http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC to break ground on new building at Vicksburg-Warren Campus

Author Archives: Danny Barrett

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Danny Barrett Jr. is a 17-year journalist with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mass Communication from Nicholls State University in Thibodaux, La. Barrett covered county government and business at The Vicksburg Post for 10 years and came to Hinds Community College in 2015.

Hinds CC to break ground on new building at Vicksburg-Warren Campus
Posted by
06 October

Hinds CC to break ground on new building at Vicksburg-Warren Campus

VICKSBURG – Hinds Community College and its supporters in local government and the business community in Vicksburg will break ground on a 40,000-square-foot Academic & Career-Technical Building at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

A rendering of the planned Academic & Career-Technical Building at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

A rendering of the planned Academic & Career-Technical Building at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

Officials will gather at the site in front of campus at 10 a.m. for a ceremony to mark the start of construction. The campus is located at 755 Hwy. 27, across from Warren Central High School.

 The two-story facility will house 10 classrooms, eight training labs, administrative offices, meeting space and a multipurpose room. Two parking lots and a bus drop-off are also proposed as part of the project, plus an access road to connect parking spaces to the existing parking area.

[tweetable alt=””]#Hinds CC to break ground on new building at Vicksburg-Warren Campus[/tweetable]

0 621 06 October, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members, officers
Posted by
02 October

Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members, officers

PEARL – The Alpha Omicron Omega Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus inducted new members and officers Sept. 21.

From left, Angela Cole, Molly Graef, Summer Dunlap, Alexis Frederick; back row, MaKenzie Downs, Madison Brunt, Joshua Williamson, Trevor Williams, Corey Lovette, Dylan Smith, Rachel Clements and Camryn Willoughby, all of Brandon (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, Angela Cole, Molly Graef, Summer Dunlap, Alexis Frederick; back row, MaKenzie Downs, Madison Brunt, Joshua Williamson, Trevor Williams, Corey Lovette, Dylan Smith, Rachel Clements and Camryn Willoughby, all of Brandon (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Newly inducted members include Rachael Clements, biology; Angela Cole, graphic design, both of Brandon; MaKenzie Downs, of Brandon, biochemistry; Summer Dunlap, of Brandon, undecided; Lauren Ferguson, of Kosciusko, psychology; Alexis Frederick, radiologic technology; Molly Graef, physical therapy assistant; Taylor Hall, general studies, all of Brandon; Thomas Harkins, of Jackson, nursing; Eric Kinan, of Florence, mechanical engineering; Victoria Lawrence, of Pearl, pre-med; Lekitia Lee, of Pelahatchie, fashion merchandising; Destiny Little, of Madison, psychology; Corey Lovette, of Brandon, accounting; Courtney Lum, of Pelahatchie, nursing; Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, history; Breana McCord, nursing; Scarlett Mitchell, biochemistry, Shelby Moore, nursing, all of Pearl; Paula Morehead, of Morton, nursing, Sheridan Morris, of Puckett, interior design; Jordan Nowell, of Pearl, kinesiology; Faith Peterson, of Jackson, nursing; Ashlyn Rader, of Puckett, nursing; Keyana Robey, of Clinton, medical data technology; Dylan Smith, of Brandon, Spanish; Cristina Steinwinder, of Florence, nursing; Trevor Williams, poultry science; Josh Williamson, business administration; Camryn Willoughby, biological sciences, all of Brandon.

Also inducted were Corbin Billings, Michelle Brister, Benjamin Bristow, Jared Collum, McKenzi Crockett, Christopher Glass, James Hood, Khanya Ntoni, Karigan Teer, Shelby Trimm, Lindsee Washington, Brian Williams and Emily Yates.

New chapter officers, from left, Win Winstead, of Pelahatchie, Carlos Martinez, of Pearl, Madison Brunt, of Brandon, Hannah Stovall, of Brandon, Claudia Nelson, of Flowood; back row, from left, Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, Josh Williamson, of Brandon, James Flickner, of Pelahatchie, Eric Kinan, of Florence (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

New chapter officers, from left, Win Winstead, of Pelahatchie, Carlos Martinez, of Pearl, Madison Brunt, of Brandon, Hannah Stovall, of Brandon, Claudia Nelson, of Flowood; back row, from left, Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, Josh Williamson, of Brandon, James Flickner, of Pelahatchie, Eric Kinan, of Florence (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Officers include Madison Brunt, president, of Brandon; Hannah Stovall, of Brandon, president; James Flickner, of Pelahatchie, vice president of fellowship and MS/LA Regional Central District Representative; Josh Williamson, of Brandon, vice president of service; Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, vice president of leadership; Claudia Nelson, of Flowood, vice president of scholarship, Carlos Martinez, of Pearl, vice president of scholarship; Win Winstead, of Pelahatchie, vice president of public relations; Eric Kinan, of Florence, vice president of communications.

Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society for community and junior college students. Membership in Phi Theta Kappa is extended to students who have a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or above on 12 or more transferrable credit hours. There are more than 1,200 Phi Theta Kappa chapters throughout the United States and abroad. For more information about Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds, go to http://www.hindscc.edu/admissions/studentlife/clubs/ptk/index, email Faculty Adviser Joy Rhoads at jdrhoads@hindscc.edu or follow the society’s Hinds chapter on Twitter at @HindsRankinPTK. The new Honors Institute program at the Rankin Campus may be followed at @HCCHonorsRankin.

[tweetable alt=””]#Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members[/tweetable]

Front row, from left,  Breanna McCord, of Pearl, Ashlyn Rader, of Puckett, Victoria Lawrence, Jordan Nowell, both of Pearl, Courtney Lum, of Pelahatchie; back row, from left, Scarlett Mitchell, of Pearl, Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, Eric Kinan, of Florence, Lakitia Lee, of Pelahatchie, Cristina Steinwinder, of Florence, Shelby Moore, of Pearl (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Front row, from left, Breanna McCord, of Pearl, Ashlyn Rader, of Puckett, Victoria Lawrence, Jordan Nowell, both of Pearl, Courtney Lum, of Pelahatchie; back row, from left, Scarlett Mitchell, of Pearl, Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett, Eric Kinan, of Florence, Lakitia Lee, of Pelahatchie, Cristina Steinwinder, of Florence, Shelby Moore, of Pearl (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Keyana Robey, left, and Faith Peterson, both of Jackson (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Keyana Robey, left, and Faith Peterson, both of Jackson (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lauren Ferguson, left, of Kosciusko, and Paula Morehead, of Morton (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Lauren Ferguson, left, of Kosciusko, and Paula Morehead, of Morton (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

Destiny Little, left, of Madison, and Thomas Harkins, of Jackson (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Destiny Little, left, of Madison, and Thomas Harkins, of Jackson (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

1 434 02 October, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Music Department to host U.S. Air Force brass quintet
Posted by
02 October

Hinds CC Music Department to host U.S. Air Force brass quintet

RAYMOND – The Hinds Community College Music Department will host Gateway Brass, a component of the U.S. Air Force Band of the West, on Friday, Oct. 6 in the Vashti Underwood Muse Band Hall.

Gateway Brass

Gateway Brass

The performance is from 11 a.m. to noon and is free and open to the public. Contact Hinds Music Department Chair Shane Sprayberry at 601.857.3273 or jssprayberry@hindscc.edu for more information.

Gateway Brass is a brass quintet with percussion which showcases military professionalism at Department of Defense ceremonies and entertaining public functions throughout the Gulf Coast region on behalf of the Air Force. The virtuoso group of active duty airman musicians perform musical styles spanning five centuries.

The ensemble is based at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. All enlisted airmen must first pass through JBSA-Lackland, making it known as “The Gateway to the Air Force”, which became the inspiration for the group’s name.

[tweetable alt=””]#Hinds CC Music Department to host U.S. Air Force brass quintet [/tweetable]

0 301 02 October, 2017 News more
Scholarship a blessing for Hinds CC Rankin Campus student on long road to success
Posted by
27 September

Scholarship a blessing for Hinds CC Rankin Campus student on long road to success

Note: The following story appears in the fall issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website. To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here.

PEARL – From a difficult birth into the world to a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome, Sarabian Ross hasn’t had an easy life. His elementary school years, academically and socially, were a series of arduous steps toward a fulfilling life.

“I didn’t even think I was smart enough to be in college,” said Ross, of Jackson, known to his friends and family as Ray. “My mom (Arlisha) and I didn’t know where the money would come from.”

Sarabian Ross

Sarabian Ross

Thanks to a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, the student who’s now quick with a hello to his buddies on campus hopes to build on successes he didn’t ever think was possible.

“The scholarship is important to me because I had no idea how I would make it through college,” he said. “So, I’m just feeling very blessed.”

Ross is attending Hinds on the Oscar Richard Ainsworth & Edith Wetzel Ainsworth Scholarship and is on track to graduate in 2018. He’s mapping out his plans for future one day at a time, but he’s impressed by what he’s seen so far in the college’s Animation and Simulation Design Technology program.

“I’ve been interested in animation and how those things came to life since I was a kid,” he said. “Before computers, it was just pencil and paper. I thought that was cool right there. In animation, whenever you build certain characters in 3-D, it starts out with just basic shapes. They’re all made up of polygons. It’s really just like a sculpture, one you have to mold from the polygons into a face.”

Since starting Hinds, Ross is achieving things far beyond what his mom expected. He has landed on the Dean’s List and became part of the Rankin Campus’ Phi Theta Kappa honor society chapter, Alpha Omicron Omega.

The classroom setting has been a welcoming sight for both mother and son. His mother works as a school crossing guard for the Jackson Police Department and is completing a degree at Mississippi College. Together, they’ve discovered new study strategies and feel relieved for the help in financing Ray’s education.

“The scholarship was a blessing because it took away the burdens and stress of him coming to school, the cost of the books, things like that,” Arlisha Ross said. “And he has excelled being here.”

Ray says young adults in his situation can make it, provided they have support and help from family, friends and peers.

“I want to encourage people who have autism and have Asperger’s that they can make it to college like I did,” he said. “I got here with the help of my mother, my godfather and my grandmother, who’s no longer with us. What I’d tell them is to have someone around who they can trust, like their mom or a counselor like I have, with whom they can open up about their feelings.”

[tweetable alt=””]Scholarship a blessing for #Hinds CC Rankin Campus student on long road to success[/tweetable]

1 458 27 September, 2017 News more
Strong foundation at Hinds CC laid foundation for local nursing chief
Posted by
27 September

Strong foundation at Hinds CC laid foundation for local nursing chief

Note: The following story appears in the fall issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

RAYMOND – Solid foundations in healthcare are built one satisfied patient at a time.

For Brenda Howie, the essentials of caregiving are built with the kinds of foundations laid every day at Hinds Community College for its nursing students.

Brenda Howie

Brenda Howie

“Hinds was my foundation and I built it in the Associate Degree Nursing program,” said Howie, who marked her 40th year in nursing in 2017 alongside being named chief nursing officer at Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, where she’s worked since 1981. “My education at Hinds is the reason I am where I am today.”

Howie was in the Student Nursing Association during her time in the program at Hinds, when it was housed at the Raymond Campus with other science classes. The Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center opened in 1982.

“I lived at home during school and it was a busy two years,” she said. “I was taking all my prerequisites with my nursing. We had a checkoff labs back then instead of simulation labs. We did IVs and injections on each other.”

Howie began at Baptist as a staff nurse on a medical-surgical unit. She has served various roles, including staff nurse, educator, assistant manager, nurse manager and clinical director. Additionally, she has been an adjunct clinical instructor for both Hinds and Mississippi College School of Nursing.

“It is always wonderful when our graduates are recognized for excellence in their profession,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, current dean of Nursing and Allied Health, who also taught part of Howie’s doctoral program. “Brenda Howie is an outstanding example. This promotion is well deserved, and I know Brenda will continue to serve Baptist with excellence.”

In her current role, Howie provides leadership to more than 1,000 RNs in the hospital’s nursing department. She also oversees the Educational Resource Center and is the executive leader for service.

In August 2015, Howie obtained her doctorate degree in Nursing Education and Administration from William Carey University. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Masters of Science in Nursing from the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Her days in front of students in a classroom might be done, but she emphasizes that teaching never really stops in her world.

“You teach every day,” she said. “The biggest change is technology, especially with electronic medical records.”

The field today has many challenges, including keeping quality personnel.

“In today’s world, there’s so many more avenues, professionally, a nurse can take,” she said. “It’s challenging to keep a strong workforce. You have to adapt and learn with the generations.

“You have to learn how to take time to listen to the patients. They are why I’m still here today. You have to learn the right words at the right time, so you can communicate with them while utilizing all the advanced technology we have in healthcare today. Patients and their families are at the center of why we do what we do.”

[tweetable alt=””]Strong foundation at #Hinds CC laid foundation for local nursing chief[/tweetable]

0 429 27 September, 2017 News more
‘Sweetheart’ of Hinds CC allied health makes dreams come true for children
Posted by
27 September

‘Sweetheart’ of Hinds CC allied health makes dreams come true for children

Note: The following story appears in the fall issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

VICKSBURG – Helping people get better and having fun doing it is what Melissa Smithhart is known for among friends and associates.

By day, she’s a physical therapist assistant at Scott Robbins Physical Therapy in Vicksburg, where she helps people recover from surgery or injuries to vital joints such as shoulders, hips and knees. For the past few years, though, it’s her work making dreams literally come true for children with life-threatening medical conditions that has taken her calling in life to another level.

Melissa Smithhart

Melissa Smithhart

“Working in physical therapy, you see a lot of personalities and types of people,” Smithhart said. “You need to be caring and compassionate. It’s rewarding to see people get back to their prior level of function.

“With a child that has an illness, to make them happy for one day and see the smile on their face is amazing. It takes a caring and compassionate personality to see that as well.”

About three years ago, Smithhart, a graduate of the Physical Therapist Assistant program at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, became a volunteer with the Make-A-Wish Foundation as part of her participation in Junior Auxiliary in Vicksburg. An official with the foundation had inquired about the local group’s interest in becoming liaisons between the organizations and children’s families.

“There was no one in Warren County to volunteer, so we got the staff together and said, ‘there’s no reason we can’t take this on,’” she said. “Conscience pushed me to say, ‘well, let me just say yes and see what happens.’”

This past summer, Smithhart and fellow volunteers helped make a “sensory room” for an 8-year-old girl with a debilitating developmental condition. The story made print headlines in Mississippi and beyond. Another involved a little boy who wanted to meet his favorite Disney character, Pluto, at Walt Disney World. “I love to plan kids’ parties anyway, so this was up my alley.”

Smithhart earned her Hinds degree after having already earned a bachelor’s degree in Exercise Science from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2005. During summer sessions in between, she took some of her core academic classes at the Hinds Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

Her chosen career chose her, in a way, as a teenager, she said.

“My senior year in high school, my uncle had a stroke,” she said. “He had physical therapy done, so I got to see it and it interested me. And I’ve always liked to exercise, so it seemed fitting.”

Her kindly manner with people made it easy to believe she had gone on to help people, said Pam Chapman, chair of the Physical Therapist Assistant program at NAHC.

“I passed the story on to some of her classmates from back then, and all they had to say was, ‘That’s Melissa!’ and how they fully expected her to get involved with something so good,” Chapman said. “Melissa was an excellent student and she’s amazing with everyone she works with. One of her fellow students referred to her as ‘Melissa Sweetheart.’”

Smithhart credits her Hinds experience for keeping her on track to live her own dreams.

“I studied a lot and I was just determined,” she said. “Hinds gave me the opportunity to have this career and the chance to make a difference in people’s lives.”

[tweetable alt=””]‘Sweetheart’ of #Hinds CC allied health makes dreams come true for children[/tweetable]

2 515 27 September, 2017 News more
Hinds CC instructor drafts new career as Fab Lab director
Posted by
26 September

Hinds CC instructor drafts new career as Fab Lab director

Note: The following story appears in the fall issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

RAYMOND – Phil Cockrell has struck when the iron was hot, so to speak, many times in his professional career.

These days, the material he works with is more plastic than iron and his equipment is actually the “coolest” on campus.

Phil Cockrell, inside the Fab Lab (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Phil Cockrell, inside the Fab Lab (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Cockrell, a Magee native and Brandon resident, instructs courses in the Engineering and Drafting Design Technology program. He’s also the director of the Fab Lab on the Raymond Campus, which opened in August. He says it’s a place where students, faculty, industry and the public alike can, as Cockrell puts it, “Imagine, design and build.”

“It’s for prototyping products for any number of purposes, and it’s open to students, faculty and the public,” Cockrell said. “Theoretically, you could come up with an idea for a product and patent it, as teenagers in similar labs in other states have done.”

Located in the Vocational Technical Building A, the lab is outfitted with 3-D printing machines, laser cutters and related equipment capable of etching designs or cutting flat sheet material such as acrylic and metal. The resulting prototypes are limitless – from small trinkets such as a cartoon character’s crown to a full 3-D reproduction of parts used in heavy industry and the human form itself.

Printing in 3-D involves programming a set of instructions into a central control panel or a separate computer, then loading the appropriate material – often forms of polyvinyl plastic – into a feeder line where the material is melted and flows through mechanical arms to “print” an object based on the instructions.

The lab was financed through the Predominantly Black Institutions Formula grant and is the first member lab in Mississippi of the U.S. Fab Lab Network, a group of 76 high schools, colleges, universities and businesses nationwide. An introductory non-credit course launched the lab in August 2017  for students while Cockrell began training instructors to become certified on the equipment.

A mechanical arm inside a 3D printer prints an object in the Fab Lab. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

A mechanical arm inside a 3D printer prints an object in the Fab Lab. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

All the heady technology has transformed what was once simply called drafting, said Cockrell, a former Simpson County sheriff’s deputy who switched careers to return to school at age 28.

“I was getting married and I wanted to make a career change,” he said. “I did some research, and drafting and design was getting to be a hot field. Hinds’ program had a really good reputation, so I got out of law enforcement and came back to school.”

Cockrell’s wife, Rebecca, graduated from the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds and is Learning Lab/Clinical Placement coordinator at the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

He earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Drafting and Design Technology, graduating summa cum laude. It was a line of work that was changing along with the world itself, as the Internet opened new possibilities.

“Technology made things easier,” he said. “Instead of working out a set of house plans by hand, I could sit at a computer and do a set of house plans in a fraction of the time. I could manipulate it a lot easier on a computer than by hand.

“As a student, I was well-prepared for the industry, as I worked part-time doing small parts for air conditioning systems and in construction,” he said. “Eventually, I was able to take a building, design it, estimate it and project-manage it. Hinds prepared me to do that.”

His instructors took note of his skill set when the time came to launch his second career.

“Phil was always a class leader, the first to volunteer for outside projects and excelled in his coursework,” said Cindy West, dean of Career and Technical Education for the Raymond Campus and Cockrell’s instructor for Drafting and Design. “Phil’s name was always at the top of my ‘short list’ of former students to call in the event there was ever an open instructor position.”

While the Cockrells vacationed in late 2007, and after he contemplated going to nursing school, a position indeed came open and his teaching vocation began.

“I enjoy the classroom setting, especially watching students as they start to get the concept. That’s a joy.”

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC instructor drafts new career as Fab Lab director[/tweetable]      

0 379 26 September, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Nursing/Allied Health Center looks back, moves forward during Centennial celebration
Posted by
25 September

Hinds CC Nursing/Allied Health Center looks back, moves forward during Centennial celebration

JACKSON – Bobbie Anderson and Mary Ann Sones had a combined 58 years in positions leading a generation of future nurses and healthcare professionals at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

Decades’ worth of memories on top of theirs flowed freely from the two program pioneers and numerous retired faculty and alumni who reunited Sept. 21 at the Chadwick Drive complex as part of the college’s Centennial celebration.

Bobbie Anderson, left, retired dean at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, speaks during a reunion of former deans and instructors at the facility Sept. 21. Also seated are Mary Ann Sones, center, also a retired dean, and Dr. Libby Mahaffey, right, the center's current dean. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Bobbie Anderson, left, retired dean at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, speaks during a reunion of former deans and instructors at the facility Sept. 21. Also seated are Mary Ann Sones, center, also a retired dean, and Dr. Libby Mahaffey, right, the center’s current dean. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“It’s not often you get to the ground floor of something like this and see it get off the ground,” said Anderson, of Vicksburg, the first dean at NAHC who worked 24 years in the Associate Degree Nursing program. “It’s truly an honor.”

Testimonials to the nursing and allied health programs’ success since the Chadwick Drive facility opened in 1982 highlighted the ceremony, dubbed “Looking Back, Moving Forward”, as did an exhibit displaying the evolution of nursing school equipment through the years. Attendees signed a banner marking the complex’s part in the Centennial. Also, a time capsule was buried and a flowering plum tree was planted near the front of campus to mark the event. Anderson and Sones were presented personalized medallions marking each being among the “100 People Passionate about Hinds” honored at a separate ceremony in August.

“I was so lucky to have been in the right place at the right time when I became an instructor at Hinds Community College,” said Sones, a Kosciusko native and dean of the facility from 1993, when Anderson retired, through 2004. She spent more than 34 years overall at Hinds in various teaching and administrative positions. “I was fortunate to have wonderful people to work with. I learned so much from this lady, Ms. Anderson. I learned how to be an administrator from Bobbie Anderson.”

Standing, from left, Kay Jones, Shirley Williams, Dr. Libby Mahaffey, Florence Lewis and Judy Fortenberry; seated is Bobbie Anderson (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Standing, from left, Kay Jones, Shirley Williams, Dr. Libby Mahaffey, Florence Lewis and Judy Fortenberry; seated is Bobbie Anderson (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Nursing programs began at Hinds in 1966 with 26 students in one room of the Home Economics building on the Raymond Campus. Eight years later, with Anderson as its director, the program moved to a converted residence on campus and enrollment grew rapidly. It prompted a new home be built, at its current site beside the former Hinds General Hospital, now Merit Health Central.

Anderson remembered the move from Raymond to the current digs taking place over the span of just one weekend.

“Rebecca Tustain had set up our learning lab,” Anderson said. “Those tables in there, they must have weighed at least a hundred pounds. We had called a moving van to move them. She had dared them to have something fall and break.”

Today, the complex consists of the 51,000-square-foot original building which was renamed in 1993 for Anderson, a 33,000-square-foot annex building housing a majority of allied health programs and academic courses, and the Ball Simulation Center, which features five tech-driven labs for training purposes.

Lee Cooper, maintenance technician at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, buries a time capsule during a reunion Sept. 21 of former deans and instructors at the facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Lee Cooper, maintenance technician at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, buries a time capsule during a reunion Sept. 21 of former deans and instructors at the facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I started work here when the Nursing Allied Health Center was opened,” said Dr.

Lee Cooper, left, maintenance technician at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, and Mike Daniels, facilties manager for the facility, stand near a plum tree planted during a reunion of retired deans and faculty Sept. 21 at the facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Lee Cooper, left, maintenance technician at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, and Mike Daniels, facilties manager for the facility, stand near a plum tree planted during a reunion of retired deans and faculty Sept. 21 at the facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Libby Mahaffey, dean of the facility since 2005. “So, this is all I have ever known at the college.”

Former NAHC faculty shared stories of the nursing program’s humble beginnings.

“We had three instructors to an office back then at Raymond,” said Kay Jones, retired former Associate Degree Nursing instructor and 34-year employee. “One day we came in, and there were so many books on the shelf that it fell off the wall and the books were on the floor.”

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

Through physical expansions, the program’s architects and instructors point to the spirit of family at Hinds that has produced the standard of excellence seen in NAHC’s graduates.

“Every day was so enjoyable because of the people I worked with,” Sones said. “It was a wonderful 34 ½ years.”

Dr. Joycelyn Washington, director of Student Services/Counselor for NAHC, served as event chair for the NAHC Centennial event. Dr. Portia Travis, director of the Transition to RN program, presented roses to commemorate the center’s role in the Centennial celebration. Therese Winschel, chair of the Respiratory Care Technology program, and Mike Daniels, facilities manager for NAHC, headed up the time capsule and tree planting.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC Nursing/Allied Health Center looks back, moves forward during Centennial celebration[/tweetable]            

Bobbie Anderson, seated, retired dean of Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, receives a personalized medallion from Jackie Granberry, executive director of the Hinds Community College Foundation, during a reunion Sept. 21 of former deans and instructors at the facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Bobbie Anderson, seated, retired dean of Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, receives a personalized medallion from Jackie Granberry, executive director of the Hinds Community College Foundation, during a reunion Sept. 21 of former deans and instructors at the facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Mary Ann Sones, a retired dean of Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, holds a personalized medallion received during a reunion Sept. 21 of former deans and instructors at the facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Mary Ann Sones, a retired dean of Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, holds a personalized medallion received during a reunion Sept. 21 of former deans and instructors at the facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left, Judy Fortenberry, Martha Hopper and Dr. Libby Mahaffey gather following a reunion Sept. 21 of retired deans and faculty at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Hopper was among the first students at NAHC, which opened in 1982. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, Judy Fortenberry, Martha Hopper and Dr. Libby Mahaffey gather following a reunion Sept. 21 of retired deans and faculty at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Hopper was among the first students at NAHC, which opened in 1982. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, Christie Adair, Dr. Jane Skinner, Michelle McGuffee, Dottie Binkley, Marilyn Hughes, Lee Cooper, Dr. Libby Mahaffey and Mike Daniels

From left, Christie Adair, Dr. Jane Skinner, Michelle McGuffee, Dottie Binkley, Marilyn Hughes, Lee Cooper, Dr. Libby Mahaffey and Mike Daniels (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

0 335 25 September, 2017 News more
Hinds CC launches link to help Mississippians finish degree
Posted by
11 September

Hinds CC launches link to help Mississippians finish degree

RAYMOND – A better future is a click away for thousands of Mississippians who have some college coursework under their belts but are still short of a degree. Hinds Community College is among the state’s higher education institutions partnering to help those Mississippians complete their degrees in order to compete in today’s job market.

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Complete 2 Compete, launched in August by the Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning (known informally as the state College Board), provides information and resources available to help working-age adults in the state return to college and complete requirements necessary to earn their degrees. The site is accessible at www.msc2c.org.

Current or former Hinds Community College students can check into their progress toward a degree at http://www.hindscc.edu/complete-to-compete.

“Degree completion and student success are our goals at Hinds Community College,” said Stephanie Hudson, district Dean for Student Advancement and district Registrar. “C2C participants will get personalized assistance with the Admissions and Registration processes to ensure they are able to take advantage of all of the resources available to them and complete their degree in the shortest amount of time possible.”

The Complete 2 Compete website will serve as an important resource for thousands of Mississippians:

  • More than 2,400 former students age 21 or over have enough credits to earn a bachelor’s degree with no additional coursework.
  • An additional 28,000 students have enough credits to earn an associate degree with no additional coursework.
  • More than 100,000 former students can earn either an associate or bachelor’s degree with some additional coursework.

“As a statewide initiative, Complete 2 Compete has the potential to impact hundreds of thousands of Mississippians,” said Dr. Andrea Mayfield, Executive Director, Mississippi Community College Board. “Expanding career and wage opportunities are just two, of many, benefits of Complete 2 Compete. I am excited to see this collaborative effort become a reality. Without the partnership and efforts of many, this initiative would not be possible. I look forward to the positive impact on individuals, employers, and Mississippi’s economy.”

There is no cost for submitting information through the C2C website and doing so may help an individual determine how close they are to completing degree requirements. Depending on what programs are needed to satisfy an individual’s career and educational interests, the Complete 2 Compete website will match potential students to a list of schools that offer the classes needed to complete a degree.

Tuition and fees for enrollment in courses may be assessed according to the established tuition and fee schedule at each institution. Some incentives, including academic forgiveness, virtual tutoring, adult learner scholarships and tuition assistance, prior learning assessment and repayment plan options may be available at some of the institutions.

“Complete 2 Compete will grow our skilled, educated workforce, in turn growing economic development across the state,” said Gov. Phil Bryant. “This partnership will ensure Mississippi remains attractive to business and industry looking for a favorable tax climate and a workforce ready to excel on day one. I am grateful to everyone involved in making it a reality.”

Mississippi public universities, the Mississippi Community College Board and the Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges are partners in the effort to identify target groups, implement adult learner services and re-engage adult students to help them complete their degrees.

The Mississippi Department of Human Services has provided funding through a grant designed to help low-income Mississippians improve their job skills. An additional grant for the program has been provided by the Mississippi Department of Employment Security.

“This website provides important information that can have life-changing results for many Mississippians,” said Dr. Glenn Boyce, Commissioner of Higher Education. “Workforce studies have shown that the vast majority of future jobs will go to those with a post-secondary degree or credential of value beyond high school. I would encourage individuals to access this website as it could be an important first step in helping them achieve a goal that will ultimately lead to a better, higher-paying job and greater job and financial security.”

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC launches link to help Mississippians finish degree[/tweetable]

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Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company
Posted by
11 September

Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company

RAYMOND – Four Hinds Community College students who interned with Continental Tire over the summer have even more of a reason to cherish their nine weeks of paid training at the company’s tire plant in Mount Vernon, Ill.

Continental has covered tuition for the fall 2017 semester for Dylan Canant, Mack Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell. The students had been placed at Continental’s maintenance department for on-the-job experience in electrical, electronic, mechanical and hydraulic systems.

Hinds students Dylan Canant, from left, Mackie Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell spent their summer as interns for Continental Tire in Mount Vernon, Ill. (Submitted to Hinds Community College)

Hinds students Dylan Canant, from left, Mack Pope, Samuel Williams and Cody Waddell spent their summer as interns for Continental Tire in Mount Vernon, Ill. (Submitted to Hinds Community College)

The students’ enthusiasm and aptitude for their budding careers with the company building a $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County near Clinton that’s planned to open in 2019.

“During my visit to Mount Vernon, I heard nothing but positive feedback about our interns from Mississippi. They obviously did a great job and were great ambassadors,” said Michael Egner, project manager with Continental. “The student’s success is proof that we’ve found a strong partner in Hinds Community College. Together, we can build a great workforce and future for Continental in Mississippi.”

Pope, an Electronics student on the Raymond Campus, and Canant, an Electrical Technology student on the Raymond Campus, counted the exposure to new people and faces as a plus to go along with the diversified workforce training.

“Being an electronics tech I came here expecting to do electronics,” Pope said. “However I was hired as a multi-tech, meaning that I would also do electricians and mechanics work on top of that. It has been a wonderful experience meeting new people.”

“My experience has been really great and I am really proud of myself and the people who pushed me to do this,” Canant said. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime thing for anybody who gets this opportunity. It is one of the best experiences I have ever had in my life.”

Waddell, an Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology student at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus, took note during his internship of the vibrant culture that existed in the plant as he learned to troubleshoot, install and repair tire components in the mixing department.

“This company cares about their employees and it’s obvious to anyone who works here,” Waddell said. “And that alone is most interesting thing to me about this experience.”

Maintenance technicians will be some of the first positions filled when hiring begins in the commercial vehicle tire plant in late 2018. As one of the key roles in Continental’s daily operations, maintenance technicians are responsible for both reactive and preventive maintenance of equipment throughout the facility.

Williams, an Industrial Maintenance Technology student at the Rankin Campus, hopes to fill one of those roles thanks to the unique opportunity he had this past summer.

“I’ve learned new things I didn’t think were possible,” Williams said, adding he learned correct workplace safety tips through the use of Personal Protective Equipment. “This has been one of the best opportunities of my life and I am truly blessed to be a part of it.”

[tweetable alt=””]Summer interns at Continental have tuition at Hinds CC paid by company[/tweetable]

 

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