http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans MDOT Awards STEM Scholarship to Hinds Community College Student

Author Archives: Danny Barrett

Full Name: Danny Barrett Website:
Info: Danny Barrett Jr. is a 18-year journalist with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mass Communication from Nicholls State University in Thibodaux, La. Barrett covered county government and business at The Vicksburg Post for 10 years and came to Hinds Community College in 2015.
Posted by on 29 September

MDOT Awards STEM Scholarship to Hinds Community College Student

The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) has awarded a $500 scholarship to Douglas Edward Patrick Jr., a student at Hinds Community College in Raymond.

Patrick, a resident of Clinton, is pursuing a career in computer science. The MDOT scholarship is awarded to students studying STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology and Math) toward a career path in transportation engineering, and majoring in computer science, urban or community planning, or other transportation related technology fields.

MDOT Human Resources Division Training Manager and Scholarship Coordinator Terry Winstead, Transportation Commissioner Dick Hall, Douglas Edward Patrick Jr. and Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse at the Clyde Muse Center on the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in Pearl.

MDOT Human Resources Division Training Manager and Scholarship Coordinator Terry Winstead, Transportation Commissioner Dick Hall, Douglas Edward Patrick Jr. and Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse at the Clyde Muse Center on the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in Pearl.

“This scholarship program highlights MDOT’s support for future generations of transportation professionals,” said Transportation Commissioner Dick Hall. “We recognize the need to support educational opportunities for young people in these fields to further the maintenance and advancement of Mississippi’s multi-modal transportation infrastructure.”

Funded in support by the Southeastern Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (SASHTO), the MDOT scholarship is awarded to help defray education expenses, which may include academic fees, tuition and books, room and board, and other related expenses. This is the 12th year of the scholarship program. Student eligibility is determined by GPA and a desire to pursue a career path in transportation STEM.

For more information on MDOT scholarships, visit GoMDOT.com.

29 September, 2015 News more
Posted by on 29 September

‘Play therapy’ vocation has roots in upbringing at Hinds CC for Prewitt

It was a wooden ventriloquist doll named Jerry that brought Rebecca Brooks Prewitt out of her shell as a child.

“My parents taught speech at Hinds,” Prewitt remembers. “They were very verbal and well-spoken. As a child, I was very shy. I began using Jerry when I was in the seventh grade. Jerry became my voice. He’s been with me quite some time.”

Rebecca Prewitt, a pediatric outpatient social worker at University of Mississippi Medical Center, holds a rubber duckie, one of many toys she keeps around as a licensed play therapist. She earned her specialization in the emerging field of study earlier this year. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Rebecca Prewitt, a pediatric outpatient social worker at University of Mississippi Medical Center, holds a rubber duckie, one of many toys she keeps around as a licensed play therapist. She earned her specialization in the emerging field of study earlier this year. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

These days, Prewitt, the daughter of longtime Hinds teachers Sue Brooks and the late Fred Brooks, is building on her own use of play as a voice to foster positive mental health in children. Earlier this year, Prewitt became a registered play therapist with the Clovis, Calif.-based Association for Play Therapy (APT). It came after completion of a specialized play therapy career track degree program at the University of Mississippi – the first of its kind in the nation.

Her upbringing spent in the academic atmosphere of Hinds shaped her own desire to be an educator. Her own experiences helped her see an even greater mission as it relates to children’s emotional health.

“I grew up in the environment of academia, being a third-generation teacher,” said Prewitt, whose parents are the namesakes of Brooks Hall, where speech is taught, and Brooks Theatre on the Raymond Campus. A brother, Rick Brooks, and one of her sons, Matthew, are Hinds alumni.

Prewitt’s educational journey began at Hinds where she was extremely involved in campus life. She was a member of the Hi-Steppers dance team, sang in the choir, was an officer in Phi Theta Kappa and was involved in the Wesley Foundation.

She moved on to the University of Southern Mississippi where she received a bachelor’s in elementary education and a master’s in social work. She taught in Oklahoma for four years and one year at Hinds, in the Resource and Coordinating unit under former vice president Bob Mullins.

“I was in education for a while but wanted to do more counseling,” she said. “My goal at that time was to be a therapist. I was excited to find a way to blend the two. I don’t formally do play therapy, but it informs my work here.”

Those like Prewitt who are licensed in the discipline help client children use play as the language by which their emotions are expressed. The association claims a membership of more than 1,000 individuals and credentialed play therapists nationwide, a number that includes 35 in Mississippi.

Play therapy “is separate from my actual work, but it’s all tied in,” said Prewitt, whose official job is as a pediatric outpatient social worker at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. “In play therapy, children are brought over to a play room. As play therapists, we facilitate. We start at ages 3 to about 12. They may be too young to talk about their feelings, so they play out what’s bothering them.”

UMMC collaborated with Ole Miss to provide space and clients for Prewitt to complete a practicum for her degree in the specialty, though the discipline is not part of the hospital’s array of services.

Typically, cases are brought to specialists such as Prewitt through schools, pediatricians, other doctors’ offices and word of mouth. Analyses from play sessions can help school counselors, parents and other professionals draw conclusions.

“Children experience trauma of many kinds,” she said. “We have what we call ‘Big-T Trauma,’ which is like an earthquake, a hurricane, seeing someone shot or being in a family experiencing divorce or loss. Then we have ‘Little-t traumas,’ such as when a bicycle gets stolen, someone won’t share their cookie, or a friend moves a few blocks away.

“Play is a child’s language, and the toys are a child’s words,” she said. “So, we choose toys of different categories. One is real life, such as a toy kitchen area. Another is expressive toys, like puppets, stuffed animals, art or clay. The third is the aggressive category, such as dart guns or handcuffs like the cops use. We encourage them to show metaphorically what’s happening. A child who has distress might do some kind of nurturing activity, like they might serve somebody food or drink. They might put a doll to bed or give it a bath. These are all ways they might soothe themselves.”

As for Jerry, her ventriloquist doll, his legs and arms aren’t as sturdy as they used to be, but he’s still alive and kicking.

“I might have Jerry tell a story about his life, and it might mirror something going on in the child’s life,” Prewitt said.

Prewitt’s mother still remembers how Jerry – referred to almost in human terms when the subject comes up – helped a shy girl grow into a confident woman.

“My earliest memory of it was when she was in elementary school,” Sue Brooks said. “She was interested in ventriloquism, so we were able to get her Jerry and he really brought her out.

“She was always interested in things, but she was just shy. With Jerry, she could meet people and address them. He helped her find her voice.”

That same idea is being put to work for children with whom Prewitt works as a play therapist.

“If a child can play out their problem and put it out for themselves and us to see, there’s not a lot that can’t be helped,” Prewitt said. “Not a lot can be done to change a child’s situation, but the therapy can help the way a child relates to their situation.”

29 September, 2015 News more
Hinds CC Honors program expands to Rankin Campus
Posted by
24 September

Hinds CC Honors program expands to Rankin Campus

The Honors Institute at Hinds Community College is expanding to the Rankin Campus effective for fall 2016, a move touted as a response to the community.

“Students and parents from Rankin County have been asking for an expansion of the Honors Institute for several years,” said Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus and two-time Principal of the Year in the Rankin County school system at Pisgah High School where he was previously employed.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse approved the expansion officially on Sept. 18. Some Honors classes will be offered in the spring, with a full launch next August. Joy Rhoads, chair of the Social Sciences Division, will coordinate the program at the Rankin Campus.

In place at the Raymond Campus, since fall 1996, the Honors Institute provides an enhanced and supportive learning environment for students. The Institute offers programming in four broad areas – Honors Program, Leadership Studies, International Studies and Phi Theta Kappa.

“We believe more Rankin County students will attend Hinds if they have access to the Honors Institute at the Rankin campus,” Session said. “There are dozens that qualify, some already on campus here.”

Rhoads said details such as class offerings and teaching assignments are under development.  Staff at Raymond and Rankin are working closely to establish quality programs on the Rankin Campus.

“We are very excited to have the opportunity to build on and expand an already successful Honors Program,” Rhoads said. “This expansion will afford students on the Rankin Campus an enhanced learning opportunity through a collaborative and inclusive environment as well as an opportunity to benefit the college and our community through leadership and service. Certainly, we are grateful for the support we have been given in this undertaking, and we expect that this expansion will serve our students well.”

Rhoads and Honors Program District Director Dr. Ben Cloyd will assist students in class selection and community service. “By next fall, a full range of Honors course offerings will be available to Rankin Campus students,” Cloyd said.

“Honors courses will be a boon to the Rankin Campus, for they will offer stimulation to students who wish to grow intellectually and to the faculty who teach them,” said Gary Fox, academic dean for the Rankin campus. “Naturally, the Rankin community also will profit from their growth.”

Students who enroll in Honors classes at Hinds will have the opportunity to earn Honors scholarships each semester and be considered for priority enrollment in international study and leadership classes.

Session said the Honors Program will be a draw for high school graduates who have participated in the college dual enrollment program. “This program is a new scholarship opportunity for students attending the Rankin Campus,” he said.

The program remains inclusive and requires no previous Honors experience, said District Honors Institute Dean Deborah McCollum. Students can qualify for the program on three criteria – a composite score of 25 or better on the ACT, a 3.5 or better high school GPA (on a 4.0 scale) or a Hinds GPA of 3.5 or better based on college transfer credit classes.

“The Hinds program was developed according to guidelines established by the National Collegiate Honors Council, and we proudly remain a member of this organization today. We are very pleased to offer this programming to students on the Rankin Campus,” McCollum said.

 

For more information on the Honors Program at Hinds, call 601.857.3531/3837, email Joy Rhoads at JDRhoads@hindscc.edu or visit http://www.hindscc.edu/admissions/studentlife/clubs/honors.

24 September, 2015 News more
Honoré ends M2M summit with challenge to ‘take on the impossible’
Posted by
16 September

Honoré ends M2M summit with challenge to ‘take on the impossible’

Doing the impossible is something retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré has made look easy in uniform and in post-military life.

In closing out this year’s Minority Male Leadership Initiatives Best Practices Summit, the three-star general stressed aiming high to succeed in life wasn’t merely possible – it’s imperative.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

“Don’t be afraid to take on the impossible,” Honoré said to a packed main arena Tuesday at Hinds’ Clyde Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. “I was the proverbial C-student. My mama couldn’t read, my daddy could only read a little bit.

“C-students like me, you gotta hustle,” Honoré said. “You’ve gotta use every gift God gave you to make it. There’s no reason or excuse not to make it. I made it because I didn’t let anyone around me outwork me. And I’m not going to settle for your excuses.”

Honoré, best known for his efforts to restore order in New Orleans as head of Joint Task Force Katrina following the devastating 2005 hurricane, spoke on the virtues of self-discipline and perseverance during the final hour of the summit, themed “Preparing African American Males for Success in the 21st Century”. A recurring theme in his address was preparing the current generation of high school and college students to be world leaders through basic skills.

“When I was growing up, people fought to be able to ride on a bus,” he said. “We won the right to get on the bus, and now we’re the people who drive all the buses. You know what job we want this century? We want to own the bus.”

Retired Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the crowd from floor level at the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

Retired Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the crowd from floor level at the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

Born in 1947 as the youngest of 12 children in Pointe Coupee Parish, La., Honoré, an African-American who identifies as Creole, enlisted in the Army in 1971. By 2004, he was a three-star general and oversaw deployment of National Guard divisions heading to Iraq and Afghanistan. Three years after leading the Katrina effort, he retired, and in 2009 authored the book, “Survival: How a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family from Disasters and Leadership in the New Normal.”

In 2012, a program similar to Hinds’ M2M Initiative was established in Louisiana by Honoré’s alma mater, Southern University. As with M2M, it is geared to increase college graduation rates of minority male students.

Literacy is the most vital basic skill the current generation has to tackle issues on the national and world stage, Honoré said, seasoning his remarks with the use of the Army’s oft-shouted cheer, “Hooah!”

“In the State of Louisiana, one of the largest concentrations of black men is in prisons,” he said. “There are cities in America that assess the reading level of fourth-grade, 10-year-old males to determine how many prisoners they’ll have in 20 years. They have the formula. Because if you can’t read by the time you’re 10 years old, you’ll have a 40 percent chance of having a run-in with the law by the time you’re 14. I didn’t make that up; it comes from the Children’s Defense Fund.

“We’ve got people graduating from high school now who can’t read. And they’re showing up in colleges. I challenge every teacher in here. I don’t care what the test says. These children need to know how to read. If they can’t read, I don’t care how many computers we give them. Life will mean nothing to them.”

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré accepts a copy of his 2009 book " “Survival: How a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family from Disasters and Leadership in the New Normal" for high school students in the Minority Male Initiative. Honoré gave the closing address at the M2M program's Best Practices Summit that ended Tuesday.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré accepts a copy of his 2009 book ” “Survival: How a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family from Disasters and Leadership in the New Normal” for high school students in the Minority Male Initiative. Honoré gave the closing address at the M2M program’s Best Practices Summit that ended Tuesday.

Slides during his address showed a Model of Excellence triangle and the iconic depiction of Gen. George Washington crossing the Delaware River during the American Revolutionary War, which he used as an example of winning the battles of life against long odds.

“Competence, confidence, discipline – that’s what creates excellence,” he said. “Discipline is what we do when nobody’s watching, and you do the right thing. It’s that little voice in the back of your head. Knowing what to do and having the initiative to do it when nobody’s looking is how we create excellence.”

“Twenty percent of the troops (with Washington) were slaves who weren’t free, and they’re fighting for freedom from the British. You got this? But think about this. You sit here today and think about how hard you got it. Think about how hard they had it – fighting for the freedom of a country, but themselves are slaves.

“But, we sit here today at Hinds talking about an enduring problem we’ve had for 239 years we’ve yet to resolve. The good news is we’re talking about it and we’ve given you an action plan for success. That action plan is you. The only one who will determine your success is you.”

“We need you to be prepared to take on the impossible,” he said. “Previous generations did it. They fought and won our freedom when they were not free themselves.”

The M2M Minority Male Initiative is a grant-funded project based at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center on Sunset Drive. The initiative provides leadership training, career counseling, tutoring, mentoring and opportunities for travel to senior level universities for program participants.

16 September, 2015 News more
Posted by on 11 September

Golf tournament namesake ‘committed to Hinds,’ loved youth sports

For years, both during and after each had made their mark on education in Warren County, Clyde Donnell and Othel Mendrop strode the greens of Clear Creek Golf Club in Bovina to talk about the college and the game each loved.

Both are gone now, but this year the Hinds Community College golf tournament and scholarship benefit that had honored one will now honor both.

“He was committed to Hinds in no uncertain terms,” Caroline Mendrop said this month, as organizers with Hinds’ Alumni Association prepared to add her late husband’s name to that of Donnell’s in the title of the scholarship benefit put on by the association’s Warren-Claiborne County chapter. “All my children went to Hinds, and we are a Hinds Junior College family.”

Othel Mendrop

Othel Mendrop

The Clyde Donnell and Othel Mendrop Memorial Golf Tournament is Sept. 16 at the east Warren County golf course and will again benefit a scholarship fund for students through the Warren-Claiborne County chapter of the Alumni Association. About $160,000 has been raised in the more than 25 years since the tournament began. Proceeds from the tournament began going to the scholarship in 1999. The scholarship became endowed in 2003.

Registration begins at noon, with play to begin at 1 p.m. For more information, contact alumni coordinator Libby Posey, at 601.857.3350.

Born in Vicksburg in 1927, Mendrop attended Hinds and Memphis State College on basketball scholarships. After a master’s degree in administration from Mississippi College and four years in the U.S. Air Force, he coached basketball and football and was principal in the former Warren County School District. For 10 years, he was principal at Warren Central High School and coached girls track there. Later, he became assistant superintendent of education for the district.

The 1989 inductee to the Hinds Community College Sports Hall of Fame also coached youth sports and continued to enjoy watching his family’s activities after retiring. The great-grandfather of four died in 2014.

“He loved Hinds and he was thrilled to see his children and grandchildren do well, especially in sports,” said Melanie Mendrop Dornbusch, one of four children. “Clyde Donnell was a buddy of his and they were in a golf group. They loved to play.”

Donnell was a member of the college’s Board of Trustees and the Foundation Board, as well as a former Warren County supervisor from District 1. He died in 2005, and the golf tournament’s organizing committee named the annual scholarship benefit for him.

Caroline Mendrop said the honor is befitting an ardent supporter of the college and champion for education.

“Hinds meant so much to him,” she said. “We felt so humbled by it. His friends told me when he died, ‘You know he’s got a tee time already up there.’”

11 September, 2015 News more
Posted by on 10 September

Hairdresser, daughter plan education together at Hinds CC nursing expo

Sharita Williams, who owns a beauty shop in Franklin County, had always wanted to go back to school. Her daughter, Taylor, a senior at Franklin County High School, is interested in becoming a nurse.

Together, they plan to achieve both goals at Hinds Community College.

“One of my 80-year-old hair clients graduated from community college last year,” Sharita Williams said. “She motivated me to go back.”

Sharita Williams, center, and Taylor Williams, center right, take a tour of facilities during the Hinds Community College Nursing/Allied Health Center Showcase event on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. The event was an open house for prospective students interested in programs offered at the campus. Information booths and learning lab tours were available. The Williamses are interested in the nursing and phlebotomy programs.

Sharita Williams, center, and Taylor Williams, center right, take a tour of facilities during the Hinds Community College Nursing/Allied Health Center Showcase event on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. The event was an open house for prospective students interested in programs offered at the campus. Information booths and learning lab tours were available. The Williamses are interested in the nursing and phlebotomy programs.

Mother and daughter were among about 200 people who attended the 2015 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase on Tuesday at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. Prospective students and others toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty, explored the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

“Our faculty spoke with people one-on-one to learn about our programs of study and the promising careers in healthcare that Hinds graduates obtain,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

Programs of interest included Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emerging Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Healthcare Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Phlebotomy and Nursing Assistant.

Taylor is already taking a class that is preparing her for a medical career.

“We practice checking vital signs and things,” she said. “I like helping people and making them feel better if I can.”

Annalese Burton, a senior at Philadelphia High School, made the trip from Neshoba County with her mother, Crystal, to find out more about a program that she says virtually runs in the family.

Annalese Burton, center, a senior at Philadelphia High School, and her mother, Crystal, talk with District Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole at the Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015 at Hinds' Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center.

Annalese Burton, center, a senior at Philadelphia High School, and her mother, Crystal, talk with District Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole at the Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015 at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center.

“I have several, several people in my family in the nursing field,” Burton said. “I’ve researched Hinds. It’s small and seems like a family. I feel like I’ll really excel here.”

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

10 September, 2015 News more
Rankin County students get info, advice at Hinds CC College Fair
Posted by
09 September

Rankin County students get info, advice at Hinds CC College Fair

Damian Broom had the look and sound of success, as did many of his fellow high school classmates and peers in Rankin County on Wednesday.

“I love English and I’d like to be a teacher,” said Broom, a Pisgah High School senior, one of about 2,500 high school students at the Rankin County School District College Fair, held at the Muse Center on Hinds’ Rankin Campus.

Looking every bit the teacher in a teal dress shirt and glasses, Broom said a love for the spoken and written word drives him to be an educator.

Pisgah High School students Omar Smith, Thomas Perigo, Damian Broom, Brian Matthews and Ken Williams speak with Hinds Community College Rankin/ Jackson Academic-Technical Center Vice President Norman Session during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. Many colleges were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

Pisgah High School students Omar Smith, Thomas Perigo, Damian Broom, Brian Matthews and Ken Williams speak with Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus and the Jackson Academic/Technical Center, during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. More than 60 universities and branches of the military were present to recruit high school students from the school district.

“I was thinking of graphic design, but I just think English is important,” Broom said.

The annual event draws students from the nine high schools in the Rankin public school system and representatives from more than 60 universities, mainly in Mississippi and Louisiana, and branches of the military.

More than 700 students visited Hinds booths at the fair, said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

“Students learned all about enrolling at Hinds, as well as the majors and scholarships we have to offer,” Cole said. “We enjoy having Rankin County graduates attend Hinds after high school. Many of them come to Hinds to finish their Associates of Art degree after already having a jump start on college through our dual credit program.”

Prospective student Molly Hunter, of Brandon High School, takes a selfie with Hinds Community College Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. Many colleges were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

Prospective student Molly Hunter, of Brandon High School, takes a selfie with Hinds Community College Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. More than 60 universities and branches of the military were present to recruit high school students from the school district.

The event gives students a chance to talk to recruiters about a range of career paths that only a post-high school education can provide.

McLaurin High School’s Christina Elam is another prospective educator looking to get educated on what’s to offer from universities.

“I’m planning on going to Hinds for a few years, then transferring to Mississippi State, preferably to teach English,” Elam said. “I’ve had a love of being with kids my whole life.”

An engineering career beckons for Saray Benitez, of Northwest Rankin High School, who visited with recruiters from Hinds’ Utica Campus about the STEM-UP program, which fosters careers in science and math.

Hinds Community College Utica Campus recruiters Chelia Thompson, left, and  John Townes met with prospective students, including Northwest Rankin High School student Saray Benitez ,center, during  the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. Many colleges were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

Hinds Community College Utica Campus recruiters Chelia Thompson, left, and John Townes met with prospective students, including Northwest Rankin High School student Saray Benitez ,center, during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. More than 60 universities and branches of the military were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

“I’d like to be a civil engineer,” she said. “I’ve always liked messing with math and science.”

Horace Gentry, a senior at Florence High School, is leaning to nursing and all things medical.

“I have relatives that used to do it and they’ve said you can make a good living off it,” Gentry said. “And I’ve always been interested in how the human body works.”

Ditto for Ariel Griffin and Myaya Harris, both Brandon High seniors and looking into nursing programs – possibly post-natal care.

“I want to take care of babies,” Griffin said. “I wouldn’t want to do deliveries, but I’d like to work to take care of them.”

Myaya Harris of Brandon High School speaks with recruiters at the Hinds table during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. Many colleges were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

Myaya Harris of Brandon High School speaks with recruiters at the Hinds table during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. More than 60 universities and branches of the military were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

The outdoors is drawing Brandon Wilson’s interest, while Lee Schisler is programming for himself a possible career in information technology.

“I’m actually looking into something to do with wildlife and being a game warden,” said Wilson, also a Florence High senior. “I’m here to find about programs I should take to do that.”

“I’m thinking of doing anything technology-wise,” said Schisler, a Pisgah High School senior. “I’m thinking IT because it’s always a growing market and jobs should always be there.”

09 September, 2015 News more
Annual golf tournament renamed for Hinds CC Sports Hall of Famer
Posted by
08 September

Annual golf tournament renamed for Hinds CC Sports Hall of Famer

Hinds Community College’s annual golf tournament at Clear Creek Golf Club in Bovina is being renamed to honor a second big supporter of the annual fundraiser.

The Clyde Donnell and Othel Mendrop Memorial Golf Tournament is Sept. 16 at the east Warren County golf course and will again benefit a scholarship fund for students through the Warren-Claiborne County chapter of the Alumni Association. About $160,000 has been raised in the more than 25 years since the tournament began. Proceeds from the tournament began going to the scholarship in 1999 and were endowed in 2003.

Registration begins at noon, with play to begin at 1 p.m. For more information, contact alumni coordinator Libby Posey, at 601-857-3350.

This year’s tournament is rebranded to add Othel Mendrop’s name to the event. Mendrop, who died in 2014, was inducted to Hinds’ Sports Hall of Fame in 1989 and was an avid golfer and tournament supporter.

Born in 1927, Mendrop attended Hinds and Memphis State College on basketball scholarships. After a master’s degree in administration from Mississippi College and four years in the Air Force, he coached basketball and football and was principal in the former Warren County School District. For 10 years, he was principal at Warren Central High School and coached girls track there. Later, he became assistant superintendent of education for the district.

08 September, 2015 News more
Hinds CC receives gift to train, boost ranks of women truckers
Posted by
04 September

Hinds CC receives gift to train, boost ranks of women truckers

Andre’a Gaston had faced challenges before enrolling in truck driver school – mainly being a mother to two daughters and a son.

Driving a manual shift transmission turned out to be a close second in that category, but now she’s certified and bona fide to take on the road.

“At first, I thought my age would prevent me from doing it and the fact I’m a female. I had not driven a stick shift vehicle in my life, and I’m 44!,” Gaston said Thursday during a ceremony in which Hinds Community College received $220,000 from the Walmart Foundation to support the training of more women and underserved populations who enroll in the driver’s academy at KLLM Transport Services.

Andre'a Gaston, who earned her commercial driver's license (CDL) at the KLLM Driving Academy, speaks Thursday during a ceremony to present Hinds with a $220,000 check from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers.

Andre’a Gaston, who earned her commercial driver’s license (CDL) at the KLLM Driving Academy, speaks Thursday during a ceremony to present Hinds with a $220,000 check from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers.

“My entire family is proud of me for taking this big step and doing what no one thought I could do,” Gaskin said.

The Grenada native credited instructors at the firm’s driving academy for helping her secure her commercial driver’s license last week.

“I had my days where I had trouble. But they’re determined. They stick with you and make sure you get it. Anyone who wants this job, it can be done. You’ll have the backing for it from every single teacher and instructor.”

The money, part of a larger $100 million commitment by the retailer to bolster workforce training, education and career pathways for retail workers nationwide, will support training women and underserved populations who enroll in the driver’s academy at KLLM Transport Services. The money comes to Hinds via the Jackson-based Foundation for the Mid South.

Dr. Clyde Muse, from left, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District and Ivye Allen, president of the Foundation for the Mid South, hold a ceremonial check signifying a $220,000 gift to Hinds from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers.

Dr. Clyde Muse, from left, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District and Ivye Allen, president of the Foundation for the Mid South, hold a ceremonial check Thursday signifying a $220,000 gift to Hinds from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers.

“Walmart supported us in this plan to expand opportunities to all folks, but gave us a challenge to do it women,” said Ivye Allen, president of Foundation for the Mid South. “I’m glad today to see females represented here in this profession.”

Diane Smith, one of Gaston’s driving instructors, could attest to her own life-changing achievement. She began driving trucks nearly 20 years ago and ran her own business.

“At first, I didn’t want to be a truck driver because of what people would think of me,” Smith said. “But I did it to provide for my family.”

She started her career at KLLM and was eager to return to KLLM for the opportunity to help other women earn their CDL and become financially secure.

Diane Smith, at podium, speaks at a ceremony Thursday to present Hinds with a $220,000 check from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers. Smith has been a licensed truck driver for nearly 20 years. At left is Andre’a Gaston, who earned her commercial driver’s license last week.

 

Hinds’ partnership with KLLM to train truck drivers at the company’s Richland headquarters and boost their ranks began in fall 2012. KLLM handles the training. Hinds handles the coursework. The facility itself opened in March 2014.

“Basically, one of our goals at the company is to make sure we have a person in all 3,000-plus trucks we currently have,” said KLLM vice president Kirk Blankenship.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse said the funds enhance the partnership’s initial goal of helping train the state’s overall workforce and taps into a growing segment of the student population at Hinds.

“Now, with the Walmart Foundation and the Foundation for the Mid South, we have a secondary goal, and that is to increase the number of female drivers,” Muse said. “Our student body now consists of 65 percent females, so there’s great fertile ground out there to find female students.”

A mix of grants and other investments from Walmart and its philanthropic foundation are part of the Opportunity Initiative, rolled out earlier this year. It will spread the funds over five years to help retail workers across the industry advance careers and achieve greater economic mobility.

“The big focus is on women’s empowerment,” said Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation. “So to hear this provides support to women in retail and transportation sectors and is so important to our community.”

Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, from left, Eric Red, director of the KLLM Driving Academy, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, and Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District, Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, from left, -----, director of the KLLM Driving Academy, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, and Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District, Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, from left, -----, director of the KLLM Driving Academy, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, and Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District, Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, from left, -----, director of the KLLM Driving Academy, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, and Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District,

Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, from left, Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District, Donald Slabach, grants coordinator at Hinds, and Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development and Coordination of Career/Technical Education, associate dean of Career and Technical Education for the Raymond Campus, hold a ceremonial check Thursday signifying a $220,000 gift to Hinds from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers.

The grant further enhances the standing of Mississippi’s transportation system, said Dick Hall, transportation commissioner for the state’s central district.

“The training of a driver student like this that will use our transportation system certainly gets my attention,” Hall said.

04 September, 2015 News more
Hinds CC to receive $250K gift from Walmart Foundation
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01 September

Hinds CC to receive $250K gift from Walmart Foundation

Hinds Community College and KLLM Transport Services are boosting their training capabilities, thanks to a $250,000 gift from the Walmart Foundation that will help diversify the ranks of the trucking industry.

The money, part of a larger $100 million commitment by the retailer to bolster workforce training, education and career pathways for retail workers nationwide, will support training women and underserved populations who enroll in the driver’s academy at KLLM Transport Services. The money comes to Hinds via the Foundation for the Mid South.

The participating groups will join together to discuss the project in a news conference at 9 a.m. Thursday in the Board Room at Fountain Hall on the Raymond Campus. Media representatives are invited and are requested to rsvp at cchayden@hindscc.edu by 8:30 a.m. Thursday. Fountain Hall is located at the intersection of East Main Street and Hinds Boulevard on the Raymond Campus.

Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the state’s Central District, headlines the list of those who will speak at the presentation. Also taking the podium are Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Ivye Allen, president of Foundation for the Mid South, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation and Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM.

Hinds Community College and KLLM Transport Services have partnered together since fall 2012 to boost the number of truck drivers in Mississippi. KLLM handles the training. Hinds handles the coursework. The program is housed at the KLLM Driving Academy in Richland, which opened as a new facility in March 2014.

A mix of grants and other investments from Walmart and its philanthropic foundation are part of the Opportunity Initiative, which will spread the funds over five years to help retail workers across the industry advance careers and achieve greater economic mobility.

 

 

01 September, 2015 News more