were honored April 28 at the 30th annual Bill Buckner FCA Luncheon in Jackson.

Candidates for the award are chosen based on their heavy involvement in FCA on their respective campuses, as well as their commitment to making disciples in their communities and churches. The award is named for the organization’s longtime director and those recognized for exemplifying the characteristics of dignity, strength and humility.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC soccer coach, team leader honored by FCA[/tweetable]

0 1123 05 May, 2017 News more