http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Byram brass man new assistant in Hinds CC Eagle Band

Author Archives: Danny Barrett

Full Name: Danny Barrett Website:
Info: Danny Barrett Jr. is a 17-year journalist with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mass Communication from Nicholls State University in Thibodaux, La. Barrett covered county government and business at The Vicksburg Post for 10 years and came to Hinds Community College in 2015.
Byram brass man new assistant in Hinds CC Eagle Band
Posted by
27 August

Byram brass man new assistant in Hinds CC Eagle Band

RAYMONDThe Hinds Eagle Band’s newest assistant has a love for music that grew out of another traditional youth activity.

“I had an older friend in my Boy Scout troop who played trumpet,” Bullock said. “I thought it was cool, so I decided to do it, too.”

Ben Bullock of Byram began July 1 as the band’s newest assistant director. He succeeds Robert Cheesman, who retired. He also instructs the high brass section of marching and concert bands at Hinds, which includes the trumpet and French horn players.

New assistant band director Ben Bullock.

New assistant band director Ben Bullock.

A Tupelo native, he came to Hinds Community College from Lewisburg High School in Olive Branch. Previously, he directed and assisted bands at Milam Intermediate School in Tupelo and Kosciusko Middle School.

He holds an undergraduate degree in music education from the University of Southern Mississippi. His master’s is also from USM, in trumpet performance.

Bullock will work to develop the high brass studio, or section, in the concert, marching and jazz bands, Band Director Shane Sprayberry said, adding this year’s band features about 150 members.

Recruiting high school musicians who want to carry their tunes to college is job one for both men.

“I want to make Hinds a sort of place where people who will major in this will want to come here,” Bullock said. “I’d like to make it grow.”

This year’s Eagle Marching Band show is “Seasons of Love” featuring: Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club, When A Man Loves A Woman (1992 Blue Devils arrangement), Love Drunk and Seasons of Love/Finale from RENT.

The band performs, along with the Hinds Hi-Steppers precision dance team, at each home football game, Aug. 27, Sept. 3, Sept. 17, Oct. 8 and homecoming on Oct. 15 as well as numerous other parades and performances.

0 1231 27 August, 2015 News more
Hinds CC nursing program to be showcased Sept. 8
Posted by
21 August

Hinds CC nursing program to be showcased Sept. 8

RAYMONDThe Hinds Community College Nursing & Allied Health Showcase is set for 5 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 8 at the Nursing/Allied Health Center in Jackson.

Prospective students and others will get a chance to tour the campus’ learning labs, speak with faculty, explore the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and find out about requirements and deadlines.

The showcase is open to anyone interested in pursuing a career in healthcare. Free food and prizes will be offered.

“We would love to introduce you to one of our nursing and allied health programs which all focus on preparing competent, caring healthcare professionals,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean of Nursing and Allied Health. “Graduates of our programs are employed at rates of 90 to 100 percent within a year of graduation and consistently meet national benchmarks for licensure/registry pass rates.”

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

Programs of interest include Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emerging Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Healthcare Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Phlebotomy and Nursing Assistant.

“This event is a great opportunity for prospective students to meet our faculty and get first-hand information about our programs and how to get admitted,” District Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole said.

The Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center is at 1750 Chadwick Drive. For more information on the event, call 601-376-4807 or visit http://www.hindscc.edu.

 

0 1222 21 August, 2015 News more
Classes begin at Hinds amid excitement for fresh faces, older students
Posted by
17 August

Classes begin at Hinds amid excitement for fresh faces, older students

In a previous routine, Patricia Martin used to take a load off by pulling a latch on the heavy doors of an 18-wheeler. Those were fairly heavy and involved cross-country driving.

Now, she simply stops in the Eagle’s Nest student lounge on the Raymond Campus to take a load off in between classes.

Patricia Martin, a nursing student at the Raymond campus of Hinds Community College, takes a break in between classes on Monday, Aug. 17, 2015. Monday was the first day of classes for the fall semester.

Patricia Martin, a nursing student at the Raymond campus of Hinds Community College, takes a break in between classes on Monday, Aug. 17, 2015. Monday was the first day of classes for the fall semester.

“I used to be a truck driver,” Martin said Monday as classes began for Fall 2015 at each of Hinds Community College’s six campuses. “We used to call road construction barrels ‘schneider eggs’.”

Martin, 44, a Jackson resident and Georgia native, plans to knock out required coursework this semester as she prepares to enter the nursing program, a destination she mapped upon the loss of a child.

“I lost my daughter when she was 23 from complications after her appendix ruptured,” Martin said. “If I can help care for someone as a nurse, whether it be in the ER or directly with patients, I want to do that.”

A tour of Hinds with his high school back in Chicago gave Monte Burks a taste of Hinds’ family-like, relaxed atmosphere clinched his decision to move south for college.

Monte Burks, left, a freshman from Chicago, is shown the way to the Brick Masonry class on Monday by David Hawkins, director of facilities use at the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College. Monday was the first day of classes for the Fall 2015 semester.

Monte Burks, left, a freshman from Chicago, is shown the way to the Brick Masonry class on Monday by David Hawkins, director of facilities use at the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College. Monday was the first day of classes for the Fall 2015 semester.

“We went here, we went to Jackson, we went to Alabama, and to Memphis,” Burks said on his way to his first brick masonry class. “I guess it’s just a little slower here, and the number of students to a class was already something I was used to.”

Finding the appropriate classroom turned into a group effort for first-year students Leslie Brunson, of Florence, Mary Graham, of Vicksburg, and Kaylan Johnson, of Jackson – all fresh out of high school.

Mary Graham, left, of Vicksburg, and Leslie Brunson, right, of Florence, consult class schedules at the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College on Monday, the first day of classes for the Fall 2015 semester. Monday was the first day of classes for the fall semester.

Mary Graham, left, of Vicksburg, and Leslie Brunson, right, of Florence, consult class schedules at the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College on Monday, the first day of classes for the Fall 2015 semester. Monday was the first day of classes for the fall semester.

“I’ve walked about two to three miles this morning, altogether,” Brunson said.

Hinds staffers directed waves of students to class on the Raymond Campus as the Baptist Student Union provided breakfast plates. Sophomores Michael McKnight, of Brandon, an architectural engineering student in BSU, and Jonathan Stewart, a business student from Jackson, chowed on the goodies provided as part of the organization’s Peace, Love & Pancakes drive.

“I’m seeing a lot of students back this year,” McKnight said. “It’s good, because I worked hard to help do the pancakes.”

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Helping hands of healthcare lead to career paths for Hinds CC summer graduates
Posted by
30 July

Helping hands of healthcare lead to career paths for Hinds CC summer graduates

PEARL – A typical 7-year-old girl would have been discovering coloring books and learning her “times tables” in school.

Instead, Brittany Thompson had the added challenge of managing Type I diabetes. Having earned what she needs to enter nursing school, the Utica native plans to draw on the care and advice she received years ago as she charts her career.

“The experience has made me want to go into nursing,” Thompson said, all smiles on Thursday with her mother, Jeanette Thompson, outside the main auditorium at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. “It made me want to give of myself.”

Brittney Thompson, right, gets a big hug from her mother, Jeanette Thompson, following Thursday's graduation ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Hinds Community College conferred 443 degrees and certificates to 304 graduates for this summer's ceremonies.

Brittney Thompson, right, gets a big hug from her mother, Jeanette Thompson, following Thursday’s graduation ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Hinds Community College conferred 443 degrees and certificates to 304 graduates for this summer’s ceremonies.

Hinds Community College conferred 443 degrees and certificates to 304 graduates in two ceremonies at the 75,000-square-foot multipurpose facility.

Of the total number of graduates, 23 are graduating summa cum laude, which is a perfect 4.0 grade point average; 42 are graduating magna cum laude, which is a 3.60 to 3.99 grade point average and 73 are graduating cum laude, which is a 3.20 to 3.59 grade point average.

For Angela Wilson, being a mom and mentor to her 4-year-old son, Christian, who is disabled, eventually built up the energy to make a career switch. The Jackson hairdresser wants to trade her hairbrush for a medical chart with the help of the career certificate she earned in occupational therapy.

“I want to get my specialization in pediatric disabilities,” Wilson said.

Michael Thompson, of Vicksburg, was among those who graduated cum laude, with an associate’s in general studies. It’s the start of a career switch from hairdressing to working in the mental health field.

“I’m going to Ole Miss to take advantage of my certification in the field,” Thompson said.

Angela Wilson, left, and Michael Thompson, right, enjoy a light moment before Thursday's afternoon's graduation ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Hinds Community College conferred 443 degrees and certificates to 304 graduates for this summer's ceremonies

Angela Wilson, left, and Michael Thompson, right, enjoy a light moment before Thursday’s afternoon’s graduation ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Hinds Community College conferred 443 degrees and certificates to 304 graduates for this summer’s ceremonies.

Dr. Lynn Weathersby, president of the Hinds Community College Board of Trustees and superintendent of Rankin County School District, spoke to the academic and career-tech graduates at Thursday’s afternoon session.

“Be ambitious,” Weathersby told graduates. “Successful people have enthusiasm, commitment, pride and they don’t make excuses. Anyone can come up with an excuse for why they haven’t made it. Those who want to succeed don’t make excuses.”

Dr. Lynn Weathersby, left, and Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse speak briefly before Thursday afternoon's graduation ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Hinds Community College conferred 443 degrees and certificates to 304 graduates for this summer's ceremonies

Dr. Lynn Weathersby, left, and Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse speak briefly before Thursday afternoon’s graduation ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Hinds Community College conferred 443 degrees and certificates to 304 graduates for this summer’s ceremonies.

 

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Retired Hinds CC VP Powell honored by Rankin County board
Posted by
29 July

Retired Hinds CC VP Powell honored by Rankin County board

RAYMONDThe Rankin County Board of Supervisors has honored the contributions of retired Hinds Community College Vice President Dr. Sue Powell, who worked at Hinds for 20 years. She now lives in Tupelo.

Powell retired on June 30 as vice president for the Rankin and Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center and director of Occupational Programs for the district, positions she held for 12 years. She was commended by the county board July 16 for steering expansions and advancement of the college over her tenure at Hinds.

“Special recognition and commendation is due Dr. Sue Powell on the occasion of her retirement, recognizing her many outstanding professional accomplishments as well as her commitment to educational excellence in Rankin County,” read part of a resolution supervisors passed at their July 15 meeting. “We express sincere appreciation to Dr. Powell for a life of faithful and sacrificial service to the students of our community.”

Powell was a charter member of the Rankin Campus when it opened as a secondary career center in 1983 and spent six years as an instructor and marketing education coordinator. She returned to Hinds in 2001 and, under her leadership, career-tech and nursing programs expanded at the Rankin Campus as well as its physical footprint, with the construction of the Career Technical Building off Mississippi 18.

Rankin supervisors also lauded Powell for overseeing the construction of the 75,000 square-foot Muse Center on the Rankin Campus, completed in March 2011.

0 1339 29 July, 2015 News more
Hinds CC assistant band director Mapes stays on state touring artist list
Posted by
13 July

Hinds CC assistant band director Mapes stays on state touring artist list

RAYMOND – The Hinds CC band’s top assistant will remain the group’s resident artist with the state.

Randy K. Mapes, of Clinton, has been approved by the Mississippi Arts Commission for renewed listing on the Mississippi Touring Artist Roster. Mapes, who began at Hinds in 1995, will be listed on the roster for the next three years along with many of the state’s finest musicians, artists, dancers, and actors.

Roster status allows local nonprofit organizations such as arts councils, museums, schools and libraries to apply for minigrants through the Mississippi Arts Commission.

For more information, visit www.arts.ms.gov.

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New scholarship program at Hinds CC rewards top achievers in high school
Posted by
09 July

New scholarship program at Hinds CC rewards top achievers in high school

RAYMOND – Eligible high school seniors in five counties may take advantage of a new scholarship program at Hinds Community College for 2015-16.

The Valedictorian and Salutatorian Scholarship offers full tuition to first-time college freshmen who have earned diplomas from accredited high schools in Hinds, Rankin, Warren, Claiborne or Copiah counties. It covers full-time tuition for four consecutive fall and spring semesters. Applications for the new scholarship program are being accepted up until the first day of school Aug. 17, said Kathryn Cole, director of Enrollment Services.

“We are proud to recognize the achievements of valedictorians and salutatorians in our college district by offering eligible high school graduates a full tuition scholarship at Hinds for ranking at the top of their class,” Cole said.

Applicants for the scholarship must provide an official high school transcript verifying class rank. Also, they must enroll in at least 15 credit hours by the end of the drop/add period for the 16-week term. To maintain the scholarship, students must complete 12 or more credit hours during the semester in which they are receiving the funds and pull a 3.0 GPA or higher.

Eligibility also applies to freshmen who attend summer school prior to enrolling at Hinds CC as a full-time student and who participate in dual enrollment/dual credit classes before receiving a high school diploma.

Students may receive the scholarship in addition to other awards, such as the ACT scholarship, Hinds Foundation scholarship and more, Cole said.

Recipients of the funds must also abide by the Hinds Community College Scholarship Policies.

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Hinds CC announces speakers for summer graduation ceremony
Posted by
08 July

Hinds CC announces speakers for summer graduation ceremony

RAYMOND – Summer graduation ceremonies are set for July 30 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus as students earn associate’s degrees from Hinds Community College.

All nursing and allied health graduates will receive their degrees at 10 a.m., with commencement for academic and career-tech graduates to follow at 2 p.m.

Dr. Bryan Lantrip, a Jackson physician and director of the college’s Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program, is the speaker for the morning ceremony. Hinds alumnus and president of the college’s board of trustees, Dr. Lynn Weathersby, speaks to graduates for the afternoon session.

IMG_5050

Dr. Bryan Lantrip

 

Lantrip, a Yazoo City native, has been a staff radiologist at St. Dominic Hospital since 2002 and directed the sonography program at the college since 2012. He has been named a radiologist of the year three times, in 2005 and 2011 at St. Dominic’s and in 2014 by River Region Medical Center.

He earned a medical doctorate from the University of Mississippi Medical Center in May 1991 and holds graduate and undergraduate degrees from the university in biological sciences and pharmacy. He is married to Connie Pierags. They have three children.

Weathersby, a Florence native, is a four-term superintendent of the Rankin County School District and member of the Hinds Community College Board of Trustees since 2000.

Lynn_Weathersby

Dr. Lynn Weathersby

 

He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern Mississippi, a master’s from Mississippi College and a doctorate from Mississippi State University. In addition to his work in education, which includes being an adjunct professor at Mississippi State from 2002-2004, he also served as a Rankin County supervisor from 1988 to 2000.

During Weathersby’s tenure as Rankin County schools chief, the district has implemented innovative enrichment programs including the Gateway to College program and the American School Counseling Association Model for all district schools and counselors. Gateway, a partnership with Hinds Community College, enables dropouts or those in danger of doing so to complete their K-12 education in a dual enrollment setting and earn college credit. The counseling model has allowed schools to gear the function to students’ social and emotional well-being.

Weathersby and his wife, Edie, have been married for nearly 47 years and have two children and six grandchildren.

0 1351 08 July, 2015 News more
Hinds CC Agriculture Department adds three classes for Fall 2015
Posted by
25 June

Hinds CC Agriculture Department adds three classes for Fall 2015

Three classes have been added to Hinds Community College’s Agriculture Department curriculum for Fall 2015.

The classes, offered only on the Raymond Campus, are Animal Science Technology – Beef Option, Animal Science Technology – Poultry Option and Precision Agriculture.

Each expands opportunities for hands-on learning and should sync seamlessly for prospective students from heavy agricultural areas, said Wayne Boshart, Agribusiness Technology instructor.

“The Agriculture Department places a heavy emphasis on hands-on learning,” Boshart said. “Having access to the Hinds Community College Bull Test Station and college farm, managed by Kenny Banes, allows our students to have hands-on experiences with judging live animal confirmation, as well as, herd health and forage and pasture management. Dr. Roger Jones, the Agriculture Department chairman, teaches a Soil Science course that allows students to collect, analyze, and interpret soil sample analysis, which is crucial to the effective production of forages and agronomic crops.”

Poultry and beef industry officials and observers welcome the additions to the curriculum on several levels.

“The addition of these classes at Hinds Community College will provide opportunities for students to gain the applicable knowledge and skills necessary for a career in agriculture,” state Agriculture Commissioner Cindy Hyde-Smith said.

A study released in May by Purdue University ranks Agriculture degrees among three top expected demands in the job market. The industry is Mississippi’s largest, employing 29 percent of the state’s workforce.

“I applaud the leadership and foresight of Hinds in leading the way in academic preparedness to matching job market demands,” Hyde-Smith said. “These students are the future of agriculture, and they can use the skills gained in these programs to help feed and clothe the growing population.”

Andy Berry, executive vice president of the Mississippi Cattlemen’s Association, believes careers in agriculture, especially beef production, are on the upswing.

“The average age of a cattle farmer is in the early 60s. We have a growing world population, but we have a shrinking population in agriculture. Those two factors, along with historically high beef prices, make it very attractive for me to encourage young adults to become involved in beef production,” Berry said. “Currently, there’s not a better time to be involved in agriculture, specifically beef production.”

Poultry is Mississippi’s largest income-producing agricultural commodity, with a direct impact in more than half of the state’s 82 counties and a production value of more than $2.5 billion, according to the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

“These new Agriculture programs take a unique approach to instruction by using industry driven curriculums that included industry partners at the table leading their development,” said Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president of Workforce Development and Coordination of Career/Technical Education and associate dean of Career and Technical Education for the Raymond Campus. “The classes are hands-on, with field trips to local farms and related agriculture businesses.”

Mississippi-based egg producer Cal-Maine, the nation’s largest producer and marketer of shell eggs, helped form the curriculum and is offering paid internships to students who complete the program, Stocks said.

“Poultry companies in Mississippi continue to search for talented students who are interested in a long-term career of providing nutritious poultry product to consumers,” Cal-Maine chief operating officer Sherman Miller said. “I believe that the poultry industry will benefit greatly by the caliber of students that will graduate from the poultry option class. Cal-Maine Foods is excited to be a part of this program, and we believe that Hinds will help introduce local talent into a career path that will last a lifetime.”

Precision Agriculture gathers an array of technological advances to create topographic maps to help farmers and farm families to decide what to plant and where, irrigation strategies, pest control and more. Technicians in the field will install, operate, troubleshoot and repair precision agriculture systems such as GPS (Global Positioning Systems) and GIS (Geographical Information Systems). Students completing a certificate or degree program in Precision Ag will be more competent in their own farm operations or obtain positions such as Precision Ag Technicians (implement dealers), Crop Specialists, Nutrient Management Specialists, Precision Ag Department Managers, Precision Agronomists, and Precision Farming Coordinators.

“Technicians will also use the advanced processing software to collect, visualize, and analyze data that has been collected by the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) known to most of us as drones,” Stocks said.

In April, Hinds and Mississippi State University signed a unique agreement to enhance the program at each institution. At Hinds, two separate degree options are available this fall. One, the Associate of Applied Science degree in the emerging field, allows students to go directly into the workforce. A second option, an Associate of Arts degree, will allow students to transfer to MSU with 60 hours of community college coursework toward a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Engineering Technology and Business with a concentration in Precision Agriculture.

For more information on the new classes or on the Agriculture Department, contact Melissa Washburn at 601-857-3334 or at mcwashburn@hindscc.edu.

2 2486 25 June, 2015 News more
GED graduates credit persistence after ceremony Friday at Hinds CC
Posted by
16 June

GED graduates credit persistence after ceremony Friday at Hinds CC

RAYMOND – Fay Lundy was an honors student in high school but she knew nothing about the real world.

That was more than 50 years ago. Between then and now, her education had been in the workplace, but she also felt something was missing.

“I didn’t need school then, because I knew it all,” Lundy said. “But, after a while I realized what I didn’t know. But, by then, I was married and had kids.”

Lundy was among 16 people of varying ages who were recognized during a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus for achieving their General Education Development certificate this academic term.

Being the oldest person in the group didn’t faze the 68-year-old Bolton resident and grandmother of eight who worked in convenience stores, big-box retailers and restaurants as she raised a family.

“I keep telling my grandchildren, ‘Grandma worked hard but didn’t make any money because she didn’t have an education.’”

Thomas Ealey, center, celebrates his earning a General Education Development certificate following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. Also pictured are his daughter, McKenzie, and Dianna Jones, McKenzie’s mother.

Thomas Ealey, center, celebrates his earning a General Education Development certificate following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. Also pictured are his daughter, McKenzie, and Dianna Jones, McKenzie’s mother.

Thomas Brandon Ealey, 30, one of three honors students among those recognized and among four GED recipients who received $500 from the Education Pays program, hopes to learn those lessons early. He works retail in Flowood these days and has his sights set higher after years of making “a lot of bad decisions.”

“My motivation is my three children, nieces and nephews and the people around me,” Ealey said. “I’m really contemplating law school.”

Thomas Brandon Ealey, right, lends a helping hand to Fay Lundy, left, as they make their way into Eagle Ridge Conference Center on Friday for a ceremony to recognize those who received General Education Development certificates this academic term. following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus.

Thomas Brandon Ealey, right, lends a helping hand to Fay Lundy, left, as they make their way into Eagle Ridge Conference Center on Friday for a ceremony to recognize those who received General Education Development certificates this academic term. following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus.

Hinds student and noted fashion and costume designer Nina Ghaffari spoke to this year’s recipients on a message of not giving up despite background and circumstances. Ghaffari, 34, a sociology and human rights major at the Jackson Campus – Academic/Technical Center, was born in Mississippi and received a GED in 1998 from Hinds but was taken to live in her father’s native Iran for 12 years before finding her way back to the United States.

Nina Ghaffari, guest speaker at Friday’s ceremony to recognize those who received a General Education Development certificate this academic term, receives a plaque from Carla Causey, district director of Adult Education at Hinds Community College.

Nina Ghaffari, guest speaker at Friday’s ceremony to recognize those who received a General Education Development certificate this academic term, receives a plaque from Carla Causey, district director of Adult Education at Hinds Community College.

“Risks are all about uncertainty and building a more confident you,” Ghaffari said. “If we take risks on a daily basis, we become confident to take bigger risks. Life is too short to live small.”

Recipients of GED certificates and their stated hometowns included:

  • Lela Bryant, of Flora
  • Ashley Byrd, of Jackson
  • Angela Constancio, of Vicksburg
  • Thomas Brandon Ealey, of Jackson
  • Amber Hohlt, of Jackson
  • Jared Landry, of Clinton
  • Fay Lundy, of Bolton
  • Charles Leager III, of Byram
  • William Liggins, of Vicksburg
  • Malcolm Mobley, of Clinton
  • Tanu Narula, of Clinton
  • Andrew Robinson, of Vicksburg
  • Jessica Roberts, of Vicksburg
  • Curtis West, of Clinton
  • Tauras Williams, of Clinton
  • Victoria Williams, of Clinton

Ealey, Landry and Mobley were Honor Students, with Ealey, Bryant, Byrd and Liggins also recipients of $500 scholarships from the Education Pays program. Begun in 2009, the program is a partnership between Hinds and the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation and awards checks to all Hinds CC Warren GED recipients over the age of 21.

Mobley received a $500 scholarship from Hinds’ Adult Education Advisory Committee.

Hinds offers a tuition free class to all first time college students who are admitted with a GED. The college also offers a $1,000 academic scholarship that is equivalent to the ACT Scholarship for high scoring GED achievers. For more information, visit www.hindscc.edu.

0 1432 16 June, 2015 News more