http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans GED graduates credit persistence after ceremony at Hinds CC

Monthly Archives: June 2016

GED graduates credit persistence after ceremony at Hinds CC
Posted by
27 June

GED graduates credit persistence after ceremony at Hinds CC

RAYMOND – I’Esha Granderson, of Jackson, has rung up many an order since leaving high school without a diploma, mainly pastries and fill-ups at gas stations.

But the Jackson mother of two decided it was time to try for a career instead of settling for low-paying jobs.

I'Esha Granderson, left foreground, shakes hands with David Creel, district Director of Manufacturing Training at Hinds Community College, as she walks across the stage at Cain-Cochran Hall on the college's Raymond Campus to accept her GED certificate on Thursday, June 23, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

I’Esha Granderson, left foreground, shakes hands with David Creel, district Director of Manufacturing Training at Hinds Community College, as she walks across the stage at Cain-Cochran Hall on the college’s Raymond Campus to accept her GED certificate on Thursday, June 23, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“I’ve been out of high school eight years working at lot of dead-end jobs,” Granderson said. “I’m 25 with two children, so I felt it was time to move forward with my life.”

Granderson was among 37 people of varying ages and stations in life recognized during a ceremony Thursday, June 23 at Cain-Cochran Hall on the Raymond Campus for achieving their General Education Development high school equivalency certificate this academic term.

She sees herself being in charge of the products once she continues and completes her education – and honor her deceased grandmother along the way.

“Culinary arts and business management,” she said. “I want to own a business and work for myself. That way, I’ll know the quality of food I’m serving other people.”

“My grandmother, Monevia, opened her restaurant in Tchula in 1991, the year I was born. Everyone there knew her as Nancy, or Nan. It was called Nancy’s Kitchen. She ran it herself until she passed away in 2011. I know she’s smiling down on me.”

She was among 11 participants in the MI-BEST program at Hinds who received a GED during the ceremony. MI-BEST is Mississippi’s version of the nationally recognized Integrating Basic Education and Skills Training program, or I-BEST. It allows adult students to train for a job skill while earning their GED high school equivalency certificate at the same time. Students are prepared to be job-ready in six months to a year, train in high-demand areas and earn national certifications.

Another was Ashley Clark, who enrolled in the program at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus five months ago.

Ashley Clark, left, shakes hands with Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development at Hinds Community College, during a ceremony at Cain-Cochran Hall on the college's Raymond Campus on June 23 recognizing those who earned their GED certificate in the recent academic term. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Ashley Clark, left, shakes hands with Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development at Hinds Community College, during a ceremony at Cain-Cochran Hall on the college’s Raymond Campus on June 23 recognizing those who earned their GED certificate in the recent academic term. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“The professional development class offered with the MI-BEST program has helped me bring me to a more professional level,” Clark said. “My employer, friends and family can tell how I carry myself now.

“I’ll have a Career Readiness Certificate by the end of next semester. And I should have my associate’s (two-year degree) by next spring.”

Susan Brown, 60, of Edwards, an employee of Hinds in Admissions, was the eldest student to walk across the stage and receive her diploma. Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse handed it to her personally.

Susan Brown, left, accepts her GED certificate from Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse during a ceremony at Cain-Cochran Hall on the college's Raymond Campus on June 23, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Susan Brown, left, accepts her GED certificate from Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse during a ceremony at Cain-Cochran Hall on the college’s Raymond Campus on June 23, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“One of the people who had really tried to inspire me to go back to school was actually Vashti Muse,” Brown said, referring to Dr. Muse’s wife, who died in 2010. “But I kept putting it off. But, last year, I dug in and said, ‘All I can do is fail, right?’ I just want people to know[tweetable alt=””] it doesn’t matter how old you are, you can get a degree.”[/tweetable]

Dr. Rachel DeVaughan, an Adult Basic Education program specialist for the Mississippi Community College Board, spoke to this year’s recipients with a message of not giving up despite background and circumstances.

Dr. Rachel DeVaughan, an Adult Basic Education program specialist for the Mississippi Community College Board, speaks during a ceremony at Cain-Cochran Hall on Hinds Community College's Raymond Campus recognizing recipients of GED certificates. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Dr. Rachel DeVaughan, an Adult Basic Education program specialist for the Mississippi Community College Board, speaks during a ceremony at Cain-Cochran Hall on Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus recognizing recipients of GED certificates. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

DeVaughan, a mother of two, had received a GED by the age of 19 after dropping out of high school. She returned to school at age 28 to pursue her dream of being a teacher, a journey that culminated in 2014 with her earning a doctorate in education.

In between, she rose through the ranks of McDonald’s, where she had first started work at 16, working in management and supervisory roles in the worldwide fast food chain’s restaurants in the U.S. and in England. Since 2005, she has been a middle school teacher, a curriculum specialist and an assistant dean of instruction at Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College.

“I knew I wanted more out of my life for my children,” DeVaughan said. “I realized the only way I was ever going to get ahead was to get more education.

“Some of you might not feel very confident as a student, and that’s OK,” she said. “Confidence is a feeling. Courage, on the other hand, is a choice. And you were courageous in your choice to come to Hinds Community College and work toward completing your high school equivalency diploma.”

GED recipients who were honored Thursday and their stated hometowns included:

  • Jerry Bacon, of Jackson
  • Ashley Baker, of Vicksburg
  • Brianna Brooks, of Terry
  • Brittany Bullock, of Ridgeland
  • Ashley Clark, of Vicksburg
  • Susan Brown, of Edwards
  • Donna Jad’D Crooks, of Vicksburg
  • James Cuyler, of Terry
  • Felix Davis, of Jackson
  • Hope Davis, of Jackson
  • Alicia Dixon, of Vicksburg
  • Baylee Garrett, of Brandon
  • I’Esha Granderson, of Jackson
  • Heather Harrington, of Clinton
  • Kaitlyn Hudson, of Bolton
  • Ronald Humes, of Vicksburg
  • Kylil Killian, of Vicksburg
  • Carl Landry, of Clinton
  • Joshua Martin, of Clinton
  • Cameron McClain, of Vicksburg
  • Patrick McClure, of Jackson
  • Autumn McIntosh, of Raymond
  • Shelia McLaurin, of Hermanville
  • Gerald McQuarter, of Byram
  • Amanda Miller, of Vicksburg
  • Destanie Miller, of Terry
  • Napoleon Miller, of Jackson
  • Tyeisha Nelson, of Jackson
  • Shanea Parker, of Vicksburg
  • Brendon S. Rodgers, of Vicksburg
  • Kendall Robinson, of Byram
  • Moeisha Shields, of Jackson
  • Jayshaun Simmons, of Jackson
  • Ashlyn Smith, of Pearl
  • Precious Tucker, of Bolton
  • Allen W. Warner, of Vicksburg
  • Marissa A. Williams, of Vicksburg

Fifteen of the 37 recipients present, including Granderson, were Honor Students, awarded scholarship funds, or both. Granderson received a $500 cash award from the Education Pays Program. The program began in 2009 as a partnership between Hinds and the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation to make funds available for all Hinds CC Warren GED recipients over the age of 21. The foundation has expanded the program to the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center.

Scholarship funds were also made available to this year’s GED recipients by Central Mississippi Planning and Development District and the Adult Education Advisory Council.

From left, Ashley Clark, Ronald Humes and Allen W. Warner share a smile before a ceremony June 23 at Cain-Cochran Hall on Hinds Community College's Raymond Campus recognizing those who have earned their GED certificate in the recent academic term. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

From left, Ashley Clark, Ronald Humes and Allen W. Warner share a smile before a ceremony June 23 at Cain-Cochran Hall on Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus recognizing those who have earned their GED certificate in the recent academic term. (Tammi Bowles/Hinds Community College)

0 1019 27 June, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Vice President Hartfield retires with deep legacy of leadership
Posted by
15 June

Hinds CC Vice President Hartfield retires with deep legacy of leadership

Colleen Hartfield of Raymond, vice president for Community Relations and Governmental Affairs, will retire June 30 with a combined 18 years of service to Hinds Community College.

She was first hired as assistant director of Public Relations in 1984 and was promoted to district director of Public Relations a year later. She left the college in 1992 and spent 14 years at Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, where she rose in the ranks to vice president for Institutional Relations.web_Hartfield, Colleen

In her early days at Hinds, [tweetable alt=””]Hartfield organized the first statewide Community College Month celebration.[/tweetable] In 1991, she was one of the youngest people to ever receive the college’s 3E Award, the most prestigious award Hinds gives. With the guidance and support of Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, she began working with the Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges (MACJC) on its legislative program.

“Colleen served the entire Mississippi community college system in legislative affairs at the state and national levels. Her ability to craft communication pieces and organize the advocacy efforts for 15 colleges helped to secure funding and develop policy that advanced community colleges,” Muse said.

When she returned to Hinds in 2006, Hartfield assumed President Cabinet level responsibilities for Public Relations, Marketing, Publications, Sports Information, Web Communications and Governmental Affairs.

“I feel very fortunate to have started and ended my career at Hinds, working with Dr. Muse,” Hartfield said. “During the years at Gulf Coast, I continued to work with him on community college legislative efforts, so the Hinds connection was never lost.”

While managing internal and external communications for the college, Hartfield’s role expanded as the needs of the college and its service district changed. She initiated the college’s first grants office in 2009 and worked to bring millions of dollars in external funding to Hinds. In addition, she took on the leadership role for Adult Education and worked determinedly to strengthen and expand the services the college provides to adult learners through the statewide dropout recovery initiative, which has evolved into the MI-BEST program.

 

In 2014, she worked closely with Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development and Career/Technical Education, to help Mississippi land the state’s largest economic development package, Continental Tire.

“Colleen always understood the changing needs of our students and community. Because of her leadership and support, the college was able to secure national, state, regional and private resources and engage in community partnership that increased the student’s ability to succeed,” Stocks said. “Because of her work, our students have more opportunity than ever before and our programs have been able to experience national recognition.”

She is a graduate of the Mississippi State University’s Community College Leadership Program and the MSU Education Policy Fellowship Program. In 2015 she was recognized by the Women in Higher Education Mississippi Network with its Leadership Award.

Jackie Granberry, vice president for Advancement, will assume responsibility for areas currently under Hartfield’s responsibility, with one exception. The grants office of the college will be administered by Russell Shaw, vice president for Business Services.

Colleen Hartfield and Jackie Granberry

Colleen Hartfield and Jackie Granberry

“Colleen has been a regular contributor to all activities of the Foundation, including establishing the Kay Cliffe Memorial Hinds Connection Award and the Kay Cliffe Memorial Scholarship, named in memory of her youngest sister, a 1990 graduate of Hinds,” Granberry said.

“She has been the go-to person for so many of us. Whether it was to write a speech, edit a proposal or develop an idea, she was always available and willing to help,” Granberry said. “She has always been professional. In everything that she did, she had the college’s best interest at heart.

Her plans for retirement include staying involved with Hinds and helping with the upcoming Centennial celebration. She will also continue to serve on the board for Second Chance Mississippi, the non-profit started by Dickie Scruggs to support Adult Education programs at Mississippi’s community colleges.

“In retrospect, the most meaningful accomplishments of my time at Hinds have been efforts to expand access to higher education to people desiring a better life for themselves and their families. It’s been a privilege to work with creative and committed colleagues who helped to make that possible,” Hartfield said.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 1296 15 June, 2016 News more
Retiring Hinds CC Vice President Woods: ‘It has been a great ride’
Posted by
15 June

Retiring Hinds CC Vice President Woods: ‘It has been a great ride’

After a long career in fostering economic development in Mississippi, especially through his work at Hinds Community College, [tweetable alt=””]Vice President Dr. John Woods of Clinton is retiring on June 30.[/tweetable]

“It has been a wonderful opportunity to be a member of this college’s family,” said Woods, vice president for Economic Development and Training.

Dr. John Woods is speaking at a April 19 Mississippi River Transportation, Distribution and Logistic Consortium meeting held at Eagle Ridge Conference Center.

Dr. John Woods is speaking at a April 19 Mississippi River Transportation, Distribution and Logistic Consortium meeting held at Eagle Ridge Conference Center.

Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development, will assume Woods’ duties. Stocks also leads all workforce training, career-technical education and adult education efforts.

“In the early years of our workforce division, Dr. Woods brought a level of workforce knowledge and expertise to the college that helped to established Hinds as an institution that understood the needs of business and industry. His contribution to the successful opening of the Nissan plant in Canton, and more recently the Mississippi River Consortium in Vicksburg, are among the largest projects that he directed,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse.

Woods arrived at Hinds in 1991 but even before that he worked with the college’s workforce efforts when he was employed at Mississippi State University. He retires with 34 years of total service to the State of Mississippi and is the longest serving workforce specialist currently in the state.

“We will definitely miss his leadership. It has been a great experience to work for him and with him while at Hinds,” said Jim Harper, director of the Small Business Development Center.

Woods is also the longest serving vice president of Economic Development and Training at the college and overseer of Eagle Ridge Conference Center, still a cornerstone meeting facility in the state.

“Dr. Woods has been a great asset to our division at Hinds,” said Peggy Lofton, director of Eagle Ridge Conference Center. “He has always been very supportive of what we do to make our business run smoothly. He has truly taught me to be a better leader, and for that I am thankful.”

Under Woods’ leadership, the Eagle Ridge Conference Center has been a centerpiece for some of the college’s most important efforts and most prestigious events. The facility has drawn national organizations and state leaders to its doors because of its unique setting and capable staff.

The Professional Development Institute (PDI) is another important aspect of Woods’ division. That program is the in-house foundation for training Hinds employees and provides a wide array of personal and work-related programs. In addition, his division oversees the awarding of continuing education certificates (CEUs) for local school districts and other professional organizations.

Among his colleagues, Woods is recognized as a prolific writer and avid outdoorsman. Visitors to his Eagle Ridge office have been able to see an eclectic assortment of memorabilia that reflects his diverse interests and talents.

Among his recent accomplishments are the refurbishment of the Eagle Ridge Challenge Course and the institution of the River Barge Deckhand Training project in Vicksburg.web_John Woods

“Along the way there were many successes, some failures, a few revelations and disappointments. It has been a great ride,” Woods said.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 991 15 June, 2016 News more
Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds CC to host Summer Fest
Posted by
14 June

Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds CC to host Summer Fest

JACKSON – The Minority Male Leadership Initiative at Hinds Community College will host M2M Summer Fest on Friday, June 24 at the Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center to highlight the program’s services.

Attendees to the free event may sign up for M2M, register for classes and visit information booths while they enjoy free food, prizes and a video game truck. The outdoor fest runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

“Do you want to change your future by excelling academically, culturally, and socially? [tweetable alt=””]The time is now to join M2M[/tweetable],” said Dr. Shakira Cain, who directs the program at the campus.

The program aims to help African-American males succeed in college by providing leadership training, career counseling, mentoring and tutoring. Participants discover personal strengths, interests and motivation, all of which can spur an array of career interests and post-graduate options.

Those who want to register for classes at M2M Summer Fest are advised to do the following before arriving at the Fest:

  • submit a current admission application for the Summer or Fall 2016 semester
  • submit the official transcript from the last school attended
  • submit official ACT scores, OR take the Accuplacer, OR submit a college transcript showing the completion of at least one Math and English course.

To become a member of M2M, students must be enrolled at JATC and complete an application for the program. The college’s Enrollment Services team will be on hand for the event to help prospective students apply to the college online.

0 1032 14 June, 2016 News more
Hinds CC Camp Silver Eagle offers fun for kids, older adults
Posted by
13 June

Hinds CC Camp Silver Eagle offers fun for kids, older adults

Camp Silver Eagle offers fun nature activities for children and older adults.

Camp Silver Eagle offers fun nature activities for children and older adults.

Registration is now open for the Hinds Community College, Creative Learning Fifty-Plus, annual intergenerational summer enrichment program, [tweetable alt=””]Camp Silver Eagle, for adults of all ages and children and youth ages 5 to 16[/tweetable] (with an adult).

The camp is 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. daily, July 11-15, with an Awards Day on Friday, July 15 at the Ted Kendall Agriculture Complex, McKenzie Facility, located on Seven Springs Road in Raymond.

Adults have the option to participate with or without a child or youth partner. Youth 17+ will be considered an adult. This program encourages an intergenerational experience of creative learning and adventure, shared by adults and their grandchildren or any child ages 5 to 16, which focuses on backyard conservation best practices.

Most camp activities are inside; however, there will be outside morning activities as well, but with access to near-by air-conditioning if needed.

The camp theme is Backyard Conservation: “Get Connected: You, the Backyard, and All That Lives There!” with focus programs including:

  • Amy Geike, Park Ranger, Interpretative Services, Natchez Trace Parkway, “Flora and Fauna of the Natchez Trace Parkway”;
  • Melody Field, Hinds CC coordinator, +50 Programs, “Backyard Birding”;
  • Kyle Lewis, MSU, County Extension Agent, Hinds County, ERCC,  “Raised Bed Gardening for All Ages”;
  • Bill Maily, MSU, Extension Associate III, Central MS R & E Ctr, “Backyard Habitat Management, and Fisheries Day-Managing Farm Ponds and Small Lakes, Weed Identification and Control, Identification of Common Fishes in Mississippi’s Fresh Water.” The session includes a visit to a private local lake to learn about characteristics to look for and practices used to manage the soil, water, as well as, the fish population.

Cost is $35 per adult, $50 per adult/first child pair, $15 second child and $10 per additional child. Group rates for 10 or more available.

For more information and to request a registration form, contact Melody Field, coordinator, Hinds CC Creative Learning Fifty-Plus, 601.857.3773 or mfield@hindscc.edu, or Tommie Winters, 601.946.4054/601.954.5194.

Don’t miss a great week of creative learning and fun at Camp Silver Eagle 2016. Pre-registration required; spaces are limited!

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 1044 13 June, 2016 News more
Diplomas earned by 25 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus
Posted by
09 June

Diplomas earned by 25 in Gateway to College program at Hinds CC Rankin Campus

PEARL – Janie Kovach felt like an extra in the movie of her life when she began high school a few years ago.

“It’s hard for those who need help to be noticed and for them to not be lost in the crowd,” Kovach said. “It’s very easy to be overlooked and to just hide in the shadows.”

Janie Kovach, center, in cap and gown, earned 24 college credit hours after earning her diploma from Northwest Rankin High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus. From left, Megan Ashmore, her cousin; Jameson Cardullo, her second cousin; Jordan Kovach, her sister; Janie Kovach, her mother; James Kovach, her father; Margaret Kovach, her grandmother; James Kovach Sr., her grandfather. (Apri Garon/Hinds Community College)

Janie Kovach, center, in cap and gown, earned 24 college credit hours after earning her diploma from Northwest Rankin High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. From left, Megan Ashmore, her cousin; Jameson Cardullo, her second cousin; Jordan Kovach, her sister; Janie Kovach, her mother; James Kovach, her father; Margaret Kovach, her grandmother; James Kovach Sr., her grandfather. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

On Tuesday, June 7, Kovach was no extra – she had earned what amounts to top billing as valedictorian among 25 high school students in Rankin County who received diplomas and earned college credit this past semester thanks to the Gateway to College program. [tweetable alt=””]Gateway involves students who have dropped out of high school or are at risk of doing so.[/tweetable]

 “I think I can speak for everyone and say high school wasn’t as easy for us as some of our peers,” Kovach said in an address during a graduation ceremony held at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. “For much of middle and high school, some of us were told we weren’t trying hard enough. Or that we just needed to apply ourselves. At times, it probably made us feel hopeless or that we wouldn’t amount to anything.

Janie Kovach addresses attendees at a graduation ceremony June 7 at the Muse Center for the Gateway to College program. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Janie Kovach addresses attendees at a graduation ceremony June 7 at the Muse Center for the Gateway to College program. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“But, coming to Gateway showed us we really do have a future. We were surrounded by three ladies who saw that potential in us and never let us forget it. They gave us helping hands, tough love and strong advice. They helped us exceed the expectations given to us so long ago held us to the same standards as any other high school student, if not a little bit higher.”

Kovach, of Northwest Rankin High School, finished the program with 24 hours of college credits she’ll use toward a pursuit of a psychology degree.

The ceremony was keynoted by Dr. Sue Townsend, superintendent of the Rankin County School District and member of the college’s Board of Trustees.

“Setting goals is a big part of life and success,” Townsend said. “Whether it’s continuing college or going into the workforce, it’s time to set your next goal.

“This group of 25 young people have earned between three and 62 college credit hours – that’s incredible. That means they’ve earned between a half-semester to two years of college credit.”

Lofty aspirations abounded among this year’s graduates, which included Raymond Flowers III, a first-generation high school graduate.

Raymond Flowers III, center, in cap and gown, earned three college credit hours by earning his high school diploma from Northwest Rankin High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus. Front row, from left, Allysyn Jones, a friend; Derek McIntyre, his stepfather; Tanya McIntyre, his mother; Flowers; Raymond Flowers II, his father; Dalton Ferguson, a friend; back row, from left, Chandler Coker, a friend; Tabitha Sims, his stepmother; Dylan Sims, a friend; Allie Crowley, a friend; Shelby Sims, a friend; and Claire Allen, his girlfriend. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Raymond Flowers III, center, in cap and gown, earned three college credit hours by earning his high school diploma from Northwest Rankin High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Front row, from left, Allysyn Jones, a friend; Derek McIntyre, his stepfather; Tanya McIntyre, his mother; Flowers; Raymond Flowers II, his father; Dalton Ferguson, a friend; back row, from left, Chandler Coker, a friend; Tabitha Sims, his stepmother; Dylan Sims, a friend; Allie Crowley, a friend; Shelby Sims, a friend; and Claire Allen, his girlfriend. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“I have Army National Guard on my mind,” said Flowers, also of Northwest Rankin, enjoying time post-ceremony with several family members and friends after earning three college credit hours. “I have being a history major on my mind.”

Christian Donaldson, of Brandon High School, looked back on how the program helped him get a foothold in his studies – a launching pad of sorts for his plans. He earned 26 college credit hours by finishing the program.

Christian Donaldson, right, earned 26 college credit hours by earning his high school diploma from Brandon High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus. At left is his mother, Priscilla. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Christian Donaldson, right, earned 26 college credit hours by earning his high school diploma from Brandon High School through the Gateway to College Program at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. At left is his mother, Priscilla. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“Gateway was the best thing for me,” Donaldson said. “In high school, I was distracted and really not focused on my work at all. When I got here, it was better for me that I didn’t know anyone and it was a better fit for me.

“I plan to go to Jackson State, major in criminal justice and become a security officer in the Air Force.”

Gateway began at Hinds in the 2012-13 academic term at the Rankin Campus and was expanded in 2015 to the Vicksburg-Warren Campus. It functions as a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds and the two respective school districts.

Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds.

Students entering the program must read on an eighth-grade level and pass HCC’s placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

At Rankin, the program is directed by Chandra Frazier and staffed by Ouida Holland, resource specialist, and Sherrie Daniels, administrative assistant.

From left, Sherrie Daniels, Ouida Holland, Jesse Swayze; first row, from left: Anna Claire Howard, Sarah Tristen Soelman, Janie Kovach, Shelby Hart, Alexa Hanna, Madison Brae Cook, Angel Funderburk, Raymond Garrett Flowers III; Brady Black, Tyler Smith and Chandra Frazier. Back row, from left: Miesha Smith, Christian Donaldson, James Wilson, Calvin Overton, Charles Wilson, Avery Whatley, Jalon Wilson. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

From left, Sherrie Daniels, Ouida Holland, Jesse Swayze; first row, from left: Anna Claire Howard, Sarah Tristen Soelman, Janie Kovach, Shelby Hart, Alexa Hanna, Madison Brae Cook, Angel Funderburk, Raymond Garrett Flowers III; Brady Black, Tyler Smith and Chandra Frazier. Back row, from left: Miesha Smith, Christian Donaldson, James Wilson, Calvin Overton, Charles Wilson, Avery Whatley, Jalon Wilson. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Additional Gateway graduates Tuesday included Brady Black, Northwest Rankin High School, 17 hours of college credits; Alexander Chepkevich, Northwest Rankin High School, 23 hours; Madison Cook, Northwest Rankin High School, 20 hours, Devin Cooper, Northwest Rankin High School, eight hours; Jalon Daniels, Brandon High School, 24 hours; Angel Funderburk, Brandon High School, 26 hours; Alexa Hanna, of Brandon High School, 20 hours; Shelby Hart, of Brandon High School, 25 hours; Virginia Harwell, of McLaurin High School, 27 hours; Anna Claire Howard, of Brandon High School, 27 hours; Alyssa McCullough, of Northwest Rankin High School, 50 hours; Michael Massey, of Brandon High School, 12 hours; Nicole Matthews, of Northwest Rankin High School, 41 hours; Calvin Overton, of Northwest Rankin High School, 21 hours; Miesha Smith, of Florence High School, 26 hours; Tyler Smith, of Northwest Rankin High School, 26 hours; Sarah Soleman, Pearl High School, 11 hours; Jessy Swayze, McLaurin High School, 62 hours; Kayla Tadlock, Pelahatchie High School, 11 hours; Avery Whatley, Puckett Attendance Center, 11 hours; Charles Wiggins, Northwest Rankin High School, three hours; James Wilson, Brandon High School, 18 hours.

0 1451 09 June, 2016 News more
Seven graduates of Gateway program at Hinds CC honored
Posted by
06 June

Seven graduates of Gateway program at Hinds CC honored

VICKSBURG – Seven graduates of the Gateway to College program this past semester at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus were honored during a luncheon May 20.

Receiving certificates of completion from Gateway coordinators were:

  • Jacob Barrett, Warren Central High School
  • Rita Freeman, Warren Central High School
  • Rickita Johnson, Vicksburg High School
  • Demetrick Shelvy, Vicksburg High School
  • Dylan Silverthorne, Vicksburg High School
  • Sharod Williams, Warren Central High School
  • Amy Willis, Warren Central High School

Each of the seven participated in graduation ceremonies at their respective high schools, which were held May 26-27 for this year’s senior class.

Seven graduates of the Gateway to College program this past semester at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus were honored during a luncheon May 20. Pictured are, from left, Sharod Williams, Dylan Silverthorne, Demetrick Shelvy, Rita Freeman, Amy Willis and Rickita Johnson. Also receiving a certificate of completion from the program was Jacob Barrett, who was not present for the luncheon. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

Seven graduates of the Gateway to College program this past semester at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus were honored during a luncheon May 20. Pictured are, from left, Sharod Williams, Dylan Silverthorne, Demetrick Shelvy, Rita Freeman, Amy Willis and Rickita Johnson. Also receiving a certificate of completion from the program was Jacob Barrett, who was not present for the luncheon. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

The [tweetable alt=””]Gateway to College involves students who have dropped out of high school or are at risk of doing so[/tweetable] because they have fallen behind in high school credits. Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds.

Students entering the program must read on an eighth-grade level and pass HCC’s placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

In brief addresses, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak lauded the merits of the program and this year’s graduates.

“Along the way, all of us needed help,” Muse said. “There’s not a person in this room that hasn’t in some way needed some help. They needed people who cared about them as individuals. They needed people who would listen to them.

“I’m pleased that these students have found a way, regardless of what life’s circumstances were and with the support of family, friends, teachers and others, to receive their high school diploma. The door of opportunity is open to you. Take advantage of that opportunity.”

“I’m just extremely proud for each one of these young men and women,” Moak said. “I hope to see them walking down the hallways in a college setting working on their associate degrees and then go on to four-year universities.”

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse addresses college officials, parents and others during a luncheon to recognize seven graduates of the Gateway to College program at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus this past semester. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse addresses college officials, parents and others during a luncheon to recognize seven graduates of the Gateway to College program at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus this past semester. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

The program debuted at Hinds in the 2013-14 term, at the Rankin Campus. It expanded to the Vicksburg-Warren Campus in 2015 and is directed by Denetra Taylor, who credited faculty and staff for guiding this year’s graduates.

“Gateway isn’t a fast-track program,” Taylor said. “Some of them can come in and finish in a semester or two, then for some it does take a little bit longer.

“This has been great group of students this semester. We’ve worked hard and been challenged.”

Seven graduates of the Gateway to College program this past semester at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus were honored during a luncheon May 20. Pictured are program staff, from left, Denetra Taylor, director, Nancy Robinson, administrative assistant, Tammi Sims, and Antonio Horton, both resource specialists. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

Seven graduates of the Gateway to College program this past semester at Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus were honored during a luncheon May 20. Pictured are program staff, from left, Denetra Taylor, director, Nancy Robinson, administrative assistant, Tammi Sims, and Antonio Horton, both resource specialists. (Danny Barrett Jr./Hinds Community College)

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