http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Industrial Maintenance program at Hinds CC training tomorrow’s factory workers

Author Archives: Danny Barrett

Full Name: Danny Barrett Website:
Info: Danny Barrett Jr. is a 18-year journalist with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mass Communication from Nicholls State University in Thibodaux, La. Barrett covered county government and business at The Vicksburg Post for 10 years and came to Hinds Community College in 2015.
Industrial Maintenance program at Hinds CC training tomorrow’s factory workers
Posted by
22 February

Industrial Maintenance program at Hinds CC training tomorrow’s factory workers

Programs like Hinds’ Industrial Maintenance program on the Raymond, Rankin, Vicksburg-Warren and Utica campuses are at the heart of workforce training efforts for Continental Tire, which plans a $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County.

“Hinds’ specific role is to develop and deliver workforce training to individuals in our state who will ultimately fill jobs that Continental Tire will bring to our area,” said Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development, about the project, two years in the making. “We’ve been working closely with the Mississippi Development Authority, the Mississippi Employment Security Commission and the Mississippi Community College Board to come up with the specific training needs for Continental Tire.”

The global company, in partnership with Gov. Phil Bryant, a Hinds graduate, and the Mississippi Development Authority announced on Feb. 8 the location of the facility on more than 900 acres off Norrell Road, off I-20 West in Hinds County. Construction of the facility is slated to begin in January 2018, with tire production to begin in 2019. The plant will employ 2,500, company officials have said. Gov. Bryant has mentioned Jackson, Bolton, Vicksburg and Edwards as areas that should benefit from jobs created by the plant.

“I really believe that this has the greatest possibility to revolutionize western Hinds County of anything I’ve seen since I’ve been here. It has that possibility,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. “It’s an opportunity the college has got to show people we can be successful and really be a player. In the final analysis, they wouldn’t be here unless we could train the workforce.”

Hinds Community College students Reed Scoggins, left, of Brandon, and Christolein Simmons, of Yazoo City, are enrolled in the Industrial Maintenance program at the Raymond Campus. Recently added technology in the program lab combines functions in the electrical and mechanical disciplines to integrate training for modern-day factory jobs. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hinds Community College students Reed Scoggins, left, of Richland, and Christolein Simmons, of Yazoo City, are enrolled in the Industrial Maintenance program at the Raymond Campus. Recently added technology in the program lab combines functions in the electrical and mechanical disciplines to integrate training for modern-day factory jobs. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Industrial Maintenance is among several other workforce training courses that offer career certificates that can enhance a resume’ and open educational doors for students who might not otherwise attend college.

Christolein Simmons, a Yazoo County native, was steered by his academic advisers to take introductory class in mechatronics, an emerging multidisciplinary field of engineering that combines mechanical, electrical, telecommunications, control and computer engineering. He works in a factory and attends school, though the training at Hinds could be a key to career advancement, Simmons said.

“I just love working with my hands,” he said. “And every day, it brings something new. We’re learning to troubleshoot and just doing the framework before we get hands-on. I think I can go on to a four-year college, enhance myself, then go on to work somewhere and continue to go to school.”

Reid Scoggins, of Richland, is also a student in his first course in Industrial Maintenance. His family has run an industrial equipment business for decades, but his father encouraged him to further his education.

“He said it never hurts to have a degree,” Scoggins said. “And with this degree, you can make good money. I’ve liked machines and working on things with my hands. When I got into the program, they showed us all the machines they’d work on and the things we’d learn to do. It piqued my interest.”

Visits to the state’s two-year colleges by company officials cemented the role they’ll play in supplying the workforce.

“It was key for the program for them to see what Hinds Community College and other community colleges offer,” said David Creel, district director of Manufacturing Training. “The programs here at Hinds will complement the processes that Continental will have.”

Stocks had the responsibility of showing the college had the expertise and capacity to train the workers needed.

“[tweetable alt=””]What attracted Continental was our college being a 100-year-old institution with a proven track record of training [/tweetable]and flexibility plus availability of the consortium,” Stocks said. “We were able to demonstrate all that.”

Paul Williams, executive vice president for Continental Commercial Vehicle Tires in the Americas, said after the formal announcement a lot of locations were toured but the capacity for growing skilled workers was a key factor. “We toured the schools; we toured the technical colleges. Our greatest asset is always our people. It’s the skill level, the technical capability of the population.”

Students in the Industrial Maintenance program begin with safety courses, then move on to more involved electrical and mechanical maintenance courses that involve the latest technology that can simulate a factory setting. Completion of advanced coursework in mechatronics can earn a student an Associate of Applied Science degree.

 

22 February, 2016 News more
Eagle Experience 2016 recruiting event draws crowd
Posted by
05 February

Eagle Experience 2016 recruiting event draws crowd

For Tonesha Smith, it was all about seeing her daughter succeed in school and in life.

“I want to see her get interested in the classes she’s really interested in,” she said, escorting daughter Jazmine Hathorn and her friend, Tamera Lofton. The two Callaway High School students plan to room at Hinds together once their high school days are over.

Jazmine Hathorn, left, and Tamera Lofton, center, get information on Hinds' 2+2 Program in Elementary Education with Delta State University with the program's Terry Parrish, right, at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016 (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Jazmine Hathorn, left, and Tamera Lofton, center, get information on Hinds’ 2+2 Program in Elementary Education with Delta State University with the program’s Terry Parrish, right, at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016 (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hathorn checked out music and art programs, as did Lofton, plus her most palpable passions.

“Singing, definitely, and dance and theater,” Hathorn said.

They were among about 1,000 high school seniors who attended this year’s Eagle Experience at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus, which features exhibits highlighting all the academic and career-tech programs Hinds has to offer as well as activities ranging from student publications to the Hi-Steppers dance team to Honors.

The event is a come-and-go expo-style spread of exhibits and displays that gives high school seniors and their parents an opportunity to find out everything they need to know about enrolling at Hinds.

Eagle Experience offered Raymond Campus tours, interaction with current students and all the college basics a new student needs to know about including admissions, scholarships, majors, housing, student life and more. Participants can also enjoy food and prizes.

Lofton and Courtney Jamison, of Florence, were among those who looked into activities that go into college life at Hinds, such as cheering.

Courtney Jamison, right, a Florence High School student, checks out exhibits at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. With her is her mother, Kym, left. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Courtney Jamison, right, a Florence High School student, checks out exhibits at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. With her is her mother, Kym, left. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“I’ve been cheering all my life, really,” Jamison said. “But I’m also interested in music, Hinds Connection and doing the yearbook.”

Some attendees made this year’s event into a road trip.

“I’m into helping others, and having new experiences in new places,” said Takishia Lee, who made the trip with her mother, Tanesheia Lee, who is a certified nursing assistant, and other friends from Scott County. Lee sought information from the associate degree nursing program, as did her fellow seniors Tyunna Odom and Ambriyana Roberts.

Kimberlyn Cager, left, Tyunna Odom, center foreground, and Ambriyana Roberts, right foreground, check out lists of programs featured at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Kimberlyn Cager, left, Tyunna Odom, center foreground, and Ambriyana Roberts, right foreground, check out lists of programs featured at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Career-tech options ranged from welding to graphic design. A simulator at the Industrial Maintenance table kept prospective students combined the elements of real-world welding with a bit of virtual reality.

“It simulates welding two steel plates, which teaches body positioning, angle and distance to hold welding rods in a clean, non-waste environment,” said Industrial Maintenance Technology Instructor Geoffrey Horne as he helped Rodrick Snow, of Raymond, get the hang of a virtual welding shield through which participants could see their handiwork. For the real thing, the Welding & Cutting Technology table offered a view of neatly-sealed metal hinges, among other items.

Rodrick Snow, left, a Raymond High School senior, takes a turn in a welding simulator while Industrial Maintenance Instructor Geoffrey Horne gives some assistance at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Rodrick Snow, left, a Raymond High School senior, takes a turn in a welding simulator while Industrial Maintenance Instructor Geoffrey Horne gives some assistance at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Creating cool logos and designs using the latest graphic design programs caught the eyes of Erica Adams, Talia Sweezer and Dazieyette Jackson, a trio of Vicksburg High School seniors who made the trip as part of the school’s campus tour.

“I just have a passion for designing things like that,” Sweezer said.

Graphic Design Technology Instructor Beth Messina points out the latest design features to Erica Adams, left, Dazieyette Jackson, center, and Talia Sweezer, right, during Eagle Experience 2016 at the Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Graphic Design Technology Instructor Beth Messina points out the latest design features to Erica Adams, left, Dazieyette Jackson, center, and Talia Sweezer, right, during Eagle Experience 2016 at the Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 11,500 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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05 February, 2016 News more
Miss Hinds Community College 2016 named
Posted by
04 February

Miss Hinds Community College 2016 named

Courtney Helom, of Jackson, was named Hinds Community College 2016 in the annual pageant Feb. 3.

As Miss Hinds Community College, Helom will participate this summer in the Miss Mississippi pageant.

Miss Hinds Community College 2015 Maggie Shoultz crowns Courtney Helom, of Jackson, as Miss Hinds Community College 2016 as Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse looks on during this year's pageant Feb. 3. Helom is a sophomore at the Raymond Campus studying biology. Her platform is "Girl Scouts of America: beYoutiful". The pageant is an official preliminary pageant of the Miss America Pageant program. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Miss Hinds Community College 2015 Maggie Shoultz crowns Courtney Helom, of Jackson, as Miss Hinds Community College 2016 as Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse looks on during this year’s pageant Feb. 3. Helom is a sophomore at the Raymond Campus studying biology. Her platform is “Girl Scouts of America: beYoutiful”. The pageant is an official preliminary pageant of the Miss America Pageant program. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Helom, 20, is a Raymond Campus sophomore majoring in biology. She attended St. Joseph Catholic School and is a cheerleader and a member of Hinds Connection. Her talent was a monologue titled “Emmitt Till,” in which she took on the character of Till’s mother, and her platform is “Girl Scouts of America: beYOUtiful.”

First runner-up was Abigail Walters, 19, of Vicksburg, a Raymond Campus sophomore majoring in nursing. Second runner-up was Mary Neely Meyers, 19, of Madison, a Raymond Campus freshman majoring in business and marketing.

From left, second runner-up Mary Neely Myers, of Madison; Miss Hinds Community College 2016 Courtney Helom, of Jackson; first runner-up Abigail Walters, of Vicksburg.

From left, second runner-up Mary Neely Myers, of Madison; Miss Hinds Community College 2016 Courtney Helom, of Jackson; first runner-up Abigail Walters, of Vicksburg. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

04 February, 2016 News more
Five Hinds CC students selected for UMMC health initiative
Posted by
02 February

Five Hinds CC students selected for UMMC health initiative

Five students of Hinds Community College have been selected for a program aimed at building the ranks of males of color in healthcare.

Eddie V. Anderson, Utica Campus; Antonio McBeth and Christian Minor, Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center; Michael Pham, Raymond Campus and Zavier Smith, Utica Campus, will participate in the Health Equity and Leadership Initiative through the University of Mississippi Medical Center. The program provides those preparing for medical careers opportunities to develop skills from leaders in the healthcare workforce through in-person seminars and online sources.

“Males of color are underrepresented in our health profession schools and our goal is to offer an intimate experience for talented students such as those accepted to the Health Equity & Leadership Initiative,” said Dr. Juanyce D. Taylor, director of the program at UMMC. “The leadership development activities and shadowing experiences allow participants to learn the inner dynamics and clinical aspect of a large, complex academic health center. Essentially, [tweetable alt=””]we are building a stronger and more diverse health care workforce[/tweetable].”

Eddie V. Anderson

Eddie V. Anderson

Anderson, of Jackson, is a petty officer third class in the Navy and 2015 Hinds graduate who plans to attend nursing school. “I’m in the medical field to help people who aren’t knowledgeable about their health to do those things to improve their health,” he said.

Antonio McBeth

Antonio McBeth

Patient interaction is also important to McBeth, of Lena, in Leake County. “Interaction with the patient is an experience like no other,” said McBeth, who earned a degree in psychology from the University of Southern Mississippi before returning to Hinds to pursue eventually becoming a family nurse practitioner. “No two patients are the same, and I enjoy it.”

Applicants are recommended by faculty at their respective colleges, typically an instructor, adviser or community leader.

UMMC bases the program on research showing males of color are significantly underrepresented in most health professional programs. The program’s purpose is to support underrepresented males aged 17 to 25 enrolled in two-year colleges in Mississippi to become leaders in the healthcare workforce, while increasing access to health professional education, training, and career options. Funding for the program comes from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Dr. Mitchell Shears, academic dean for the Utica Campus, where Anderson and Smith attend class, sees the program as a chance to sell the medical field as a viable career option for an emerging pool of students.

“It is our desire on the Utica Campus to assist more students, particularly males of color, in finding opportunities like this to make them more marketable to four-year institutions and the workforce after their collegiate experiences,” Shears said.

Prospective medical careers have been shaped among this year’s participants by personal experiences.

Christian Minor

Christian Minor

“When my mother was in a car accident in 2002, I saw what the nurses in the hospital were able to do for her,” said Minor, of Jackson, a sergeant in the Mississippi National Guard who plans to be a registered nurse. “They asked about our spiritual lives and how we could get help financially.”

Michael Pham

Michael Pham

Pham, of Byram, plans to attend Mississippi State University in biochemistry before going to medical school. He doesn’t take for granted the opportunity he has. “My family left in Vietnam are farmers, so I wouldn’t have had the same opportunity to go to school there, learn something and give back to the community,” he said. “I’d have to drop out and help get money for my family, as my cousins do.”

Zavier Smith

Zavier Smith

Smith envisions being an orthopedic surgeon because of his personal experience. “I played football at Raymond High School, and I had a torn pec one time and had to have surgery. Going through that, I learned things, like how muscles contract,” he said.

The program fits with UMMC’s past support of expanding the health profession in more sectors of the community.

“The University of Mississippi Medical Center has a history of supporting pipeline programs designed to increase its diversity and create pathways to health profession careers,” said Taylor, who is assistant dean for Research and Innovation and chairs the Department of Health Sciences, where she is also an assistant professor. She is also program director for the Master of Health Sciences at UMMC’s School of Health Related Professions.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 11,500 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

02 February, 2016 News more
Classes begin at Hinds CC for continuing, older students
Posted by
12 January

Classes begin at Hinds CC for continuing, older students

It’s been a long road to college for some students attending Hinds Community College this semester.

“I was raised in Portland, Ore., but my mom’s family is from here,” said Lakosher Robinson as she shopped for small necessities like pens and flash drives at the bookstore on the Raymond Campus during a break Monday, the first day of class for the spring 2016 semester.

Lakosher Robinson, a continuing student from Jackson at Hinds Community College studying business accounting, shops for pens Monday, Jan. 11, 2016 at the bookstore at the Raymond Campus. Monday was the first day of classes for the spring semester. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Lakosher Robinson, a continuing student from Jackson at Hinds Community College studying business accounting, shops for pens Monday, Jan. 11, 2016 at the bookstore at the Raymond Campus. Monday was the first day of classes for the spring semester. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Robinson, of Jackson, is studying business accounting and wants to market those talents wherever she can, whether it’s in Mississippi or someplace else.

“I’m just trying to further my education, maybe go somewhere fresh after,” she said.

For Eddie Rogers, of Byram, her road began with helping raise a large family. Now, it’s time to pursue a passion for nursing.

“It’s something I’ve wanted to do for years,” Rogers said. “I’m really doing it this time.”

Donna Alexander, left, a student at Hinds Community College from Terry studying social work, and Eddie Rogers, a student from Byram studying nursing, shop in the campus bookstore at the Raymond Campus on Monday, Jan. 11, 2016. Monday was the first day of classes for the spring 2016 semester. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Donna Alexander, left, a student at Hinds Community College from Terry studying social work, and Eddie Rogers, a student from Byram studying nursing, shop in the campus bookstore at the Raymond Campus on Monday, Jan. 11, 2016. Monday was the first day of classes for the spring 2016 semester. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Late registration with an additional fee for classes for the spring semester’s initial eight-week session at all six of Hinds’ locations continues through Friday, Jan. 15.

“In January, we welcome back our returning students and meet many brand-new students, whether they be an adult returning to school, transferring to Hinds from another college, or starting college for the first time,” District Director of Enrollment Kathryn Cole said. “If a student missed out on getting into spring classes, we are still registering for online classes, which begin Jan. 19, and our second eight-week term, which begins March 14.”

Shelby Hilton, of Florence, who’s been published for her artwork, hopes to make some fine strokes in the classroom during the initial eight-week session to complete her visual arts studies.

“I just want to keep my grades up and have it not be a struggle,” said Hilton.

Shelby Hilton, a continuing student from Florence studying visual arts, places her order with Valley Services employee Doris Epps at the Eagle's Nest student lounge on the Raymond Campus Monday, Jan. 11, 2016. Monday was the first day of classes for the spring 2016 semester. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Shelby Hilton, a continuing student from Florence studying visual arts, places her order with Valley Services employee Doris Epps at the Eagle’s Nest student lounge on the Raymond Campus Monday, Jan. 11, 2016. Monday was the first day of classes for the spring 2016 semester. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

New students on campus rushed into warm spaces on campus to escape the chilly temperatures outside and make sure they were ready for the semester.

“I’m ready to study business,” said Keyetha McGee, of Terry, picking up headphones from the bookstore with her mother, Kimberly.

Keyetha McGee, right, of Terry, a first-year student at Hinds Community College, purchases a headphone set from campus bookstore employee Mollie Lee on the Raymond Campus Monday, Jan. 11, 2016. Monday was the first day of classes for the spring 2016 semester. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Keyetha McGee, right, of Terry, a first-year student at Hinds Community College, purchases a headphone set from campus bookstore employee Mollie Lee on the Raymond Campus Monday, Jan. 11, 2016. Monday was the first day of classes for the spring 2016 semester. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

12 January, 2016 News more
Two instructors receive emeritus status from Hinds CC
Posted by
08 January

Two instructors receive emeritus status from Hinds CC

Two retired instructors of Hinds Community College received emeritus status at the Jan. 5 spring 2016 convocation.

Cheryl Carr, of Madison, professor emeritus of Business Education/Business Technology, and Eleanor Long, of Florence, professor emeritus of History, joined 29 others who have achieved emeritus status at Hinds Community College.

Emeritus status was conferred to two retired instructors at Hinds Community College's Spring 2016 District Faculty and Staff Convocation, From left, HCC Board of Trustees President Paul Breazeale, Eleanor Long, Cheryl Carr, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, and Hinds Vice President for Advancement Jackie Granberry. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Emeritus status was conferred to two retired instructors at Hinds Community College’s Spring 2016 District Faculty and Staff Convocation, From left, HCC Board of Trustees President Paul Breazeale, Eleanor Long, Cheryl Carr, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, and Hinds Vice President for Advancement Jackie Granberry. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Carr retired in 2011 after 16 years at Hinds and 41 years in education overall. She started at Hinds as an instructor in the Business and Office Technology Department on the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Her role as a sponsor in Phi Beta Lambda helped her students win state and national awards and other honors were numerous, including being named Outstanding Instructor, HEADWAE honoree and National Business Education Association Outstanding Teacher. After retirement, Carr was executive director of the Association of Career and Technical Education.

Long has worked at Hinds for 28 years. She started as a history instructor at the Rankin Campus and was chair of the Division of Social Science there and was district curriculum coordinator. She was twice named outstanding academic instructor by Phi Theta Kappa and college-wide, represented faculty for reaccreditation, chaired the Rankin Faculty Council and judged competitions for DECA and the state Geography Bee.

Emeritus states is conferred on retirees who have dedicated their lives to Hinds Community College and are selected by a committee. A plaque and photo recognizing their status is showcased into the Emeritus Room at Fountain Hall on the Raymond Campus.

08 January, 2016 News more
Two new deans at Hinds CC Vicksburg-Warren Campus bring wealth of experience
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07 January

Two new deans at Hinds CC Vicksburg-Warren Campus bring wealth of experience

The college-level and high school programs at Hinds Community College’s Vicksburg-Warren Campus start the spring 2016 semester with new leadership.

Teressa Fulgham McCarty begins the semester as assistant dean for secondary education. She arrives at Hinds from Vicksburg Junior High School, where she was assistant principal.

Teressa McCarty

Teressa McCarty

“As assistant dean, she is responsible for daily operations of secondary programs. She will collaborate with the Vicksburg Warren School District to ensure that each student receives a high quality educational experience. Mrs. McCarty will also complete special projects for the Vicksburg-Warren Campus as assigned,” said Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak.

Dr. Elmira Ratliff is the new assistant dean for post-secondary education. She arrives at Hinds from the Mississippi Community College Board as a curriculum specialist.

Dr. Elmira Ratliff

Dr. Elmira Ratliff

In her role, Ratliff oversees college-level programs and courses taught at the campus. Her responsibilities include faculty recruitment, supervision and evaluation, maintenance of academic standards and program review and evaluation, among other procedural duties.

“We are thrilled to have Dr. Elmira Ratliff as part of the Hinds Community College team,” Moak said. “I’m sure it will not be long before the students and faculty are able to tap into her knowledge and experience.”

In the secondary programs, High school students can get ahead through dual enrollment or dual credit courses by enrolling in Hinds Community College courses while still in high school. A dozen career programs are available, including Ag and Natural Resources, Automotive Technology, Career Pathways Experience, Carpentry, Early Childhood Education, Culinary Arts, Health Sciences, Machine Tool, Masonry, Marketing Management, Simulation and Animation Design and Welding.

“It is our goal at Hinds to support students in being college and career ready. We have students that are excited to begin their chosen career fields,” McCarty said. “The career and technical education center is a great place to learn from our experts in those fields. As such, our phenomenal staff of teachers are passionate and dedicated to educating our students about these areas of study.”

Ratliff’s experience extends to the classroom, having taught English and related courses on the high school and college levels.

“I hope to increase the enrollment at the Vicksburg Campus by recruiting students and retaining them until they complete an academic or technical program,” Ratliff said. “Also, I hope to further advance the programs and initiatives that are being implemented at Hinds Community College and above all, ensure that all students have a wonderful experience after they join the ‘community’ at Hinds Community College.”

McCarty holds a master’s degree in Teaching Arts and a specialist’s degree in Educational Leadership from Mississippi College and a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communication from Tougaloo College. She is pursuing her doctorate at MC, in Educational Leadership-Curriculum and Instruction.

She is active in Tougaloo’s national and Jackson-area alumni associations, as well as the Rho Lambda Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, doing community service in each.

Ratliff holds a master’s degree in English from Mississippi College and a Ph.D in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Mississippi. Her bachelor’s is in English, from Alcorn State University.

Her experience in teaching high school English and related courses includes stops in Claiborne and Carroll county school systems. She’s also taught courses in Composition and Education at Holmes Community College, ITT Technical Institute, Alcorn State and Ole Miss. Also, Ratliff was professional development trainer for eight years for the Mississippi Association of Educators. Her sorority and alumni memberships include the Vicksburg Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. and the Montgomery-Carroll-Grenada County Alumni Chapter of Alcorn State University.

07 January, 2016 News more
Hinds CC graduates academic and career-tech students
Posted by
18 December

Hinds CC graduates academic and career-tech students

Larry Brown walked across the stage with a golden cord around his neck and satisfaction in his heart.

“I came back to school to inspire my grandkids,” Brown, 51, said minutes before graduating from Hinds Community College cum laude with an Associate of Applied Science in Accounting.

Larry Brown, left, and Linda Brown Long, right, pause for a moment during pre-ceremony preparations for graduation from Hinds Community College on Friday, Dec. 18, 2015. Brown earned an Associate of Applied Science degree and Long, his sister, earned her Associate Degreen in Nursing. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Larry Brown, left, and Linda Brown Long, right, pause for a moment during pre-ceremony preparations for graduation from Hinds Community College on Friday, Dec. 18, 2015. Brown earned an Associate of Applied Science degree and Long, his sister, earned her Associate Degreen in Nursing. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

It was an even bigger family affair than that for Brown. His sister, Linda Brown Long, 53, was also among the more than 800 students who graduated in three ceremonies Friday, Dec. 18 at the Muse Center on Hinds’ Rankin Campus.

Long earned her Associate Degree in Nursing on Friday. They walked in the midday ceremony with the academic and career-tech students simply to be on the same stage for family members.

“I pursued nursing to go into hospice,” Long said, adding an experience taking care of an older family member showed her the way to her new vocation.

“For me, it was taking care of my father who inspired me,” Long said.

It was a time for family for Keren Garrett as well.

Keren Garrett gets a hug from his nephew, Brayden, following graduation ceremonies at the Muse Center on Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus. Garrett earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Landscape Management Technology. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Keren Garrett gets a hug from his nephew, Brayden, following graduation ceremonies at the Muse Center on Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Garrett earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Landscape Management Technology. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Garrett, of Jackson, who earned an Associate of Applied Science in Landscape Management Technology, gathered with eight members of his family, including his nephew, Brayden, and his 94-year-old great-grandmother, Maudia Taylor. Garrett said he wants to start his own architectural firm.

“It was wonderful,” Taylor said of seeing her great-grandson walk across the stage. “My heart was big.”

Hinds conferred more than 1,300 credentials, including one-year career certificates or two-year technical certificates for career-technical programs or associate degrees. Some students are receiving more than one credential.

Graduating summa cum laude, with 4.0 grade point averages, are 156 students. Ninety-two graduate magna cum laude with GPAs of 3.6 to 3.99, and 135 graduate cum laude with GPAs of 3.2 to 3.59.

“We as educators look forward to the day in which we can celebrate the achievements of our students,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse.

“My challenge for each of us today is that we’ll choose to be like those people who ride the rollercoaster with both hands held high in the air,” Hughes said. “The truth is they are “all in” and because of that, they experience the joy of the ride to its fullest. You too can experience ultimate joy in life and success if you approach it by going “all in.”

18 December, 2015 News more
Television and Radio Broadcast program at Hinds CC Utica Campus trains for media careers
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17 December

Television and Radio Broadcast program at Hinds CC Utica Campus trains for media careers

As a girl, Alayshia Martin watched all the thrilling highlights of her favorite sport on the news and wondered, “How’d they do that?”

“As a little girl, I loved watching basketball,” Martin said. “I’d be watching the highlights come up, and they’re replaying them. I wanted to learn how to work the camera and make it look so interesting. If other people can do it, I can do it.”

As a first-year student in the Television and Radio Broadcasting program at Hinds Community College’s Utica campus, Martin is learning how the news, sports and more are put together in the modern-day, fast-paced broadcast media.

First-year Television and Radio Broadcast student Alayshia Martin eyes up a shot during a practice shoot at the program's studio on the Utica Campus. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

First-year Television and Radio Broadcast student Alayshia Martin eyes up a shot during a practice shoot at the program’s studio on the Utica Campus. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“Television and Radio Broadcasting, offered on the Utica Campus, prepares students to work in broadcast media in areas such as announcing, broadcasting control, editing, and more,” District Director of Enrollment Kathryn Cole said. “In this program, students benefit from experienced faculty and small class sizes with both classroom instruction and hands-on training.”

Registration for spring 2016 is ongoing; classes begin on Jan. 11. For information about enrolling, go to the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu. The campus is home to 14 career-technical programs including the  Television and Radio Broadcasting program, where students can earn a 2-year Associate of Applied Science degree. For information about the program, call director Tim Crisler at 601.885.7071.

Today’s visual media industries demand versatility beyond what Martin saw even just a few years ago growing up in Summit. Already an intern at a local television station as a result of the program, she’ll continue learning how to operate TV cameras, shoot video, find the best sound bites and write copy.

“You’ll be expected to shoot it, write it and post it before it even gets to the air,” Crisler said. “So, we teach a mixture, everything from writing, speaking and all the behind-the-scenes of putting together and anchoring a whole news show.”

It’s the quality cross-training that has Crisler’s students already in demand.

“All my students have internships at TV and radio stations in the Jackson market,” said Crisler, who worked in broadcasting and public relations 20 years in the Jackson area before coming to Hinds during the fall 2015 semester. “Our goal by the time they leave here is to have more experience than some university students. It’s essential to me to get them out into the industry, so that when they graduate they can walk right into a job.”

Martin and her classmates are taking full advantage of their education both in and out of the classroom.

“I didn’t know I had the capability with the equipment and the software,” she said. “I put what I learned in class into their workstation and it was interesting.

Quality time behind the lens, whether as part of the class or her internship, is priceless for Martin.

“It’s about getting the experience, then getting a good job,” she said.

Special projects and on-campus productions can include covering what’s going on at other career-tech programs on campus, among various opportunities to hone skills.

“We partner with all our departments here on campus and with career-tech to practice our production pieces,” Crisler said. “And I try to cover all six campuses, because learning about different people is part of being a good journalist.

“It’s a multimedia world, and it’s transformed to where you have to know it all. But, when you graduate, your talents will be on the level with the industry.”

17 December, 2015 News more
Culinary Arts program at Hinds CC Utica Campus trains for food careers
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17 December

Culinary Arts program at Hinds CC Utica Campus trains for food careers

The kitchen is a diverse, popular place these days, particularly in television and social media. But there’s plenty of room at the tables served in the economy.

Careers in food can lead students to several diverse lines of work, from restaurants to food management. In the case of Hinds Community College Utica Campus student James Chapman, it’s a way to keep his options as versatile and varied as his interests. Although he left the farm to attend college, farming is still close to his heart.

“My grandmother and mom both grew up cooking,” said Chapman, a first-year student from Carthage. “They grew crops and lived off the land, lots of greens, different vegetables and fresh food. Even with meat, they had pigs, cows and such.

“At first, I wanted to do weapons engineering for the military,” he said. “But I had talked to a recruiter for the military who told me how much they love cooking because they need an escape. I found out about the culinary program here, and I’m glad I joined it.”

Chapman was among a dozen students in instructor Durnitra Weeks’ class in the Culinary Arts program at the Utica Campus in the fall 2015 semester. The Utica Campus, formerly Utica Junior College, retains its HBCU (Historically Black College and University) status. The campus is home to 14 career-technical programs including Weeks’ class.

James Chapman, left foreground, and Durnitra Weeks, instructor in the Culinary Arts program at Hinds Community College's Utica Campus, stand in the kitchen with seven others enrolled in the program this past semester. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

First-year culinary student James Chapman, left foreground, and Durnitra Weeks, center foreground, instructor in the Culinary Arts program at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus, stand in the kitchen with eight others enrolled in the program this past semester. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“The Hinds Utica Campus Career-Technical Division is proud of the growth we’ve seen in the past year,” said Kenisha Shelton, dean of career-tech programs at the Utica Campus. “Our instructors have been working extremely hard this past year to recruit and retain students and to obtain certification for themselves to stay relevant and connected with industry. The Career and Technical division at Hinds Community College – Utica Campus is definitely turning vision into reality.”

Registration for spring 2016 is ongoing; classes begin on Jan. 11. For information about enrolling in the culinary arts program, go to the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu or call Weeks at 601.885.7114.

“We start out covering the basics – how to boil water and the correct temperature in which to cook certain foods,” Weeks said. “Then, comes the sanitary part, which is cleaning the kitchen according to health standards. Later, we cover seasoning and flavoring techniques with meat and other things like that.”

Weeks, a Bolivar County native and former executive chef and dietary manager in the healthcare industry, herself chose a cooking career over healthcare since it was second nature from an early age.

“I’m from a family of four cooks,” she said. “So, the passion came from watching them and for the enjoyment on their faces.”

Students enrolled in culinary programs at all of Hinds’ locations also learn about the connection of the program to hospitality and tourism. The college’s Hospitality and Tourism Management Technology degree program includes culinary, hotel, travel and tourism concentrations.

Part of the Culinary Arts program at Hinds Community College's Utica Campus includes proper knife work with common food items, such as potatoes. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Part of the Culinary Arts program at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus includes instruction on proper knife work with common food items, such as potatoes. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“In the Culinary Arts program on the Utica Campus, students receive hands-on training by an experienced chef,” District Director of Enrollment Kathryn Cole said. “Skills are built from the ground up – from simple boiling techniques all the way to working with specialized equipment and ingredients.”

Chapman is keeping his career options open, but both are straight out of the kitchen.

“I have two paths right now. One of them leads to be a culinary specialist in the Navy, and another is finding an apprenticeship for a restaurant, catering or food safety. With that, I’d like to stay in Mississippi.”

17 December, 2015 News more