http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Andrew Jackson Boy Scout council honors Hinds CC President Muse

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Andrew Jackson Boy Scout council honors Hinds CC President Muse
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31 August

Andrew Jackson Boy Scout council honors Hinds CC President Muse

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse was honored with the Distinguished Citizen Award by the Andrew Jackson Council of Boy Scouts of America at a dinner that raised a record $52,500 for the council. Muse has the nickname of the “godfather” of the Mississippi community college system.

Anthony Haines, CEO/Scout executive for the Andrew Jackson Council, thanked Muse for participating in the Aug. 30 event at the Hilton in Jackson that raised more money for the council than has ever been raised at this event.boyscoutsevent-78_web

“There are three things I know about you when it comes to the Boy Scouts of America,” he said. “You support us financially. You support us with your voice. You support us with your actions, and that’s all we can ask.”

Muse was also recognized by the Boy Scouts in 1988 with the Silver Beaver Award, a council-level distinguished service award. In June 2015 received the Whitney Young Service Award along with his friend Dr. Robert Smith.

“I was a Scout in my earlier days, and I enjoyed scouting. It meant a lot to me as I grew up,” he said.

Troop 92 meets at Raymond United Methodist Church, which Muse attends. “Troop 92 in our church has top priority. We enjoy supporting Scouting,” Muse said.

Master of Ceremonies Dr. David Cole, retired president of Itawamba Community College, is credited with coining the title “godfather” as Muse’s nickname.

“It is because of the nurturing care that he provides that we affectionately and reverently call him ‘godfather,’” he said. “Or it could be that, when he enters the room, all of us who are his peers stand and salute and get in line to kiss the ring. We have seen many others do that also, especially in elected positions and those seeking favor from his wide influence.”

Cole said Muse’s influence extends not only within Mississippi but outside the state.

“Originally there were only two people in Mississippi known by their first names. If you called the first name you didn’t have to call the last name. One was Elvis; the other one is Clyde,” Cole said. “If you walked in the state Capitol, looked around and asked anybody, ‘Has Clyde gotten here yet?’ they would tell you because they knew exactly who you were talking about. Whether it was a porter, whether it was a housekeeper or whether it was the governor.”boyscoutsevent-1_web

Jackie Granberry, vice president for Advancement at Hinds Community College, said she read over the Boy Scout oath and found that Muse lives out its words.

“Clyde Muse is definitely a man of honor, dedicated to serving God and helping other people at all times,” she said. “He still rises at 4 a.m. each day and heads to the Wellness Complex, where he pursues his lifelong commitment to be physically strong and mentally awake. He has been challenged with difficult circumstances, yet he has remained morally straight.”

Granberry said when she asked Hinds employees for one word to describe Muse, the words she was told the most were “caring” and “compassionate.”

Jackie Granberrry, vice president for Advancement; Ted Kendall, former president of the Hinds Board of Trustees; Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. David Cole, retired president of Itawamba Community College

Jackie Granberrry, vice president for Advancement; Ted Kendall, former president of the Hinds Board of Trustees; Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Dr. David Cole, retired president of Itawamba Community College

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse receives the Distinguished Citizen Award from the Andrew Jackson Council of the Boy Scouts of America.

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse receives the Distinguished Citizen Award from the Andrew Jackson Council of the Boy Scouts of America.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ted Kendall, chairman of Gaddis Farms and former president of the Hinds Community College Board of Trustees, recalled his long years of friendship with Muse that began when Muse was superintendent of Hinds County schools and the two of them served on the board of Hinds Junior College.

When then-college president Dr. Robert Mayo announced his impending retirement, Kendall visited the Muses in Meridian and persuaded him and the late Vashti Muse to return to Hinds County.

“I’m proud to say he became the sixth president of Hinds Junior College in July 1978. He has exceeded all of our expectations,” Kendall said. “He’s been a major fundraiser for the local scouts and now tonight for the entire Andrew Jackson Council.”

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

 

 

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Hinds CC Utica student named to 2016 HBCU All-Stars
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26 August

Hinds CC Utica student named to 2016 HBCU All-Stars

UTICA – Always a people person, Hinds CC Utica sophomore Sabrevian Davis can now count herself among a select group of high-achieving people chosen by the nation’s highest office.

Davis, a Raymond native, is among 73 students from the nation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) named a top achiever by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Sabrevian Davis

Sabrevian Davis

As part of the honor, Davis, who is studying biology toward a pre-dental major, will participate in this year’s White House HBCU Conference Oct. 23-26 in Washington, D.C.

Sixty-three HBCUs nationwide are represented on this year’s list, comprised of undergraduate, graduate and professional students. All are recognized for their accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement.

Davis is a member of the Hinds CC Lady Bulldogs basketball team and of the campus’ Science, Technology Engineering and Mathematics Undergraduate Program (STEM-UP) Academy. She has attended multiple events associated with STEM careers, including conferences in the nation’s capital, a STEM internship at Jackson State University and a BalloonSAT experience in Huntsville, Ala.

“All these experiences allow me to have an advantage over other students in both community colleges and other undergraduates on the university level,” Davis said, adding her experience at Hinds has opened doors on many levels for her.

“The best part of my Hinds experience so far has been meeting new people,” Davis said. “I’ve always been a people-person, but I was a bit shy when I came out of high school. I’ve learned to open up and accept people easier. The people here, especially administration and staff, have definitely made my experience as a Bulldog worth it.”

HBCU All-Stars serve as ambassadors of the White House initiative by providing outreach and communication with fellow students on the value of education and the initiative’s role as a networking resource. Through social media and their relationships with community based organizations, the All-Stars will share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to achieve their educational and career potential.

“I am extremely excited for Sabrevian,” said Dr. Mitchell Shears, executive director of Title III (HBCU) and Sponsored Grants at the Utica Campus. “She is respected on our campus as a star athlete and performs well in her academic studies. This will be an opportunity that she will never forget, as she will have an opportunity to network and develop relationships with many White House officials and other students across the country.

In addition to attending the conference, Davis and other All-Stars will take part in various national events and web chats with professionals from a range of disciplines.

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Hinds CC Utica Campus awarded nearly $400,000 to fortify math scores
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23 August

Hinds CC Utica Campus awarded nearly $400,000 to fortify math scores

UTICA – Nearly $400,000 has been awarded to Hinds Community College Utica Campus to fortify its already robust math and science program.

The funding comes from the National Science Foundation and will support the Targeted Infusion Project, which aims to find and keep students interested in science, technology, engineering or math careers. Students are prepared to accelerate through developmental math courses in order to complete their associate degree and transfer to four-year institutions.

“We are very excited about this Targeted Infusion Project,” said Dr. Debra Mays-Jackson, vice president of the Utica and Vicksburg/Warren campuses. “The Utica Campus of Hinds Community College will use these funds to continue strengthening our STEM initiative and support students’ interest in math and science. We are a community college that is proud to be innovators in this multifaceted career choice.”

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) through Targeted Infusion Projects supports the development, implementation, and study of evidence-based innovative models and approaches for improving the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may pursue STEM graduate programs and/or careers.

At the Utica Campus, the project seeks to establish strategies to strengthen interventions and instruction to enhance student performance of high school and college students in mathematics. Specifics of the award from the independent federal agency mention 99 percent of the Utica Campus is African-American, with 64 percent being first-generation college students.

A four-point strategy to achieve goals in the project consists of (1) increasing high school students’ test scores on state assessments, performance-based assessments, ACT and the ACCUPLACER placement exam; (2) improve performance in developmental and college-level math courses; (3) increase awareness and interest of STEM education and careers; and (4) create a dynamic teaching and learning community that improves performance in developmental and non-developmental math courses and which transforms the Hinds Community College-Utica Campus academic/educational environment.

The project will be co-directed by Dr. Mitchell Shears, executive director of Title III (HBCU) and Sponsored Grants, who was academic dean at the time of the grant submission, and Mathematics Instructor Willie Perkins. Additionally, other members of the mathematics team, Demonia Hodge and Stephanie Williams, and the new academic dean, Dr. Marquise Loving, will be instrumental in implementing the project.

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Classes begin at Hinds CC Utica Campus
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16 August

Classes begin at Hinds CC Utica Campus

UTICA – Fall classes have commenced at Hinds Community College Utica Campus, and administrators are pleased with the start of the new semester.

“We are so eager to see our returning and new students! The first day of classes has gotten off to a tremendous start, and students are still flowing into the counseling offices to register for classes. We will continue to open sections to accommodate the influx, and we are accepting and placing all students who come to us,” said Dr. Marquise Loving, Utica campus academic dean.

Television and Radio Broadcasting program director Timothy Crisler explains the details of his program to freshman students. (Hinds Community College/Allison Morris)

Television and Radio Broadcasting program director Timothy Crisler explains the details of his program to freshman students. (Hinds Community College/Allison Morris)

Students may continue to register through Friday, Aug. 19 for full-term on campus courses and Sunday, Aug, 21 for full-term and first eight-week term online classes, with additional fees.

Transportation is available for Utica campus students in Vicksburg, Jackson, Crystal Springs, Hazlehurst, Utica Edwards, Bolton, Clinton, Terry, and Port Gibson. For more information about scheduling and pickup locations, students can contact the transportation department at 601.885.7080.

Mathematics instructor Willie Perkins outlines expectations for his eight-week math course at Hinds Community College Utica Campus. (Hinds Community College/Allison Morris)

Mathematics instructor Willie Perkins outlines expectations for his eight-week math course at Hinds Community College Utica Campus. (Hinds Community College/Allison Morris)

“We’d like students to be reminded that their student ID’s must be visibly worn at all times, and that all vehicles driven to campus must be registered. Decals can be purchased on campus at the business office. We’re looking forward to an outstanding year,” said Dean of Students Dr. Tim Rush.

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Classes begin for fall 2016 semester at Hinds CC Rankin Campus
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16 August

Classes begin for fall 2016 semester at Hinds CC Rankin Campus

PEARL – Classes began Monday for fall 2016 at each of Hinds Community College’s six locations across central Mississippi, including the Rankin Campus. Students and instructors enjoyed a busy first day of class at Rankin.

Late registration ends Friday, Aug. 19. Registration for online classes ends Sunday, Aug. 21.

All students are asked to stop by the administration building for information on admissions, counseling, financial aid and testing.

Receptionist Sue Bankston, right, gives freshman student Destiny Thomas, of Morton, directions to her first class on the first day of the fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Receptionist Sue Bankston, right, gives freshman student Destiny Thomas, of Morton, directions to her first class on the first day of the fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

Tiffany Gaskin, a library technical assistant at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus helps freshman Cole Harris, of Morton, log into the My.Hinds system on the first day of the fall 2016 semester. Harris is studying Business Marketing Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Tiffany Gaskin, a library technical assistant at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus helps freshman Cole Harris, of Morton, log into the My.Hinds system on the first day of the fall 2016 semester. Harris is studying Business Marketing Technology. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

Freshman students James Grice, center, of Pelahatchie, and Jordyn Riddle, of Jackson, wait in line to purchase materials at the bookstore on the first day of the fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Grice is studying Electrical Technology. Riddle is studying Business Marketing. (Hinds Communtity College/April Garon)

Freshman students James Grice, center, of Pelahatchie, and Jordyn Riddle, of Jackson, wait in line to purchase materials at the bookstore on the first day of the fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Grice is studying Electrical Technology. Riddle is studying Business Marketing. (Hinds Communtity College/April Garon)

 

Freshmen students Patrick Murphy, Nick Fraser and Stone Smith, all of Flowood, make their way to a class on the first day of the fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Murphy is studying Radiologic Technology. Smith and Fraser are studying Business Management. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Freshmen students Patrick Murphy, Nick Fraser and Stone Smith, all of Flowood, make their way to a class on the first day of the fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. Murphy is studying Radiologic Technology. Smith and Fraser are studying Business Management. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

History instructor Joy Rhoads teaches American History I on the first day of the fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

History instructor Joy Rhoads teaches American History I on the first day of the fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

Resource Specialist Ouida Holland, right, directs Radiologic Technology student Xochitl Vazquez to her next class on the first day of the fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Resource Specialist Ouida Holland, right, directs Radiologic Technology student Xochitl Vazquez to her next class on the first day of the fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Rankin Campus. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

 

 

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Classes begin at Hinds CC amid heady plans for fresh, faces, older students
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16 August

Classes begin at Hinds CC amid heady plans for fresh, faces, older students

RAYMOND – Megan Bergeron knew it was time to get back in school once she saw the cost of not having a job with health insurance benefits.

“I’m here because I’ve realized the value of having it,” said Bergeron, 30, of Clinton, who will study Respiratory Care Technology at Hinds Community College this semester.

Megan Bergeron, of Clinton, purchases a textbook on the first day of the Fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. Bergeron is a sophomore studying respiratory therapy. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Megan Bergeron, of Clinton, purchases a textbook on the first day of the Fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College Raymond Campus. Bergeron is a sophomore studying respiratory therapy. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Classes began Monday for fall 2016 at each of the college’s six locations. Late registration ends Friday, Aug. 19. Registration for online classes ends Sunday, Aug. 21.

Bergeron plans to take her studies into a healthcare job she already knows something about.

“My aunt is a respiratory therapist, so I’m trying for something in a hospital setting,” she said.

Also moving toward a healthcare career, one class at a time, is Taylor Conway, also of Clinton.

Taylor Conway, left, of Clinton, stops for help finding a class on the first day of the Fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College's Raymond Campus. Seated at the table are recruiters Shane Brown, foreground, and Chris Evans. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Taylor Conway, left, of Clinton, stops for help finding a class on the first day of the Fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. Seated at the table are recruiters Shane Brown, foreground, and Chris Evans. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

“I’m in my third semester,” said Conway, studying to be a dietician. “It doesn’t get that much harder as much as every class is just different.”

Godey Coleus was used to imposing his will on opposing ball carriers during his high school football days in Tampa, Fla. As his five-class schedule of studies approached, the defensive lineman prospect spoke of continuing that part of his life and little bit more.

Godey Coleus, left foreground, a freshman student from Tampa, Fla., stops for help finding a class on the first day of the Fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College's Raymond Campus. At the table are recruiters Shane Brown, foreground, and Chris Evans. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Godey Coleus, left foreground, a freshman student from Tampa, Fla., stops for help finding a class on the first day of the Fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus. At the table are recruiters Shane Brown, foreground, and Chris Evans. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

“I’m studying business administration,” said during a break between classes. “I want to start my own company or look into banking or finance.”

Blair McIntosh’s quest for notebooks ended successfully in the campus bookstore – a result he hopes to duplicate in his studies.

Blair McIntosh, left, of Jackson, checks out some notebooks at the Raymond Campus bookstore on the first day of the Fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College. Behind the counter is Susan Anthony. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

Blair McIntosh, left, of Jackson, checks out some notebooks at the Raymond Campus bookstore on the first day of the Fall 2016 semester at Hinds Community College. Behind the counter is Susan Anthony. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

“I’m going into computer science,” said McIntosh, a Chicago native and two-year Jackson resident. “I’m undecided on if that’ll be in networking, programming or tech support, but it’ll be in computers.”

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Hinds CC alum Jeff Henderson wins gold at Summer Olympics
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14 August

Hinds CC alum Jeff Henderson wins gold at Summer Olympics

Hinds CC alum Jeff Henderson wins the gold.

Hinds CC alum Jeff Henderson wins the gold.

Former Hinds Community College long jump standout Jeff Henderson won a gold medal Saturday in the men’s long jump at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. His winning jump was 8.38M.Jeff Henderson.jpg

Henderson competed Saturday, Aug. 13 in the men’s long jump event at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

In July, Henderson won his second career United States long jump title in Eugene, Oregon to qualify for the U.S. team.

Henderson, a native of Sherwood, Ark., and recent inductee into the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) Track and Field Hall of Fame Class of 2016, leaped 28 feet, 2 and ¼ inches during the trials to pick up his second U.S. championship and first since 2014.

He also came in the runner-up spot in 2013 and 2015.

While at Hinds, Henderson won three NJCAA national championships in the long jump in 2008 and 2009, as well as a national championship in the 4×100 meter relay.

For more information on Hinds Community College athletes, see HindsCCSports.com

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Hinds CC nursing, allied health graduates share stories
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12 August

Hinds CC nursing, allied health graduates share stories

Zachary Lilley of Florence couldn’t let his wife one-up him. Last year Ashley Lilley finished her Associate Degree in Nursing at Hinds Community College so this year it was Zach’s turn.

“I’ve been an LPN (licensed practical nurse) for five years now,” said Lilley, 29, who, along with his wife, works at the Mississippi State Hospital at Whitfield. “I couldn’t let her be ahead of me.”

Zachary Lilley of Florence graduated from Hinds Community College on July 29 with an Associate Degree in Nursing.

Zachary Lilley of Florence graduated from Hinds Community College on July 29 with an Associate Degree in Nursing.

Lilley commuted back and forth to Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus for the Transition to RN program and has already begun the RN to BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) at University of Mississippi Medical Center. The couple has three children ages 10 months, 3 and 10.

“It’s stressful. It’s very stressful – but it’s only for a year and you can get through anything for a year,” he said.

But his wife was a true partner. “She could tell me her past experiences what she thought was important and was not so important,” Lilley said. “Getting the kids off when I had clinicals. They had babysitters so I didn’t have to worry about babysitters. She handled all that.”

Hinds Community College conferred 467 degrees and certificates to 405 graduates in two graduation ceremonies Friday, July 29

at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. “A good number of our graduates are earning more than one community college credential,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse.

Of the total number of graduates, 56 graduated summa cum laude, which is a perfect 4.0 grade point average; 36 graduated magna cum laude, which is a 3.60 to 3.99 grade point average and 66 graduated cum laude, which is a 3.20 to 3.59 grade point average.

 

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse

“I suspect if we polled each graduate, nearly all would say they went to college to make things better — for themselves and for their families,” Muse said. “The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life.  And, while the graduates here today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life.”

The speaker for both graduation ceremonies was Dr. Ed Davis, director of the doctoral program for Rural Community College leaders at Mississippi State University.

“The good thing about the job I have had for the past few years is I have had the chance to go across the nation and work with other community

Dr. Ed Davis, director of the doctoral program for Rural Community College leaders at Mississippi State University, was the graduation speaker.

Dr. Ed Davis, director of the doctoral program for Rural Community College leaders at Mississippi State University, was the graduation speaker.

college programs in a lot of states and in a lot of regions,” Davis said. “There are two things they know when you go to other states: They know Dr. Muse, and they know Hinds Community College. I think that’s a testament to the work and dedication of administrators, the faculty and staff of Hinds Community College and the leadership of Dr. Muse. The quality of programs at Hinds Community College is known nationwide.”

Jeffery Walters of Jackson received a certificate in the paramedic program. At age 49, he already works for AMR in Jackson.

Jeffery Walters of Jackson received a certificate in the paramedic program. At age 49, he already works for AMR in Jackson. Celebrating with him are his daughter, Lacey Walters and granddaughter Karri Walters.

Jeffery Walters of Jackson received a certificate in the paramedic program. At age 49, he already works for AMR in Jackson. Celebrating with him are his daughter, Lacey Walters and granddaughter Karri Walters.

“It is difficult — difficult but rewarding would be the best way to describe it,” he said. “It was difficult finding time to study because I did work fulltime at the same time.

“I told myself that, as old as I am, that after I got out of EMT school I am done with school, too old. But family, friends and coworkers finally talked me into coming back and stepping on up,” Walters said.

One of the happiest people at summer graduation had to be Lotoya Patterson of Vicksburg, who received her practical nursing degree at age 30.

“This was an emotional roller coaster but I thank God because if it wasn’t for him I wouldn’t be here,” she said. “When they say rigorous it was very rigorous. But I thank God because they prepared us to get ready for the world, to be in the hospital showing us what we have got to be prepared for. I’m really thankful to have come to Hinds Community College because their program is very rigorous.”

Lotoya Patterson of Vicksburg received her practical nursing degree at age 30 from Hinds Community College on July 29.

Lotoya Patterson of Vicksburg received her practical nursing degree at age 30 from Hinds Community College on July 29.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

 

Chelsi Pearce and Lauren Sikorski, both of Brandon, holding flowers received their degrees in medical lab technology from Hinds Community College on July 29. With them are their instructors, LaJuanda Portis, far left, and Amber Reulet, far right.

Chelsi Pearce and Lauren Sikorski, both of Brandon, holding flowers received their degrees in medical lab technology from Hinds Community College on July 29. With them are their instructors, LaJuanda Portis, far left, and Amber Reulet, far right.

Kathryn Beckham of Brandon received a degree from Hinds Community College in dental assisting on July 29. With her are dad Vernon Beckham and stepmom Leslie Beckham.

Kathryn Beckham of Brandon received a degree from Hinds Community College in dental assisting on July 29. With her are dad Vernon Beckham and stepmom Leslie Beckham.

Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus, assisted with July 29 summer graduation ceremonies at Hinds Community College.

Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus, assisted with July 29 summer graduation ceremonies at Hinds Community College.

Ashley McIlroy of Jackson graduated from Hinds Community College on July 29 with a practical nursing degree. With her are aunts, JoAnn Johnson, left, and Dorothy Dupree, right.

Ashley McIlroy of Jackson graduated from Hinds Community College on July 29 with a practical nursing degree. With her are aunts, JoAnn Johnson, left, and Dorothy Dupree, right.

Hinds Community College retiree Dr. Mary Ann Greene of Clinton was the grand marshal and mace bearer at the July 29 summer graduation ceremonies.

Hinds Community College retiree Dr. Mary Ann Greene of Clinton was the grand marshal and mace bearer at the July 29 summer graduation ceremonies.

 

Kimberly Denny of Vidalia, La., commuted across the Mississippi River to attend classes at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus. At age 47 she received her Associate Degree in Nursing, a journey she started when she was 18. Now with two daughters, 21 and 26, she decided it was “my time. I can do it for me, not for them,” she said.

Kimberly Denny of Vidalia, La., commuted across the Mississippi River to attend classes at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus. At age 47 she received her Associate Degree in Nursing, a journey she started when she was 18. Now with two daughters, 21 and 26, she decided it was “my time. I can do it for me, not for them,” she said.

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Hinds CC partnership with industry grows workforce on Mississippi River
Posted by
11 August

Hinds CC partnership with industry grows workforce on Mississippi River

VICKSBURG – Tossing a heavy, 12-foot mooring rope off a barge on the Mississippi River is a calling for some and simply a rough-sounding job for others.

Chad Vickers and Garrett Williams each have trained to do this now, and, though they took different paths to the “marine life,” they have specialized deckhand training through Hinds Community College and Golding Barge Line.

Chad Vickers turns equipment on a barge used for training purposes at Golding Barge in Vicksburg. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Chad Vickers turns equipment on a barge used for training purposes at Golding Barge in Vicksburg. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“It runs in my family,” said Vickers, 24, a Vicksburg native and Level 2 deckhand with the River City-based barge company. “They’ve been on the water all my life. My grandfather owned a ferry on the Yazoo River and we all fished.”

This past winter, he completed a 7 ½- day deckhand training course offered since 2014 and paid for by the Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant to nine members of the Mississippi River Transportation, Distribution and Logistics consortium, of which Hinds is a part. Although the grant ends in October, the college and its industry partners have worked together to keep the training available to those who want to enter the marine transport industry.

“The transportation sector is one of the largest industries in our service area.” said Chad Stocks, vice president of Career, Technical, and Workforce Education. “With the expansion of the Panama Canal and more manufacturing companies locating or expanding in the college’s service area, the ability to move goods up and down the river is essential. This training program provides qualified workers to do this work and I am thrilled that we were able to set the program up with the grant and sustain it with industry partnerships.”

Deckhands in the industry make in the $20,000 to $30,000 range annually. As a trained tankerman, Vickers stands to get a significant raise in life – to about $65,000. And he’s all in for the gig.

“I’ll be doing tankerman training next – working my way up the ladder like everyone else,” he said. “Hopefully, I’ll make it to the top soon.”

Garrett Williams reads measurements on a barge used for instructional purposes at Goldling Barge in Vicksburg. The equipment allows workers to check the level of liquid product inside the barge. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Garrett Williams reads measurements on a barge used for instructional purposes at Goldling Barge in Vicksburg. The equipment allows workers to check the level of liquid product inside the barge. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Williams is climbing the same ladder. The Rolling Fork native already had a bachelor’s degree in Education from Delta State University, but switched careers due to the earnings potential on the water.

“I found out about the program from a friend after being laid off from a job in oilfield services,” said Williams, a tankerman trainee. “Other people had talked to me about how good a company and job it is, and wanted to put myself in a position to follow behind them.”

Hinds and industry veterans with Maritime Services of Louisiana are training employees of Golding, Yazoo River Towing and Magnolia Marine.

Students are evaluated and certified accordingly after completing the training, in which they touch on every aspect of working on a barge – from throwing and securing a line, operating a johnboat, rigging, among other practical skills. Hands-on sessions are conducted after classroom sessions each morning and testing. The effect it’s had has been companies getting job-ready workers without interrupting workflow.

From left, Chad Vickers, Garrett Williams, and Golding Barge vice president of Human Resources Stirlin Hancock. (April Garon/ Hinds Community College)

From left, Chad Vickers, Garrett Williams, and Golding Barge vice president of Human Resources Stirlin Hancock. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“Experienced industry veterans instruct the training,” said Stirlin Hancock, vice president of human resources at Golding Barge. “So, we fully intend for the training to go forward after the grant is up. We’re working with Hinds to make that happen.”

For information about enrolling in the deckhand training program offered in Vicksburg through Hinds Community College, contact Marvin Moak, dean of Hinds’ Vicksburg-Warren Campus, at 601-629-6805.

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Hinds CC graduates more than 400 in summer ceremony
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08 August

Hinds CC graduates more than 400 in summer ceremony

PEARL — Cynthia Jones decision on what to study in college took a while, but her look on graduation day was all about speed.

“Everything in my house is decorated cheetah,” Jones said, with her favorite animal print adorning her shoes and top of her mortarboard. A silver C shined bright in the middle of black and gold wildcat spots.

Hinds Community College Jackson Campus- Academic/Technical Center student Cynthia Jones graduated with an Associate of Arts in General Studies and plans to study healthcare administration at a four- year institution. She decorated her hat in her favorite pattern, Cheetah, and her first initial. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Hinds Community College Jackson Campus- Academic/Technical Center student Cynthia Jones graduated with an Associate of Arts in General Studies and plans to study healthcare administration at a four-year institution. She decorated her hat in her favorite pattern, cheetah spots, and her first initial. At left, Jones shows off her cheetah-print shoes. (Hinds Community College/April Garon)

Jones graduated from Hinds Community College on Friday, July 29 with an Associate in Arts degree in General Studies, a credential she hopes will be a first step to an advanced degree in healthcare administration.

“My mom is a registered nurse at UMMC in Jackson,” she said. “What I want to do is open a daycare with a medical staff to help out parents who often have to spend time and money taking care of their kids when they are sick. It will be daycare with a little bit of healthcare.”

Cynthia Jones 2

Hinds Community College conferred 467 degrees and certificates to 405 graduates in two graduation ceremonies at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. “A good number of our graduates are earning more than one community college credential,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse.

Of that number, 256 students have chosen to participate in one of the two summer ceremonies.

Of the total number of graduates, 56 graduated summa cum laude, which is a perfect 4.0 grade point average; 36 graduated magna cum laude, which is a 3.60 to 3.99 grade point average and 66 graduated cum laude, which is a 3.20 to 3.59 grade point average.

Among those were friends Jawanza Tillman and Amber Taylor, who met while attending the Utica Campus.

Jawanza Tillman, left, looks on as her friend, Amber Taylor checks her hat using her smartphone camera just before summer graduation at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College. Tillman earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Early Childhood Development, while Taylor's Associate of Arts is in Accounting. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Jawanza Tillman, left, looks on as her friend, Amber Taylor checks her hat using her smartphone camera just before summer graduation at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College. Tillman earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Early Childhood Development, while Taylor’s Associate of Arts is in Accounting. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“This day is special because it’s us, it’s two friends graduating,” Tillman said. Her Associate of Applied Science degree is in Early Childhood Development, while Taylor’s Associate of Arts is in Accounting.

As much as Lemond Williams credits his instructors for making his graduation from Hinds Community College possible, it was inspiration at home that cheered him loudest.

“It was actually my wife who inspired me to come to college,” said Williams, a machine operator at Batesville Casket in Vicksburg who earned career and technical certificates on Friday during summer graduation ceremonies.

Lemond Williams, second from right, was among more than 400 graduates to whom degrees and certificates were conferred on Friday, July 29, 2016 during summer graduation ceremonies held at the Muse Center on Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. From left, John Singleton, Williams’ father-in-law, Genean Edmond, his daughter, Tanna Williams, his wife, Williams, and Marcelina Singleton, his mother-in-law. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Lemond Williams, second from right, was among more than 400 graduates to whom degrees and certificates were conferred on Friday, July 29, 2016 during summer graduation ceremonies held at the Muse Center on Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. From left, John Singleton, Williams’ father-in-law, Genean Edmond, his daughter, Tanna Williams, his wife, Williams, and Marcelina Singleton, his mother-in-law. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

The lifelong journeyman balanced work and school with grueling, 17-hour days – working his dawn-to-dusk shift at the plant, then attending classes at the college’s Vicksburg-Warren Campus. It wasn’t easy, his wife, Tanna, agreed, but he made it happen.

“He hadn’t ever been to college, so it was just amazing,” she said. “I’m so proud of him.”

The speaker for both graduation ceremonies was Dr. Ed Davis, director of the doctoral program for Rural Community College leaders at Mississippi State University.

“Many of you graduating today have chosen a path to go into the world of work immediately. Your terminal degree will provide you access to jobs providing for your family and love ones.  You are to be commended for having the desire to become proficient in an area that is needed and seek out employment,” Davis said. “Some you are only beginning the pursuit of a degree. You now will go on to other institutions and seek to reach a level of a certain type with your next steps.

“I challenge you all to be, whatever your professional choice, invested in the communities, towns, homes and regions where you will live.  Become involved, not just in your life, and those of your loved ones and friends.  Find ways to reach out and serve.  I promise you will live a more fulfilled life if you strive to do as much good to all around you every day,” Davis said.

“I suspect if we polled each graduate, nearly all would say they went to college to make things better — for themselves and for their families,” Muse said. “The power of education is that it drives our vision for a better life.  And, while the graduates here today represent a diverse set of circumstances, they are connected by their belief that a community college education is a step up to a broader opportunity to build a better life.”

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