http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Award a time for reflection for trailblazing physician, Utica Institute alum

Monthly Archives: March 2018

Award a time for reflection for trailblazing physician, Utica Institute alum
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28 March

Award a time for reflection for trailblazing physician, Utica Institute alum

 Note: The following story appears in the spring issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website. To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here.

A life spent at the forefront of battles for social justice and affordable health care has come full circle for local physician Dr. Robert Smith.

Dr. Robert Smith

In November, the American Medical Association awarded Smith the Medal of Valor Award for fighting social injustice and providing health care to Mississippians during the civil rights era.

“In riotous and dangerous times, Dr. Smith placed himself repeatedly in harm’s way and made it his mission to stand up for the health care rights of African-Americans,” said AMA president David O. Barbe, M.D. “He is a man of compassion and courage who has and continues to fulfill his Hippocratic Oath by providing medical care to the poor, uninsured and underserved citizens of Mississippi.”

Smith’s academic career began at the Utica Institute, which later became Hinds Agricultural High School, part of Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus.

His education flourished beginning when he was a precocious teen at the Utica high school, where he graduated as valedictorian.

“It was one of the best things that happened to me,” Smith said of his time there starting in 1949. “In today’s terms, I would be considered ADHD. I had the opportunity to go to high school very early.

“We didn’t have a public high school in the county at the time. But, this was around the time of Brown vs. Board of Education, so the county bought a small, struggling school modeled after Booker T. Washington’s school. It was just a blessing for me,” Smith said.

The Utica school was both a boarding school and day campus.

“My folks didn’t want me to leave home for schooling, so I became one of the first teens to get up at 4:30 in the morning and ride a little old bus 45 miles nearly all through dirt roads to get to school. In the winter, I’d leave home at night, and I’d get home at night. Many times the bus broke down, but luckily my daddy had a car that would come and find us and retrieve us all.

“But, going to Hinds AHS was like going to heaven,” Smith said. “I found a great bunch of people, and it was the first time I had people around me who had gone to college and were degreed.”

Once there, Smith found “mentors, father figures, mother figures, the whole nine yards – and people who believed in discipline,” as he put it, once again remembering his teen years.

“I had a math teacher who’d tell me, ‘Robert Smith, sit down! You’re not going to take over my class!’ There were other teachers like Maggie Dunson who told me, ‘Just wait till you get to college. They’ll fix you.’”

Dr. Robert Smith speaks during the Summer 2014 graduation ceremony for Nursing/Allied Health students.

Where he found a niche was in agriculture, then taught by A.D. Williams. “I had been in the 4-H Club before I went to Utica,” Smith said. “I was 4-H champion and among the first to show Polled Hereford cattle in a livestock show. I transferred my experience to being in New Farmers of America, where I was the first Mississippian of record to hold office in it.”

Smith credits Williams with teaching him the basics of communication and formal self-expression. “He taught me how to develop and present a talk,” Smith said. “He left, and A.D. Boykins came in. He had the same personality. I ended up winning state and regional speaking contests and going to Washington D.C.”

Another source of pride is having been taught by Dr. Walter Washington, who later presided over Utica Junior College and Alcorn State University. “His speeches about achievement and educational preparing were inspirational,” he said.

In 1963, the Terry native founded Mississippi Family Health Center in Jackson. The facility later became Central Mississippi Health Services and has locations in south Jackson and at Tougaloo College, where Smith had earlier earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry. His medical degree was earned at Howard University School of Medicine.

Smith witnessed the civil rights movement in Mississippi from a perspective few other people could, given his profession.

“I’d been a member since college of the NAACP, and I got to know Medgar Evers in college at Tougaloo when he was invited to talk,” Smith said. “I had attended a reception for him the night he was killed.

“The outgrowth of it all is that, through other memberships such as the Freedom Democratic Party, I became the unpaid physician to the movement.”

He was assisted in establishing a clinic in Bolivar County’s Mound Bayou by doctors from the Northeast, who, a year later, were part of 1964 Freedom Summer in Mississippi. The clinic served the poorest of the poor for basic medical needs.

“I was concentrating on how to get black folks into health care,” he said. “I helped prepare reports for Congress that brought about regional medical programs that brought advances in the care of heart, cancer, strokes and renal disease to local communities.

Both Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. Robert Smith were honored with the Whitney Young Service Award from the Andrew Jackson Council of the Boy Scouts of America in 2015.

“It’s about education, education, education. The best way to lower costs is to teach prevention. That has to come from grade school. It ought to be like English,” he said.

Two friendships he treasures are with the living giants who helped shape the modern-day Hinds Utica Campus and the college as a whole – Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. George Barnes, former vice president for the Utica Campus who retired in 2013 after 51 years.  Both men were instrumental in the merger between the Utica Campus and the Hinds Community College district.

“When they talked about merging those institutions, obviously there were concerns. But, I don’t know anything that could have done better since then,” Smith said.

He credited both men with the Utica Campus keeping “its traditional value system,” such as its colors and annual events such as the Coronation, while “providing opportunities for the least of these in education.”

Muse has known Smith for many years. He met him through his brother, George, who served on the Hinds County Board of Supervisors. Both had gone to the Utica Institute.

“Early in his life and career, he had a burning desire to see that all people had good medical attention and services,” Muse said, noting his work to establish the Mound Bayou clinic. “He was a pioneer in providing or getting medical services to people. And it was not the popular thing to do in those days. He had the courage to step out there and do it.”

Smith sees the American Medical Association honor as a benchmark not just for himself, but African-American membership in the organization.

“It was a national problem,” Smith said of the scarcity of full-member black doctors when his nearly six-decade medical career began. “In Mississippi, it was magnified. Even in a place like New York City or in Chicago, there was only a handful of black physicians – maybe five people – who were full members of the AMA.”

Among Smith’s numerous staff appointments through the years was at Central Mississippi Medical Center, now Merit Health Central.

“The contributions Dr. Smith has made in the healthcare field, not just in our community, but throughout our state cannot be lauded enough,” Merit Health Central CEO Barry Moss said. “We are grateful for his continuing leadership in his field, and I am proud he is a part of our Merit Health Central medical staff.”

In the spirit of gratitude, Smith has given back to the Utica Campus and Hinds, speaking at graduations several times and at the Utica Campus annual Founder’s Day celebration. He spent six years on the Hinds Community College Foundation Board, where he and his brother started a scholarship aimed at helping eligible Utica Campus students pay for college. He is a frequent presence at important Hinds events.

And, his service also continues in the medical community.

“He is a great person with a great medical mind that is still providing wonderful service to people in need of medical help,” Muse said.

Barnes literally owes his life to Smith. “About 29 years ago, he recommended me to Johns Hopkins University to treat pancreatic cancer,” Barnes said. “So I can’t really say enough about him. Any awards he has gotten, he deserves.”

Smith is quick to say that his path to success started in Utica.

“My education at Hinds prepared me for the opportunity to become the first black physician of record and board-certified physician, a fellow in family medicine, a teacher, a researcher, an author, and most of all, a family physician to the least of these that have come from many parts of the country.”

28 March, 2018 News more
MSU ag chief, Hinds alum wins national award
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28 March

MSU ag chief, Hinds alum wins national award

 Note: The following story appears in the spring issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website. To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here.

Dr. George Hopper worked at Anderson Tully lumber company in Vicksburg while he attended Hinds in the years after high school. Quite fittingly, he has been sawing wood in his professional career ever since – and he’s been recognized by his peers for his work.

Dr. George Hopper

This past fall, Hopper won the Excellence in Leadership award for 2017 from the Southern Association of Agricultural Experiment Stations Directors at the Association of Public Land-Grant Universities. Hopper’s directorship of the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station and role as dean of Mississippi State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences formed the basis for his award, presented at the APLU’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Hopper is also dean for the university’s College of Forest Resources and director for its Forest and Wildlife Research Center.

The 16 experiment stations in the state are closely associated with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, which share knowledge and solutions with farmers, business people and government agencies throughout the state and beyond. One station is housed on Hinds’ Raymond Campus, as part of the T.H. Kendall III Agriculture Complex. Another, for cattle, the Gene Morrison Brown Loam Experiment Station, is on the outskirts of town.

“Our role and responsibility is to serve the people of Mississippi,” Hopper said. “Part of that is developing better farming and livestock practices and ways to protect the environment.”

For Hopper, coming to Hinds meant getting to Raymond from the River City when Interstate 20 was barely complete on the western side of the state. He juggled work in the evenings and attended class daily, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

“Four or five of us from Vicksburg commuted to class. But, we had great memories and an excellent education, indeed,” he said. “As an administrator, I know what I learned at Hinds means the teachers were good. It got me on the right track. Hinds had a good reputation for science even back then.”

After finishing STEM-related prerequisites at Hinds, he earned his bachelor’s in chemistry from MSU, then moved on to Virginia Tech University where he earned his Ph.D. in plant physiology.

Hopper worked at the University of Tennessee for a time, then went into administration in forestry/wildlife. He moved on to Mississippi State as dean of college of forest resources. Eight years ago, he was asked to head up agriculture in addition to forestry.

Part of his job is getting students involved in research. It is some of Hopper’s and others’ early research in the area of biomass energy that Stephen Dicke, an Extension professor for Forestry, remembers.

“I first met him in 1979,” Dicke said. “We’d be cutting sycamore trees in the hot summer and weighing the stems, all for research. I saw a quick-witted optimist with a real heart. He’s gone above and beyond what’s been asked of him by doing a lot of extra work.”

Hopper credits his Hinds experience for shaping his career and advises students to be unafraid of few challenges in their own lives and studies.

“People are interested in the curious. And that’s what drew me to science in the first place,” he said. “Our society needs the STEM areas and needs leadership in that area. Fundamentally, we need to have clean water and a healthy and safe food supply.”

28 March, 2018 News more
Ag alum credits department icons for his success
Posted by
28 March

Ag alum credits department icons for his success

 Note: The following story appears in the spring issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website. To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here.

Almost anyone with fond memories of their days as a student at Hinds Community College has a favorite “Hinds story.” Matt Woods is no exception.

Matt Woods

His favorite story involves an apple and what he carried on as a family tradition in English instructor Jenny Muse’s class. It started with his father, Alvin Woods, who walked into Muse’s class “brushing an apple on his shirt, plopped it on her desk and winked at her.”

Matt Woods remembered the story when he started at Hinds the week after he graduated from high school.

“A group of us from south Jackson rode together here for the first day of class. I told the others I’d be a little late, but I’d be there in just a second,” he recalled.

Muse “called roll and got to ‘Matt Woods,’ then said ‘I guess he’s not going to be with us today.’ I opened the door and walked through everybody up to her desk and said, ‘Ms. Muse, I apologize for my tardiness’ while I shined an apple on my shirt. I plopped it on her desk and winked at her.

“She said, ‘You’ve got to be Alvin Woods’ son!’”

Once he got inside the classroom, Woods found success and honed skills learned being around his father’s feed mill. He was a member of the Agriculture Club and the livestock judging team. He credits a handful of people who Woods said were “more than just instructors” to him, including Billie Banes, Drs. Thad Owens, Bill Dixon and Roger Jones. Jones has worked at Hinds since 1970 and still chairs the college’s Agriculture Department. The tutelage helped Woods earn his bachelor’s degree from Mississippi State University, in Agriculture Education.

“They prepared us for college life and the real world,” he said. “And they did it with a caring, yet firm hand.”

Jones remembers seeing signs of success early in Woods’ days as a student.

“Matt was a very conscientious and hardworking student that was always very mature for his age,” Jones said. “I have seen him use skills he had in student organizations at Hinds, along with the knowledge he gained as a student here and at Mississippi State University to become very successful. I am proud of the man he has become.”

Woods worked at his father’s feed mill briefly after college, then returned to Hinds in 1995 to earn an Emergency Medical Technology certificate to bolster his stock as a volunteer firefighter in Learned. In 1998, he took up a job offer from Jackson-based Cal-Maine Foods – the nation’s largest producer and marketer of shell eggs – after mulling becoming a teacher himself. He worked in the central purchasing area for 17 years before becoming chief of the company’s feed mill in 2015.

“The most rewarding part of my job is to look at the eggs we produce and to know those birds were fed through feed mills I’m responsible for,” he said. “It’s also very challenging because we want to be the most wholesome, safest food source there is.”

He has also been a hand-up to some of the best students who’ve graduated from the Agriculture Department in recent years. That includes Christopher McCloud, who manages the company’s feed mill in Watts, Okla., and Austin Van Etten, an assistant manager in Hammond, La. “The students who come through the department here have the skills and knowledge to either step straight into the workforce and be a productive employee, or go on to a university and pursue a bachelor’s degree,” he said.

His Hinds experience has continued beyond his days as a student. As a member of the advisory council for the Agriculture Department, he helped develop the curriculum for the Animal Science Technology, Poultry Option class introduced in 2015.

“If Hinds Community College went further than two years, I’d probably be working on my tenth doctorate degree right now,” he said. “I would never have left. Nothing compared to my time here. It made for an easy transition from being a high school kid to being a college student.”

28 March, 2018 News more
Scholarship lets Hinds student manage school, work
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28 March

Scholarship lets Hinds student manage school, work

 Note: The following story appears in the spring issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website. To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here.

College is an awakening on many levels for students fresh out of high school, and Drew Ferguson likes what he sees of it so far at Hinds.

Jack Ferguson

“It’s nice to know the teachers, who know you by name,” said Ferguson, of Raymond, who goes by Jack. “It’s small classes and it’s a comfortable atmosphere. And I’ve really branched out and met new people, which has been eye-opening and fun.”

Ferguson comes from a Hinds family, as his brother, Alec, graduated in 2017 and his grandfather, Robert Ferguson, attended Hinds when the college still included a high school curriculum. Later, the elder Ferguson was a state legislator and member of the Hinds Community College Foundation Board. His grandmother, Martha, met Robert at Hinds and was a member of the Hi-Steppers precision dance team. Both were instructors at Hinds for a time – in the case of his grandfather, it was Business Law, in which Jack is now enrolled.

“Knowing that my grandparents both walked these halls, taught and came to school here, it’s a good feeling to know I’m on the right track,” Jack said.

He’s attending Hinds on the Merchants & Planters Bank Scholarship, which rewards high-achieving students in business and related fields. Jack is also receiving an ACT Scholarship and the Austin Thomas Memorial Scholarship, offered through his high school alma mater, Central Hinds Academy.

Attending college on multiple scholarships allows Jack to juggle work and school with much less stress.

“It makes me feel better to not have to ask my parents for money to attend school,” he said. “I work during the evenings, so any books I need to pay for, I can pay for it out of my pocket. And I live just five to 10 minutes away. It’s not too stressful, so I can manage work and school. The comfort level here is great.”

He’s already coming to appreciate the persistence of his instructors as he makes his way through school.

“They always send reminders and make sure to tell you things in class, send emails and messages outside of class. It’s extremely helpful. I don’t have much time for procrastination,” he said.

His goals once he completes his education would take advantage of what he likes to do and, ideally, keep him in Mississippi.

“I’ve always been interested in running my own business someday,” he said. “My brother and I have talked about doing a gunsmith and sporting goods store. He would do the labor part and I’d manage the finances.”

28 March, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Rankin College Day draws hundreds to Muse Center
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26 March

Hinds CC Rankin College Day draws hundreds to Muse Center

PEARL – Justin Sanders, of Florence High School, wants to turn his interest in creating things into a career when he leaves high school.

Justin Sanders, left, of Florence High School, Andrew Shaw and Mick Kuhn, both of Brandon High School, look on as Andrea Blair, a chemistry instructor at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, conducts an experiment at Rankin College Day March 23 at the Muse Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’m thinking of doing graphic design or possibly even architecture,” Sanders said. “I have some family in architecture.”

Julie Harrison, of Pearl High School, already wants to help mold young lives or aid them back to health.

“It’s either nursing or early childhood education for me,” Harrison said. “It’s all about helping people.”

They were among about 250 high school juniors, seniors and others who attended Rankin College Day on Feb. 24 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus, which featured exhibits for all academic and career-tech programs, activities and organizations Hinds has to offer.

Carol McLaurin, dean of Student Services at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, explains programs at the campus to Julie Harrison, of Pearl High School, at Rankin College Day March 23 at the Muse Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

For those still studying for their high school diploma, it’s a time to find out how Hinds’ programs of study can build a successful career.

“I’ve wanted to do television production since I was a kid,” said Myrandis McGrone, of Northwest Rankin High School.

Prospective students interacted with faculty and Hinds students about admissions, scholarships, majors, student life and more.

“We look forward to many of the students from Rankin County and the surrounding area enrolling at the Rankin Campus and taking advantage of what we have to offer.” said Dr. Norman Session, vice president of the Rankin Campus and the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

Myrandis McGrone, foreground, of Northwest Rankin High School, looks at what’s being created in the Radio, Television Production and Broadcasting Program with instructor Randy Kwan during Rankin College Day at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus March 23. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Dr. Carl DeWitt, left, and Amanda Blair perform an experiment for prospective students at Rankin College Day March 23 at the Muse Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus, speaks with Charlie Parker, center-left, of East Rankin Academy, his mother, Melissa Parker and Maddie Morgan at Rankin College Day March 23 at the Muse Center (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

26 March, 2018 News more
MIBEST program at Hinds CC sets young lady on path to better life
Posted by
19 March

MIBEST program at Hinds CC sets young lady on path to better life

PEARL – Still waters have always run deep for Jessica Spann, in school and in life.

Now quiet in nature and quick with a smile, Spann, 20, has come a long way in a short time when it comes to completing her education.

Jessica Spann

“I kept telling myself I had to do it and that working fast food and at gas stations wasn’t going to be a career,” Spann said. “I just wasn’t a fan of high school. I was an aggressive person for a while as I tried to figure myself out. And now I’m just so happy.”

In January, Spann, of Brandon, became the first student in the MIBEST program at Hinds Community College to earn her High School Equivalency certificate through the Competency-Based option. The track involves the recognition of industry credentials as well as academic standards. She earned a silver rating on the National Career Readiness Certificate exam, a nationally-recognized career-readiness skills test, and in May will walk across the stage a Hinds graduate with a career certificate in Medical Data Technology.

Spann credits the unique adult education and career-readiness program with honing her skills in more than just the basics.

“I speak up more in class when I’m not understanding something, instead of getting frustrated when I don’t understand something,” she said. “My attention span is better. I’m in accounting now. It’s hard, but I want to keep on learning about it.”

MIBEST is Mississippi’s version of the nationally recognized Integrating Basic Education and Skills Training program, or I-BEST, and originated in Washington state. The program kicked off a few years ago with federal funds and allows adult students to train for a job skill while earning their GED high school equivalency certificate at the same time. In Mississippi, MIBEST was implemented at each state community college in 2016 thanks to a $6 million grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Students are prepared to be job-ready in six months to a year, train in high-demand areas and earn national certifications.

Jessica Spann

Spann landed in the program thanks to Angie Miles, who works in the program as a navigator, tasked with helping its students find solutions for “life issues” such as transportation, child care and financial aid so they can focus squarely on academics.

Miles knew Spann from when she was homeroom mother for her own daughter’s fifth grade class – a group that also included Jessica. Over the years, she became familiar of a tough family life when it came to completing her education.

Seeing Spann enter her MIBEST orientation classroom was a surprise, Miles said, one that has produced a level of achievement neither thought possible.

“I was so excited to see the beautiful young woman she had grown up to be,” Miles said. “I was even more thrilled that she was wanting to pursue her high school equivalency and take college classes at Hinds Community College.”

Kristi Johnson, an instructor in the program, has watched Spann blossom since last summer into a successful, career-ready student.

“At that time, I met a very distant young lady that put up a lot of walls around her,” Johnson said. “She was quick to get angry, from frustration, because she didn’t believe that she was smart or capable. However, over time, she began to trust those who want the best for her and to believe in herself. Today, she is an excellent student and a confident young woman.”

For more information on the MIBEST program at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus, contact Miles at 601-936-1834 or Johnson at 601-936-1850.

19 March, 2018 News more
Hinds CC a perfect place to take next step in healthcare careers
Posted by
09 March

Hinds CC a perfect place to take next step in healthcare careers

JACKSON – The best examples of the rewards of a healthcare career can sometimes be found in one’s own family tree.

Lora Shoemaker, left, a second-semster student in the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College, demonstrates equipment used in the ADN lab as Olivia Taylor, right, looks on during the spring 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase March 8 at the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“My mother graduated from Hinds, in nursing, and my sister just graduated from here in Surgical Technology,” said Olivia Taylor, of Crystal Springs, checking out the college’s healthcare career offerings at the spring 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase held March 8 at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center.

“I want a career where I’m in a position to help people,” Taylor said.

Destiny Erving and her cousin, Joanne Jones, made the trip to the showcase from Holmes County to help Erving make the jump from high school to college – and in the process complete the process of being a first-generation college student.

“It will open a lot of opportunities by coming to school,” Erving said as she and Jones, a director of nursing at a long-term care facility, toured each program’s labs and spoke to faculty.

About 200 people who attended this fall’s event, which is held each semester at the Chadwick Drive complex. Prospective students and others toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty, explored the college’s 12 health-related and two short-term programs and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

Destiny Taylor, left, checks a manikin as nursing student Ebonie May looks on during the spring 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase March 8 at the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Guests spoke with our faculty one-on-one to learn about our programs of study and the promising careers in healthcare that Hinds graduates obtain,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

Programs showcased included Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emergency Medical Science, Health Care Assistant, Health Information Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Nursing Assistant and Phlebotomy.

“We are excited to offer nursing and allied health programs that provide excellent employment opportunities for our students,” said Nursing and Allied Health Dean Dr. Libby Mahaffey. “Graduates of our programs are employed at rates of 90 to 100 percent within a year of graduation and consistently meet national benchmarks for licensure/registry pass rates.”

Each semester, the event is a showcase brings out healthcare professionals looking to build their credentials and pursue higher-paying jobs in the industry.

Varetta Gordon, right, goes over application information with Kimberly Neely, a continuing education coordinator at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center during the Spring 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase on March 8 at NAHC. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’m trying to move up the ladder from where I am in my career,” said Varetta Gordon, a certified nursing assistant from Canton.

Others, such as private music teacher Jasmine Keys, of Brandon, looked to switch careers and gather information on the programs NAHC has to offer.

“I’ve thought before about coming to Hinds to change careers,” Keys said. “I’m doing it because I’m happy to help people.”

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines. The Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center is at 1750 Chadwick Drive. For more information on individual programs, call 601.376.4807 or visit http://www.hindscc.edu.

 

Jasmine Keys, left, goes over admission requirements with Tiffany Johnson, a recruiter at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center during the Spring 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase on March 8 at NAHC. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Destiny Erving, center, chats with Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services at Hinds Community College, during the spring 2018 Nursing Allied Health Showcase March 8 at the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. With Erving is her cousin, Joanne Jones, left. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

09 March, 2018 News more
Hinds CC names Most Beautiful in annual Beauty Revue
Posted by
09 March

Hinds CC names Most Beautiful in annual Beauty Revue

RAYMOND – Julia Rester of Jackson was selected as Most Beautiful in the annual Hinds Community College Eagle Beauty Revue pageant on Thursday, March 8.

From left, Bryanna Luke, Kirby King, Julia Rester, Alexis Spiller and Mallory Bunkley

The pageant is sponsored by the Eagle yearbook on the Raymond Campus.

Rester, 19, a Rankin Campus freshman, is a recipient of a Foundation Scholarship and an ACT Scholarship. She is a graduate of Central Hinds Academy who has had 14 years of training studying classical ballet. Her parents are Mark and Beverly Rester.

Other beauties selected were Mallory Bunkley, Kirby King, Bryanna Luke and Alexis Spiller.

Bunkley, 20, a Raymond Campus sophomore, is studying psychology and is a lieutenant on the Hi-Steppers precision dance team. She attended Brandon High School and plans to become a Dallas Cowboys cheerleader, own her own dance studio and meet renowned ballet dancer Misty Copeland. Her parents are Scott and Mardi Bunkley.

King, 19, a Raymond Campus freshman, is studying kinesiology and is a Hinds cheerleader, member of the Honors Institute and Phi Theta Kappa. She attended Pisgah High School and is a Dean’s Scholar and recipient of the Charlie Griffin Scholarship. She plans a career in sports medicine. Her parents are Chuck and Kris King.

Luke, 19, a Raymond Campus freshman, is studying Dental Assisting Technology and is a member of the softball team. She graduated with honors from Lake High School and was a member of the Beta Club. After Hinds, she plans to attend the University of Mississippi Medical Center Dental Hygiene program. Her parents are Greg and Pamela Luke.

Spiller, 19, a Raymond Campus freshman, is studying biomedical engineering and is a member of the Hi-Steppers precision dance team. She attended Warren Central High School where she was a cheerleader. After Hinds, she plans to own a business and give back to the community. Her parents are Valorie and Neal Spiller.

09 March, 2018 News more
Posted by on 09 March

Hinds CC trustees approve moving forward with Metrocenter Mall proposal

The Hinds Community College Board of Trustees on Wednesday, March 7 approved moving forward with a proposal for a Comprehensive One-Stop Center to house career-technical and workforce training and support services in Metrocenter Mall in south Jackson.

Hinds Community College is working with 11 other partners on the proposed project. Hinds would administer the center on behalf of all the partners, said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse.

To bring the proposed project to fruition, the college is partnering with the Hinds County Board of Supervisors, Central Mississippi Planning and Development District, Mississippi Department of Human Services, Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, Mississippi Community College Board, Mississippi Department of Employment Security, Families First of Mississippi, Mississippi Hospital Association, Southcentral MS Works Local Workforce Development Area, the City of Jackson and the Hinds Community College Early Childhood Academy.

A formal signing ceremony with all the partners will be held at a later date.

The center will house high-tech classrooms for programs to train workers for the advanced manufacturing, transportation, and hospitality and tourism industries. It will offer a range of training opportunities, from basic employability skills to two-year technical degree classes.

“We have a tremendous number of people in our area, particularly in the city of Jackson, who do not have a high school diploma and need to upgrade their skills to get a job. We’ve got about 80,000 people in the Jackson metro area who could benefit from this kind of help,” Muse said.

He said the Metrocenter Mall property is an ideal location for such a project. “It is centrally located, accessible to Jatran transportation and accessible to two interstates and another major highway. You can’t get anything more accessible than that,” he said.

Muse credited Mary Powers, Workforce director at Central Mississippi Planning and Development District, with getting the project off the ground.

He also expressed appreciation for the Hinds County Board of Supervisors, which is allocating .92 mills of taxes annually, or approximately $1.6 million, for the college’s share of the money to fund the operation. “The college has no additional money other than what the Hinds County Board of Supervisors has allocated to make it work. All the other partners are investing dollars and other resources to help us make it work,” Muse said.

“This is a game-changing opportunity that allows workforce partners to serve the people and respond to the growing workforce needs of business and industry in the 17 counties that make up the Southcentral Mississippi Works workforce network,” said Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Career, Technical, Workforce and Adult Education. “This center will not only consolidate the workforce partners into one location, but it also allows us the opportunity to grow and expand offerings with cutting edge workforce training that will help fill the skills gap that industries talk about every day.

“Hinds Community College is excited to have the opportunity to take the lead on this project. This project exemplifies the meaning of community, economic and workforce development at its best,” Stocks said.

The center also will have classrooms for MI-BEST, a community college program that teaches adult students without a high school diploma both academic and technical skills so they will be job ready. The center’s focus will also be on other workforce-related and support services for those students, such as job search, workshops, assistance with unemployment Insurance benefits, funding to pay for career tech training, On-the-Job Training opportunities, TANF/SNAP, Vocational Rehabilitation and others.

Muse said the college has a two-fold motivation for being involved in the proposed project.

“We’re out of space for a lot of our career and technical programs. Our enrollment has been growing significantly in that area,” he said.

“But, it will not only give us additional classrooms and labs to teach in, but it will give the citizens of our district a centralized convenient place where they can go to obtain the support services they need to get a job,” Muse said.

The center would encompass 160,000 square feet of both floors of the southeast end of Metrocenter Mall, where McRae’s or Belk was formerly located. The bottom floor will include an event area and programs for metal fab machining and welding. The top floor would include the bulk of the offices for all the partners and more classrooms, including those for mechatronics, robotics and 3D design.

The project renovation should only take about six months, Muse said. “Everything is already there – the infrastructure, heating and plumbing. They’ve just got to take down those walls,” he said.

Hinds could potentially relocate MI-BEST, Adult Education, the Early Childhood Academy and manufacturing related career and technical training programs to the One-Stop Center to support the initiative.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolls about 12,000 students each fall semester. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

09 March, 2018 News more
Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members
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08 March

Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members

PEARL – The Alpha Omicron Omega Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus inducted new members and officers Feb. 22.

Rankin PTK inductees for Spring 2018 include, front row, from left: Kassidy Irby, of Pearl; Noah McDaniel, of Richland; Amber Williams, of Brandon; Farrah Pitts, of Jackson; Tyler Hocutt, of Florence; Samantha Dinnella, of Brandon; Tywanna Millwood, of Pearl;Abby McCardle, of Brandon; Kaley Crotwell, of Brandon; Kate Busby, of Trenton; second row, from left, Carter Wagoman, of Florence; Richard Goodwin, of Monroe; Jessica Stamps, of Brandon; Victoria Lawrence, of Jackson; Mary Barton Rogers, of Brandon; Hope Jenkins, of Brandon; Rachel Nolan, of Brandon; Raleigh Havard, of Brandon; Madison Starks, of Brandon; third row, from left, Daniel Hill, of Madison; Jake Watts, of Pearl; Colton Pierce, of Sandhill; Karley Alexander, of Brandon; Abigail Cockerill, of Brandon; Antara Sharma, of Brandon; Anna Smith, of Brandon; Katie Brown, of Brandon; back row, from left, Joseph Crawford, of Pearl; Branden Hines, of Brandon; Caleb Ries, of Florence; Jessica Waldrop, of Brookhaven; Ray Ferguson, of Kosciusko; Preston McCue, of Richland.

Newly inducted members include Kassidy Irby, of Pearl; Noah McDaniel, of Richland; Amber Williams, of Brandon; Farrah Pitts, of Jackson; Tyler Hocutt, of Florence; Samantha Dinnella, of Brandon; Tywanna Millwood, of Pearl; Abby McCardle, of Brandon; Kaley Crotwell, of Brandon; Kate Busby, of Trenton; Carter Wagoman, of Florence; Richard Goodwin, of Monroe; Jessica Stamps, of Brandon; Victoria Lawrence, of Jackson; Mary Barton Rogers, of Brandon; Hope Jenkins, of Brandon; Rachel Nolan, of Brandon; Raleigh Havard, of Brandon; Madison Starks, of Brandon; Daniel Hill, of Madison; Jake Watts, of Pearl; Colton Pierce, of Sandhill; Karley Alexander, of Brandon; Abigail Cockerill, of Brandon; Antara Sharma, of Brandon; Anna Smith, of Brandon; Katie Brown, of Brandon; Joseph Crawford, of Pearl; Branden Hines, of Brandon; Caleb Ries, of Florence; Jessica Waldrop, of Brookhaven; Ray Ferguson, of Kosciusko; and Preston McCue, of Richland.

Officers this semester are Win Winstead, of Pelahatchie; Hannah Stovall, of Brandon; Madison Brunt, of Brandon; Claudia Nelson, of Brandon. Back row: Christina Hamilton, of Pelahatchie; Josh Williamson, of Brandon; Destiny Little, of Madison; James Flickner, of Pelahatchie; and Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett.

Rankin Campus PTK Officers Spring 2018 include, from left, front row: Win Winstead, of Pelahatchie; Hannah Stovall, of Brandon; Madison Brunt, of Brandon; Claudia Nelson, of Brandon; back row, from left, Christina Hamilton, of Pelahatchie; Josh Williamson, of Brandon; Destiny Little, of Madison; James Flickner, of Pelatchie; Jacob Mahaffey, of Puckett.

 

 

 

 

 

Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society for community and junior college students. Membership in Phi Theta Kappa is extended to students who have a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or above on 12 or more transferrable credit hours. There are more than 1,200 Phi Theta Kappa chapters throughout the United States and abroad. For more information about Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds, go to http://www.hindscc.edu/admissions/studentlife/clubs/ptk/index, email Faculty Adviser Joy Rhoads at jdrhoads@hindscc.edu or follow the society’s Hinds chapter on Twitter at @HindsRankinPTK. The new Honors Institute program at the Rankin Campus may be followed at @HCCHonorsRankin.

 

08 March, 2018 News more