http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Student goes from layoff to payoff thanks to Hinds CC MI-BEST program

Monthly Archives: November 2016

Student goes from layoff to payoff thanks to Hinds CC MI-BEST program
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30 November

Student goes from layoff to payoff thanks to Hinds CC MI-BEST program

RAYMOND – Only 18 months ago, Felix Davis found himself laid off from his job and still without a high school diploma.

Fast forward to today, and all his minuses have turned to pluses – to the tune of 26 hours of college credit and a 4.0 GPA thanks to the MI-BEST program at Hinds Community College.

“I was laid off from a job in manufacturing because of downsizing,” Davis said. “I’m a single parent, so I had to get out and do something.”

Felix Davis

Felix Davis

Davis, of Jackson, a 34-year-old father of two girls, met the program’s point person at Hinds, Dr. Robin Parker, at a job fair at Metrocenter Mall not long after he was laid off.

“I didn’t know there was a place you could go to get your GED at the same time as going to college,” Davis said. “I didn’t know that college was even an option, because in the past, not having my high school diploma prevented that.

MI-BEST is Mississippi’s version of the nationally recognized Integrating Basic Education and Skills Training program, or I-BEST. It allows adult students to train for a job skill while earning their GED high school equivalency certificate at the same time.

Students are prepared to be job-ready in six months to a year, train in high-demand areas and earn national certifications.

“Students can earn a high school equivalency while learning a skill,” said Parker, who is district director of Integrated Pathways and coordinator of Adult Basic Education at Hinds. She is also assistant dean of Career/Technical Education on the Raymond Campus.

Parker ties the program’s impact on the state’s workforce to U.S. Census data on skill levels of working-age adults. A 2014 survey of Mississippi adults 25 to 64 years of age showed nearly 30 percent had only a high school diploma, while another large chunk, nearly 24 percent, had some college credit, but didn’t finish.

“And that’s fertile ground in the state of Mississippi because we have a lot of low-skilled adults who really want an opportunity to enter a career to provide for them and their families,” Parker said.

After just eight weeks in the program, Davis landed a job at PCA, a packaging products manufacturer, in Pearl. He’s earned two pay raises and is now making $20 an hour.

In the classroom, Davis has completed those 26 semester hours in the burgeoning Industrial Maintenance area of study, where he’s successfully put past and present together.

“He entered the program focused and determined and quickly used his past manufacturing experience to validate the principles and concepts he was learning in class,” said David Creel, district director of Manufacturing Training at Hinds.

He’s also earned a silver-level Career Readiness Certificate, a credential used by industry to track basic job skills in potential employees. He’s on track to graduate soon with an Associate of Applied Science degree.

“My plan is to reach back into my community and help others who have the same need I had a year ago,” Davis said.

Student goes from layoff to payoff thanks to Hinds CC MI-BEST program
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Hinds CC touts benefits of new Career-Tech Building entrance
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21 November

Hinds CC touts benefits of new Career-Tech Building entrance

PEARL– Agencies who partnered with Hinds Community College to build a new entrance to the Rankin Campus’ Career-Technical Building heard thanks from one of the nearly 300 students who attend classes in the building during a ribbon-cutting and program Friday, Nov. 18.

Heather Long, a third-semester Associate Degree Nursing student at Hinds Community College, speaks during a ceremony Nov. 18 officially opening Community College Boulevard to the Career-Technical Building at Hiinds' Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Heather Long, a third-semester Associate Degree Nursing student at Hinds Community College, speaks during a ceremony Nov. 18 officially opening Community College Boulevard to the Career-Technical Building at Hinds’ Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“There’s a large amount of commercial traffic with the businesses on that road,” said Heather Long, a third-semester Associate Degree Nursing student at the Rankin Campus, during the brief program to officially unveil Community College Boulevard, off Greenfield Road. Long, also president of the Student Nursing Organization at the campus, referred to Commercial Park Drive, which is how students and instructors got to class previously.

“Forklifts and 18-wheelers use it daily, which causes a lot of wear and tear on the road itself,” Long said. “This made for a very bumpy ride for students traveling to and from campus every day. I’d like to thank all the agencies and partners that came together to make this boulevard a reality. This is definitely more attractive and much easier to maneuver.”

Hinds purchased the Career-Technical Building in December 2008 and began classes in 2009. At the time, it was the United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Gulf Coast Regional Training Center. Built in 2002, the two-story, 40,000 square-foot building sits on five acres about five miles from the main Rankin Campus off Highway 80.

“This entrance was something that was critically needed by students, faculty and people who visited,” Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse said. “We have nearly 300 students in career and technical programs in that building.”

Muse also credited state Sen. Dean Kirby, of Pearl, with making the new boulevard a reality. The senator played an instrumental role during the 2008 Legislature to support a special appropriation to help the college purchase the building.

From left, Dr. Norman Session, vice presdient Hinds Community College Rankin Campus and Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center; Heather Long, third semester Associate Degree Nursing student; Jared Morrison, president of the Rankin County Board of Supervisors; Rankin County Chancery Clerk Larry Swales, also president of the Hinds Community College Alumni Association; Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse, Pearl Mayor Brad Rogers; and state Sen. Dean Kirby. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, Dr. Norman Session, vice president Hinds Community College Rankin Campus and Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center; Heather Long, third semester Associate Degree Nursing student; Jared Morrison, president of the Rankin County Board of Supervisors; Rankin County Chancery Clerk Larry Swales, also president of the Hinds Community College Alumni Association; Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse, Pearl Mayor Brad Rogers; and state Sen. Dean Kirby. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Officials at the event said another big key to building the road was local government and college working together to do so and still accommodate city and county infrastructure.

“Dr. Muse summed it up – that we all worked together,” said Jared Morrison, president of the Rankin County Board of Supervisors. “I think that’s what sets Rankin County apart, and why we’re growing the way we grow, is that everybody works together.”

“This is absolutely the best thing that could have happened,” Pearl Mayor Brad Rogers said. “It’s a great boulevard, beautiful entrance. And it’s nothing short of what Hinds Community College usually does, and that’s top-notch, A-1 work.”

The building houses classes for plumbing, electrical, welding, industrial maintenance, practical nursing and Associate Degree Nursing with nearly 300 students and 24 total employees. The building also houses Rankin County adult education classes and the Rankin Campus MI-BEST navigator and instructor.

New access road to Hinds CC Rankin Campus career-tech building is now open
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Hinds CC hosts legislators for information session
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18 November

Hinds CC hosts legislators for information session

Hinds Community College hosted an information session on Nov. 17 for legislators in the college’s district. The focus of the meeting was to talk about community college legislative priorities and to share stories from Hinds students and faculty about programs that make a difference in students’ lives.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Local legislators meet at Hinds CC.
Members of Hinds Community College's Student Voices met with legislators in the college's district during the Nov. 17 annual Legislative Luncheon held on the Raymond Campus. The Student Voices group learn about the governmental process and community college issues. They include, from left, Donavon Drennan of Madison, Nicole Rigsby of Brandon, Joanna Stevens of Terry, Abigail Baker of Clinton, Landon Hunter of Hermanville and Tye Sutton of McCall Creek.

Members of Hinds Community College’s Student Voices met with legislators in the college’s district during the Nov. 17 annual Legislative Luncheon held on the Raymond Campus. The Student Voices group learn about the governmental process and community college issues. They include, from left, Donavon Drennan of Madison, Nicole Rigsby of Brandon, Joanna Stevens of Terry, Abigail Baker of Clinton, Landon Hunter of Hermanville and Tye Sutton of McCall Creek.

Sen. Briggs Hopson of Vicksburg, left, and Rep. Alex Monsour of Vicksburg, right, with Hinds Community College student Destinie James, also of Vicksburg. James is a member of the college’s Hinds Connection student recruiting group.

Sen. Briggs Hopson of Vicksburg, left, and Rep. Alex Monsour of Vicksburg, right, with Hinds Community College student Destinie James, also of Vicksburg. James is a member of the college’s Hinds Connection student recruiting group.

Joanna Stevens of Terry, left, and Abigail Baker of Clinton, right, are with Sen. Hillman Frazier of Jackson at the Nov. 17 Hinds Community College legislative luncheon. Stevens and Baker are members of the college’s Student Voices advocacy group.

Joanna Stevens of Terry, left, and Abigail Baker of Clinton, right, are with Sen. Hillman Frazier of Jackson at the Nov. 17 Hinds Community College legislative luncheon. Stevens and Baker are members of the college’s Student Voices advocacy group.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Rep. Alex Monsour of Vicksburg, Rep. Deborah Butler Dixon of Raymond and Dr. Chad Stocks at the Nov. 17 Legislative Luncheon at Hinds Community College.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Rep. Alex Monsour of Vicksburg, Rep. Deborah Butler Dixon of Raymond and Dr. Chad Stocks at the Nov. 17 Legislative Luncheon at Hinds Community College.

Rep. Ray Rogers of Pearl, Sen. Dean Kirby of Pearl, Rep. Tom Weathersby of Florence and Hinds Community College student Nicole Rigsby of Brandon.

Rep. Ray Rogers of Pearl, Sen. Dean Kirby of Pearl, Rep. Tom Weathersby of Florence and Hinds Community College student Nicole Rigsby of Brandon.

Dr. Mitchell Shears, left, Title III coordinator on the Utica Campus; Rep. Greg Holloway of Hazelhurst and Utica Campus sophomore Sabrevian Davis.

Dr. Mitchell Shears, left, Title III coordinator on the Utica Campus; Rep. Greg Holloway of Hazelhurst and Utica Campus sophomore Sabrevian Davis.

Rep. Credell Calhoun of Jackson, Sen. Hillman Frazier, Hinds Community College student Abigail Baker of Clinton, Hinds Community College Director for Marketing and Community Relations Renee Cotton, Rep. Deborah Butler Dixon of Raymond; back, Rep. Greg Holloway of Hazelhurst.

Rep. Credell Calhoun of Jackson, Sen. Hillman Frazier, Hinds Community College student Abigail Baker of Clinton, Hinds Community College Director for Marketing and Community Relations Renee Cotton, Rep. Deborah Butler Dixon of Raymond; back, Rep. Greg Holloway of Hazelhurst.

Dr. Mitchell Shears, left, Title III coordinator on the Utica Campus; Rep. Deborah Butler Dixon of Raymond and Utica Campus sophomore Sabrevian Davis.

Dr. Mitchell Shears, left, Title III coordinator on the Utica Campus; Rep. Deborah Butler Dixon of Raymond and Utica Campus sophomore Sabrevian Davis.

Hinds Community College student Logan Courtney and Rep. Tom Weathersby, both of Florence.

Hinds Community College student Logan Courtney and Rep. Tom Weathersby, both of Florence.

Hinds Community College student Nicole Rigsby of Brandon, left, Sen. Josh Harkins of Flowood

Hinds Community College student Nicole Rigsby of Brandon, left, Sen. Josh Harkins of Flowood

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Miss Hinds Community College 2017 named
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18 November

Miss Hinds Community College 2017 named

RAYMOND – Abigail Walters, of Vicksburg, was named Miss Hinds Community College in the annual pageant Thursday, Nov. 17.

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse and Miss Hinds Community College 2017 Abigail Walters, of Vicksburg. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse and Miss Hinds Community College 2017 Abigail Walters, of Vicksburg. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As Miss Hinds Community College, Walters will participate next summer in the Miss Mississippi pageant in Vicksburg. The pageant is an official preliminary pageant of the Miss America Pageant program.

Walters, 20, is a student at the Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. She graduated from Hinds in 2016 and is currently in nursing school. She attended Warren Central High School. Her talent was a jazz dance routine and her platform was Stay Active Seniors!

First runner-up was Bethanie Myers, of Walnut Grove, a Raymond Campus sophomore studying Secondary Education. Second runner-up was Hope Ragan, of Vicksburg, a Utica Campus freshman studying Criminology.

From left, second runner-up Hope Ragan; Miss Hinds Community College 2017 Abigail Walters, both of Vicksburg; and first runner-up Bethanie Myers, of Walnut Grove. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, second runner-up Hope Ragan; Miss Hinds Community College 2017 Abigail Walters, both of Vicksburg; and first runner-up Bethanie Myers, of Walnut Grove. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Former Miss Hinds Community College 2016 Courtney Helom crowns Abigail Walters, of Vicksburg, as Miss Hinds 2017 during the year's pageant Nov. 17. The pageant is an official preliminary pageant of the Miss America Pageant program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Former Miss Hinds Community College 2016 Courtney Helom crowns Abigail Walters, of Vicksburg, as Miss Hinds 2017 during the year’s pageant Nov. 17. The pageant is an official preliminary pageant of the Miss America Pageant program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vicksburg native wins Miss Hinds Community College 2017
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Hinds CC nursing/allied health dean, retired dean inducted into professional academy
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16 November

Hinds CC nursing/allied health dean, retired dean inducted into professional academy

Dr. Libby Mahaffey, left, and Bobbie Anderson

Dr. Libby Mahaffey, left, and Bobbie Anderson

A current Hinds Community College dean and a retired dean were recently inducted into a prestigious national professional academy at its inaugural event.

Dr. Libby Mahaffey of Raymond, dean, Nursing and Allied Health, and Bobbie Anderson of Vicksburg, retired dean of the same programs, were inducted into the newly established Academy of Associate Degree Nursing by the Organization for Associate Degree Nursing (OADN) on Nov. 5 in Dallas, Texas.

The two were among 10 inductees. The Academy of Associate Degree Nursing (AADN) program recognizes associate degree nursing educators, and others committed to associate degree nursing education, who model exemplary dedication to nursing education and practice.  Appropriately, Mrs. Anderson was the first person inducted into the Academy as a full member.

Anderson began teaching in Hinds Community College’s Associate Degree Nursing program in fall 1969 and in 1973 was named the program director. In 1984, after the program moved to the Chadwick Drive location as Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, Anderson became the first dean. In 1993 the first building at NAHC was named Anderson Hall in her honor upon her retirement. Anderson continued to teach including at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

During a time of uncertainty for Associate Degree Nursing programs, Anderson was a state and national advocate, holding numerous leadership positions. This included serving as the chair of the organizational steering committee and later a president of the National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing (N-OADN), now recognized as OADN.

“Associate Degree Nursing Education is a part of the fiber of my life,” Anderson said. “I willingly gave of myself because of my strong belief in associate degree nursing education. My goal in any leadership position was to lead with integrity and to role model leadership for others.”

Dr. Elizabeth “Libby” Mahaffey, became dean, Nursing and Allied Health in 2005. Mahaffey began teaching at Hinds in 1982 and served as a team leader and sophomore coordinator before transitioning to the dean role.  Following in the steps of her mentor, Mahaffey served on the N-OADN Board for six years, including two years as president.  She also served for six years on the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission Board of Directors, including four years as chairperson.

“I still strongly believe in nursing education at the community college where access, affordability, and graduate success continue to make a difference in the lives of students and in the healthcare of our communities,” she said.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Dr. Libby Mahaffey, Bobbie Anderson inducted into prestigious academy.
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Workforce specialist, retiring instructor are graduation speakers at Hinds CC
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15 November

Workforce specialist, retiring instructor are graduation speakers at Hinds CC

RAYMOND – Fall graduation ceremonies are set for Dec. 16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus as students earn credentials from Hinds Community College.

All nursing and allied health graduates will receive their degrees at 8 a.m., with commencement for academic and career-tech graduates to follow at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Dexter Holloway, assistant executive director for Workforce and Economic Development with the Mississippi Community College Board, is the speaker for the nursing and allied health graduate ceremony. Dr. Bobby Glenn, director of the Veterinary Technology program at Hinds, speaks to graduates at the midday and afternoon sessions.

Dexter Holloway

Dexter Holloway

Holloway, of Brookhaven, has worked with MCCB since 1999, first as a workforce specialist, then as director of Workforce Education. He was named to his current position in April. Previously, he worked with the Mississippi Department of Employment Security and the Mississippi Department of Education.

He holds a master’s degree in Industrial Education from Alcorn State University, where he had earned his bachelor’s, in Technical Education with a concentration in Drafting. Currently, he is on the board of directors for several organizations in Lincoln County, including the Boys and Girls Club and the Alcorn State Alumni Association and Booster Club.

Dr. Bobby Glenn

Dr. Bobby Glenn

Glenn, of Madison, a 40-year employee of Hinds, received a bachelor’s degree from Mississippi State University and a doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Auburn University. He has directed the Veterinary Tech program since 1976. In October, Glenn was named the college’s faculty honoree for the Legislature’s HEADWAE program in February. The program honors academically talents students and faculty who have promoted academic excellence.

Glenn, who is retiring in December, is a member of the Mississippi Veterinary Medical Association and the American Veterinary Medicine Association. He had served two years in the Army, including one year of deployment in Vietnam, and rose to the rank of captain before starting a private practice. He worked for the Mississippi Diagnostic lab for two years just prior to starting work at Hinds.

 

Fall graduation speakers announced at Hinds CC
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Hinds CC names Most Beautiful in annual Beauty Revue
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14 November

Hinds CC names Most Beautiful in annual Beauty Revue

RAYMOND — Shelby Lynn Simmons of Waynesboro was selected as Most Beautiful in the annual Hinds Community College Eagle Beauty Revue pageant on Thursday, Nov. 10.

The pageant is sponsored by the Eagle yearbook on the Raymond Campus.

From left, Catherine Lloyd, Courtney Jamison, Shelby Lynn Simmons (Most Beautiful), Meagan Barnhart, Molly Hunter, Natalie Scurlock. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

From left, Catherine Lloyd, Courtney Jamison, Shelby Lynn Simmons (Most Beautiful), Meagan Barnhart, Molly Hunter, Natalie Scurlock. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Simmons, 20, a Raymond Campus sophomore, plans to major in Paralegal or Barbering. She is a graduate of Wayne County High School who has been an Eagle cheerleader and a member of the homecoming court. She plans to attend Mississippi State University in the fall of 2017 to complete a bachelor’s degree. Her parents are Lynn and Chip Simmons.

Other beauties selected were Meagan Barnhart, Molly Hunter, Courtney Jamison, Catherine Lloyd and Natalie Scurlock.

Barnhart, 20, of Florence, is a sophomore on the Raymond Campus who is studying Respiratory Care Technology. She is a graduate of Florence High School where she participated in Key Club and Fellowship of Christian Athletes. She is a captain on the Hinds Hi-Steppers precision dance team. Her parents are Mark and Liz Barnhart.

Hunter, 19, of Brandon, is a freshman on the Rankin Campus who is studying Interior Design. She is a graduate of Brandon High School who won Miss Teen Magnolia State 215 and Miss Teen Gulf Shores 2016. She plans to earn a degree in Interior Design and travel extensively. Her parents are Tommy and Tara Hunter.

Jamison, 18, of Florence, is a freshman on the Raymond Campus who is studying Education. She is a graduate of Florence High School where she graduated with honors and was homecoming queen. At Hinds, she is a member of the cheerleader team and the yearbook staff. She plans to pursue a degree in Secondary Education. Her parents are Jamie and Kym Jamison.

Lloyd, 18, of Hernando, is a freshman on the Raymond Campus who is studying Radiology. She is a graduate of Hernando High School where she graduated with a 4.0 GPA and participated in Fellowship of Christian Athletes. At Hinds, she plays softball and plans to join Phi Theta Kappa. She also plans to work in research medicine once she earns her degree. Her parents are Kevin and Lacey Lloyd.

Scurlock, 19, is a freshman on the Raymond Campus who is studying Business Administration. She is a graduate of Copiah Academy where she was an honors graduate. At Hinds, she is a member of Hinds Connection. She plans to pursue a degree in business at Mississippi State University. Her parents are Kathy and Tommy Purser.

Shelby Lynn Simmons wins 2016 Eagle Beauty Revue

 

 

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Hinds CC celebrates official opening of new Career-Tech Building entrance
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11 November

Hinds CC celebrates official opening of new Career-Tech Building entrance

Hinds Community College will celebrate a new entrance to the Rankin Campus’ Career-Technical Building with a ribbon-cutting and program at 2 p.m. on Nov. 18.greenfield_entrance_web

The Career-Technical building is off Greenfield Road. The new entrance is Community College Boulevard.

The brief program will begin at 2 p.m. with refreshments immediately following.

Hinds purchased the Career-Technical Building in December 2008 and began classes in 2009. At the time, it was the United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Gulf Coast Regional Training Center.

The building now houses classes for plumbing, electrical, welding, industrial maintenance, practical nursing and Associate Degree Nursing with about 200 students and 24 total employees. The building also houses Rankin County adult education classes and the Rankin Campus MI-BEST navigator and instructor.

Approximately five miles from the main Rankin Campus off Highway 80 in Pearl, the building was constructed in 2002 by the United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters. Hinds Community College paid $3.2 million for the building with a special FY 09 state bond appropriation and additional capital funding support from Rankin County.

Community College Boulevard leads to the two-story 40,000-square-foot building, which sits on nearly five acres of land.

Directions to the Career-Technical Building (not on the main Rankin Campus): Take I-20 East to Exit 54. Turn right off Exit 54 onto Highway 18 East. Go straight through the first red light. Go to the second red light and turn right at Bob Boyte Honda dealership onto Greenfield Road. Travel about 7/10 of a mile, past Greenfield Village subdivision, to Community College Boulevard. 

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Hinds CC will celebrate a new entrance to the Rankin Campus’ Career-Technical Building on Nov. 18.
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Hinds CC Utica Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members
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11 November

Hinds CC Utica Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members

The Alpha Beta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus has inducted new members for fall 2016.

hinds-cc_utica-_2016-ptk-new-inductees-2-_web

Flanking the inductees on either side is Vice President Dr. Debra Mays-Jackson, left, and Academic Dean Dr. Marquise Loving, right. Inductees include Eddie Perry of Port Gibson, Tybrea Vivians of Jackson, Erykah Wilson of Utica, Teraneka Terrell of Utica, Ra’Shay Watts Port Gibson, Kathryn Green of Greenville, Artashia Stewart of Fayette, Areleatha Gibson of Montgomery, Ala., Marion Brooks of Canton and Jeffery Fairley of Jackson.

Three of the inductees received most of their credits while enrolled in dual credit courses in high school. From left, Erykah Wilson of Utica and Teraneka Terrell of Utica, who attended Crystal Springs High Schools, and Tybrea Vivians of Jackson, who attended Jim Hill High School.

hinds-cc_utica_ptk-dual-credit_web

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Hinds CC Utica Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members.
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Teamwork can preserve honeybee population, expert says at Hinds CC
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10 November

Teamwork can preserve honeybee population, expert says at Hinds CC

Continued teamwork between beekeepers and farmers will help preserve the world’s honeybee population, said a bee expert with the state during a special workshop on the subject Nov. 9 at Hinds’ Raymond Campus.

Recent field studies tracking the use of seed treatments to ward off pests to crops such as cotton and soybeans show common insecticides, when applied properly, dissipate by the time plants reach a productive stage most attractive to bees, said Dr. Jeff Harris, a research professor and entomologist at Mississippi State University.

Dr. Jeff Harris, a research professor and entomologist at Mississippi State University, discusses the state of beekeeping in Mississippi during the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 at Reeves Hall on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Dr. Jeff Harris, a research professor and entomologist at Mississippi State University, discusses the state of beekeeping in Mississippi during the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 at Reeves Hall on the Raymond Campus. On display in the background are suits worn by beekeepers. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Harris said beekeepers, researchers and farming interests need “to work together to give bees the best protection they can and minimize the risk” to the most traceable challenges to the bee population. Those include fungus, beetles and the Varroa mite, which is an external parasite first detected in the U.S. in the late 1980s.

The much-publicized “colony collapse disorder” affected some of the nation’s largest commercial beekeepers in the past decade, Harris said, and can be attributed to a combination of factors, including parasites, viruses and natural stressors for the insect, such as constant transportation.

About 15 to 25 families get a majority of income from beekeeping in Mississippi, Harris said. Before the Varroa mite invasion, there were 50 to 60, and in the 1920s and ‘30s, the state was a world leader in bee production, he said. More rigorous maintenance and threat prevention, coupled with higher startup costs for a bee box and other equipment, have combined to make “beekeeping as a way of life” rarer, he said.

The workshop, titled Bee Informed, was sponsored by the Honors Institute at Hinds and the Gamma Lambda Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa. It was part of this year’s Honors in Action Project, which encourages students to take community action in response to a topic of global interest.

Martha Hill, director of the Landscape Management Technology program of study at Hinds, spoke of the best ways to make a home garden bee-friendly.

Martha Hill, director of the Landscape Management Technology program at Hinds, speaks on bee-friendly gardens at the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Martha Hill, director of the Landscape Management Technology program at Hinds, speaks on bee-friendly gardens at the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Native plants are certainly great choices for our gardens and for pollinators,” Hill said.

Metro area beekeepers spoke on the highlights of their trade, plus some do’s and don’ts of handling a hive.

“I learn things all the time about beekeeping,” said Harold Watson, who’s been handling bees since 1960, and like Harris, is active in the Mississippi Beekeepers Association.

The best advice for beginner beekeepers is to start with a less-aggressive species and slowly work up to more active types.

“Working with a mentor is important because they can help minimize the stings and other things,” Harris said.

Teamwork needed to preserve honeybee population, state bee expert says
Debbie McCollum, dean of the Honors Institute at Hinds Community College, handles a used honeycomb during the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 at Reeves Hall on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Debbie McCollum, dean of the Honors Institute at Hinds Community College, handles a honeycomb during the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 at Reeves Hall on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

A panel of metro Jackson-area beekeepers answered questions and spoke of the beekeeping trade at the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 at Reeves Hall at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. From left, Dr. Jeff Harris, John Hackney, Harold Watson and Matthew Giammalvo. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

A panel of metro Jackson-area beekeepers answered questions and spoke of the beekeeping trade at the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 at Reeves Hall at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. From left, Dr. Jeff Harris, John Hackney, Harold Watson and Matthew Giammalvo. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Logan Williamson, center right, hands a honeycomb to fellow Honors Institute student Jabari Williams during the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. At far left is Hannah Van Noy. At far right is Tyler Tatum. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Logan Williamson, center right, hands a honeycomb to fellow Honors Institute student Jabari Williams during the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. At far left is Hannah Van Noy. At far right is Tyler Tatum. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Hannah Van Noy, an Honors Institute student, handles a honeycomb during the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 at Reeves Hall on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Hannah Van Noy, an Honors Institute student, handles a honeycomb during the Bee Informed workshop Nov. 9 at Reeves Hall on the Raymond Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

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