http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC Rankin Campus student named career-tech student of month

Monthly Archives: January 2017

Hinds CC Rankin Campus student named career-tech student of month
Posted by
31 January

Hinds CC Rankin Campus student named career-tech student of month

PEARL – Benjamin Smith, a student in the Animation and Simulation Technology program at the Rankin Campus, has been named DISTINCT CTE Student of the Month by the Mississippi Community College Board’s Office of Career and Technical Education.

Benjamin Smith

Benjamin Smith

The honor, which stands for Determined, Inspiring, Smart, Talented, Innovative, and Notable, recognizes exceptional Career and Technical Education students in Mississippi’s 15 community and junior colleges. Each month during the school year, the board’s career-tech office presents it to an outstanding student from one school. Instructors from each of the colleges nominate students for the award.

“It’s such a privilege to have received this recognition,” said Smith, a Brookhaven native. “The Animation and Simulation design program, which no other school in the state offers, has been so empowering.

“I’ve been passionate about 3D animation and games since a very young age, and I never thought I’d be able to go to school to follow that passion here in Mississippi. Hinds is doing something very forward thinking with this program, and I’m so excited to be a part of it.”

Smith’s graphics work was featured during the Girls Scouts Conference in October.

“Benjamin demonstrates considerable planning, intelligence, and organization in his student classwork projects and submittals,” said Animation and Simulation Technology Instructor Kathy Boyte. “He has a 4.0 GPA in the major of Animation and Simulation Design, and will be among four to graduate from this newly created full-time program at Hinds.”

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC Rankin Campus student named career-tech student of the month in MS cc’s [/tweetable]

1 938 31 January, 2017 News more
Former jet mechanic, instructor cooks up new career with Hinds’ help
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30 January

Former jet mechanic, instructor cooks up new career with Hinds’ help

Note: The following story appears in the winter issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

RAYMOND — Jim Hatten has been down many trails in his professional career, from that of a jet engine mechanic to a salesman. These days, he’s blazing a new one fostered by his Hinds experience — first as an instructor but, more recently, as a student.

The 57-year-old Jackson native and former staff sergeant in the U.S. Air Force was an instructor in the college’s Aviation Maintenance program from 1992-95. He was both teacher and marketer, working to promote the program with aviation businesses.

Jim Hatten stands outside Chimneyville Smokehouse in Jackson. Hatten markets the Mississippi BBQ Trail, which promotes barbecue restaurants in the state such as the downtown Jackson staple. The listing was conceived during his time as a student at Hinds Community College. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jim Hatten stands outside Chimneyville Smokehouse in Jackson. Hatten markets the Mississippi BBQ Trail, which promotes barbecue restaurants in the state such as the downtown Jackson staple. The listing was conceived during his time as a student at Hinds Community College. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’m very grateful for the opportunity,” he said. “I enjoyed the students and did a lot of different things. Inspiring the students was really a great pleasure for me. I had a good experience working at Hinds.”

His professional life then took a circuitous path. He spent eight years in engineering and design in the aerospace industry, then took to the road as an insurance salesman and became involved in commercial property development.

Then in 2011 two seemingly unrelated events formed the idea that became his next life — the Mississippi BBQ Trail, a marketing vehicle for barbecue restaurants in the state.

“At one (commercial) property, there was this 5,000-gallon steel fuel drum they wanted to turn into a barbecue grill. The same week, Smithsonian Magazine came out with something about the feral hog epidemic in the South. I thought, man, wild hog barbecue is some of the best-tasting meat you ever put in your mouth. I started thinking of ways I could help sell that.”

Months of research into the state’s barbecue offerings became Hatten’s homework when he returned to Hinds in 2013 as a student in the Marketing Management Technology program.

While working on a class project, “I came up with 263 barbecue joints in the state,” he said.

“Most of these places are mom-and-pop operations with five to nine employees and make less than $250,000 a year. That tells me they can’t afford to advertise two blocks down the street. For the locally-owned barbecue joint, they don’t have any visibility. And only 21.7 percent had a website. That told me the tourists can’t find them,” he said.

His class projects garnered top grades, for which he credits instructors at Hinds as well as for bringing his marketing knowledge into the 21st century. The fruit of that labor can be seen on the trail’s website, at www.msbbqtrail.com.

“The marketing management faculty helped with everything. They taught me how to build a website, which had been like a black box of magic to me.” Hatten earned his Associate of Applied Science in Marketing Management Technology with a little extra sauce — he’d also graduated magna cum laude and been a member of Phi Theta Kappa and DECA.

“While in my class, Jim learned how to build a website, the concepts needed to manage a website and how to publish a website,” said Jo Ponder, who instructs Computer Programming Technology on the Raymond Campus. “Jim took that knowledge and elevated it to a working model.”

The trail itself connects locals, tourists and grill foodies alike to local businesses which register to be on the listing site. A potential “stop” on the trail must have a business license, cook and serve barbecue pork and/or beef and have a valid health department inspection certificate.

Hatten describes the state’s barbecue restaurant scene as a world market of sorts, where all culinary styles on the grill can be found.

“We have everything,” he said. “We have all the different kinds of barbecue here. You have the Memphis style, which is a tomato-based sauce, the Carolinas style, with vinegar-based sauce, the Kansas City style, which is a lot of wet ribs. Also, a lot influences in Mississippi came from the Caribbean, which we have as well.”

Hatten sees his efforts to promote the industry as simply paying it forward.

“My teachers, my coaches, my mentors, find somebody who needs help and help them,” he said. “And here’s an entire industry that’s underrepresented online. I just want to give people a reason to turn off the road and get something to eat.”

[tweetable alt=””]Former jet mechanic, instructor cooks up new career with Hinds’ help[/tweetable]

0 785 30 January, 2017 News more
Education at Hinds CC a perfect reinforcement for state’s adjutant general
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30 January

Education at Hinds CC a perfect reinforcement for state’s adjutant general

RAYMOND – Engineer soldiers rely on solid planning and execution to make any mission run smoothly.

Thanks to the classes he took at Hinds, Brig. Gen. Janson D. (Durr) Boyles was properly equipped to handle his own academic mission, which was to become an engineer.

Brig. Gen. Janson D. (Durr) Boyles peers out an office window at Mississippi National Guard headquarters in Jackson. Boyles, who attended Hinds, was appointed adjutant general of the guard in 2016. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Brig. Gen. Janson D. (Durr) Boyles peers out an office window at Mississippi National Guard headquarters in Jackson. Boyles, who attended Hinds, was appointed adjutant general of the guard in 2016. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I went to Mississippi State out of high school and studied engineering,” Boyles said. “I got into calculus, which was challenging. In calculus, if you don’t have an early understanding of the subject matter, you never get it. I passed it, but I came back to Hinds and passed it again to make sure I understood the subject matter.”

Boyles sharpened his skills in the classroom at Hinds, he said, because the atmosphere was just right for doing so.

“It was a friendly campus, and the student-to-teacher ratio was probably the best part of it for me. The ability of the teachers to transfer the information from the book to where I’d understand it was key, too.”

Boyles’ career in uniform got a most handsome transfer in 2016 when he was appointed by Gov. Phil Bryant as adjutant general of the Mississippi National Guard. A Jackson native, Boyles followed up his bachelor’s degree in engineering by entering the Army in 1982. Later, in 2005, he earned a master’s in Strategic Studies from the United States Army War College.

In his new post, he oversees both the Army and Air National Guard units in the state. The Army National Guard consists of 151 units throughout the state, plus 97 armories in 93 communities. The Air National Guard consists of seven components that support a multitude of functions.

Even with those responsibilities, he needn’t look further than Guard headquarters in Jackson to find a fellow product of a Hinds education. That is Lt. Col. Christian Patterson, public affairs director for the Guard.

“The quality of education that I received at Hinds Community College was outstanding,” Patterson said. “I was blessed to have strong instructors that prepared me for my studies at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. Hinds is strong academically, affordable, and close to home. I would highly recommend the school to any student seeking to receive a great education.”

For Boyles, that education helped instill a certain discipline before he ever put on a uniform.

“It’s really up to you to open your doors. But, try to have three, four, five doors open at a time that you can walk through,” he said. “Sometimes, they work out and sometimes they don’t. Getting an education at Hinds is one of those doors you need to walk through. And if you do, the people at Hinds will do their part.”

[tweetable alt=””]Education at Hinds CC a perfect reinforcement for state’s adjutant general [/tweetable]

0 684 30 January, 2017 News more
New Hinds CC scholarship honors legacy of now-closed Gilfoy School of Nursing
Posted by
30 January

New Hinds CC scholarship honors legacy of now-closed Gilfoy School of Nursing

Although the closure of the Mississippi Baptist Hospital/Gilfoy School of Nursing in 1971 marked the end of an era, its 1,407 graduates received the skills and knowledge to provide the best of care for their patients.

The majority of the practicing nurses who graduated from the Gilfoy School of Nursing felt that its memories and legacy were still very much alive. Before its closure, the school had a long association with Hinds Community College, which taught the academic studies to provide the foundation for the three-year course of study.

For many years, the Gilfoy School of Nursing continued to have an active Alumni Association, which was established in the early 1930s. One of the objectives of the Alumni Association was to provide scholarships for nursing students. The scholarship program began in 2000 with Hinds Community College as one of the recipients. Monies raised by the alumni and gifts to the Alumni Association began the trust accounts that were established for such a purpose.

In August 2016, the Mississippi Baptist Hospital/Gilfoy School of Nursing Alumni Association, which had in the past served in the distribution of the scholarship awards, was permanently closed. With these funds now at Hinds Community College, the wishes of the graduates to maintain the legacy of the school will be honored.

One of these graduates is Leola Cowart, a 1948 graduate of the Mississippi Baptist Hospital / Gilfoy School of Nursing. In March 2012, she established the Dennis D. and Leola K. Cowart Scholarship at Hinds Community College at the request of her husband, who died on Feb. 24, 2012.

With the closure of the Alumni Association, she has now established the Dennis D. and Leola K. Cowart Endowed Scholarship/ Mississippi Baptist Hospital and Gilfoy School of Nursing Alumni Association Scholarship at Hinds.

April Garon/Hinds Community College Retired Hinds nursing learning lab manager Dene Bass Cook, left, Leola Cowart and Renee Cotton, district director of marketing and community relations, were on hand for the Gilfoy School of Nursing Alumni meeting, which included a presentation about the new Dennis D. and Leola K. Cowart Endowed Scholarship/Mississippi Baptist Hospital and Gilfoy School of Nursing Alumni Scholarship Scholarship to be awarded at Hinds Community College.

April Garon/Hinds Community College
Retired Hinds nursing learning lab manager Dene Bass Cook, left, Leola Cowart and Renee Cotton, district director of marketing and community relations, were on hand for the Gilfoy School of Nursing Alumni meeting, which included a presentation about the new Dennis D. and Leola K. Cowart Endowed Scholarship/Mississippi Baptist Hospital and Gilfoy School of Nursing Alumni Scholarship Scholarship to be awarded at Hinds Community College.

Dennis D. Cowart attended Hinds Junior College from 1949 to 1950. Leola Cowart also attended Hinds as a part-time student after she completed nursing school. The Cowarts lived on campus in a small cottage when their daughter was born.

After completing nursing school in 1948, Leola Cowart worked for the Mississippi Department of Public Health for 13 months. She was then employed by Foster General Military Hospital, which later became Veterans Administration Hospital. She retired 36 years later. She also served as a nurse volunteer for the American Red Cross for more than 50 years.

The Cowart family includes Dr. Mary Ann Cowart Wilkerson and husband Joe of Meridian; grandson, Dr. Ben Wilkerson, and his wife Kelly of Covington, La., and granddaughter, Dr. Shelley Wilkerson Ellis, and her husband Todd of Meridian.

To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here. The deadline for fall 2017 is Feb. 15.

Scholarships are awarded on the basis of a student’s desire for achievement, involvement in extracurricular activities, financial need, grades and letters of recommendation.

For more information about establishing a scholarship at Hinds Community College, contact Jackie Granberry, 601.857.3630, jgranberry@hindscc.edu.

[tweetable alt=””]New Hinds CC nursing scholarship honors Gilfoy School of Nursing.[/tweetable]

0 718 30 January, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Scholarship endowed in honor of late Vicksburg businessman
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30 January

Hinds CC Scholarship endowed in honor of late Vicksburg businessman

The late David L. May of Vicksburg drew on his skills in finance to help guide the Vicksburg-Warren Campus. His widow, Martha Ann May Klaus, has endowed a scholarship in his name to continue his legacy of involvement in education, especially at Hinds Community College.web_David May

May was a member of the Hinds Community College Foundation Board of Directors and was chairman of the advisory board for the Vocational/Technical Center on what is now the Vicksburg-Warren Campus. He also served on the board for Warren County Schools.

“He was involved in every level, and he was always available for advice on financial matters,” said Joe Loviza, director and dean of the Vicksburg-Warren Campus from 1973-93.

As a businessman, he founded May & Company, a certified public accounting firm. His businesses also included his marine towing business, real estate development and other enterprises. May, who died in 1995, grew up in Mobile and graduated from the University of Alabama. He was married to Martha Ann Johnston for 42 years until his death.

[tweetable alt=””]David May Scholarship at Hinds CC honors late Vicksburg businessman.[/tweetable]

To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here. The deadline for fall 2017 is Feb. 15.

Scholarships are awarded on the basis of a student’s desire for achievement, involvement in extracurricular activities, financial need, grades and letters of recommendation.

For more information about establishing a scholarship at Hinds Community College, contact Jackie Granberry, 601.857.3630, jgranberry@hindscc.edu.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 666 30 January, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Louis Strickland Scholarship targets Rankin County students, aviation majors
Posted by
30 January

Hinds CC Louis Strickland Scholarship targets Rankin County students, aviation majors

Late Hinds Community College alumnus Louis Gene Strickland (1947) of Brandon received numerous recognitions for his service to Hinds Community College during his lifetime.  Now, the former Hinds athlete has a scholarship endowed in his name by family and friends.web_Louis Gene Strickland

The Louis Gene Strickland Memorial Endowed Scholarship gives special preference to Hinds students who are from Rankin County or who are interested in aviation. Strickland served Hinds as a member of the Hinds Community College Foundation Board, Hinds Alumni Association and the Rankin County Alumni Chapter. Strickland was inducted into the Sports Hall of Fame in 1986 and honored as the 1992 Hinds Community College Alumnus of the Year.

He later reflected on his time at Hinds with these sentiments: “I fell in love with the place. Hinds had a tremendous influence on my life. It was very unusual for anyone in my community to go to college … and I feel blessed that I had the opportunity to go to Hinds.”

One of seven children from a family in Yazoo County, Strickland graduated from high school at Hinds and returned as a college student on a football scholarship after having entered the U.S. Air Force at age 18.

During his time at Hinds, he was recognized as an All-State center. He treasured the profound impact that Hinds Community College coach Jobie Harris had on his life and considered him not only a teacher and coach but a father figure. He completed his degree and college football career as a student at Delta State University.

Strickland “was a devoted Christ follower who lived daily to glorify God,” said Stephanie Strickland Smith, one of his three daughters. “His leadership as a teacher in the classroom, coach on the football field, director in the workplace and elder in the church had life-changing impact on many in the community.

“This scholarship is endowed in memory of the 64 years lived by Louis Gene Strickland and in honor of the God he served who lives forever,” she said.

He began his professional career as a teacher and coach at Picayune High School. He spent nine years as the head football coach at Brandon High, and the high school football field is named for him. He concluded his coaching career by winning the Little Dixie Championship.

He devoted the next 24 years of his career counseling, teaching and directing rehabilitation programs for the blind in Mississippi. He was instrumental in establishing the Addie McBryde Rehabilitation Center for the Blind in Jackson where he served as director from 1972 until his 1990 retirement. The Center was recognized worldwide as a model for educating and equipping the blind to live productive lives.

Strickland had a lifelong love of aviation and enjoyed piloting his Cessna and listening to live ATC transmissions on his radio in the evenings. His greatest fulfillment, however, came from helping other people – whether sharing vegetables from his garden or through his service with the Brandon Lions Club, Smith said.

He and his wife, Bonnie Jean, had three daughters – the late Sharon Cannon, Susan Crawford and Stephanie Smith.

[tweetable alt=””]The deadline to apply for the Louis Gene Strickland Scholarship at Hinds CC is Feb. 15.[/tweetable]

To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here. The deadline for fall 2017 is Feb. 15.

Scholarships are awarded on the basis of a student’s desire for achievement, involvement in extracurricular activities, financial need, grades and letters of recommendation.

For more information about establishing a scholarship at Hinds Community College, contact Jackie Granberry, 601.857.3630, jgranberry@hindscc.edu.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 636 30 January, 2017 News more
Hinds CC Wiley Magee Scholarship targets agriculture or health care major
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30 January

Hinds CC Wiley Magee Scholarship targets agriculture or health care major

Friends and family of the late Wiley Magee, who graduated from Hinds Community College in 1964, established a scholarship in his name that is available to be awarded to a Hinds student majoring in the agriculture or healthcare fields of study. The deadline for applying for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship is Feb. 15.

Magee, who lived in Mendenhall, was circuit clerk in Simpson County from 1984 until he retired in 2004. Magee died on Nov. 9, 2010, at age 67.

“I met Wiley at Hinds and developed a lifelong friendship,” said longtime friend Woody May. “Wiley remains one of the most positive people I ever met. He was a living example that life is not about your problems or your obstacles, but how you react to them.”

William Wiley Magee was born in a one-room shack across the road from where he raised his family in Mendenhall. His family, including four siblings and parents Bill and Lucia Magee, raised horses, cattle and various other livestock in Simpson County. He graduated from Mendenhall High School in 1961.

At Hinds Community College, he was involved in many campus activities before graduating in 1964. He also attended the University of Southern Mississippi and the Mississippi College School of Law.

He served as Director of Mississippi Department of Public Welfare in Simpson County and was later elected to five consecutive terms as circuit clerk of Simpson County. During his years in office, Magee modernized the Circuit Clerk’s office by digitizing the voter rolls and court documents. He also was an active member of the Mississippi Circuit Clerks’ Association and helped train newly elected clerks.

He and his wife Elizabeth raised two children, Lucy Magee Roark, an alumna of Hinds Community College and Robert Magee, an alumnus of USM and William Carey University.web_Magee Photo

One of the highlights of his life was coaching Dixie Youth baseball. He thought of his players as his own children and would spend many hours not only teaching them the game of baseball but also instilling in them the values and morals that would make them successful members of society.

He was an active member of First Baptist Church Mendenhall, serving as deacon, Sunday school teacher, singing in the choir, and serving on numerous committees until his death.

To apply for a Hinds Community College Foundation scholarship, go to the Admissions tab on college web site at www.hindscc.edu or click here.

[tweetable alt=””]The deadline to apply for the Wiley Magee Scholarship for fall 2017 is Feb. 15.[/tweetable]

Scholarships are awarded on the basis of a student’s desire for achievement, involvement in extracurricular activities, financial need, grades and letters of recommendation.

For more information about establishing a scholarship at Hinds Community College, contact Jackie Granberry, 601.857.3630, jgranberry@hindscc.edu.

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. Hinds opened in September 1917 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. In 1982 Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College merged, creating the Hinds Community College District. Today, as Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution with six locations. Hinds offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 667 30 January, 2017 News more
Raymond Campus Preview Day offers fun, information about Hinds CC
Posted by
26 January

Raymond Campus Preview Day offers fun, information about Hinds CC

RAYMOND – High school seniors who are thinking about attending Hinds Community College in fall 2017 are invited to the Raymond Campus Preview Day on Feb. 3.

Area high school students pause during a come-and-go event at Mayo Gymnasium at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus in February 2016. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Area high school students pause during a come-and-go event at Mayo Gymnasium at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus in February 2016. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

The expo style event is come-and-go, from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. It gives seniors and their parents an opportunity to find out everything they need to know about enrolling at Hinds.

At Preview Day, high school seniors will get to meet faculty, staff and students, tour campus, and learn about admissions, scholarships, majors, housing, student life and more. Participants can also enjoy food and prizes.

For more information or to register, visit hub.hindscc.edu/previewday or call 601.857.3767. Activities will be centered at Mayo Gymnasium on the Raymond Campus.

[tweetable alt=””]Eagle Preview Day on the Raymond Campus is Feb. 3[/tweetable]

0 843 26 January, 2017 News more
Hinds CC to play vital role in career-readiness initiative launched Wednesday
Posted by
19 January

Hinds CC to play vital role in career-readiness initiative launched Wednesday

JACKSON – Three counties in the Hinds Community College district have joined a growing list of communities in Mississippi working to be recognized as a job-ready workforce.

Angela Hayes, district WIN Center Education Coordinator, looks on as Jimmie Coins, human resource specialist with Atmos Energy , signs up to recognize the ACT Work Ready Community effort Jan. 18 at the Jackson Convention Complex. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Angela Hayes, district WIN Center Education Coordinator, looks on as Jimmie Coins, human resource specialist with Atmos Energy, signs up to recognize the ACT Work Ready Community effort Jan. 18 at the Jackson Convention Complex. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

At least 100 employers each in Hinds, Warren and Rankin counties must agree to begin recognizing the National Career Readiness Certificate in order for each county to be certified an ACT Work Ready Community. The national credential is a portable, industry-recognized standard of achievement that identifies proficiency in three key areas for landing jobs of today – reading for information, applied math and locating information. The national initiative is headed up by ACT, the nation’s leading college admissions testing company.

Beginning this month, Hinds Community College is administering the NCRC exam to Adult Basic Education and Career-Technical Education students, as well as to current employees from industry partners. WIN Job Centers in the three counties, as well as in Madison County, will begin administering it to clients in each community who are applying for jobs.

“The way this has become successful is multiple entities have come to the table in a collaborative partnership.” said Dr. Robin Parker, district director of Integrated Pathways and coordinator of Adult Basic Education at Hinds. “We are all combining resources in an effort to give opportunities for good jobs for the citizens we serve.”

Carla Causey, left, district Director of Adult Basic Education, speaks to Dr. Delores Bolden Stamps, vice president for Institutional Advancement at Tougaloo College, about the ACT Work Ready Community effort as Stamps signs up to recognize the national credential during a launch of the effort Jan. 18 at the Jackson Convention Complex. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Carla Causey, left, district Director of Adult Basic Education, speaks to Dr. Delores Bolden Stamps, vice president for Institutional Advancement at Tougaloo College, about the ACT Work Ready Community effort as Stamps signs up to recognize the national credential during a launch of the effort Jan. 18 at the Jackson Convention Complex. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Partnering on the effort are the GJCP, Hinds Community College, Holmes Community College, Rankin First, Hinds County Economic Development Authority, the Warren County Port Commission Economic Development Foundation, Madison County Economic Development Authority, Mississippi Department of Education, Central Mississippi Planning and Development District and WIN Job Centers in the region.

“We want to be on the cutting edge of workforce development,” said Duane O’Neill, president of the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership during the organization’s annual meeting Wednesday, Jan. 18, when the effort launched officially. “It’s a priority with site selectors of companies looking to go someplace. With this program and certification, it tells the employers how the people taking it fit into the workforce.”

Issued at four levels – bronze, silver, gold, and platinum – the ACT NCRC helps take the guesswork out of hiring, training, and promotion decisions. Funding from the Mississippi Department of Education will allow career-tech students in the Jackson, Hinds County, Vicksburg-Warren and Rankin school districts to complete the NCRC.

Duane O'Neill, president of the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership, speaks about the ACT Work Ready Community effort during the organization's annual meeting Jan. 18 at the Jackson Convention Complex. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Duane O’Neill, president of the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership, speaks about the ACT Work Ready Community effort during the organization’s annual meeting Jan. 18 at the Jackson Convention Complex. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Economic development has changed over the past few years,” said Greg Word, senior vice president of economic development for GJCP. “In the past, communities could bring a site selector to the area, show the future site and discuss the ease of distribution of the goods that could be manufactured at the site. Now, site selectors are asking for data to prove that the community is work ready. The ACT Work Ready Community initiative will help our state and regional economic developers quantify the work readiness of our community.”

For more information related to the Work Ready Initiative, please visit http://hub.hindscc.edu/WRC.

From left, Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak, Dr. Clyde Muse, District Director of Adult Basic Education Carla Causey, Associate Vice President of Career and Technical Education Sherry Franklin, District Director of WIN Education Center Angela Hayes, District Director of Integrated Pathways and coordinator of Adult Basic Education Dr. Robin Parker. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, District Director of Adult Basic Education Carla Causey, Associate Vice President of Career and Technical Education Sherry Franklin, District Director of WIN Education Center Angela Hayes, District Director of Integrated Pathways and coordinator of Adult Basic Education Dr. Robin Parker. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC helps kick off national work-ready initiative for Greater Jackson[/tweetable]

0 773 19 January, 2017 News more
M2M program at Hinds CC expands with new services
Posted by
11 January

M2M program at Hinds CC expands with new services

JACKSON – Wilburn Holmes wants to manage a hotel someday. Jordan Brown sees himself troubleshooting that hotel’s computers. Both know they can’t get there without a little help.

Providing that network is the goal of an expanded Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

Wilburn Holmes, 19, of Jackson, fills out a membership form at a meet-and-greet Dec. 1 for the Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Holmes is a sophomore studying Hotel and Restaurant Management Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Wilburn Holmes, 19, of Jackson, fills out a membership form at a meet-and-greet Dec. 1 for the Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Holmes is a sophomore studying Hotel and Restaurant Management Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

The grant-funded initiative on campus that has provided leadership training, career counseling and other services to help African-Americans succeed in college is building on a $1.6 million federal grant secured earlier in the year under the Title III, Part A, Predominantly Black Institutions (PBI) Formula Program of the U.S. Department of Education. The funds will enable the college to improve its instructional program and emerging technologies, plus augment student support services.

“I’m signing up because it might mean more job opportunities and connections made,” said Holmes, 19, of Jackson, a sophomore studying Hotel and Restaurant Management Technology. Staff has increased to six, adding a recruiting and outreach coordinator and additional tutors for Math and English.

“We’re hitting the ground running and want to continue to build membership and a positive image in the community,” said Aleisha Coins, M2M director and assistant PBI formula grant director. “My goal with this leadership initiative is to continue to facilitate the academic growth and development of these students and provide them with the tools needed to be impactful citizens.”

The staff of M2M, from left, Robert Smith, Academic Success Coach, Ahmad Smith, Recruitment and Outreach Coordinator, April Reynolds, Instructional Guide-English, Colleen Hartfield, PBI Director, Aleisha Coins, Program Director, Felicia Garner, Administrative Assistant, Keith Williams Jr., Academic Success Coach.

The staff of M2M, from left, Robert Smith, Academic Success Coach, Ahmad Smith, Recruitment and Outreach Coordinator, April Reynolds, Instructional Guide-English, Colleen Hartfield, PBI Director, Aleisha Coins, Program Director, Felicia Garner, Administrative Assistant, Keith Williams Jr., Academic Success Coach.

The M2M program is just one component of the PBI-Formula Grant, said Colleen Hartfield, executive assistant to the President for special projects, who is directing the PBI grant.

Among emerging technologies, the added funding aims to make a reality at JATC a learning laboratory, Tech Nest, which is to be geared for independent and group study.

“Our primary goal is to help students persist and graduate,” Hartfield said. “The M2M program and other support services offered through this grant focus on student engagement and helping students broaden their life experience as it relates to being a successful college student.”

For this semester’s new recruits, a chance to learn more about the working world through simply meeting new friends is enticing enough.

“It’s a chance for someone like me, who’s from a rural community, to have new experiences with this program,” said Brown, of Flora, a freshman studying Computer Network Technology.

For more information on the program, contact Aleisha Coins at 601.987.8109.

[tweetable alt=””]M2M program at Hinds CC expands with new services[/tweetable]

Jordan Brown, of Flora, fills out a membership form at a meet-and-greet Dec. 1 for the Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Brown is a freshman studying Computer Network Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jordan Brown, of Flora, fills out a membership form at a meet-and-greet Dec. 1 for the Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center. Brown is a freshman studying Computer Network Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

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