http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC agrees with industry partners to train diesel equipment professionals

Monthly Archives: September 2016

Hinds CC agrees with industry partners to train diesel equipment professionals
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29 September

Hinds CC agrees with industry partners to train diesel equipment professionals

Hinds celebrated a new partnership Sept. 26 with Empire Truck Sales and Stribling Equipment to train students in the college’s growing Diesel Equipment Technology program.

Key to that partnership is a state-of-the-art training facility, the Diesel Technology Academy, provided by Hinds’ industry partners on Highway 49 in Richland.

Public officials, including Gov. Phil Bryant, heavy equipment industry officials and Hinds employees were among those on hand Sept. 26 for the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy on Highway 49 in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Public officials, including Gov. Phil Bryant, heavy equipment industry officials and Hinds employees were among those on hand Sept. 26 for the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy on Highway 49 in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“The Hinds Diesel Academy is another example of the ability of Hinds Community College to work directly with business and industry and carefully craft a workforce development pipeline that develops students to fill not only the skills gap that exists in the diesel Industry, but also combat the shortage of technicians in Mississippi,” said Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development and Adult Education at Hinds.

Gov. Phil Bryant, a Hinds graduate and himself the son of a diesel mechanic who worked at Empire as his last job, said the academy represented both job creation and better quality of life in the state.

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales, Hinds alumnus Gov. Phil Bryant and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse greet one another Sept. 26 at the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales, Hinds alumnus Gov. Phil Bryant and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse greet one another Sept. 26 at the official opening of the Diesel Technology Academy in Richland. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Today, the men and women who will go through this Diesel Technology Academy will have a bright future,” Bryant said. “They will be able to live the American dream. And what they will make per hour making these advanced technology machines we see here, they may be able to buy a home…make sure that their children can go to Hinds Community College and over to a great university. Living the American dream will be the responsibility of those who will teach here.”

At a signing ceremony, Stocks referred specifically to the program’s role in filling middle-skill jobs in Mississippi – those that require an education beyond high school but not a four-year degree. He also touched on other jobs in the truck and heavy equipment maintenance industry that could benefit from those who complete the program, such as parts, body work, sales and logistics.

Getting to that point, however, required numerous meetings with industry partners to revamp curriculum.

“We brought this curriculum out of the 1980s and into the 21st century,” Stocks said, referring to the nearly three-year effort with industry partners. “Once we started with that curriculum, we modified about six or seven other curricula and got them into the 21st century as well.”

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse sign the official memorandum of understanding between the college and the companies as Cindy West, dean of Career/Technical Education on the Raymond Campus, Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Career/Technical Education and Adult Education, and Sherry Franklin, associate vice president for Career/Technical Education, look on. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jerry Swanson, CEO of Stribling Equipment and Empire Truck Sales and Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse sign the official memorandum of understanding between the college and the companies as Cindy West, dean of Career/Technical Education on the Raymond Campus, Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Career/Technical Education and Adult Education, and Sherry Franklin, associate vice president for Career/Technical Education, look on. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Under the agreement, a new cohort of 15 students enters the program every eight weeks if they meet minimum requirements in core subjects either on the ACT or college placement tests. The first year of classes is held on the Raymond Campus; the second year at the Diesel Technology Academy.

“We know there is a huge need in Mississippi for programs like this one that train people for skilled jobs that are there waiting to be filled in industries that are critical to business growth,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. “And these are good jobs that offer wages and benefits that can sustain a family. Thanks to this partnership and this impressive facility, we can satisfy both the needs of the industry and the desire of our people for good jobs.”

Jerry Swanson, the CEO of Empire Truck Sales LLC and Stribling Equipment, said Hinds’ partnership with KLLM Transport Services to form the KLLM Driving Academy in 2014, also in Richland, was the inspiration behind putting together the Diesel Technology Academy.

“We are very excited to see a vision of improving job opportunities for our young people become a reality,” Swanson said. “This effort has been more than two years in the making and, with Dr. Muse’s and Dr. Stocks’ leadership, is now a vibrant testimony to industry and education partnerships.”

Broken out, the program offers an accredited transition pathway of 15 semester credit hours, a career certificate at 30 credit hours, and an Associate of Applied Science degree at 60 credit hours. Two options are offered for technical certificates, at 45 credit hours transportation (medium to heavy trucks) and another for heavy equipment.

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Hinds CC, partners celebrate new Diesel Technology Academy
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26 September

Hinds CC, partners celebrate new Diesel Technology Academy

RICHLAND – Hinds Community College celebrates a new partnership with Empire Truck Sales and Stribling Equipment today with a signing ceremony program that begins at 4 p.m. at the Diesel Technology Academy at 301 Highway 49 South in Richland, off the west frontage road near the Stack exchange.

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Among the speakers will be Hinds Community College alumnus Gov. Phil Bryant, Stribling and Empire CEO Jerry Swanson and Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse. The program will also feature students in the Diesel Technology program along with Dr. Chad Stocks, Hinds Community College vice president for Workforce Development, Career and Technical Education and Adult Basic Education.

The Diesel Technology Academy is located near the headquarters of Empire Truck Sales and Stribling Equipment in Richland. The newly retooled program allows Hinds Community College students to choose between trucking or heavy equipment during the second year after the first year of courses have been completed on the Raymond Campus.

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HCC students select homecoming queen
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23 September

HCC students select homecoming queen

RAYMOND – Latashanna Ransom, of Laurel, was crowned homecoming queen at Hinds Community College during festivities Sept. 22 on the Raymond Campus.

Latashanna Ransom, of Laurel, was crowned homecoming queen at Hinds Community College during festivities Sept. 22 on the Raymond Campus. With her are Casey Larry, from left, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and former queen Jamellia Williams. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Latashanna Ransom, of Laurel, was crowned homecoming queen at Hinds Community College during festivities Sept. 22 on the Raymond Campus. With her are Casey Larry, from left, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and former queen Jamellia Williams. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Ransom, the daughter of Natalie Amos and Cortias Nixon, is a graduate of Laurel High School. She is a sophomore studying Broadcast Journalism on the Raymond Campus. She was escorted by Casey Larry, also a sophomore at the Raymond Campus.

Latashanna Ransom, right, and her escort, Casey Larry, react as Ransom is announced homecoming queen at Hinds Community College during festivities Sept. 22 on the Raymond Campus. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Latashanna Ransom, right, and her escort, Casey Larry, react as Ransom is announced homecoming queen at Hinds Community College during festivities Sept. 22 on the Raymond Campus. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Latashanna Ransom, right, and her escort, Casey Larry, react as Ransom is announced homecoming queen at Hinds Community College during festivities Sept. 22 on the Raymond Campus. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Latashanna Ransom, right, and her escort, Casey Larry, react as Ransom is announced homecoming queen at Hinds Community College during festivities Sept. 22 on the Raymond Campus. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

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Hinds CC Utica Campus continues Holtzclaw Lecture Series
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20 September

Hinds CC Utica Campus continues Holtzclaw Lecture Series

UTICA – A decorated author and historian on race and class issues in U.S. history will address the next installment of the Holtzclaw Lecture Series, sponsored in part by the Humanities Department at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus.

Jacqueline Jones

Jacqueline Jones

Jacqueline Jones, chair of the History and Ideas Department at the University of Texas, will speak at 7 p.m. Oct. 27 at the Gore Art Gallery at Mississippi College on a chapter of her 2013 book, “A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama’s America.” The chapter is dedicated to William H. Holtzclaw, who founded the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute in 1903 that is now the Utica Campus. The lecture itself is titled “A Dangerous Thing: Black Schooling in William Holtzclaw’s Mississippi.”

Jones will be signing copies of the book at 6:30 p.m., before the lecture.

The Holtzclaw Lecture Series is designed to bring nationally recognized scholars and experts on African American education in the South for public lectures in a variety of venues around the state. This lecture is co-sponsored by Hinds, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mississippi Humanities Council, the Mississippi College School of Humanities, with major funding by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Jones’ has penned eight books on American social history with emphases on race, class and gender. A Mastin Gentry White Professor of Southern History at UT, she won a Bancroft Prize for her 1985 work, “Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow: Black Women, Work, and the Family from Slavery to the Present.” The prize is awarded annually by Columbia University for books about diplomacy or history of the Americas. That book and “A Dreadful Deceit” were finalists for a Pulitzer Prize. In 1999, Jones was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, awarded for exemplary creativity in a wide array of disciplines.

The series is part of a National Endowment for the Humanities grant announced in 2015, “The Black Man’s Burden: William Holtzclaw and the Mississippi HBCU Connection,” that highlights the work of Holtzclaw in African-American education. The project will contribute to a growing body of research and interest in the “Little Tuskegees” as important forerunners of the Civil Rights Era in the Deep South.

This two-year research program is designed to equip faculty and student-scholars to explore themes in Holtzclaw’s writing in humanities courses, combined with the development of a Summer Teachers’ Institute and teaching resource kit that will be used by other institutions (both on the high school and community college level) to extend the work beyond the institution.

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Five inducted into Hinds Sports Hall of Fame for 2016
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13 September

Five inducted into Hinds Sports Hall of Fame for 2016

RAYMOND – Key pieces of Hinds’ success on the gridiron and other fields of play have been inducted into the college’s Sports Hall of Fame for 2016.

This year’s Hinds Sports Hall of Fame inductees were:

  • John Earl Hagan, track and field, 1962-1964
  • Jaret Holmes, football, 1994-1995
  • Christi Smith, softball, 1988-1990
  • Oliver “Pete” Stone, basketball, 1970-1971
  • Freddie Townsend, basketball, 1969-1971
John Earl Hagan

John Earl Hagan

Hagan, a Jackson native, was a key cog in the Eagles’ track and field machine in the early 1960s.

Hagan excelled in the 100-yard dash, 440-yard and 880-yard relays and low hurdles for the Hinds “thinclads” pair of state champion teams. The sprinter was the 100-yard dash state champion and anchored the two relay teams during each title run. He was also a manager on the Hinds football team.

After Hinds, he attended Mississippi State University on a track scholarship. He made the President’s List and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Education.

In 1971, he became district executive director of the Elk River Boy Scouts, in Alabama, and was named among the “Outstanding Young Men of America” at the time. Later, he became assistant scoutmaster of a Boy Scout troop for developmentally challenged boys.

He lives in Homewood, Ala., outside Birmingham, and continues to work today, as owner and director of an assisted living facility. His three sons, Greg, Chris and Joshua also participated in football and track.

Jaret Holmes

Jaret Holmes

Holmes, a Clinton native, starred on two state champion football teams during his time at Hinds.

Holmes was the placekicker on teams that lost just two games and competed in a bowl game and the National Junior College Athletic Association playoffs. An All-American his second year, Holmes was also a star in the classroom, landing on the Deans’ and President’s lists both years with a 4.0 GPA and, in 1995, won the Eagle Award given to the college’s best male and female athletes.

He graduated from Auburn University in 1998 after a stellar career on and off the field. Off it, he carried a 3.5 GPA and earned a Bachelor’s of Science degree. On it, he was an All-Southeastern Conference selection in 1996 and 1997 and became the first kicker to win the university’s Pat Sullivan Award for Most Outstanding Player. His best moments came his senior year – the game-winning kick in the “Iron Bowl” game against Alabama, a 52-yard field goal in the SEC Championship Game and a field goal of the same distance in the Peach Bowl, both records at the time.

He spent time on the rosters of six different NFL teams from 1998 to 2002, appearing in 11 regular season games with the Chicago Bears, New York Giants and Jacksonville Jaguars. After the 1999 season, the Bears sent him to NFL Europe, where he was Special Teams Player of the Year with the Berlin Thunder. His stint with the Giants in 2000 came during the team’s run to Super Bowl XXXV.

In 2003, Holmes returned to Mississippi and opened Holmes Specialty Advertising Inc. Today, the company employs 15 people and serves hundreds of customers from its two offices in Clinton.

Holmes lives in Edwards with his wife, Sarah Webb Holmes. They have two daughters and one son.

Christi Smith

Christi Smith

Smith, a Pearl native, was a two-time All-American shortstop for the Hinds Lady Eagles.

She entered Hinds having won the Best Offensive Softball Award at two different high schools, Northwest Rankin and Pearl, plus an array of other merits for softball and track. At Hinds, she was a vital cog in a scoring machine that won the state and Region XXIII championships in 1989. Her .614 batting average was tops on the team.

In 1990, Smith was selected for an Eagle Award, given to the college’s best male and female athletes. In addition to her duplicating her place on the National Junior College Athletic Association’s All-America team, her batting average (.592) once again led the team. Off the field, she was two-time Academic All-American as well, with a 4.0 GPA.

After Hinds, she earned a nursing degree from Mississippi University for Women. For the past 20 years, she has been employed by Baptist Health Systems, winning numerous awards for her work. In 2015, she was among three nurses honored for outstanding Team Nursing for the year’s first quarter.

Oliver "Pete" Stone

Oliver “Pete” Stone

Stone, a Vicksburg native, was the big man in the middle for Hinds’ state champion basketball team in his only season at the school.

Stone had entered Hinds from a single season at Mississippi State University. Once at Hinds, Stone, the team’s starting center, and his Eagles teammates had their way on the hardwood in 1971. They finished 24-1 and swept the state playoffs and finals, where they defeated Northeast Mississippi Community College 82-72 for the title. The talented squad also featured two other future Hinds Sports Hall of Famers, forwards Wade Evans and Randy Shelton, and one of this year’s honorees, guard Freddie Townsend.

Stone made first team All-State and led the team in scoring. After finishing up at Southeastern Louisiana College, he pursued a career in business in his hometown, where he and wife, Amy, live. He is the president of Unitech, Inc.

Freddie Townsend

Freddie Townsend

Townsend, a Pelahatchie native, was another key piece of Hinds’ championship basketball team during his sophomore season.

Townsend, a guard on the near-perfect team Hinds fielded in 1971, excelled in the backcourt under head coach Robert Garrison’s first team after succeeding longtime coach Troy Arlis Ricks. During his freshman season, Townsend was fifth in scoring on the 11-member team.

He finished up his college basketball career at Belhaven University, where he was the school’s Most Valuable Player during his senior year and shot 92.5 percent from the free throw line, a mark that led the NAIA. In the classroom, he earned a bachelor’s degree in Business and Physical Education.

After college, he managed his family’s farm for 10 years, then went to work at Hudspeth Center as a recreation therapist. He retired from there after 30 years, a time during which he was heavily involved in Special Olympics as a basketball and equestrian coach. He was also a longtime deacon and volunteer with Concord Baptist Church.

Townsend died in August 2015. He was survived by his wife of 41 years, Jan Massengale Townsend, and their two daughters, Jennifer Townsend Harper and Jeanette Townsend.

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Hinds CC students select Homecoming Court for 2016
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13 September

Hinds CC students select Homecoming Court for 2016

Hinds Community College students have selected the members of the Homecoming Court for 2016. The winner will be crowned at halftime festivities on Sept. 22 in the football game between Hinds and Pearl River Community College at Joe Renfroe Stadium on the Raymond Campus.

Sophomore maids are, front from left,  Scottilyn Lloyd of Brandon, Raymond Campus; Kayla Boler of Vicksburg, Vicksburg-Warren Campus; Cynterrial Fairley of Brandon, Jackson-Academic/Technical Center; Latashanna Ransom of Laurel, Raymond Campus; Lindsey Jeselink of Clinton, Jackson-Nursing/Allied Center; Kennedy Garner of Brandon, Rankin Campus; Whitney Jackson of Madison, Raymond Campus.

Hinds Community College students have selected the members of the Homecoming Court for 2016. The winner will be crowned at halftime festivities on Sept. 22 in the football game between Hinds and Pearl River Community College. Sophomore maids are, front from left, Scottilyn Lloyd of Brandon, Raymond Campus; Kayla Boler of Vicksburg, Vicksburg-Warren Campus; Cynterrial Fairley of Brandon, Jackson-Academic/Technical Center; Latashanna Ransom of Laurel, Raymond Campus; Lindsey Jeselink of Clinton, Jackson-Nursing/Allied Center; Kennedy Garner of Brandon, Rankin Campus; Whitney Jackson of Madison, Raymond Campus. Freshmen maids are, back from left, Shenise McKinnis of Pelahatchie, Raymond Campus; Carly Saldana of Vicksburg, Vicksburg-Warren Campus; Kennedey Wilson of Jackson, Jackson-Academic/Technical Center; Parriss Rhone of Pearl, Rankin Campus; Bailey Howell of Brandon, Jackson-Nursing/Allied Health Center; Cyla Logan of Edwards, Raymond Campus; Myia Harris of Clinton, Raymond Campus. Candidates for queen are sophomores Kayla Boler, Cynterrial Fairley, Latashanna Ransom, Lindsey Jeselink and Kennedy Garner.

Freshmen maids are, back from left,  Shenise McKinnis of Pelahatchie, Raymond Campus; Carly Saldana of Vicksburg, Vicksburg-Warren Campus; Kennedey Wilson of Jackson, Jackson-Academic/Technical Center; Parriss Rhone of Pearl, Rankin Campus; Bailey Howell of Brandon, Jackson-Nursing/Allied Health Center; Cyla Logan of Edwards, Raymond Campus; Myia Harris of Clinton, Raymond Campus.

Candidates for queen are sophomores Kayla Boler, Cynterrial Fairley, Latashanna Ransom, Lindsey Jeselink and Kennedy Garner.

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Hinds CC always home for ‘50s hoops star, Alumnus of the Year
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13 September

Hinds CC always home for ‘50s hoops star, Alumnus of the Year

RAYMOND – They say home is where the heart is, and for Dr. Wayne Lee home has been many places since his days on hardwood for Hinds and in small-town schools in Mississippi.

Lee, of Ponchatoula, La., returned home, in a way, to Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus this summer to catch up with his alma mater and the man who has shaped it for a generation.

Dr. Wayne Lee

Dr. Wayne Lee

Lee will be honored as Alumnus of the Year along with Alumni Service Award recipient Sen. Dean Kirby of Pearl and Sports Hall of Fame inductees John Earl Hagan, a Jackson native who lives in Homewood, Ala.; Jaret Holmes, a Clinton native who lives in Edwards; Christi Smith, a Pearl native who lives in Flowood; Oliver P. “Pete” Stone of Vicksburg and the late Freddie Townsend of Pelahatchie at a dinner at 5 p.m. Sept. 22 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus.

“I knew Dr. Clyde Muse when he was coaching at Canton High School in the early 1950s,” said Lee, referring to Hinds’ longtime president. Lee attended Clinton High School at the time. “We used to play Canton when I was there. I played basketball and ran track.

“He’s a great guy, a principled guy. You can believe what he says and he has run a great program. Easy to know, easy to talk to.”

Lee was a guard and forward on the Hinds basketball team for Coach Troy Arlis Ricks, the legendary Hinds basketball coach from 1951 to 1970. “I was the skinny kid with a scholarship to play basketball – and poor as a son of a gun.”

For his part, Muse remembers Lee as quite the formidable foe for his first squad in Canton.

“When I first came to Canton in 1952, I was coaching basketball, junior high football and track,” he said. “Wayne was a player for Clinton High School. When I say player, I mean player – he was good. He was one of the best high school centers I ever carried a team up against.”

His hoops career continued at Delta State, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology. Drafted into the Army, he served two years, mostly in Germany. “I set up a division basketball team over there, where we traveled around to villages and towns and played teams there. It kept me sane. I was so glad to get home I kissed the ground when I got back to Mississippi.”

He coached hoops and taught for five years, in Anguilla and Belzoni, before earning his first master’s, in biology, from Mississippi College. He credits the man for whom today’s Hinds science building is named for creating his first molecule of interest in science.

“It was T.T. Beemon who turned me on to biology,” Lee said. “He was a great instructor and took time with his students back then. He loved botany and zoology and he made his students buy into his love of it.”

After a short stint in sales, he returned to school, this time to the University of Southern Mississippi, where in 1972 he earned another master’s degree, in Health, Physical Education and Recreation. He took his skills to Louisiana, where he worked for the state for the next 28 years, 24 of them at Southeastern Louisiana University as a professor of physical education and health studies courses. In the middle, he worked four years with the state’s Department of Education, in educational support and research development.

In 1995, he was inducted into the Hinds Sports Hall of Fame. Then and now, he said, it’s easy to note what’s changed and what hasn’t about the place that gave him his start.

“This building right here wasn’t here, for one thing,” he said of Fountain Hall, built in 2010. “There was a cattle dairy across the street from here.

“My ex-students who are teaching and working here now say the staff and instructors are still concerned about helping the student accomplish things in life and moving on ahead.”

In 2000, he returned to his college alma mater in Cleveland, Miss., for his final years in the health education classroom, which ended earlier this year. His and Muse’s ties to Delta State have benefited Hinds several times over.

“I got to really know him again when he came back to Delta State,” Muse said. “He has continued to be very interested in Hinds, served on the Sports Hall of Fame committee for many years. And one of the ways he’s helped us a lot is recommending people to Hinds for employment. We’ve gotten many very good employees that he either taught or knew at Delta State.”

One former student remembers a unique teacher whose love of teaching was symbolized by his two most fun-loving, furry fans.

“I’ll never forget his love for his two dachshund hound puppies that ‘lived’ at his office,” said Mark Stanton, district director of Student Recreation at Hinds and pupil of Dr. Lee’s while the former worked on his MSE at Delta State.

While working in Intramurals at DSU, Stanton’s office shared a hallway with Lee’s, making for memorable mornings.

“I could hear when they would arrive each day, running down the hall to his office and they, much like him, were eager to start the day, ready to help his students the same ways he did – loyal, caring, happy to see them, but also expecting of their respect.”

Loyalty might endure, but tablets have replaced slate as a raw material of classroom settings these days. Still, changing his teaching style in the age of technology wasn’t even a thought for Lee.

“I haven’t changed since 1959 in how I teach the basic subject matter,” he said. “Of course, eight-year-olds can do more stuff on their iPhones than I can. And grading is easier since you can set it up by computer now.”

Brian Oakes, assistant football coach and physical education instructor at Hinds, was also a graduate student of Lee’s at DSU. Lee’s tech-savvy is better than that – and he’d have it no other way, as a friend and former student, Oakes said.

“At the age of 82 years young, he still calls, texts and sends emails to check on me,” Oakes said. “I can’t say enough good things about Dr. Lee and the passion he has displayed as a lifetime educator.”

One message he’s made sure to get across to his students through the years is persistence in finding ways to pay for college.

“Nowadays, there’s so many ways you can pay for school,” Lee said. “Back in my day, either your parents had money or you got a scholarship. Thank goodness I got a scholarship, or I don’t know what I’d be right now. Without Hinds Community College and Delta State, I don’t know what I’d be.”

Homecoming events for 2016 are:

Wednesday, September 21

50+ Reunion & Luncheon

10 a.m., Fountain Hall

Honoring the college class of 1966 and high school and college classes prior

 

Thursday, September 22

5 p.m., Mayo Gym

The Alumni Recognition Dinner honoring Alumnus of the Year Dr. Wayne Lee, Alumni Service Award Recipient Sen. Dean Kirby and the 2016 Sports Hall of Fame Inductees including John Earl Hagan, Jaret Holmes, Christi Smith, Oliver P. “Pete” Stone and Freddie Townsend (posthumously)

 

Homecoming football game

Hinds vs. Pearl River Community College

7 p.m. Joe Renfroe Stadium

Halftime presentation of Homecoming Court, Alumni Awards recipients and Sports Hall of Fame inductees; performances by the Eagle Marching Band and Hi-Steppers with a special appearance by Hi-Stepper Alumni

 

For tickets or more information, call 601.857.3363.

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Rankin legislator demonstrates deep support, named Hinds CC Alumni Service Award recipient
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13 September

Rankin legislator demonstrates deep support, named Hinds CC Alumni Service Award recipient

State Sen. Dean Kirby referred to himself as a “spoke in the wheel” in 2009 during the celebration of the new Career-Technical Education building Hinds Community College had then recently acquired.

But  Kirby of Pearl, this year’s Alumni Service Award recipient, is much more than that when it comes to support of community colleges, Hinds Community College in particular and especially the Rankin Campus.

He will be honored along with Alumnus of the Year Dr. Wayne Lee and Sports Hall of Fame inductees John Earl Hagan, a Jackson native who lives in Homewood, Ala.; Jaret Holmes, a Clinton native who lives in Edwards; Christi Smith, a Pearl native who lives in Flowood; Oliver P. “Pete” Stone of Vicksburg and the late Freddie Townsend of Pelahatchie at a dinner at 5 p.m. Sept. 22 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus.

kirby-headshot

A legislator since 1992, Kirby was a key player in the 2008 Legislature in helping Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse persuade legislators to support a special appropriation to purchase what was the United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Gulf Coast Regional Training Center on Commercial Park Drive off Greenfield Road in Pearl.

“We never would have been able to acquire the building from the plumbers union without his assistance and without his knowing how to get it done,” said Muse, who has known the Rankin County legislator and retired insurance executive for more than 20 years. “He was able to work through the minefield and get us some help to enable us to buy that building, which, by the way, is one of the finest buildings in the entire district. We’ve got it full of students right now.”

At the time, Kirby chaired the Senate Finance Committee, which handles capital improvement bonds. Hinds paid $3.2 million for the building that appraised for three or four times that with a special Fiscal Year 2009 state bond appropriation along with additional capital funding support from Rankin County.

Kirby remembers well when Muse approached him about helping to get state funding for the building.

“It helped at the time that the lieutenant governor was Phil Bryant, who had gone to Hinds. Dr. Muse came to me and said, ‘Dean, we’ve got this great deal. It will really help your area and it will really help Hinds a whole lot,’” Kirby recalled.

Kirby said it didn’t hurt either that the words “Gulf Coast” were in the name of the building just a few years after Hurricane Katrina. After he made his case from the podium of the Senate floor, “everybody said it’s a great deal.”

The building now houses classes for plumbing, electrical, welding, industrial maintenance, practical nursing and Associate Degree Nursing with about 200 students and 24 total employees.

A Pearl High School graduate, Kirby’s relationship with Hinds goes back to his years as a Mississippi College basketball player when he was teammates with former Hinds basketball players or adversaries against current Hinds players.

“When I was at Pearl High School everyone knew about Hinds,” he said. His Mississippi College freshman basketball team played the Hinds team, which was then based on the Raymond Campus. He’s close friends still with many Hinds alumni from the basketball days, including Harlan Stanley, J.W. Barnes and Rep. Tom Weathersby, his colleague in the Legislature.

Years later when he opened his insurance office and Hinds began construction of the Rankin Campus, which opened in 1983, he met Jimmy C. Smith, who is retired as vice president of the campus. As the campus was being constructed, Smith had an office in a trailer nearby.

“Dean was very supportive. His office was right there on Airport Road. I got to know him when I was in the little trailer house across the street from him. I could go to his office and sit down and talk to him,” Smith said. “He was very supportive of education, period. As far as funding for the community colleges, he was my point person. I would always go to him any time there was a bill that Dr. Muse was working on.”

Said Kirby: “I’ve tried to be involved as much as I could without being in the way. Anything Dr. Muse asked for, I tried to get. He knows a lot more about running a community college than I do. If he says that needs to be done, then I believe him.”

Kirby calls the campus in Pearl one of the greatest engines of economic progress in the county. “I never dreamed how much it would mean to Rankin County, how important it would be to those people that are maybe married and out of school and want to continue their education. It’s really been helpful,” he said. “I’m really excited about Hinds and what it has done for Rankin County, and hopefully we’ve been as good to Hinds as Hinds has been to us.”

Over the years Kirby and Muse have collaborated many times for the community college system, but none of their projects has been more successful than the Rankin Campus Career-Technical Education building, which got a new attractive and more visible boulevard street entrance over the summer.

Kirby said he helped negotiate the purchase of the land with the Pearl mayor, who wanted part of the land for a new fire department. “I was involved in the initial negotiations for the right away. I got a call from Dr. Muse saying, ‘We need a better entrance because it’s behind a couple buildings. Do you think you can handle that?’” Kirby said.

Most recently, Kirby spoke to the Mississippi Association of Community and Junior College Trustees at their summer conference.

“I requested that he come to the coast and provide for all the community colleges an update on the Legislature. He came and did a great job. He has always been ready to help the community colleges and particularly Hinds,” Muse said.

“He is one of the finest legislators that we have at the Capitol. He is very competent, he always does his homework on every piece of legislation that comes to him and his committee. He always has an open door for the community colleges.”

 

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC schedules homecoming activities for alumni Sept. 21-22
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13 September

Hinds CC schedules homecoming activities for alumni Sept. 21-22

Hinds Community College celebrates homecoming Sept. 21-22 with activities honoring alumni.

Wednesday, September 21

50+ Reunion & Luncheon

10 a.m., Fountain Hall

Honoring the college class of 1966 and high school and college classes prior

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Thursday, September 22

5 p.m., Mayo Gym

The Alumni Recognition Dinner honoring Alumnus of the Year Dr. Wayne Lee, Alumni Service Award Recipient Sen. Dean Kirby and the 2016 Sports Hall of Fame Inductees including John Earl Hagan, Jaret Holmes, Christi Smith, Oliver P. “Pete” Stone and Freddie Townsend (posthumously)

 

Homecoming football game

Hinds vs. Pearl River Community College

7 p.m. Joe Renfroe Stadium

Halftime presentation of Homecoming Court, Alumni Awards recipients and Sports Hall of Fame inductees; performances by the Eagle Marching Band and Hi-Steppers with a special appearance by Hi-Stepper Alumni

 

For tickets or more information, call 601.857.3363.

 

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students
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09 September

Hinds CC a perfect place to start nursing careers for young, older students

JACKSON – Careers in healthcare often come from life experiences that put people up close and personal with matters of life and death.

Tiffany Roberts and Al Brennan, both of Pearl and prospective students in programs offered at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, see nursing school as chances to repay or improve on gifts of life.

Tiffany Roberts, second from left, of Pearl, listens to a presentation in the Associate Degree Nursing Learning Lab at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Tiffany Roberts, second from left, of Pearl, listens to a presentation in the Associate Degree Nursing Learning Lab at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“When I was 15, my brother had an accident and spent several months in an ICU,” said Roberts, a mother of three who’s ready to go back to school in the medical field. “I knew at that point in time, standing in his room, what I wanted to do.”

Brennan used to work behind the camera making television commercials. A series of medical experiences led to a switch to healthcare. Now, he’s a mental health technician has his sights set on a career of service in nursing.

Al Brennan, of Pearl, speaks with Kim Neely, coordinator of Continuing Education for Short Term Programs at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Al Brennan, of Pearl, speaks with Kim Neely, coordinator of Continuing Education for Short Term Programs at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“My grandmother had Alzheimer’s, then my son and I have been to an ER in the past, and I’ve been through bad experiences,” he said. “It was just the insensitivity in patient care that really got my attention. I’d want to be the type of nurse that would want to reach out and show compassion, work with doctors and help the patient.”

Both were among about 120 people who attended the 2016 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 6 at NAHC.

Prospective students and others toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty, explored the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

“Guests spoke with our faculty one-on-one to learn about our programs of study and the promising careers in healthcare that Hinds graduates obtain,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

Programs showcased included Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emergency Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Health Care Assistant, Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Nursing Assistant and Phlebotomy.

“Graduates of our programs are employed at rates of 90 to 100 percent within a year of graduation and consistently meet national benchmarks for licensure/registry pass rates,” said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean of Nursing and Allied Health.

The program’s solid reputation brought Rachel Norton, of Clinton, back to earn additional credentials as she builds her career.

Rachel Norton, of Clinton, seeks information about continuing her education at the 2016 Fall Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Norton is a Hinds graduate who wants to return to complete the college's Physical Therapy Assistant program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Rachel Norton, of Clinton, seeks information about continuing her education at the 2016 Fall Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. Norton is a Hinds graduate who wants to return to complete the college’s Physical Therapy Assistant program. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“I’m already graduate of Hinds,” Norton said. “I’ve come back to complete the Physical Therapy Assistant program.”

Alexis Vaughn, 16, of Brandon, has graduated a year early from high school and already has the energy to serve. She’s considering Hinds for the program’s successes and its proximity to home.

Alexis Vaughn, center foreground, speaks about the George Ball Simulation Center with support staff member Lesa McFarland at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. From left, Vaughn's mother and sister, Marsha and Madison Vaughn. On the table is a manikin used to simulate various life functions in the simulation facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Alexis Vaughn, center foreground, speaks about the Dr. George Ball Simulation Center with support staff member Lesa McFarland at the Fall 2016 Nursing Showcase at Hinds Community College Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center. From left, Vaughn’s mother and sister, Marsha and Madison Vaughn. On the table is a manikin used to simulate various life functions in the simulation facility. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

“Nursing is something I’ve always wanted to do because I like helping people and the impact nurses have on people’s lives,” Vaughn said.

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

The Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center is at 1750 Chadwick Drive. For more information on individual programs, call 601-376-4807 or visit http://www.hindscc.edu. 

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