http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC Vicksburg-Warren Campus continues advanced river barge training course

Monthly Archives: June 2017

Hinds CC Vicksburg-Warren Campus continues advanced river barge training course
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28 June

Hinds CC Vicksburg-Warren Campus continues advanced river barge training course

VICKSBURG – A career-building program on the Mississippi River has moved onto Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus to stay.

Specialized training to be tankermen on push boats that help move products up and down the river is filling a big need for skilled labor on the water. Completion allows deckhands on tank barges to move up to the job responsible for managing liquid cargo on the average barge tow and seeing it’s transferred safely to and from tank barges.

Garrett Williams reads measurements on a intructional replica of a barge at Goldling Barge. Williams was part of the river barge training program in 2016 at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Garrett Williams reads measurements on a replica of a barge at Golding Barge. Williams was part of the river barge training program in 2016 at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

A Coast-Guard approved course first hosted on campus last year has received support from local industries to continue for the fall 2017 semester. Industry partners Golding Barge Line, Magnolia Marine Transport and Smith Towing Company have supplied rope, steel and other equipment for the class, which is being expanded with staff instruction. Previously, an outside service taught the course.

“We’ve taken on the class and are having it here on campus because it’s the only program of its kind in Mississippi,” Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak said. “It’s a unique opportunity.”

A classroom course, which covers basic terminology on flammable or combustible materials and sources of fuel for potential hazards, is followed by fire safety and other hands-on courses held outdoors on campus.

Chad Vickers uses equipment on an instructional replica of a barge at Golding Barge. Vickers was part of the river barge training program in 2016 at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus. (April Garon/ Hinds Community College)

Chad Vickers uses equipment on an instructional replica of a barge at Golding Barge. Vickers was part of the river barge training program in 2016 at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus. (April Garon/ Hinds Community College)

Earnings potential on the water drives the current wave of entrants to deckhand school, which trains for the industry’s entry-level position. In 2014, the college and Golding partnered on the deckhand training course when it was made possible by a federal workforce grant.

After students attain second-level experience handling and rigging lines, they can choose to train for tankerman positions that can pay double the annual salary of entry-level deckhands. Students are evaluated and certified accordingly at the completion of each of the training courses.

Six months of experience and supervised transfers by licensed tankermen are necessary before a trainee can become similarly certified. In addition to class lecture and fire safety, formal training also covers rules and regulations, transfer procedures and emergency response,

For information about enrolling in the deckhand or tankerman training program offered in Vicksburg through Hinds Community College, contact Marvin Moak, dean of Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus, at 601.629.6804.

River barge training course at Hinds CC trains for top-dollar careers 

 

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Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC
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09 June

Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC

RAYMOND – A person’s inner dialogue can be helpful or hurtful, depending on what that little voice inside says.

It was a strong enough message to lead off this summer’s leadership summit for students involved in the Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds Community College.

Adonis Lenzy, of Paradigm Shift, speaks to high school students and others at an M2M Leadership Summit June 5 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Adonis Lenzy, of Paradigm Shift, speaks to high school students and others at an M2M Leadership Summit June 5 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“No matter what people say to you, it’s what you say to yourself that really matters,” said Adonis Lenzy of Paradigm Shift as the group helped kick off a two-day series of programs and exercises for M2M members and mentors June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. The Oklahoma-based nonprofit connects ministers and other volunteers with poor communities to foster economic and social change.

“There’s nothing wrong with looking at yourself in the mirror and saying ‘You can’,” Lenzy said.

Joining Lenzy for the summit was minister Heady Coleman and community leaders Ryan Eller, Derrick Sier and Mikey Manghum to present programs on various team-building exercises, such as setting goals, time management, copying practices seen in successful people, and changing up routines to prevent life from becoming stale. Lenzy likened that to releasing a caged bear into the woods, only to have the bear still be stuck in a cage in its mind.

“We’ve got to be bigger than a routine,” he said. “You’ve got to make sure you steer clear of any ruts.”

High school students who attended the summit wrote down short- and long-term goals on sticky notes to foster active communication, said M2M Director Aleisha Escobedo.

Wingfield High School students Paul James Curry, a junior, Dequavious Guice, a senior and James Stubb, a junior, attended the M2M Leadership Summit held June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Wingfield High School students Paul James Curry, a junior,
Dequavious Guice, a senior and
James Stubb, a junior, attended the M2M Leadership Summit held June 5-6 at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus.
(Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“This summit provided an opportunity for our students to engage with their peers and serve as active leaders and forward thinkers,” Escobedo said. “I especially loved that Paradigm Shift challenged our students to focus on attainable goals and helped them to recognize that having strong social and community support will foster success.”

Becoming a success in life often involves the answer to a key question of those whom students see as successful, Lenzy said.

“The number one question you need to ask them is, if you can get in their circle, what was it like for you before you became successful?” he said. “That’s the story you’ll want to hear about.”

The M2M program is based at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. For more information, call 601.987.8129 or visit www.hindscc.edu/go/M2M.

Teamwork, self-motivation front and center at M2M summit at Hinds CC
Front row, from left, April Reynolds, M2M English instructional guide, Aleisha Escobedo, M2M Director, Derrick Sier, Adonis Lenzy, both of Paradigm Shift, Robert Smith, M2M Academic Success coach, Felicia Garner, M2M administrative assistant; back row, from left, Keith Williams, M2M Academic Success coach, Ryan Eller, Mikey Manghum, Gregory “Heady” Coleman, all of Paradigm Shift, Ahmad Smith, M2M Recruitment and Outreach coordinator (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Front row, from left, April Reynolds, M2M English instructional guide, Aleisha Escobedo, M2M Director, Derrick Sier, Adonis Lenzy, both of Paradigm Shift, Robert Smith, M2M Academic Success coach, Felicia Garner, M2M administrative assistant; back row, from left, Keith Williams, M2M Academic Success coach, Ryan Eller, Mikey Manghum, Gregory “Heady” Coleman, all of Paradigm Shift, Ahmad Smith, M2M Recruitment and Outreach coordinator (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

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Diplomas earned by 18 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus
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08 June

Diplomas earned by 18 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus

PEARL – For Laura Marie Barrett, being on a stage she once thought herself unworthy of her presence meant thanking a few people first.

Laura Marie Barrett, center, with her father, William, and her mother, Marie (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Laura Marie Barrett, center, with her father, William, and her mother, Marie (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I just want to say thank you so much to three wonderful women,” Barrett said, referring to the trio who have coordinated the Gateway to College program at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. “They’ve helped me through hard times and difficult times these past two years.”

On Tuesday, June 6, she was among 18 students from Rankin County School District thankful for the opportunity to graduate high school and earn college credit this past semester thanks to the program.

Program director Chandra Frazier, along with program specialists Sherrie Daniels and Ouida Holland, were praised highly by students who told their stories to family and friends during a graduation ceremony held at the Muse Center.

“If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t have known about this program or learned how to push myself a lot harder than I used to,” said Barrett, of Florence High School, who earned 24 hours of college credits she’ll use to pursue a cosmetology career. “I thought since I had failed in regular high school, that was it.”

The program, in place since 2012-13 at the Rankin Campus, has involved students who have dropped out of high school or are at risk of doing so. Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds. The program expanded to the Vicksburg Warren Campus in 2015. The program, a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds and the two school districts, is ending for the 2017-18 term.

Students had to read on an eighth-grade level and pass the college’s placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

Nicholas Hydrick, center, with his father, Ryan, and his mother, Nancy Cobb (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Nicholas Hydrick, center, with his father, Ryan, and his mother, Nancy Cobb (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Being in the program taught me time management,” said Nicholas Hydrick, of Northwest Rankin High School, who earned 22 credits toward college. He was equally thankful to program officials he described as “three amazing women.”

“I’m truly thankful God put these three women in my life,” he said on stage as he, Barrett and fellow RCSD students Shelbie Cranfield and Maeghan Romo in sharing brief testimonials about their experiences in the program. “I never would have graduated without their help,” Hydrick said. “I want you to know that you three have reserved spots in my heart forever.”

The ceremony was again keynoted by Dr. Sue Townsend, superintendent of the Rankin County School District and member of the college’s Board of Trustees.

“There’s a freedom that you feel when you’ve accomplished a goal,” Townsend said. “When you walk out of here, you’re going to have a new sense of freedom and what it offers to you.”

Frazier thanked guidance counselors and others in the Rankin County School District for supporting the program from the start.

“We have walked this journey together,” Frazier said.

Rankin Gateway to College director Chandra Frazier

Rankin Gateway to College director Chandra Frazier

Beverly McClure, a guidance counselor at Northwest Rankin, told graduates they’d still be there for them as they continued their education at the college level.

“We’re here to support,” McClure said. “This is not work, this is easy. This is love. You still belong to your home school and every counselor in this district. And we want to help.”

Gateway graduates present Tuesday also included Zoe Armagost, 24 hours of college credits; Nicole Aucoin, 43 hours; Charlie Banks, 15 hours; Cranfield, 10 hours; Leanna Frazier, 42 hours; Kelsey Heard, 33 hours; Benjamin Heckman, 38 hours; Marcenia Holloway, 38 hours; Cody Holmes, 32 hours; Kaylee Jackson, 21 hours; Kinsley Parkman, 24 hours; Austin Scott, 19 hours; Romo, 29 hours; and Mary Ward, 32 hours. Also completing high school through the program for 2017 were Alexander Heintzelman and Peyton Love, who were not present Tuesday. All graduates were students in the Rankin County School District.

Diplomas earned by 18 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus
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Early Childhood Academy opening at Hinds CC
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07 June

Early Childhood Academy opening at Hinds CC

Hinds Community College is becoming the home to one of 10 Early Childhood Academies being housed at community colleges throughout the state.

An open house to spotlight the new program, which officially opens on July 1, is planned for 2 p.m. June 15 at the academy’s headquarters in the Adult Education Building on the Raymond Campus.

“We’re pleased to have this new program at Hinds. With the large number of child care centers in our college district, it is a much needed resource,” said Vice President Dr. Chad Stocks.

The Early Childhood Academy program has several components: professional development, technical assistance and resource and referrals for the approximately 250 child care centers in those counties. The program also offer referrals for families who need guidance.

Currently, the project has two employees, but Stocks is expecting that number to grow quickly. LaTina Gray and Amelda Ellis will oversee the Early Childhood Academy for the Hinds district.

LaTina Gray, left, and Amelda Ellis with some of the materials available to child care providers at the new Early Childhood Academy on the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College.

LaTina Gray, left, and Amelda Ellis with some of the materials available to child care providers at the new Early Childhood Academy on the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College.

“We’re going to be providing training and professional development to child care providers across the Hinds County district area in the counties of Warren, Hinds, Claiborne and Rankin,” said Gray, coaching and professional development specialist.

For the child care providers, the academy will have scheduled professional development training to be announced later.

“We will train them on a number of topics, such as health and safety, child growth and development, nutrition, planning learning activities, guidance and discipline, linkage with community services, communications and relations with families and detection of child abuse,” she said.

The centers will also have access to materials and resources at the center from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Fridays.

“The providers and teachers can come out and use any materials and tools, including printing machines, the copier, and lamination— anything that they need to get classrooms where they want them to be, any resources that we have,” Gray said. “They can pull from resources that we will have available in our resource center.”

Parents will be able to find out about local child care centers through the referral and data collection service. They also will be able to pull from in content area they might need for parenting, she said.

Gray of Pearl holds a master’s degree in Early Childhood Education and a bachelor’s in Childcare and Family Education, both from Jackson State University.

“I want to help and guide childcare providers, teachers and families that are a part of the Early Childhood Academy program to a successful path and ensure that high quality services for the children and families of Mississippi are provided,” she said.

Ellis of Jackson works as a resource and referral associate for the program. Ellis has a Master of Arts in Elementary Education and a bachelor’s degree in the same subject, both from Alcorn State University.

“I want to be transparent, hands on and resourceful with the providers and community,” she said. “I also want to build cohesive relationships with local agencies. Finally, I want to be welcoming and inviting to all the people whom I will come in contact with on a daily basis in the Resource and Referral Center.”

Both arrived at Hinds from the Mississippi State University Early Years Network.

Hinds CC’s Early Childhood Academy has open house 2 p.m. June 15.

 

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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U.S. Department of Education awards Hinds CC Utica Campus $5.1 million
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01 June

U.S. Department of Education awards Hinds CC Utica Campus $5.1 million

The Utica Campus of Hinds Community College has been awarded more than $5.1 million for four Upward Bound Programs for the next five years. The grant will provide more than $1 million per year, beginning Sept. 1, 2017, to help fund the program that will target students in grades 9 – 12 at the following high schools: Crystal Springs, Hazlehurst, Raymond, Terry, Vicksburg, Warren Central, Forest Hill in Jackson and Wingfield in Jackson.

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“We are very excited to partner with feeder school districts to assist with increasing state test scores, increasing graduation rates and increasing the number of students entering postsecondary institutions,” said Vice President Dr. Debra Mays-Jackson. “This will definitely help to establish a strong pipeline for both our academic and career and technical programs on the Utica Campus or entrance to other colleges or universities.”

Upward Bound provides fundamental support to participants in their preparation for college entrance. The program provides opportunities for participants to succeed in their pre-college performance and ultimately in their higher education pursuits. The goal of Upward Bound is to increase the rate at which participants complete secondary education and enroll in and graduate from institutions of postsecondary education.

“As a product of the Upward Bound program that was once on the Utica Campus, I truly understand the importance of the program, so it was my goal while writing the grants to include as many schools and students that I could,” said Dr. Mitchell Shears, executive director of Title III & Sponsored Grants. “I was very excited to know that we submitted favorable proposals that reviewers felt would impact families in this area for the next five years.”

Together, the programs will serve a minimum of 240 participants who are from low-income families, potential first-generation college students and/or individuals who have a high risk for academic failure. The programs will consist of an academic year component and a six-week summer component that will provide academic instruction in mathematics, laboratory sciences, composition, literature, foreign languages and other educational and cultural experiences.

Hinds CC Utica Campus receives grant for Upward Bound.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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