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Grads of workforce development programs shine bright on big day
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19 December

Grads of workforce development programs shine bright on big day

PEARL — Just two years ago, Ronald Humes had dropped out of high school and was seemingly out of options.

Today, he has credential and a job offer in hand – and he feels on top of his world.

Ronald Humes, center, of Vicksburg, was among nearly 900 students who received credentials from Hinds Community College in three ceremonies Dec. 16. Humes earned a Career Certificate in Welding Technology and, earlier this year, had earned his High School Equivalency after completing the MI-BEST program at Hinds. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Ronald Humes, center, of Vicksburg, was among nearly 900 students who received credentials from Hinds Community College in three ceremonies Dec. 16. Humes earned a Career Certificate in Welding Technology and, earlier this year, had earned his High School Equivalency after completing the MI-BEST program at Hinds. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“It’s really a dream come true right now,” said Humes, of Vicksburg, among those in academic and technical areas of study who graduated from Hinds Community College Friday, Dec. 16 in ceremonies held at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Humes had earned his High School Equivalency certificate this past summer after completing the MI-BEST program at Hinds, a program that combines the high school equivalency curriculum with job training skills. Humes’ career certificate in Welding Technology was just the start of his big day Friday.

“I have a job offer right now where I’d make $32 an hour,” Humes said, surrounded by family and friends.

The college graduated nearly 900 students who received 1,263 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number 554 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday.

Among the graduates, nine achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 46 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 110 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Jimmy Phillips and Thomas Scoggins graduated Hinds Community College on Friday, Dec. 16 with more than their credentials in hand.

Jimmy Phillips, left, of Copiah County, and Thomas Scoggins, of Richland, were among nearly 900 graduates from Hinds Community College who received credentials in three ceremonies Dec. 16, 2016. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jimmy Phillips, left, of Copiah County, and Thomas Scoggins, of Richland, were among nearly 900 graduates from Hinds Community College who received credentials in three ceremonies Dec. 16, 2016. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Each has a job offer after completing the Industrial Maintenance program, which prepares students for modern-day manufacturing facilities.

“I’ve got two offers now, in service and technical work,” said Phillips, of Copiah County, who grew up on a cattle farm and, on Friday, earned technical and career certificates in the field. Scoggins, of Richland, whose family owns an industrial equipment business, earned an Associate of Applied Science degree and graduated cum laude.

“I have some offers I’ll be going after, with this degree,” Scoggins said.

Coursework in the program combines previously separate disciplines into a single concept dubbed mechatronics, a multifaceted field of engineering, telecommunications, control and computer engineering.

Keila Adams, of Jackson, grew up with a few family members unable to hear the world around them.

Now, with an Associate of Applied Science degree in Interpreter Technology in hand, Adams will be able to help her and countless others interact with their own loved ones.

Keila Adams, of Jackson, was among nearly 900 graduates at ceremonies held Dec.16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. She earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Interpreter Technology, graduating summa cum laude. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Keila Adams, of Jackson, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec. 16. She earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Interpreter Technology, graduating summa cum laude. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“Sign language is a totally different language,” Adams said before walking across the stage as a summa cum laude graduate. “It’s a world not only of language, but of facial expressions.”

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse noted that many students want to make a better life for them and their families.

“The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life.  And, while the graduates who sit upon this stage today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life,” Muse said.

Dr. Bobby Glenn, director of the Veterinary Technology program at Hinds since 1976, spoke to academic and technical graduates on the value of their education in multiple measures.

“Twenty-five percent of first-semester college students do not return for their second semester,” Glenn said. “You did return. And you returned again. And you finished.

“Your degree will open doors that otherwise would not have opened. Wear your degree with pride – you’ve earned it.”

Hinds CC workforce program grads shine bright on big day
Dr. Bobby Glenn and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse

Dr. Bobby Glenn and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse

Darylle Buckley, right, was among nearly 900 nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec.16. Buckley earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Landscape Managment Technology. With her is Martha Hill, who directs the program of study. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Darylle Buckley, right, of Jackson, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec.16. Buckley earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Landscape Management Technology. With her is Martha Hill, who directs the program of study. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jamie Johnson, center right, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec. 16. Johnson earned an Associate of Arts degree in general studies and plans to pursue a nursing degree. With her is her father, Jimmy Johnson, left, her daughter, Carlie Blok, and her mother, Beverly Johnson. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jamie Johnson, of Vicksburg, center right, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec. 16. Johnson earned an Associate of Arts degree in general studies and plans to pursue a nursing degree. With her is her father, Jimmy Johnson, left, her daughter, Carlie Blok, and her mother, Beverly Johnson. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Curtis Hicks, left, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec. 16. Hicks earned an Associate of Arts degree in kinesiology. With him are friends Kayla Thompson, Imani Adams and Tylesha Davis. All were classmates at Northwest Rankin High School. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Curtis Hicks, left, was among nearly 900 graduates of Hinds Community College at ceremonies held Dec. 16. Hicks earned an Associate of Arts degree in kinesiology. With him are friends Kayla Thompson, Imani Adams and Tylesha Davis. All were classmates at Northwest Rankin High School. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

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Hinds CC nursing, allied health students graduate
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16 December

Hinds CC nursing, allied health students graduate

On Friday, Hinds graduated nearly 900 students who received 1,263 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number 554 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Among the graduates, nine achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 46 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 110 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse noted that many students want to make a better life for them and their families.

“The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life.  And, while the graduates who sit upon this stage today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life,” Muse said.

Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board, was the speaker for the nursing and allied health graduate ceremony on Friday, Dec. 16.

“Some of you who have scratched, scraped and clawed to get this degree;  juggling the responsibilities, trying to find enough time to study, making sure that you had your tuition and funds to get to class,” Holloway said. “Congratulations – because you made it! These trials and tribulations will help you with challenges to come. Cherish this tremendous accomplishment. You have so very much to be proud of, and be assured that all of us here celebrating with you today are very proud of you.”

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. The college opened in September 2017 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. Hinds has six locations in central Mississippi. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

Hinds CC graduated nearly 900 students on Friday, Dec. 16.

 

Hinds Community college nursing and allied health graduates gather in front of the Muse Center at the Rankin Campus after their Dec. 16 ceremony.

Hinds Community college nursing and allied health graduates gather in front of the Muse Center at the Rankin Campus after their Dec. 16 ceremony.

Students who graduated with honors receive cords before proceeding across the Muse Center stage during Hinds Community College graduation ceremonies on Dec. 16. Among the graduates, nine achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 46 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 110 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Students who graduated with honors receive cords before proceeding across the Muse Center stage during Hinds Community College graduation ceremonies on Dec. 16. Among the graduates, nine achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 46 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 110 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Students prepare to walk across the stage at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Hinds Community College graduate nearly 900 students in three ceremonies on Dec. 16.

Students prepare to walk across the stage at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Hinds Community College graduate nearly 900 students in three ceremonies on Dec. 16.

Cantrell Anderson of Benton receives his Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. With him are, from left, sister Maesha Luckett, niece Bailey and his mom Julia Luckett.

Cantrell Anderson of Benton receives his Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. With him are, from left, sister Maesha Luckett, niece Bailey and his mom Julia Luckett.

Sabrina Foucher of Ridgeland celebrates receiving her Practical Nursing degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with her dad Wallace Foucher.

Sabrina Foucher of Ridgeland celebrates receiving her Practical Nursing degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with her dad Wallace Foucher.

Rachel Junkin of Clinton, left, and Roxi Odom of Terry received Associate Degrees in Nursing on Dec. 16 from Hinds Community College in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Rachel Junkin of Clinton, left, and Roxi Odom of Terry received Associate Degrees in Nursing on Dec. 16 from Hinds Community College in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Texas native Ivan Muniz of Clinton plans to return to Texas for a job in a hospital emergency room after receiving his Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16. He is standing in front of a carved eagle at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Texas native Ivan Muniz of Clinton plans to return to Texas for a job in a hospital emergency room after receiving his Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16. He is standing in front of a carved eagle at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Amanda Lumm of Terry, left, is engulfed in a hug by her best friend Brittany Ross after receiving her dental assisting degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16.

Amanda Lumm of Terry, left, is engulfed in a hug by her best friend Brittany Ross after receiving her dental assisting degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16.

Shameeka Williams of Jackson, center, graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a Practical Nursing degree. With her are Maya Bostic, left, and Vernita Johnson, right.

Shameeka Williams of Jackson, center, graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a Practical Nursing degree. With her are Maya Bostic, left, and Vernita Johnson, right.

Sydne Allee of Pearl graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a Practical Nursing degree. With her are husband Aaron and sons Caiden, left, and Grayson.

Sydne Allee of Pearl graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a Practical Nursing degree. With her are husband Aaron and sons Caiden, left, and Grayson.

Hannah Wells of Pearl graduated in dental assisting from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. She is with Paul Bennett, left, and Caleb Bennett. Taking the photo is Stephanie Morgan.

Hannah Wells of Pearl graduated in dental assisting from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. She is with Paul Bennett, left, and Caleb Bennett. Taking the photo is Stephanie Morgan.

Emily Herring of Flowood graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a certificate in dental assisting. Celebrating with her are, from left, Natalee Long, Olivia Etheridege and, right, Laurel McLeland.

Emily Herring of Flowood graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 with a certificate in dental assisting. Celebrating with her are, from left, Natalee Long, Olivia Etheridege and, right, Laurel McLeland.

Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board, addresses nursing and allied health graduates on Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus.

Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board, addresses nursing and allied health graduates on Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus.

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse addresses nursing and allied health graduates at the Dec. 16 ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse addresses nursing and allied health graduates at the Dec. 16 ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Ivan Muniz of Clinton receives an Associate Degree in nursing on Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College graduation ceremonies held at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Ivan Muniz of Clinton receives an Associate Degree in nursing on Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College graduation ceremonies held at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Vice President Dr. Theresa Hamilton of Raymond hands out diplomas at the Dec. 16 graduation ceremony for nursing and allied health graduates at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus.

Vice President Dr. Theresa Hamilton of Raymond hands out diplomas at the Dec. 16 graduation ceremony for nursing and allied health graduates at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus.

Rachel Spell of Terry, left, Ciera Stephens of Pearl receive Associate Degrees in Nursing from Hinds Community College at a ceremony on Dec. 16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Rachel Spell of Terry, left, Ciera Stephens of Pearl receive Associate Degrees in Nursing from Hinds Community College at a ceremony on Dec. 16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Jessica Pierce of Morton, left, and Ametra Enochs of Jackson graduated from the Health Care Assisting program at Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Jessica Pierce of Morton, left, and Ametra Enochs of Jackson graduated from the Health Care Assisting program at Hinds Community College on Dec. 16 in a ceremony at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Practical nursing graduates Khadijah Anderson of Vicksburg; left, Shamone Byest of Belzoni and Tammy Barrett of Vicksburg take a selfie before their ceremony on Friday, Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College’s Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Practical nursing graduates Khadijah Anderson of Vicksburg; left, Shamone Byest of Belzoni and Tammy Barrett of Vicksburg take a selfie before their ceremony on Friday, Dec. 16 at Hinds Community College’s Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Hinds Community College held three graduation ceremonies on Dec. 16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. From left are graduation speaker Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board; Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. Joyce Jenkins, retired Hinds Community College dean for Raymond Campus Career-Technical Education, who was the grand marshal and mace bearer for the nursing and allied health graduation ceremony.

Hinds Community College held three graduation ceremonies on Dec. 16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. From left are graduation speaker Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board; Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. Joyce Jenkins, retired Hinds Community College dean for Raymond Campus Career-Technical Education, who was the grand marshal and mace bearer for the nursing and allied health graduation ceremony.

Dr. Joyce Jenkins, retired Hinds Community College dean for Raymond Campus Career-Technical Education was the grand marshal and mace bearer for the nursing and allied health graduation ceremony on Dec. 16

Dr. Joyce Jenkins, retired Hinds Community College dean for Raymond Campus Career-Technical Education was the grand marshal and mace bearer for the nursing and allied health graduation ceremony on Dec. 16

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Mom celebrates new baby, Hinds CC graduation
Posted by
16 December

Mom celebrates new baby, Hinds CC graduation

Niccole Landrum of Madison graduated on Dec. 16 with a certificate in Practical Nursing. With her are husband Wyatt and one-month-old son Parker.

Niccole Landrum of Madison graduated on Dec. 16 with a certificate in Practical Nursing. With her are husband Wyatt and one-month-old son Parker.

Niccole Landrum of Madison celebrated two big events on Friday: Her graduation from Hinds Community College with a Practical Nursing certificate and the one-month birthday of her son Parker.

He was born on the day she was supposed to take her last test, but she wound up taking a make-up test instead.

When she learned she would be pregnant while finishing nursing school, her first thought was “Oh, my goodness!” But she and husband Wyatt were thrilled.

“I knew it was perfect timing. We had tried for so long to have a baby,” Landrum said.

Parker slept through the ceremony in his dad’s arms while mom walked across stage to pick up her diploma. “I had worked so hard for it and I wanted him to be here with me,” she said.

Her next step is to continue on in the Transition to RN program and pick up a degree.

On Friday, Hinds graduated nearly 900 students who received 1,263 degrees and certificates, meaning some graduates received more than one credential. Of that number 554 chose to participate in one of the three ceremonies on Friday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Among the graduates, nine achieved summa cum laude, a 4.0 grade point average; 46 achieved magna cum laude, 3.6 to 3.99 GPA and 110 achieved cum laude, 3.2 to 3.59.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse noted that many students want to make a better life for them and their families.

“The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life.  And, while the graduates who sit upon this stage today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life,” Muse said.

Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board, was the speaker for the nursing and allied health graduate ceremony on Friday, Dec. 16.

“Some of you who have scratched, scraped and clawed to get this degree;  juggling the responsibilities, trying to find enough time to study, making sure that you had your tuition and funds to get to class,” Holloway said. “Congratulations – because you made it! These trials and tribulations will help you with challenges to come. Cherish this tremendous accomplishment. You have so very much to be proud of, and be assured that all of us here celebrating with you today are very proud of you.”

Hinds Community College is celebrating its 100th year of Community Inspired Service in 2017. The college opened in September 2017 first as an agricultural high school and admitted college students for the first time in 1922, with the first class graduating in 1927. As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College offers quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. Hinds has six locations in central Mississippi. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

New mom among Hinds CC nursing, allied health graduates.

 

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Hinds CC student wins $1K scholarship for writing meme caption
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14 December

Hinds CC student wins $1K scholarship for writing meme caption

RAYMOND – With scholarship money on the line, Kristen Stull didn’t crack under pressure.

In fact, she cracked up those in charge of a scholarship program sponsored by GEICO by creating the funniest meme caption submitted for the program.

Kristen Stull's winning meme caption.

Kristen Stull’s winning meme caption

Stull, of Florence, a freshman on the Raymond Campus studying business, has been selected as a 2016 MEME 4 Money: GEICO Creativity Scholar by the national Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. The insurance provider awarded five such scholarship based on the comedic value of captions submitted by PTK members nationwide for a meme photo on the scholarship application.

Stull’s was chosen among those five best out of nearly 1,000 entries. Her $1,000 scholarship award covers expenses for the spring 2017 semester. Captions submitted had to be 100 words or shorter, Stull said.

“We had a few pictures to choose from,” she said. “There was the eggs, which is the one I chose. There were some other pictures, like a dog at a beach.

“Coming up with a meme was more challenging than I thought it would be. It took me a while to come up with the egg joke. I happened to be talking to a friend, and they said something about ‘cracking up’. I thought, ‘Hey, I could use that!’”

Kristen Stull

Kristen Stull

In addition to PTK, Stull’s activities on campus also include being a member of the Hinds Hi-Steppers precision dance team. She says her interest in studying business is an outgrowth of being part of the business academy at Florence High School.

“We actually had a coffee shop that we had to run, as students,” she said. “I was the marketing manager for a couple of years. I loved the business aspect of it.”

Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society for community and junior college students. Membership in Phi Theta Kappa is extended to students who have a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or above on 12 or more transferrable credit hours. There are more than 1,200 Phi Theta Kappa chapters throughout the United States and abroad. Its national headquarters is located in Jackson.

Hinds CC student cracks up competition to win scholarship
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Miss Hinds 2017 prepares for Miss Mississippi Pageant
Posted by
14 December

Miss Hinds 2017 prepares for Miss Mississippi Pageant

RAYMOND — Miss Hinds Community College 2017 Abigail Walters received a check from Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse to cover her expenses as she prepares for the Miss Mississippi pageant, a preliminary pageant for Miss America.

Miss Hinds Community College 2017 Abigail Walters and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse

Miss Hinds Community College 2017 Abigail Walters and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse

Walters, 20, of Vicksburg, a student at the Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center, was crowned Miss Hinds on Nov. 17. She graduated from Hinds in 2016 and is currently in nursing school.

Miss Hinds prepares for Miss Mississippi Pageant

 

 

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Hinds CC, William Carey University display telemedicine capabilities
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08 December

Hinds CC, William Carey University display telemedicine capabilities

RAYMOND – The eyes and ears of disaster response in the not-too-distant future was on display Dec. 6 at John Bell Williams Airport at Hinds Community College.

Two of Hinds’ Unmanned Aerial Vehicles were displayed during a presentation held by the college and William Carey University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. Each UAV, popularly known as drones, held a telemedical package.

Dennis Lott, director of the Unmanned Aerial Systems program at Hinds Community College, points out a component on a UAV equipped with a telemedical package during a presentation Dec. 6 at John Bell Williams Airport to launch the Telemedical Drone Project. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Dennis Lott, director of the Unmanned Aerial Systems program at Hinds Community College, points out a component on a UAV equipped with a telemedical package during a presentation Dec. 6 at John Bell Williams Airport to launch the Telemedical Drone Project. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

One held supplies such as a tourniquet, chest seal, gauze, scissors and clotting sponge to treat a severely injured victim, while the other package is set up for a mass casualty and is capable of treating up to 100 people with a range of injuries.

The Telemedical Drone Project, known as HiRO (Health Integrated Rescue Operations), was developed by Dr. Italo Subbarao, a disaster medicine expert and senior associate dean of William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine (WCUCOM), and Guy Paul Cooper Jr., a fourth-year medical student at WCUCOM while the two studied the medical response to the devastating EF-4 tornado that struck Hattiesburg in 2013.

“Reaching the victims is the critical challenge in these situations,” Subbarao said. “As an osteopathic physician, my goal was to find ways to help save lives. A medical drone is the bridge that delivers life-saving treatment directly to the victims, giving remote physicians eyes, ears and voice to instruct anyone on site.”

The presentation was a mix of video and re-enactment. Students from WCU who played the part of shooting victims and potential caregivers in an emergency in the dramatization re-enacted those roles in person for the event.

Experts from the college, along with Subbarao and Cooper, designed and built both disaster drones, capable of carrying telemedical packages in adverse conditions. The aircraft are owned by Hinds and built at the college-owned airport from components sourced from around the world, said Dennis Lott, director of the Unmanned Aerial Systems program at Hinds.

Students from William Carey University's College of Osteopathic Medicine re-enact the treatment of a shooting victim during a presentation Dec. 6 at John Bell Williams Airport at Hinds Community College to launch the Telemedical Drone Program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Students from William Carey University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine re-enact the treatment of a shooting victim during a presentation Dec. 6 at John Bell Williams Airport at Hinds Community College to launch the Telemedical Drone Program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“These drones were specifically designed to support medical emergencies,” Lott said. “The drones have impressive lift and distance capability while following FAA regulations. The drones can also be outfitted with a variety of sensors, such as infrared, to help support these types of events. This relationship presents an ideal setting to develop, test, and bring this technology to the field. It is just a matter of time before the drones become part of routine life.”

Both kits incorporate the federal Department of Homeland Security’s recommendations provided through the “Stop the Bleed” initiative.

“One thing we know for sure is that many people are dying in these types of events needlessly,” said Richard Patrick, a senior advisor for health policy with the department, noting research on active shooter events shows opportunities to save lives are there.

When a critical care kit opens, a physician appears on video and can direct treatment via a Google Glass, which someone can wear and move away from the drone while keeping audio and visual contact with the physician.

Further development needed to make telemedicine via the drones a routine part of disaster response includes integrating them into 911 response systems, Subbarao said.

“From our perspective, we feel it’s a system being applied here – a system that will save people’s lives,” he said.

Hinds CC, William Carey University display telemedicine capabilities 

 

An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, popularly known as a drone, is equipped with a telemedical package as part of the Telemedical Drone Project, known as HiRO. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, popularly known as a drone, is equipped with a telemedical package as part of the Telemedical Drone Project, known as HiRO. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, popularly known as a drone, is equipped with a telemedical package as part of the Telemedical Drone Project, known as HiRO. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, popularly known as a drone, is equipped with a telemedical package as part of the Telemedical Drone Project, known as HiRO. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

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