http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC Physical Therapist Assistant students volunteer for Little Light House

Monthly Archives: October 2016

Hinds CC Physical Therapist Assistant students volunteer for Little Light House
Posted by
31 October

Hinds CC Physical Therapist Assistant students volunteer for Little Light House

web_hinds-cc_second-year-pta-students_8376Hinds Community College second-year Physical Therapist Assistant students volunteered for the Oct. 22 Laps for Little Ones event benefitting The Little Light House of Central Mississippi.

The Little Light House offers a tuition-free early intervention program for children birth to six years consisting of intensive therapeutic care and cognitive remediation. Addressing a child’s physical ability, wellness, mind and community the year-round program promotes systematic, long-term, healthy change.

Hinds Community College’s Physical Therapist Assistant curriculum is a two-year program of study that prepares a PTA to perform interventions under the supervision of a physical therapist in an ethical, legal, safe and effective manner.

PTAs enhance the delivery of physical therapy services by providing delegated interventions, assisting the PT with data collection, communicating with other members of the health care delivery team, interacting with members of the patient’s family and caregivers, and working cooperatively with other health care providers.

Upon graduation the student is eligible to take the National Physical Therapy Examination for licensure. For more information about the program contact chair Pam Chapman at ptchapman@hindscc.edu.

The second-year students who participated are, front from left, Brooke Gunn of Utica, Aleasha Haver of Eupora, Kristen Shelton of Winona, Wade Rogers of Flowood; second row, Heather Johnson of Chunky, Desiree Roos of Kosciusko, Natalie Brady of Pelahatchie, Jessica Whitehead of Madison, Kelsey Robertson of Winona, Sandy Wren of Raymond; back row, Tim Marshall of Vicksburg, Ashlee Lee of Forest, Harrison Shuerman of Clinton, Olivia King of Vicksburg, Ben Hood of Pearl, Aubrey Kimball of Pass Christian, Matt Smith of Wesson, Dawn Little of Florence and program director Pam Chapman of Flora.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC second-year Physical Therapist Assistant students volunteered.[/tweetable]

0 688 31 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Physical Therapist Assistant students attend conference
Posted by
31 October

Hinds CC Physical Therapist Assistant students attend conference

Hinds Community College first year Physical Therapist Assistant students from the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center attended the fall meeting of the Mississippi Physical Therapy Association in Tupelo on Oct. 22. Those attending include, front from left, Chelsey Howington of Delhi, La., Courtney Vosika of Byram, Ladrekia Culbert of Fayette, Kara Patterson of Richland, Stephanie Ricks of Brandon, Josh Farley, president of the Mississippi Physical Therapy Association; back row, Hailey Stacy of Brandon, Sam Peacock of Jackson, Kelsey Nowell of Louisville, BJ Breelon of Byram, Tavi Toles of Ridgeland, Dakota Medina of Brandon and Alex Hayden of Brandon.

Hinds Community College first-year Physical Therapist Assistant students from the Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center attended the fall meeting of the Mississippi Physical Therapy Association in Tupelo on Oct. 22.

Those attending include, front from left, Chelsey Howington of Delhi, La., Courtney Vosika of Byram, Ladrekia Culbert of Fayette, Kara Patterson of Richland, Stephanie Ricks of Brandon, Josh Farley, president of the Mississippi Physical Therapy Association; back row, Hailey Stacy of Brandon, Sam Peacock of Jackson, Kelsey Nowell of  Louisville, BJ Breelon of Byram, Tavi Toles of Ridgeland, Dakota Medina of Brandon and Alex Hayden of Brandon.

The Physical Therapist Assistant curriculum is a two-year program of study that prepares a PTA to perform interventions under the supervision of a physical therapist in an ethical, legal, safe and effective manner. PTAs enhance the delivery of physical therapy services by providing delegated interventions, assisting the PT with data collection, communicating with other members of the health care delivery team, interacting with members of the patient’s family and caregivers, and working cooperatively with other health care providers.

Upon graduation the student is eligible to take the National Physical Therapy Examination for licensure.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds Community College first-year Physical Therapist Assistant students[/tweetable]

0 810 31 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC names HEADWAE honorees for 2017
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25 October

Hinds CC names HEADWAE honorees for 2017

RAYMOND – Veterinary Technology Program director Dr. Bobby Glenn, of Madison, and Ashleigh Chatfield, of McComb, a sophomore Interpreter Training Technology on the Raymond Campus, have been named Hinds Community College’s honorees for the Legislature’s HEADWAE (Higher Education Appreciation Day – Working for Academic Excellence) program for 2017.

Dr. Bobby Glenn

Dr. Bobby Glenn

As the faculty HEADWAE honoree, Glenn is also one of the graduation speakers for the fall ceremonies on Dec. 16 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. He will speak at the 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. ceremonies. The speaker for the 8 a.m. nursing and allied health ceremony has not been named.

Glenn, a 40-year employee of Hinds, received a bachelor’s degree from Mississippi State University and a doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Auburn University. He has directed the Veterinary Tech program since 1976.

“When Dr. Muse contacted me about being named, it was quite an honor,” Glenn said. “But, it’s really about the students. They keep me motivated. As teaching methods change, you have to change with it. Back in my day, it was the blackboard and writing on it. Now, it’s PowerPoint, overheads and Internet. But, it’s affected the hands-on part very little. I could show you a slide all day about how to draw blood from a certain vein, but you wouldn’t really know about it until you do it.

“Academically, it’s challenging to the student. It’s not easy. You have to learn the skills, not only the dog, cat, horse or anything else you may be working on.”

Chatfield, who was home-schooled until she enrolled at Hinds, is a member of Phi Theta Kappa and writes for its newsletter, The Kappa Chronicle. She is a member of the Honors Institute and plays synthesizer in the Hinds Eagle Marching Band.

Ashleigh Chatfield

Ashleigh Chatfield

“The Honors program has helped me grow and develop,” Chatfield said. “The Honors teachers are very encouraging and motivating. They challenge you a little bit more and the way information is presented in an honors class versus a typical class is much more interesting to me.”

Her volunteer work includes being a student missionary in Aurora, Ill., with the Baptist Student Union, and disaster relief work in Hammond, La. during the spring 2016 semester.

Chatfield is also the recipient of two scholarships that have financed her education, one for the band and another from the Honors Institute. After finishing classes in Raymond in May 2017, she plans to complete her certification as a sign language interpreter in an accredited program.

“I grew up with sign language interpreting, since my mom signed,” she said. “Before college, I started working in a restaurant and we had a man who’d come in every other day who was deaf. He couldn’t talk to anyone, but he’d bring his pictures and he’d write his notes. I knew just enough sign language to get by, but it was really sad to see him have no communication because we really didn’t know his language.”

Glenn, who is retiring in December, is a member of the Mississippi Veterinary Medical Association and the American Veterinary Medicine Association. He had served two years in the Army, including one year of deployment in Vietnam, and rose to the rank of captain before starting a private practice. He worked for the Mississippi Diagnostic lab for two years just prior to starting work at Hinds.

HEADWAE was established in 1988 to honor academically talented students and faculty who have made outstanding contributions in promoting academic excellence. The 30th annual program is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds CC names HEADWAE honorees for 2017[/tweetable]

0 1694 25 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Honors Institute to host pollinator workshop
Posted by
24 October

Hinds CC Honors Institute to host pollinator workshop

RAYMOND – The Hinds Community College Honors Institute and the Gamma Lambda chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa honor society will host a[tweetable alt=””] free pollinator workshop 12:30 p.m. Nov. 9 in Reeves Hall, Room 165, on the Raymond Campus[/tweetable]. The event is open to the public.

jeff_harrisJeff Harris, a research professor and entomologist at Mississippi State University, will keynote the event. Harris is a bee specialist and is actively involved in the Mississippi Beekeepers Association. The program will include a program on pollinator gardens as well as a panel of metro-area beekeepers, who are encouraged to display and sell their products as part of the event. The conference is expected to conclude at 3:30 p.m.

The Honors Institute and Raymond Campus’ PTK chapter are sponsoring this workshop as part of this year’s Honors in Action Project, which encourages students to take community action in response to a topic of global interest.

Students in the program have been researching the importance of agricultural pollinators such as honeybees and environmental challenges they have faced in the 21st century. Honeybee populations have decreased significantly in recent years, and because bees are integral pollinators worldwide, many scientists see a need for protecting bee habitats and protecting them from manmade threats, such as certain insecticides. Hinds is happy to offer this workshop to increase awareness of pollinator issues in the community.

0 987 24 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Rankin Campus instructor named Humanities Council winner
Posted by
24 October

Hinds CC Rankin Campus instructor named Humanities Council winner

Hinds Community College instructor Joy Rhoads of Pearl, chair of Social Sciences and coordinator for the Rankin Campus Honors program, and a faculty adviser for the Alpha Omicron Omega chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, has been selected as Hinds’ recipient for the Mississippi Humanities Council 2016 Humanities Teacher Award.

hinds-cc_-joy-rhoads_web

As a recipient, Rhoads will offer a lecture at 7 p.m. Nov. 3 at the George Wynne Building on the Rankin Campus. Her lecture is titled “Legislated Landscape: Historical Political Influence on Mississippi Communities.”

A reception will follow in the building’s first floor lobby.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

[tweetable alt=””]Joy Rhoads will present a lecture Nov. 3 as Hinds CC’s Humanities Teacher of the Year.[/tweetable]

1 748 24 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Rankin Campus showcases Honors program, science classes
Posted by
21 October

Hinds CC Rankin Campus showcases Honors program, science classes

“That’s so cool!”

Seniors from Park Place Christian Academy in Pearl were among the students attending an Oct. 21 open house at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus. Among the activities was a demonstration by physics teacher Carl DeWitt. The students are, front from left, Ansley Burford of Flowood, Riley Grace Eutzler of Brandon, Mollie Jones of Pearl; back, Hope Jenkins of Brandon and Lexi Davis of Brandon.

Seniors from Park Place Christian Academy in Pearl were among the students attending an Oct. 21 open house at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Among the activities was a demonstration by physics teacher Carl DeWitt. The students are, front from left, Ansley Burford of Flowood, Riley Grace Eutzler of Brandon, Mollie Jones of Pearl; back, Hope Jenkins of Brandon and Lexi Davis of Brandon.

A group of Park Place Christian Academy seniors standing in front of a science demonstration gasped practically the same words at exactly the same time.

The demonstration with what’s called a Rubens’ tube involved a tube pumped full of gas, fire and eardrum-shattering music making the flames dance in time with the beat.

Carl DeWitt is a physics instructor at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus.

Carl DeWitt is a physics instructor at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus.

While Hinds Community College Rankin Campus physics instructor Carl DeWitt was performing this demonstration in one room, across the hall chemistry instructor Lou Ann Williams gave the students another take on a fire demonstration.

Hinds Community College Rankin Campus chemistry instructor Lou Ann Williams and Hinds sophomore Lindsey Bowen use soap bubbles, methane gas and fire for an impressive science demonstration.

Hinds Community College Rankin Campus chemistry instructor Lou Ann Williams and Hinds sophomore Lindsey Bowen use soap bubbles, methane gas and fire for an impressive science demonstration.

Williams pumped methane gas into dish soap, grabbed a huge handful of large bubbles as they overflowed from the beaker and tossed them into the air as Hinds sophomore Lindsey Bowen lit them. They, literally, burst into flames as they floated toward the ceiling.

Both experiments were dramatic ways of capturing the attention of more than 120 high school seniors from about a dozen schools in mostly Rankin County.

The seniors were at the Rankin Campus in Pearl to learn what Hinds has to offer them but, in particular, to hear about the Honors program that started in January. The Raymond Campus has had an Honors program for a number of years.

To qualify for the Honors program, entering freshman must have a high school GPA of 3.5 or a 25 on the ACT college entrance exam – but not both.

“I wanted to bring the Honors program to the Rankin Campus because we have a lot of Rankin County students who want to stay local and go to school,” said Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus. “The good thing about an Honors program is you start building that resume. You’re stretching yourself a little bit after you get here and you’re building that resume.”

Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus, left, Sherry Franklin, Rankin Campus dean of Career-Technical Education, and Gary Fox, Rankin Campus dean of Academics

Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus, left, Sherry Franklin, Rankin Campus dean of Career-Technical Education, and Gary Fox, Rankin Campus dean of Academics

Many students who qualify to enter the Hinds Honors program will also earn the grades to become members of Phi Theta Kappa honor society for two-year college students. Those students are eligible for high-dollar transfer scholarships to the state’s four-year universities, both public and private.

Students also got a chance to see the dedicated space where Honors students can lounge between classes or work on computers.

Being in the Honors program means “you are willing to put forth the effort. It means you have tapped into that academic excellence. It means that it affords you some opportunities that you might not otherwise have,” said Joy Rhoads, coordinator of the Rankin Campus Honors program.

Joy Rhoads is the coordinator of the Honors program at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus.

Joy Rhoads is the coordinator of the Honors program at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus.

But the Honors program isn’t the only draw to Hinds, DeWitt pointed out.

“Hinds is a great place to start. Here on this campus we teach physical science, trig-based sciences for professions like occupational therapy and physical therapy. We have calculus-based science for those who are science majors or engineers,” he said. “You can get a really good start with your first two years at Hinds Community College.”

Williams, who is a Hinds alum herself, has been teaching at Hinds for 24 years.

“I came to Hinds when I was 17 years old as a science major. I loved my time here, loved my instructors,” she said.

 

Hinds Community College chemistry instructor Lou Ann Williams sets up a science demonstration while Copiah Academy seniors Caleb Phillips and Noah Chapa, both of Crystal Springs, watch.

Hinds Community College chemistry instructor Lou Ann Williams sets up a science demonstration while Copiah Academy seniors Caleb Phillips and Noah Chapa, both of Crystal Springs, watch.

Hinds Community College instructor Lou Ann Willliams explains a science demonstration to Pearl High School senior Jasmine Alvarado.

Hinds Community College instructor Lou Ann Willliams explains a science demonstration to Pearl High School senior Jasmine Alvarado.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Williams transferred to Mississippi State University for a bachelor’s degree “expecting to be behind. I was right on track and was ahead in some of my classes. That’s when I really realized how good of an education that I got.

“It’s a great place to be. It’s like a big family. I love my students. I know my students’ names,” she said.

Several students said they already have plans to attend Hinds next fall.

Ansley Burford, 17, of Flowood, a senior at Park Place Christian Academy in Pearl, called Hinds her “major go-to because it’s saving me a ton of money.”

Caleb Phillips of Crystal Springs, a Copiah Academy senior, plans to major in chemistry or biochemistry. “Hinds is closer to home, and it just feels like the right choice,” he said.

Both Noah Chapa, a Copiah Academy senior, and Jasmine Alvarado, a Pearl High senior, are planning to come to Hinds for the nursing programs.

“I’ve heard Hinds is better in nursing, more recommended than other programs,” Chapa said.

Alvarado is already in the high school licensed practical nurse program on the Rankin Campus.

“They have great classes here. I feel welcome. I feel a part of this community. It’s amazing feeling to have amazing instructors,” she said.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus Honors program offers opportunity.[/tweetable]

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

2 942 21 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC partners with global testing provider
Posted by
20 October

Hinds CC partners with global testing provider

RAYMOND – Hinds’ assessment centers are now set up to administer tests for Information Technology company employees pursuing key industry certifications.

The college signed an agreement with Pearson VUE to handle exams on behalf of hundreds of businesses, boards and organizations worldwide. The list of clients includes HP, Cisco, Oracle, CompTIA, EMC, LPI and VMware.

“The Pearson VUE Testing System is the most powerful available and gives us unparalleled control and flexibility over our ability to manage our business our way and the agreement means we can easily offer same-day testing, or bring testing to our customers’ locations,” said Marnee’ Tompkins, district director of Assessment for Hinds. “We’re pleased to partner with a company whose industry status, technology and passion for excellence will allow us to provide even greater service for our customers.”

The list of certification tests available from test sponsors through the Pearson VUE system is continually growing. Test results are quickly transmitted back, ensuring the candidate’s certification status is promptly updated.

“We are proud to welcome Hinds Community College to the rapidly growing global network of Pearson VUE Authorized Test Centers,” said Ray Murray, vice president of business development for Pearson VUE. “Together, we are providing even more candidates with the opportunity to obtain meaningful certifications and advance their careers.”

Pearson VUE, the computer-based testing business of UK-based Pearson PLC, is a world leader in electronic testing, delivering 10 million exams in more than 150 countries.

Hinds’ assessment centers are located on the Raymond, Rankin and Jackson campuses.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds now set up to help IT industry workers get certified[/tweetable]

0 612 20 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC named among top degree-producing colleges for African-American students
Posted by
19 October

Hinds CC named among top degree-producing colleges for African-American students

RAYMOND – Hinds Community College has been named as one of the top degree-producing community colleges in the United States for African-American students across all fields of study by Community College Week, a national publication covering the nation’s more than 1,000 community colleges and technical schools.

The ratings involved statistics reported to the U.S. Department of Education for the 2014-15 academic year, the most recent year of nationally available data.

Hinds ranked seventh out of the top 100 community colleges for the number of associate degrees awarded to African-American students. Degrees conferred totaled 866, a 12 percent increase over 2013-14. The college ranked 54th when all minorities are considered, reflecting a 13 percent increase. Hinds was the only Mississippi community college to make the Top 100 in this category.

“We are proud to serve our community as a top degree producing institution,” Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse said.

Since 2012, the college’s Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center has been the base for the Minority Male Leadership Initiative, known as M2M. The initiative is a grant-funded project that provides leadership training, career counseling, tutoring, mentoring and opportunities for travel to senior-level universities for program participants. Activities aim to help African-American males discover personal strengths to succeed in college.

Also, the college offers a broad range of student support services in an effort to ensure student success. One example would be two web apps Hinds launched during the 2015-2016 academic year. One helps students track progress in their degree plan and another that tracks financial aid status. Each is geared to keep them on track to graduate.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with academic programs of study leading to seamless university transfer and career and technical programs teaching job-ready skills. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2016. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds among top degree-producing community colleges for African-American students[/tweetable]

0 707 19 October, 2016 News more
Hinds CC named among top degree-producing colleges for nursing, health students
Posted by
19 October

Hinds CC named among top degree-producing colleges for nursing, health students

RAYMOND – Hinds Community College has been named as one of the top degree-producing community colleges in the United States in registered nursing and related fields by Community College Week, a national publication covering the nation’s more than 1,000 community colleges and technical schools.

“The Nursing and Allied Health programs have enjoyed the support of our College administrators as we continue to prepare students to be competent, caring health care practitioners,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean of the Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. “The faculty have a wealth and variety of clinical experiences that enhance the rigorous programs of study. These rankings validate our commitment to meet the needs of our community stakeholders which include students, health care agencies, and consumers of health care.”

The ratings involved statistics reported to the U.S. Department of Education for the 2014-15 academic year, the most recent year of nationally available data.

Hinds is ranked 17th in the Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing category. Degrees conferred totaled 246, for a 29 percent increase over 2013-14. Hinds’ Associate Degree Nursing program celebrates its 50th year in existence this year.

The college also ranked highly, 22nd, in the Health Professions & Related Programs category. Those degrees totaled 439, for a 14 percent increase. Hinds was the only Mississippi community college to make either list.

Prospective nursing student Taylor Williams listens as student Jennifer Lariccia talks about the learning lab during a tour at the Hinds Community College Nursing/Allied Health Center Showcase event on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. The event was an open house for prospective students interested in programs offered at the campus. Information booths and learning lab tours were available. 

Prospective nursing student Taylor Williams listens as student Jennifer Lariccia talks about the learning lab during a tour at the Hinds Community College Nursing/Allied Health Center Showcase event on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. The event was an open house for prospective students interested in programs offered at the campus. Information booths and learning lab tours were available.

Hinds offers the broadest selection of nursing and allied health programs in the state, including Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emergency Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Health Care Assistant, Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Nursing Assistant and Phlebotomy.

A full slate of nursing and allied health programs are offered at Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center off Chadwick Drive near Merit Health Central, formerly Central Mississippi Medical Center. The Rankin Campus in Pearl offers Practical Nursing, Associate Degree Nursing and Medical Assisting Technology. The Vicksburg-Warren Campus offers Practical Nursing and Transition to RN.

[tweetable alt=””]Hinds among top degree-producing colleges for nursing, allied health[/tweetable]

0 799 19 October, 2016 News more
Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds CC inducts new members for Fall 2016
Posted by
19 October

Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds CC inducts new members for Fall 2016

The Gamma Lambda Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College held a ceremony Oct. 14 on the Raymond Campus to induct members for the Fall 2016 semester.

Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society for community and junior college students. Membership in Phi Theta Kappa is extended to students who have a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or above on 12 or more transferable credit hours. There are more than 1,285 Phi Theta Kappa chapters throughout the United States and abroad.

Inductees include, front row, from left, Stephanie Lewis, Anisa "Max" Martin, Emily Neely and Victoria Mulqueen, all of Clinton. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees include, front row, from left, Stephanie Lewis, Anisa “Max” Martin, Emily Neely and Victoria Mulqueen, all of Clinton. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees include, front row, from left, Jemylle Grace S. Morato, Anna Katherine Grace, both of Richland; second row, Jason Humphrey, of Florence, Lauren Frazier, of Flowood; top row, Tyler Trussell, Kyle Singleton, and Dylan Henderson, all of Brandon. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees include, front row, from left, Jemylle Grace S. Morato, Anna Katherine Grace, both of Richland; second row, Jason Humphrey, of Florence, Lauren Frazier, of Flowood; top row, Tyler Trussell, Kyle Singleton, and Dylan Henderson, all of Brandon. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inductees included, front row, from left, Ciara Ray, Logan Williamson, both of Byram, Alexa Nicole Brown, of Terry; back row, from left, Elena Moore, Kristen Chisholm, both of Byram, and Joanna Stevens, of Terry. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees included, front row, from left, Ciara Ray, Logan Williamson, both of Byram, Alexa Nicole Brown, of Terry; back row, from left, Elena Moore, Kristen Chisholm, both of Byram, and Joanna Stevens, of Terry. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees included, from left, Taras Savannah, of Raymond, and Lizette Bethea, of Edwards. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees included, from left, Taras Savannah, of Raymond, and Lizette Bethea, of Edwards. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inductees included, from left, Jaelyn Bullock, of Utica, and Catrina Robinson, of Crystal Springs. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees included, from left, Jaelyn Bullock, of Utica, and Catrina Robinson, of Crystal Springs. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees included Marcus Felix, of Jackson. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees included Marcus Felix, of Jackson. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inductees included, front row, from left, Taylor Scroggins, of Bentonia, DeMichael Harris, of Vicksburg, back row, from left, Desmond King, of Magee, and Alexandra Guion, of Yazoo City. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees included, front row, from left, Taylor Scroggins, of Bentonia, DeMichael Harris, of Vicksburg, back row, from left, Desmond King, of Magee, and Alexandra Guion, of Yazoo City. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees included, front row, from left, Kiana Gayden, of Winona, Marlee Franklin, of Rolling Fork, Maya Joanna Greco, of St. Louis, Mo., William Thompson III, of Lacey, Wash., and Amberlee Nix, of Springhill, La. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees included, front row, from left, Kiana Gayden, of Winona, Marlee Franklin, of Rolling Fork, Maya Joanna Greco, of St. Louis, Mo., William Thompson III, of Lacey, Wash., and Amberlee Nix, of Springhill, La. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inductees included Darryl Grant Jr., of Zion, Ill. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

Inductees included Darryl Grant Jr., of Zion, Ill. (Hinds Community College/Tammi Bowles)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[tweetable alt=””]Phi Theta Kappa at Raymond Campus inducts new members for 2016[/tweetable]

1 1758 19 October, 2016 News more