http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC cheerleaders take top prizes at summer cheer camp

Monthly Archives: July 2016

Hinds CC cheerleaders take top prizes at summer cheer camp
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28 July

Hinds CC cheerleaders take top prizes at summer cheer camp

Hinds Community College cheerleaders won superior blue ribbons in four categories at the 2016 Universal Cheerleaders Association College Spirit Camp held July 22-25 at the University of Alabama.

Hinds Community College cheerleaders won superior ratings in four categories at the 2016 UCA College Spirit Camp held July 22-25 at the University of Alabama. Front row, from left, Libby Burgess, Julia Hall, Hannah Adcock, Courtney Jamison, Baylee Ponder, Rae Partridge; second row, from left, Head Coach Ashley Horne, Chris Westlake, Richard Torres, Powell Pearson, Addison Sumrall, Roy Aguilar, Alex Hutton, Assistant Coach Cory Boyd; third row, on shoulder sits, Micaela Williamson, Madison Gregory, Alyanna Poole, Grace Berry, Breyana Minor, Ivy Depriest.

Hinds Community College cheerleaders won superior ratings in four categories at the 2016 UCA College Spirit Camp held July 22-25 at the University of Alabama. Front row, from left, Libby Burgess, Julia Hall, Hannah Adcock, Courtney Jamison, Baylee Ponder, Rae Partridge; second row, from left, Head Coach Ashley Horne, Chris Westlake, Richard Torres, Powell Pearson, Addison Sumrall, Roy Aguilar, Alex Hutton, Assistant Coach Cory Boyd; third row, on shoulder sits, Micaela Williamson, Madison Gregory, Alyanna Poole, Grace Berry, Breyana Minor, Ivy Depriest.

The 18-member Hinds cheer squad swept four areas in competition, winning top honors in the fight song, sideline cheer, sideline chant and gameday overall categories. It marked the team’s first appearance at the annual summer camp in more than 10 years, said Head Cheer Coach Ashley Horne.

“I am extremely proud of this team, being Hinds CC hasn’t stepped foot in a camp in over 10 years,” Horne said. “They went, and not only made a statement but brought home five pieces of hardware and four blue, all-superior ribbons and beat teams that have been to camp every year!”

The 18-member Hinds Community College cheer squad won the top honors in the fight song, sideline cheer, sideline chant and gameday overall categories.

The 18-member Hinds Community College cheer squad won the top honors in the fight song, sideline cheer, sideline chant and gameday overall categories.

Hinds’ cheerleaders finished as a top-six team overall among schools that competed. The team also won the association’s Cheer Improvement Award, based on the performance during the camp. Four members were chosen to try out for positions on the UCA staff next summer – Grace Berry, a freshman out of Pearl High School, Ivy DePriest, a freshman out of Northwest Rankin High School, Madison Gregory, out of Vancleave High School, and Alyanna Poole, out of Wayne County High School.

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Disciple of nursing icons credits Hinds ADN program’s ‘hands-on’ approach
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15 July

Disciple of nursing icons credits Hinds ADN program’s ‘hands-on’ approach

JACKSON – A stellar career for Becky Tustain teaching aspiring nurses in Hinds’ Associate Degree Nursing program began with just a small request of her husband.

“When I came here in 1975, I asked my family for two years to go to school,” she said. “I didn’t think I could ask my family to give me but two years. I’ve gone on to a lot since then, but in my heart, I’m an associate degree nurse.”

Becky Tustain, a retired former instructor in the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College, shows equipment in the learning lab at the college's Nursing Allied Health Center. She and fellow instructors designed the lab when the center was built in 1982. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Becky Tustain, a retired former instructor in the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College, shows equipment in the learning lab at the college’s Nursing Allied Health Center. She and fellow instructors designed the lab when the center was built in 1982. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

A decade out of Central High School in Jackson and already a mother of one of her three children, Tustain grabbed ahold of an education in nursing that morphed quickly into a profession. She earned her ADN credential from Hinds in 1977, then moved on to William Carey College for her bachelor’s five years later, all the while working as an instructor in Hinds’ program and a staff nurse at Mercy Regional Medical Center in Vicksburg, where she settled and still resides.

She completed her master’s in Nursing Education from the University of Mississippi in 1986. She retired from Hinds in 1995 to pursue a Nurse Practitioner’s credential, which she earned from Mississippi University for Women in 1998.

Such a quick turnaround from learning to teaching in the program meant she was with ladies she still calls the “icons” of the nursing program, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.

“Eunice Pace was our first dean at NAHC, then it was Bobbie Anderson,” she said. “We had Mildred Hearn, Dixie Keyes, Kay Stubblefield Jones, Linda Hughes, Sherry Avenmarg, Patty Baker.

“I knew I had a good core,” she said. “My mother had a stroke and my father had a heart attack during the few weeks between graduation and boards, so I didn’t get to study. I walked into boards, and passed them. That was because of that faculty.”

Tustain’s timeline teaching in the college’s nursing program runs closely with that of the Nursing/Allied Health Center itself, into which the program moved in 1982 from smaller venues on the Raymond Campus.

“When I started teaching, I volunteered to come in before my contract began because I wanted to start out doing it right,” she said. “Back then, the program was all done in this little-bitty room in the science building. But, we were much more functional than when it was in the old house and it had supplies. And we had some great faculty teaching me.”

There was no down time between the move to the new facilities and the teaching schedule.

“Dr. Muse said we will teach on that Friday and Monday, and we’d just move over the weekend,” Tustain said. “The moving company moved the heavy conference tables and other equipment, but they didn’t know how to set it up. It took about 20 of us women faculty, but we got the beds in and set them up. We moved Friday afternoon, we worked all day Saturday and Sunday, and we all taught Monday. Now, is that not teamwork?”

Moving into it might have been a group project, but her mark on the learning lab remains, down to the positioning of electrical outlets and mirrors above the beds so students could see what they’re doing – commonplace now, but unique among nursing programs at the time.

“The learning lab is my baby,” Tustain said. “I designed it to where student and instructor could see what they were doing, with the mirrors overhead.”

In 1985, Tustain, Anderson and ADN instructors in a handful of neighboring states organized what is today the Organization for Associate Degree Nursing. Anderson was its first president.

“The group was formed in order to protect AD nursing as an entry-level program for registered nursing as a whole,” Tustain said.

“It allowed people who couldn’t give four years of a financial contribution outside of work to do it.”

The ADN program’s brand is strong in Mississippi and in medical circles because of its tradition of quality instruction, she said.

“We were one of the larger and productive programs, and our pass rates were good, so everybody wanted Hinds nurses,” she said. “It’s because we did direct care. The faculty went with the student and did direct care. We didn’t just send them out to observe. It was hands-on learning.”

 

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From hamburgers to healthcare, Hinds CC alum has taken care of his customers
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15 July

From hamburgers to healthcare, Hinds CC alum has taken care of his customers

Note: The following story appears in the summer issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

JACKSON – Before Carl Mangum was certified to take a pulse, he could still take an order – either crispy or with fries, that is.

“In a former life, I was a restaurant manager,” Mangum said of his days working in chicken and burger outlets in the Jackson area. “I’m a graduate of Hamburger University – on the dean’s list.”

Dr. Carl Mangum, an instructor at the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing, demonstrates a piece of machinery in the school's learning lab. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Dr. Carl Mangum, an instructor at the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing, demonstrates a piece of machinery in the school’s learning lab. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Mangum, his wife, Christina, and three young sons came to the same crossroads where many young families find themselves. “I was looking for something else to do. I was working for 100-plus hours a week and making very little money. I needed to do something different.”

A boyhood fascination with emergency medical technicians, spurred by a TV series, turned into a life-altering decision. “I always wanted to be a paramedic, because of the TV show “Emergency!,” from the 1970s. The show followed two paramedics in Los Angeles and their station. And so I thought it was cool.

“But, why I went back into nursing school was to make a better life for me and my family.”

He enrolled at Hinds, and the family scraped by at first, with Mangum working part-time jobs. But he hasn’t looked back since graduating in 1994.

After completing the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds, he moved on to the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s School of Nursing, where he earned his bachelor’s and a master’s, in Psychiatric Mental Health/Nurse Practitioner. He also has a Ph.D. in leadership from the University of Southern Mississippi.

His work in mental health began during his time at a program with the Mississippi State Hospital in Whitfield. It paid Mangum a monthly stipend in exchange for working with the facility as he went through school, and it became a passion.

“When I graduated, I had a job waiting for me there,” he said. “I was on their educational leave program, which means I signed up with them for four years. “Mental illness is not the dragon people claim it to be. It’s a brain disease – no different than heart disease, cancer, diabetes, anything else. It just involves the brain instead of the heart or the pancreas.”

In keeping with his passion, Mangum, of Byram, teaches a Psychiatric Nursing course at UMMC, as well as the Assessment, Fundamentals and Health Promotion courses. He’s also a certified volunteer firefighter and a HAZMAT technician. Also, he commands the Mississippi-1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team, part of the National Disaster Medical System with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

“I’ve responded to Hurricane Sandy, in 2012, and was deployed for Hurricane Ike, in 2008, in the command center in Austin, Texas,” he said. “For Hurricane Katrina, I did a lot of stuff at the Fairgrounds and Coliseum. UMMC set up a clinic there a couple of days in, to help get them medicine if they were out.”

His life in the medical field has come alongside success for wife Christina and similar career paths in the family.

She teaches math at Murrah High School and now has three master’s degrees. All three of his daughters-in-law are also nurses.

From his days at Hinds, he remembers the unique personal touch, which along with his experiences in the working world, he channels into his own teaching style.

“Nursing school is quite difficult,” he said. “It’s one of the hardest things you can choose to do. Hinds was my way of getting into the profession. The faculty was great, caring people. But, I also use principles in the hospital that I learned in the food industry, because we’re a service industry, too. It’s just with healthcare, and not hamburgers.”

Colleagues say it’s a formula that works.

“As a professional, he never settles,” said Sherri D. Franklin, director of the RN-BSN program at UMMC School of Nursing and classmate of Mangum’s during their days at Hinds. “He always seeks opportunities for development and is a great mentor to students and less-experienced co-workers.”

And it’s a certain versatility with today’s students that’s the strongest vital sign in Mangum’s life in healthcare.

“Students want that recognition and want us to be proud of and pleased with them. So, I do the high-five type of stuff to say, ‘Hey, great job!’

“And, still, if they’re doing something wrong, you want to be stern with them since we’re dealing with people’s lives here.”

 

 

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Hinds CC culinary arts students benefit from White family scholarship, Oyster Open Golf Classic
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14 July

Hinds CC culinary arts students benefit from White family scholarship, Oyster Open Golf Classic

The following story is from the Summer 2016 issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For information about scholarships at Hinds Community College, please see the website.

The family of father and son Harold T. White and Hal White, who sponsor a Hinds Community College culinary arts memorial scholarship that bears their names, has developed a variety of creative methods to raise funds over the years.oysteropen

One of those fundraisers is the July 16 Oyster Open Golf Classic held annually at Hinds Community College’s Eagle Ridge Golf Course in Raymond.

 

The late Hal White co-founded Hal & Mal’s bar and restaurant in downtown Jackson in 1985 along with his brother, Malcolm White, who is currently executive director of the Mississippi Arts Commission for the second time. Before that, he served a three-year stint as executive director of Visit Mississippi.

Hal White at the annual St. Paddy's Day Parade, which has been renamed in his honor.

Hal White at the annual St. Paddy’s Day Parade, which has been renamed in his honor.

Their father, Harold T. White, served as the sixth president of Northeast Mississippi Community College for 22 years, from 1965 until his death in 1987. During his years in the community college ranks, White was not only the president of NEMCC, but he also served as the community college liaison to the Mississippi Legislature where he mentored his life-long friend, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Malcolm White said.

“This scholarship not only honors the father-son legacy of Harold and Harold Jr., but also the friendship between the White and Muse families and the success of the community college system in Mississippi,” he said.

Established in 1990, the scholarship was originally named the Harold T. White Scholarship. Hal White’s name was added after he died in 2013.

Among the many accomplishments and innovations of their father as a community college president was the creation of the Hotel-Motel Restaurant Management Program in 1973. Hal White was in the first class to graduate from program in fall 1974.

After graduation from Northeast, Hal worked for years in the hospitality and hotel business in Hattiesburg, Alexandria, La., and New Orleans before returning home to Mississippi to open Hal & Mal’s with his brother.

Hal was co-owner and chef of the family business and specialized in masterful soups that became his legacy and calling card. He mentored many men and women who came through the ranks of Hal & Mal’s over the years and inspired more than one to pursue a career in the food business, including James Beard, award winning chef Martha Foose and rising star owner/chef April McGreger of Farmer’s Daughter Brand Pickles & Preserves of Hillsborough, N.C.

Hal White is in the kitchen cooking the first meal served when Hal & Mal's opened in 1985.

Hal White is in the kitchen cooking the first meal served when Hal & Mal’s opened in 1985.

The family scholarship for a Hinds culinary arts student is funded by various creative outings including the Hal & Mal’s Oyster Open, Art Soup and proceeds from the annual International Gumbo Fest.

Art Soup, held biannually at Hal & Mal’s, is organized by Hal’s daughter and son-in-law, Brandi and P.J. Lee, with friends Teresa Haygood and Rebecca Wilkinson. It highlights local artists and musicians and celebrates Hal’s signature culinary prowess in soup making. The event features an art market, an all-day silent auction and delicious special dishes from Hal’s treasure trove of recipes.

There is a Christmas Holiday version in mid-December and a summertime Art Soup as well. The Hal & Mal’s family of artists and musicians will celebrate the fifth edition in August 2017.

The International Gumbo Festival was established in 1992 by Malcolm White, Arden Barnett and Bill Bissell and has been headquartered in Smith Park in downtown Jackson.

The fall event celebrates the annual “Gumbo Champion” of Mississippi and features regional live music, great food, local craft beers and a unique family atmosphere in the heart of Jackson.

The scholarship is awarded to a student pursuing a degree in Culinary Arts and Hospitality and Tourism Management, offered at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center on Sunset Drive. It may be awarded to a freshman or a returning sophomore student.

The recipient has the unique opportunity to participate in an internship of a minimum of 20 hours per week at Hal & Mal’s in order to get “hands-on” experience in the day-to-day operation of food and beverage business.

This scholarship and the potential experience of working at Hal & Mal’s are the gift of a father and a son. This gift is now an opportunity for Hinds students who want practical experience and an opportunity for a career, or perhaps a chance to someday own their own restaurant, like Hal White once dreamed.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

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Hinds CC RN program celebrates 50 years of teaching quality care
Posted by
14 July

Hinds CC RN program celebrates 50 years of teaching quality care

Note: The following story appears in the summer issue of Hindsight alumni magazine. For more information about the Hinds Alumni Association, see the website.

It’s been 50 years and a world away for early faculty of the Associate Degree Nursing program at Hinds Community College.

The program was established on the Raymond Campus in one room of the Home Economics building in fall 1966. The first class had 26 students. The Hinds ADN program is celebrating its 50-year anniversary.

“At the time, we had no learning lab as we have today,” said Bobbie Anderson, who worked in the program for 24 years and was named the Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center’s first dean shortly after it was built. “They gave us one bed in the corner of the home ec lab (on the Raymond Campus) and one manikin.”

Long before computers and lifelike manikins that can sweat, it was strictly a world of chalk and slate for aspiring nurses.

 

Hinds-50YearsNursingHinds Community College’s Associate Degree Nursing program is recognizing its 50th anniversary this year beginning with a Sept. 9 celebration, said Dr. Libby Mahaffey, dean for Nursing and Allied Health.
“Sept. 9 is the inaugural event in our year-long celebration of 50 years of associate degree nursing at Hinds Community College. The program has a rich heritage of providing excellent nurses throughout the past 50 years. Other events will be scheduled throughout the year to focus on our current students and alumni,” Mahaffey said.
Sponsors and other invited guests will have a luncheon at noon. “This celebration lunch will highlight alumni as well as former and current leaders of the program,” she said.

A come-and-go reception open to the community is 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Both events will be in Room 9/10 of Anderson Hall at Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center at 1750 Chadwick Dr. in Jackson.

Sponsorships for these events are available and will assist in endowing the Hinds Community College Associate Degree Nursing Alumni Scholarship. Sponsor levels are Bronze, $100; Silver, $250 and Gold, $500. Other donations to the scholarship are also welcome and appreciated.

For more information about the sponsorships, please contact Alumni Coordinator Libby Posey at 601.857.3350, or by email at olivia.posey@hindscc.edu. For more information about the celebration events, please contact Libby Mahaffey at 601.376.4950, or by email at ehmahaffey@hindscc.edu.

 

“I started teaching at Hinds in 1975,” said Gloria Coxwell, who served as assistant dean of NAHC and director of division of ADN from 1993-2005. “Teaching tools consisted of a blackboard, a piece of chalk, and, on rare occasions, slides were available. Students furiously tried to write down every word that came out of the teacher’s mouth and memorize it for the test.”

Debra Spring, a 25-year instructor and Coxwell’s successor as assistant dean, remembers being the “sage on the stage” despite being only about eight years older than her first batch of students in August 1980.

“The students I taught early in my career accepted everything I said and tried their best to meet my every demand of them,” said Spring, now the dean of Alcorn State University’s nursing school. “Today’s student expects a rationale for all of the educational requirements and challenges faculty and administrators to review processes and procedures in keeping with achievement of educational outcomes. Not a bad thing, just different.”

The program’s first director was Eunice Pace. Regular academic courses were incorporated into nursing studies. By 1968, 18 had graduated from the original class.

In those days, Mississippi didn’t mandate nursing instructors have master’s degrees. Also, students had to practice their lessons with their own friends and relatives – even down to proper bathing techniques, Anderson said.

“When it came to injections, we had sterile equipment, so there was no infection involved with it, but we had to get volunteers from family members to allow students to give injections,” she said. “I was one of the volunteers, too. That was a big order for a faculty member to do.

“Once we did that, we went directly to the patient’s bedside and a faculty member would supervise each student.”

A warm atmosphere between instructor and student prevailed, but so too did a grueling course of study worthy only for serious students, said Terri Meadows (1980), a product of the ADN program and, currently, chief nursing officer at Merit Health Madison.

“During clinicals, when we’d apply our studies in a hospital setting, all students were required to have handwritten 3-by-5 cards with specific information on all drugs that would be administered to patients in the clinical setting,” Meadows said. “I recall one student arriving at clinical unprepared and was sent home due to lack of preparedness.

“No doubt, I had a fearful respect for the instructors. It was not an easy program. It required full commitment and dedication.”

Growing enrollment in the program’s second decade, coupled with stellar and qualified faculty, steadily built Hinds’ nursing program into a gold standard of sorts in the medical community. In 1978, the program was accredited nationally.

“Third year I was there, we doubled enrollment and doubled faculty. We were sitting in offices made for one person but had two or three faculty rotating in and out,” Anderson said.

In 1979, the Jackson Chamber of Commerce commissioned a study that revealed a shortage of nurses. It became obvious the program needed to have its own location. “It made sense for the college to take whatever offer they had, and that was the space at Hinds General (Hospital),” she said.

And up it went, in just two years following groundbreaking. The $4 million Nursing Allied Health Center, next to the hospital now called Merit Health Central, was completed in 1982 and at first featured a single, 51,000-square-foot facility for all nursing and allied health programs. In 1993, the main building was renamed Anderson Hall, for its longtime director and first dean of NAHC, and a 33,000-square-foot annex building was added to house a majority of allied health program courses and academic courses.

The program has continued to expand with the 2014 opening of the Ball Simulation Center, featuring cutting-edge technology in the way of video, audio and other equipment train more than 1,000 nursing and allied health students in five simulation labs, two medical surgical patient rooms, an emergency room, a childbirth simulation area, home care lab and four debriefing rooms.

More expansion is planned with the addition of 11.5 acres of nearby property and two buildings in a swap with the Hinds County Board of Supervisors. More teaching labs and programs are planned, plus additional parking space and a direct connection to the simulation center.

With that expansion has come enrollment growth. Freshman enrollment stood at 320 for 2015-16, with a total nursing and allied health student population of 1,114. Nursing faculty now numbers 45.

Through the physical expansions, the program’s architects and instructors point to a more valuable aspect to its standing in the community – trust.

“Hinds graduates had an excellent pass rate on the licensure exam and were highly recruited for employment by area hospitals,” Coxwell said. “Throughout the years this standard of excellence has not changed.

What has changed is that both graduate competencies and practice areas have expanded greatly. In addition to hospitals, graduates are now sought after for positions in a wide variety of settings such as home health, long-term care facilities and clinics.”

It’s a reputation built with demanding study that alums and instructors say still had room for lighthearted friendships.

“What I enjoyed most was our groups of 10 for clinicals,” Meadows said. “I was part of an awesome group of people. We were supportive of one another – studying together, eating together and enjoying a lot of laughter.”

For more information about Hinds’ nursing program see the website.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 11,500 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC announces speaker for summer graduation ceremony
Posted by
08 July

Hinds CC announces speaker for summer graduation ceremony

RAYMOND – Summer graduation ceremonies are set for July 29 at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus as students earn associate’s degrees from Hinds Community College.

All nursing and allied health graduates will receive their degrees at 10 a.m., with commencement for academic and career-tech graduates to follow at 2 p.m.

Dr. James E. Davis, director of the Ph.D. program for Rural Community College leaders at Mississippi State University, is the speaker for both ceremonies.

Dr. James E. Davis

Dr. James E. Davis

Davis has spent 38 years working at all levels of education in Mississippi. His career as a teacher, instructor and administrator began as a junior high teacher in Columbus, followed by teaching jobs in Booneville and Philadelphia. He taught four years in community colleges as a biology instructor, then moved on to the university level and completed his doctorate in Leadership. He has directed the specialized leadership program at MSU, alma mater, for the past 14 years.

A seventh-generation family farm owner, Davis is an ardent supporter of rural issues and causes. Davis and his wife, Louise Davis, also an educator, have been married 38 years and have two sons, Thomas and Christopher.

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