http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC Preview Day offers high school students glimpse into college life

Author Archives: Cathy Hayden

Full Name: Cathy Hayden Website:
Info: Cathy Hayden is a 30-year career journalist with a bachelor's degree in journalism and English from the University of Mississippi and a master of theological studies from Spring Hill College in Mobile. Hayden, who covered education at The Clarion-Ledger for 17 years, came to Hinds Community College in January 2007.
Hinds CC Preview Day offers high school students glimpse into college life
Posted by
18 January

Hinds CC Preview Day offers high school students glimpse into college life

Hinds Community College kicks off a series of individual campus recruiting events with Preview Day to be held on the Raymond Campus beginning at 8:30 a.m. on Feb. 2.

Preview Day, at the Mayo Fieldhouse, is a way for high school seniors who are considering Hinds in fall 2018 to learn everything they need to know about the college.

“Preview Day is a great recruiting event to attend since so many of our faculty are there,” said Kathryn Cole, director of Enrollment Services. “Guests can meet instructors in more than 50 booths to talk about classes, programs of study, academic transfer majors and career/technical programs.”

The expo style event is come-and-go until noon. At Preview Day, high school seniors will get to meet faculty, staff and students, tour campus and learn about admissions, majors, housing, student life and more.  Participants can also enjoy food and prizes.

They will also learn about financial aid and scholarships, including the Hinds Community College Foundation scholarships, which have a Feb. 15 application deadline. For information see the scholarship tab under Admissions at www.hindscc.edu.

For more information or to register for Preview Day, visit Hub.hindscc.edu/previewday or call 601.857.3767.

Other upcoming recruiting events include:

Feb. 16  9 a.m. to noon  “See Ya at the U” recruiting event, Utica Campus

Feb. 23  9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Ag Expo 2018, Kendall Agricultural Complex, Raymond Campus

March 2  8 a.m. to noon  March Madness recruiting event, Vicksburg-Warren Campus

March 8 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.  Nursing and Allied Health Spring Showcase, Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center

March 23  8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Rankin Campus College Day recruiting event, Muse Center

April 6  9 a.m. to 1 p.m. College Carnival recruiting event, Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center

April 10  3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Spring Sign-Up Day recruiting event, Vicksburg-Warren Campus

Get all the details about these special events at hub.hindscc.edu/events.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.eduor call 1.800.HindsCC.

18 January, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Vicksburg-Warren Campus reopens for night classes tonight, Jan. 18
Posted by
16 January

Hinds CC Vicksburg-Warren Campus reopens for night classes tonight, Jan. 18

The Vicksburg-Warren Campus of Hinds Community College will be open for classes tonight, Thursday, Jan. 18. The campus will also resume a normal schedule tomorrow, Jan. 19.

Hinds Community College’s other five locations returned to a normal schedule today, Jan. 18.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 each fall. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

16 January, 2018 News more
Deadline for Hinds CC Foundation scholarships is Feb. 15
Posted by
02 January

Deadline for Hinds CC Foundation scholarships is Feb. 15

New or current students who want to apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation Scholarship for the 2018-2019 academic year have until Feb. 15, 2018, to turn in their complete application packets. 

About 85 percent of students at Hinds receive financial aid of some kind. Through the generosity of donors, the Hinds Community College Foundation awards scholarships to more than 600 students each year ranging from $300 to $2,400. The Foundation manages nearly 300 scholarship funds.

The application process for Foundation Scholarships is easy. Students can access the required forms on the college web site. Go to www.hindscc.edu and click on the Admissions tab.

Unless otherwise indicated, Foundation Scholarships are awarded to full-time students who enroll in a minimum of 15 credit hours. Minimum grade point average varies per Foundation scholarship; however all applicants must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above. Students wishing to be considered for scholarships on the basis of financial need should have the results of their Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) sent to Hinds CC prior to the Feb. 15 deadline.

Foundation scholarship candidates must submit all required documentation to the Office of Enrollment Services, P.O. Box 1100, Raymond, MS 39154 for consideration. Scholarship decisions are generally made in early April and are awarded for the fall semester. For questions, please call 601.857.3744 or email scholarships@hindscc.edu.

Persons interested in providing scholarships may contact Robyn Burchfield, Foundation specialist, at 601.857.3800.

Another scholarship opportunity for high school seniors is the ACT scholarship. ACT scholarships range from $1,000-$3,000 per semester. Students who attend Hinds as their first college after high school graduation will automatically receive an ACT scholarships if they have a 21 or above on the ACT. Eligible recipients must also be a Mississippi resident.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

02 January, 2018 News more
Hinds CC honors Foundation scholarship recipients
Posted by
14 December

Hinds CC honors Foundation scholarship recipients

The Hinds Community College Foundation recognized its 2017-18 scholarship recipients, donors and honorees at a reception Oct. 27 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

The Hinds Community College Foundation awarded more than 600 scholarships in the 2017-2017 academic year. The deadline to apply for a scholarship for the 2018-2019 academic year is Feb. 15, 2018. For more information, visit www.hindscc.edu.

Hinds Community College, celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017, is a comprehensive institution with six convenient locations in the central Mississippi area. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. Today, Hinds stands as the largest community college in Mississippi and offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Among those recognized was Katherine Wyndam of Brandon, who received the George M. McLendon Scholarship. With her is Tom Bowen of Madison.

Among those recognized was Hannah Sendelweck of Brandon, who received the Toby and Nancy Tenhet Scholarship. With her is Nancy Tenhet of Utica.

Among those recognized was Cameron Blackwell of Ovett, who received the Martha Hill Endowed Scholarship. With her is Martha Hill of Clinton.

Among those recognized was Daniel Trussell, center, of Clinton, who received the Edith Ballard Scholarship. With him is Bart Ballard, left, and Tammie Ballard of Puckett.

Among those recognized was Brinkley Branch of Raymond, right, who received the Hinds Community College Education Association Scholarship. With her is Lisa Davis of Raymond.

Among those recognized was Derrick Williams of Clinton, who received the Lorene Martin Nursing Scholarship. With him are Melissa Seward of Byram, left, and Frankie Pinon of Pearl.

Among those recognized was Carson Weaver of Terry, center, who received the Dr. Roger Jones and Lamar Currie Scholarship. With him are Dr. Roger Jones of Raymond, left, and Lamar Currie of Utica, right.

Among those recognized was Victoria Ross of Vicksburg, right, who received two scholarships, the Clarence and Lura Scales Scholarship and the Kay Cliffe Memorial Scholarship. With her is Haley Hartfield of Brandon.

Among those recognized was Peyton Atkinson of Waynesboro, right, who received the Jerry Agent and Mary Etta Naftel Scholarship. With her is Jerry Agent of Raymond.

Among those recognized was Myia Harris of Clinton, who received the Jesse McLendon Thrash Scholarship. With her is Tom Bowen of Madison.

Among those recognized was William Rodgers of Brandon, who received the Vito Daniel Patti Memorial Scholarship. With him is Michael Patti of Jackson, left, and Daniel Patti of Brookhaven, right.

Among those recognized was Gena Barlow of Byram, center, who received the Excellence in Career-Technical Education. With her is Sherry Franklin of Brandon, left, and Dr. Chad Stocks of Port Gibson, right.

Among those recognized was Madison Roberts of Clinton, right, who received the AT&T Endowed Scholarship. With her is Mike Walker of Clinton.

Among those recognized were front from left, Hannah Reihl of Vicksburg, Jakiyah Stirgus of Utica, Ariana Sirgew of Jackson, Jerry Thornhill of Raymond, representing Trustmark Bank; Taneesha Blount of Jackson, KaliAnn Green of Pearl, Breanna Green of Pearl, Wasia Shabbier of Pearl; back, Tristan Carson of Raymond, Paxton Files of Brandon, Jarrod Robinson of Terry, Alandria Ferguson of Terry and Kyra Carroll of Jackson. The students received the Trustmark Scholarship.

Among those recognized were Antwayne Fisher of Jackson, left, and Davis Soto of Forest, right, who received the Jobie Martin Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Lee Blackwell of Mendenhall, right, who received the Charles Jones Technical Scholarship. With him is Jerry Agent of Raymond.

Among those recognized was James Graham of Braxton, who received the Eugene Schubert Memorial Agricultural Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Jaterrica Amos of Courtland, who received the Dennis and Leola Cowart Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Charmaine Andrews-Grant of Ridgeland, who received the Lynn Garvey Memorial Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Dolyn Dillard of Vicksburg, who received the Sandy Reddit Cain Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Alexis Spiller of Vicksburg, who received the Cooper Industries Scholarship.

Among those recognized was Andrew Beesley of Natchez, who received the Chase Wroten Memorial Scholarship.

Among those recognized were, front from left, Tarri Williams of Clinton, Kierra Meadious of Foxworth, Cassie Hardacre of Goodman, Mallory Fisher of Utica and Thomas Harris of Bolton; back, Candace McKenzie of Raymond, Caleb Pitre of Jackson, Michael Thompson of Clinton , William Tyer of Yazoo City and Kali Martin of Terry. They received the Dr. Nell Ann Pickett Scholarship.

Among those recognized were students, second from left, Jalexus Walker of Prentiss, who received the Jane Pickett and Robert C. Harrell Scholarship; third from left, Emily Griffing of Byram, who received the Marian Pickett Carmichael Scholarship; back, Casey Hutson of Raymond, who received the Jimmy L. and Grace Pickett Long Scholarship and Dustin Raby of North Carrollton, who received the Harry Partin Scholarship. With them are, far left, Grace Pickett Long of Utica; second from the right, Jane Pickett Harrell of Utica and, far right, Nancy Tenhet of Utica.

Among those recognized was Amber Williams of Brandon, who received the Liles and Ruth Ann Williams Scholarship. With her is Liles Williams of Raymond.

Among those recognized were, from left, Daygon Williams of Brandon, Amaris Edwards of Byram, Holley Moore of Selmer and Evan Ratcliff of Brandon. They received the Ed, Mattie and Douglas Woolley Scholarship.

Among those were William Lum of Port Gibson, who received the Lurline Stewart Memorial Scholarship.

Among those was Brooke Patterson of Vicksburg, center, who received the Dr. Troy Lee Jenkins Scholarship. With her are Shelby Lewis, left, and Lisa Whatley, right, both of Utica.

Among those were Carley Pettway of Vicksburg, left, and Monique Weimer of Vicksburg. They received the Street Medical Foundation Scholarship.

Among those was Elizabeth Loflin of Vicksburg, second from left, who received the Bill Derden Memorial Scholarship. With her are, from left, Beverly Fatherree of Clinton, Mavis Derden of Clinton, Melissa Black and Harry Black, both of Brandon.

Among those was Garrett Hutchins of Utica, who received the A.P. and T.B. Fatherree Scholarship. With him is Beverly Fatherree of Clinton.

Among those was Stephanie Traweek of Raymond, who received the Dr. Ben Fatherree and Beverly Fatherree Scholarship. With her is Beverly Fatherree of Clinton.

Among those was Dayana Hernandez of Walls, left, who received the Yosef Patel Scholarship. With her is Rosemary Barbour of Jackson.

Among those were Laryn Winkler of Jackson, front from left, Jalyn Thomas of Shaw, Madison Curtis of Raymond; back, Zane Warren of Raymond and Caleb Pace of Terry. They received the Charlie Griffin Scholarship.

Among those was Patricia Parker of Jackson, who received the Alden McNair Scholarship.

Among those was Bobby Cavett of Jackson, who received the Student Government Association Scholarship.

Among those were Cassey Warren of Vicksburg, front from left, Erykah Wilson of Utica, Haley Frazier of Florence, Julie Thompson of Brandon, Vivi Tran of Brandon and Taylor Morgan of Raymond; back, Noah Crow of Utica, Kerri Neely of Raymond, Katie Baldwin of Brandon and Ethan Decker of Brandon. They received the Vicksburg Medical Foundation Scholarship.

Among those were Sarah Chandler of Utica, Kyisha Mayfield of Vicksburg, Michelle Spann of Brandon, Marion Lee of Louise, Ashley Polk of Crystal Springs; back, Dorothy Summers of Jackson, Ashley Levy of Jackson, Elise Ades of Clinton and Elizabeth Peale of Brandon. They received the Vicksburg Medical Foundation Scholarship.

Among those were Bari Berry of Pearl, Jamye Davis of Edwards, Morgan Bruff of Jackson, Brandi Barber of Florence, Elason Kelly of Raymond; back, Robert Batton of Mendenhall, Kristin Bates of Sandhill, Michael Gray of Richland, Taylor McMurtrey of Forest and Emily Hebert of Brandon. They received the Vicksburg Medical Foundation Scholarship.

Among those was Chloe Longley of Jackson, who received the Edward D. and Rebecca J. Brown Scholarship.

Among those was Che’Derica Samuel of Shreveport, who received the Evelyn H. (Ziefle) Byers Scholarship.

Among those were, front from left, Landon Little of Vicksburg, Jessica Hasty of Vicksburg; third from right, Sarah Smith of Redwood, who received the Marie and John Pervangher Scholarship; Aailya Johnson of Vicksburg, who received the Carroll E. “Buddy” and Grace Clark Woods Scholarship; and Lawanda Trimble of Vicksburg, who received the Marie and John Pervangher Scholarship; back, Charles Katzenmeyer of Vicksburg, Gage Ederington of Vicksburg, Fred Butler of Vicksburg, who received the Marie and John Pervangher Scholarship; Amanda Even of Clinton, who received the C. Leonard and Jane Woods Katzenmeyer Scholarship; Brandy Katzenmeyer of Vicksburg and Tristan Lowry of Vicksburg, who received the Marie and John Pervangher Scholarship. Third from left is Joan Katzenmeyer of Madison.

Among those was Emily Walker of Puckett, who received the Tommie Stroud Scholarship.

Among those was Laney Butts of Brandon, who received the Carlo and Cathy Martella Scholarship.

Among those was Colton Pierce of Brandon, who received the Thomas H. Smith Memorial Scholarship.

Among those was Alainna Newmann of Redwood, who received the Walter B. Hallberg Jr. Scholarship. With her are Walter Hallberg III, left, and Walter Hallberg Jr., right, both of Vicksburg.

14 December, 2017 News more
Hinds CC honors alumni from 1917 to 1967 at 50 + event
Posted by
05 December

Hinds CC honors alumni from 1917 to 1967 at 50 + event

As part of Homecoming and the Centennial celebration, Hinds Community College invited alumni who attended the college from 1917 to 1967 back for a 50+ brunch on the Raymond Campus.

Those who attended Hinds in the 1950s are Oliver V. Shearer of Raymond, Mark Chaney of Vicksburg, Liles Williams of Raymond, Bea Hemphill Sarrett of Pearl, Betty Taylor Ox of Bolton, David Barton of Raymond, Margaret Morris Stanford of Clinton, Rosa Taylor Russell of Raymond and Martha Gillespie Ferguson of Raymond; back, Carol King of Pinola and Ron Melancon of Poplarville.

Those from the 1960s included, from left, Joe Loviza of Vicksburg, Eugene Osborn of Utica, Bill Ferguson of Learned, Warrene Hand Holliday of Terry, Alice Shuff Conley of Raymond, Kay Hathorn Haven of Mt. Juliet, Tenn., Betty Hitt Hood of Nashville, Ruth Ann Carter-Osborn of Utica, Becky Bryant Holbrook of Raymond and Paulette Cook of Raymond.

Hi-Stepper alumnae who attended included, from left, Warrene Hood Holliday of Terry, Alice Shuff Connelly of Raymond, Becky Bryant Holbrook of Raymond, Ruth Ann Carter-Osborn of Utica, Kay Hathorn Haven of Mt. Juliet, Tenn., Betty Hitt Hood of Nashville, Rosa Taylor Russell of Raymond and Martha Gillespie Ferguson of Raymond.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

05 December, 2017 News more
Hinds CC legislative delegation learns about worthy college programs
Posted by
27 November

Hinds CC legislative delegation learns about worthy college programs

About a dozen legislators, mostly from Hinds County, were treated to stories about programs that get students trained and into the workforce at Hinds Community College’s annual legislative luncheon on Nov. 8.

Hinds Community College students and legislators include, front from left, Sen. Albert Butler, Rep. Credell Calhoun, Rep. Christopher Bell, Rep. Kathy Sykes, Rep. Alyce Clark, Hinds student Shaqwon Roberts, Rep. Debra Gibbs and Rep. Jarvis Dortch; second row, Sen. Sollie Norwood, Sen. Hillman Frazier, Raymond Campus MIBEST Navigator Kenya Johnson and Sen. David Blount; back, Hinds students Alexis Sizer of Ridgeland and Sam Williams of Jackson; Audra Canoy of Terry, Navdeep Kaur of Clinton and Joanna Stevens of Terry.

Afterward, four legislators toured two Hinds career-tech labs, the Fab Lab and the Mechatronics lab. The Fab Lab, under the direction of Phil Cockrell, is outfitted with 3-D printing machines, laser cutters and related equipment capable of etching designs or cutting flat sheet material such as acrylic and metal. The machines are programmed by a control panel or computer. Mechatronics, under David Creel, is a blend between electronics and mechanical and was specifically added to the curriculum because of the new Continental Tire plant going up in Hinds County.

Among the students who spoke was Shaqwon Roberts, 22, a culinary arts student at Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center who is in the M2M program that mentors and tutors minority males.

“These first 21 years as a young African-American man were not promising. Since losing my father, my family has struggled paying bills and barely made it through. I worked 12 hours a day to help – without sleeping or studying for tomorrow’s test. Let’s state the fact, I nearly failed all my classes that semester,” he told legislators. “I’ve gone from academic probation to being in good standing and my grades are an A and two Bs.”

Misti Lopez, 37, of Hazlehurst, is a MIBEST student studying welding on the Raymond Campus.

“It doesn’t matter how old you are or what you’ve been through – you can accomplish anything you put your mind to,” she said. “I plan on getting a welding certificate and going to work. To me, it’s a type of art. I love to draw and I’m good with my hands, so I’m doing both.”

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse also outlined the three major priorities of the 15 state community colleges: 1. Fair and equitable  funding, which includes restoration of $37 million cut from community college budgets during the past two years and $25 million for teacher salaries; 2. Workforce programs, which includes MI-BEST funding; and 3. Capital improvement dollars.

Fab Lab Director Phil Cockrell demonstrates one of the machines to Jackson legislators Rep. Kathy Sykes, Sen. Hillman Frazier, Rep. Debra Gibbs and Sen. Albert Butler.

Hinds Community College’s Fab Lab machines can be programmed to design and cut out a die for use as a mold.

Among the statistics Muse shared with legislators:

  • One in five working age adults in Mississippi is a high school dropout.
  • High school dropouts have a 29 percent unemployment rate.
  • Our workforce participate rate is only 54 percent

“We need to put in new programs that meet the needs of business and industry,” he said. “We’re the bridge to a better life.”

Sen. Albert Butler, D-Jackson, agreed with Muse’s assessment. “Workforce development is the key to Mississippi moving forward. All of us are aware that there is a need to move the lower class to the middle class. And the only way we can do that is to start training individuals so they will be able to earn the type of salaries that were presented to us by Continental Tire and other companies,” Butler said.

Muse referenced a story in The Clarion-Ledger that the University of Southern Mississippi has made $8 million in cuts because of financial difficulties.

“Hinds is in the same boat. As the state appropriation for community colleges goes down, the student part goes up. For the first year, our local contributions from tuition and our counties are more than the state’s contribution,” he said.

David Creel, director of Workforce Manufacturing Training, explains the Mechatronics lab to Jackson legislators Rep. Debra Gibbs, Sen. Hillman Frazier, Rep. Kathy Sykes and Sen. Albert Butler.

Sen. David Blount, D-Jackson, said the tax cuts made in 2016 have meant the Legislature doesn’t have the money to fund priorities like education. And, the tax cut in future years will snowball to $33 million next year, $92 million the year after and so on.

“We’re in this position because of the decisions that have been made in the past two years by the majority in the legislature … and bad decisions by the political leadership,” he said.  “We’ve got to revisit some of those decisions so you can continue to do the outstanding work that you’re doing.”

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

27 November, 2017 News more
Celebrating the Holtzclaw Legacy: Acting National Endowment for Humanities chairman to visit Hinds CC’s Utica Campus
Posted by
27 November

Celebrating the Holtzclaw Legacy: Acting National Endowment for Humanities chairman to visit Hinds CC’s Utica Campus

The acting chairman for the National Endowment for the Humanities, Jon Peede, will be visiting Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus for a celebration of the legacy of founder William H. Holtzclaw.

The program is at 9 a.m. Friday Dec. 8 in the Walter Washington amphitheater on the Utica Campus.

The celebration will focus on Holtzclaw’s contributions to African American education. The historic Utica Jubilee Singers will present several selections, and there will also be presentations of research projects and an overview of humanities activities at the Utica Campus.

Peede, who grew up in Brandon and now lives in Virginia, is expected to make brief remarks.

He holds degrees from Vanderbilt University and the University of Mississippi. He was formerly director of communications at Millsaps College and was the founding editor of Millsaps Magazine. He has served on the national council of the Margaret Walker Center for the Study of the African-American Experience at Jackson State University and was on the poet laureate selection committee for the state of Mississippi, office of the governor.

The Humanities Department at Hinds’ Utica Campus received a $100,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to fund a project called “The Black Man’s Burden: William H. Holtzclaw and the Mississippi HBCU Connection” to explore the legacy of William H. Holtzclaw. The project’s goal is to contribute to a growing body of research and interest in the “Little Tuskegees” as important forerunners of the Civil Rights Era in the Deep South.

The grant allows for a two-year research program designed to equip faculty and student-scholars to explore themes in Holtzclaw’s writing in humanities courses, a Summer Teachers’ Institute and teaching resource kits.

The project’s Holtzclaw Lecture Series has also brought nationally recognized scholars and experts on African American education in the South for public lectures in a variety of venues around the state in cooperation with the Mississippi Humanities Council.

For more information about the grant project, contact co-directors on the Utica Campus, Dan Fuller at 601.885.7097 or daniel.fuller@hindscc.edu or Jean Greene 601.885.7034 or JBGreene@hindscc.edu).

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

27 November, 2017 News more
Hinds CC’s Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center named as state’s best
Posted by
27 November

Hinds CC’s Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center named as state’s best

The Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus is the state’s best for 2017.

Presented annually by the Mississippi Construction Education Foundation, the prestigious Career and Technical Center of Excellence Award recognizes commitment and innovation across all vocational construction programs.

Valerie Barton, center, director of the Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus, accepts her center’s selection as the state’s best from the Mississippi Construction Education Foundation. Joining her at the recent awards banquet are MCEF representatives, from left, Brent Bean, Gary Beeland, Barton, Dianna Zendejas and Lauren Hunt.

At the forefront of the Pearl/Rankin CTC mission is a passion to equip students with the skills they need for successful occupations. To make that happen, the center is building a foundation around a construction curriculum that connects throughout its 15 career programs of study.

“We have seen firsthand the strides that Pearl/Rankin CTC is making to increase opportunities for students,” said MCEF President Mike Barkett. “Their administration and instructors are to be commended for the many ways they are accelerating the pace of improvement to ensure that students gain the knowledge and skills necessary for future success.”

Valerie Barton, director of the Pearl/Rankin CTC, accepted the award on behalf of her center at the recent Mississippi Associated Builders & Contractor’s Merit Awards Banquet.

“If Mississippi is going to have the skilled workforce that’s needed for tomorrow, we must encourage and train those workers today,” said Barkett. “We congratulate Pearl/Rankin CTC for going above and beyond to prepare our students for career and technical professions and for ensuring that Mississippi has the resources required to support its growing construction and manufacturing industries.”

The mission of the non-profit MCEF is to promote careers, recruit capable individuals and train a quality workforce for the construction industry in the state of Mississippi. MCEF also offers workforce training and credentialing in construction, industrial maintenance and manufacturing trades.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

27 November, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Student VOICES group meets with legislators
Posted by
17 November

Hinds CC Student VOICES group meets with legislators

Members of Hinds Community College Student VOICES group were among students who met with legislators at the annual fall legislative lunch on Nov. 8.

Student VOICES is a statewide organization designed to empower community college students to become civically engaged at the local, state, national and global levels. One of their missions is to support community college efforts toward fair and equitable funding at the state level.

They are, front from left, Nicole Rigsby of Brandon, math instructor and VOICES adviser Jeff Hughes and Joanna Stevens of Terry; back, Alexis Sizer of Ridgeland, Navdeep Kaur of Clinton and Audra Canoy of Terry.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

17 November, 2017 News more
Hinds CC opens registration for spring classes
Posted by
08 November

Hinds CC opens registration for spring classes

Spring 2018 registration for current students at Hinds Community College is now open with registration for new students to open on Nov. 13. Spring 2018 16-week and first eight-week classes begin on Jan. 8 with second eight-week classes to begin on March 5.

Carl Dewitt, a physics instructor on the Rankin Campus, talks to high school students during an Honors program open house.

To register for classes for any term, students must first be admitted to the college. After meeting with a counselor, new students can then register for classes. Offices are open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and until 6 p.m. on Tuesdays. The college will close for Thanksgiving at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 21 and reopen on Nov. 27, and the college will be closed for Christmas break from Dec. 21 to Jan. 1.

The Admissions office can be reached at 601.857.3212. Or visit the Admissions tab on the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

08 November, 2017 News more