http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Industrial Maintenance program at Hinds CC training tomorrow’s factory workers

Monthly Archives: February 2016

Industrial Maintenance program at Hinds CC training tomorrow’s factory workers
Posted by
22 February

Industrial Maintenance program at Hinds CC training tomorrow’s factory workers

Programs like Hinds’ Industrial Maintenance program on the Raymond, Rankin, Vicksburg-Warren and Utica campuses are at the heart of workforce training efforts for Continental Tire, which plans a $1.45 billion plant in western Hinds County.

“Hinds’ specific role is to develop and deliver workforce training to individuals in our state who will ultimately fill jobs that Continental Tire will bring to our area,” said Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development, about the project, two years in the making. “We’ve been working closely with the Mississippi Development Authority, the Mississippi Employment Security Commission and the Mississippi Community College Board to come up with the specific training needs for Continental Tire.”

The global company, in partnership with Gov. Phil Bryant, a Hinds graduate, and the Mississippi Development Authority announced on Feb. 8 the location of the facility on more than 900 acres off Norrell Road, off I-20 West in Hinds County. Construction of the facility is slated to begin in January 2018, with tire production to begin in 2019. The plant will employ 2,500, company officials have said. Gov. Bryant has mentioned Jackson, Bolton, Vicksburg and Edwards as areas that should benefit from jobs created by the plant.

“I really believe that this has the greatest possibility to revolutionize western Hinds County of anything I’ve seen since I’ve been here. It has that possibility,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. “It’s an opportunity the college has got to show people we can be successful and really be a player. In the final analysis, they wouldn’t be here unless we could train the workforce.”

Hinds Community College students Reed Scoggins, left, of Brandon, and Christolein Simmons, of Yazoo City, are enrolled in the Industrial Maintenance program at the Raymond Campus. Recently added technology in the program lab combines functions in the electrical and mechanical disciplines to integrate training for modern-day factory jobs. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hinds Community College students Reed Scoggins, left, of Richland, and Christolein Simmons, of Yazoo City, are enrolled in the Industrial Maintenance program at the Raymond Campus. Recently added technology in the program lab combines functions in the electrical and mechanical disciplines to integrate training for modern-day factory jobs. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Industrial Maintenance is among several other workforce training courses that offer career certificates that can enhance a resume’ and open educational doors for students who might not otherwise attend college.

Christolein Simmons, a Yazoo County native, was steered by his academic advisers to take introductory class in mechatronics, an emerging multidisciplinary field of engineering that combines mechanical, electrical, telecommunications, control and computer engineering. He works in a factory and attends school, though the training at Hinds could be a key to career advancement, Simmons said.

“I just love working with my hands,” he said. “And every day, it brings something new. We’re learning to troubleshoot and just doing the framework before we get hands-on. I think I can go on to a four-year college, enhance myself, then go on to work somewhere and continue to go to school.”

Reid Scoggins, of Richland, is also a student in his first course in Industrial Maintenance. His family has run an industrial equipment business for decades, but his father encouraged him to further his education.

“He said it never hurts to have a degree,” Scoggins said. “And with this degree, you can make good money. I’ve liked machines and working on things with my hands. When I got into the program, they showed us all the machines they’d work on and the things we’d learn to do. It piqued my interest.”

Visits to the state’s two-year colleges by company officials cemented the role they’ll play in supplying the workforce.

“It was key for the program for them to see what Hinds Community College and other community colleges offer,” said David Creel, district director of Manufacturing Training. “The programs here at Hinds will complement the processes that Continental will have.”

Stocks had the responsibility of showing the college had the expertise and capacity to train the workers needed.

What attracted Continental was our college being a 100-year-old institution with a proven track record of training and flexibility plus availability of the consortium,” Stocks said. “We were able to demonstrate all that.”

Paul Williams, executive vice president for Continental Commercial Vehicle Tires in the Americas, said after the formal announcement a lot of locations were toured but the capacity for growing skilled workers was a key factor. “We toured the schools; we toured the technical colleges. Our greatest asset is always our people. It’s the skill level, the technical capability of the population.”

Students in the Industrial Maintenance program begin with safety courses, then move on to more involved electrical and mechanical maintenance courses that involve the latest technology that can simulate a factory setting. Completion of advanced coursework in mechatronics can earn a student an Associate of Applied Science degree.

 

0 Comments Off on Industrial Maintenance program at Hinds CC training tomorrow’s factory workers 1462 22 February, 2016 News more
Eagle Experience 2016 recruiting event draws crowd
Posted by
05 February

Eagle Experience 2016 recruiting event draws crowd

For Tonesha Smith, it was all about seeing her daughter succeed in school and in life.

“I want to see her get interested in the classes she’s really interested in,” she said, escorting daughter Jazmine Hathorn and her friend, Tamera Lofton. The two Callaway High School students plan to room at Hinds together once their high school days are over.

Jazmine Hathorn, left, and Tamera Lofton, center, get information on Hinds' 2+2 Program in Elementary Education with Delta State University with the program's Terry Parrish, right, at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016 (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Jazmine Hathorn, left, and Tamera Lofton, center, get information on Hinds’ 2+2 Program in Elementary Education with Delta State University with the program’s Terry Parrish, right, at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016 (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Hathorn checked out music and art programs, as did Lofton, plus her most palpable passions.

“Singing, definitely, and dance and theater,” Hathorn said.

They were among about 1,000 high school seniors who attended this year’s Eagle Experience at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus, which features exhibits highlighting all the academic and career-tech programs Hinds has to offer as well as activities ranging from student publications to the Hi-Steppers dance team to Honors.

The event is a come-and-go expo-style spread of exhibits and displays that gives high school seniors and their parents an opportunity to find out everything they need to know about enrolling at Hinds.

Eagle Experience offered Raymond Campus tours, interaction with current students and all the college basics a new student needs to know about including admissions, scholarships, majors, housing, student life and more. Participants can also enjoy food and prizes.

Lofton and Courtney Jamison, of Florence, were among those who looked into activities that go into college life at Hinds, such as cheering.

Courtney Jamison, right, a Florence High School student, checks out exhibits at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. With her is her mother, Kym, left. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Courtney Jamison, right, a Florence High School student, checks out exhibits at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. With her is her mother, Kym, left. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“I’ve been cheering all my life, really,” Jamison said. “But I’m also interested in music, Hinds Connection and doing the yearbook.”

Some attendees made this year’s event into a road trip.

“I’m into helping others, and having new experiences in new places,” said Takishia Lee, who made the trip with her mother, Tanesheia Lee, who is a certified nursing assistant, and other friends from Scott County. Lee sought information from the associate degree nursing program, as did her fellow seniors Tyunna Odom and Ambriyana Roberts.

Kimberlyn Cager, left, Tyunna Odom, center foreground, and Ambriyana Roberts, right foreground, check out lists of programs featured at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Kimberlyn Cager, left, Tyunna Odom, center foreground, and Ambriyana Roberts, right foreground, check out lists of programs featured at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Career-tech options ranged from welding to graphic design. A simulator at the Industrial Maintenance table kept prospective students combined the elements of real-world welding with a bit of virtual reality.

“It simulates welding two steel plates, which teaches body positioning, angle and distance to hold welding rods in a clean, non-waste environment,” said Industrial Maintenance Technology Instructor Geoffrey Horne as he helped Rodrick Snow, of Raymond, get the hang of a virtual welding shield through which participants could see their handiwork. For the real thing, the Welding & Cutting Technology table offered a view of neatly-sealed metal hinges, among other items.

Rodrick Snow, left, a Raymond High School senior, takes a turn in a welding simulator while Industrial Maintenance Instructor Geoffrey Horne gives some assistance at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Rodrick Snow, left, a Raymond High School senior, takes a turn in a welding simulator while Industrial Maintenance Instructor Geoffrey Horne gives some assistance at Eagle Experience 2016 at Mayo Gym at the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Creating cool logos and designs using the latest graphic design programs caught the eyes of Erica Adams, Talia Sweezer and Dazieyette Jackson, a trio of Vicksburg High School seniors who made the trip as part of the school’s campus tour.

“I just have a passion for designing things like that,” Sweezer said.

Graphic Design Technology Instructor Beth Messina points out the latest design features to Erica Adams, left, Dazieyette Jackson, center, and Talia Sweezer, right, during Eagle Experience 2016 at the Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Graphic Design Technology Instructor Beth Messina points out the latest design features to Erica Adams, left, Dazieyette Jackson, center, and Talia Sweezer, right, during Eagle Experience 2016 at the Mayo Gym on the Raymond Campus Feb. 5, 2016. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 11,500 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

-30-

0 Comments Off on Eagle Experience 2016 recruiting event draws crowd 1234 05 February, 2016 News more
Hinds CC alumna establishes 3 new endowed scholarships
Posted by
05 February

Hinds CC alumna establishes 3 new endowed scholarships

web_Miley Scholarship_Dorothy Davis Miley

Note: The following story is from the Winter 2016 issue of Hindsight alumni magazine.

For Dorothy Davis Miley, Hinds Community College is like family. She demonstrates in many ways that her love and commitment to the college run deep.

With three new recently endowed family scholarships, the long-time college benefactor has upped her commitment to five fully endowed Hinds scholarships. The three new scholarships are the Dorothy Davis Miley Scholarship, the Louise White Davis Scholarship, named for her mother, and the Mamie Louise Miley Scholarship, named for her daughter, Mamie Louise Miley Griffing of Jackson.

Miley continues to add to the new scholarships as well as two scholarships established earlier. The H.H. “Shine” Davis Endowed Scholarship was established in 1982 in memory of her father, who served for 38 years as a trustee of both the Hinds Junior College and Utica Junior College boards. That scholarship was inspired by “the love my father had for the college,” Miley said.

The Robert Miley Endowed Scholarship was established in memory of her husband in 1992.

Miley began planning the addition of the three new scholarships in 1993 with an investment she gave to the Hinds Community College Foundation. Recognizing that its maturity value would not fully endow three scholarships, she began making monthly contributions to ensure that they would eventually be properly endowed as soon as possible.

“My parents taught me it is better to give than receive. I look on this as an opportunity,” she said. “I only went to Hinds one year, but I enjoyed it so much. I got to know the teachers on a personal basis.”

She particularly wanted to see the awarding of the Dorothy Davis Miley Scholarship. “It was my goal while I’m still on this earth to meet a student that received the scholarship named for me. It was the nicest present for my birthday to meet that student,” she said.

Other than funding the scholarships, Miley has another special long-standing Hinds project: She presents portraits to Hinds campuses for placement in buildings named for particular people. This project also started as a tribute to her family. The first portrait was for her father when the Barber and Beauty School building on the Utica Campus was named for H.H. Davis.

 

“Mrs. Miley has such a wonderful, giving spirit. We are so fortunate at Hinds to be the recipient of much of her generosity,” said Jackie Granberry, vice president for Advancement.

One of Hinds Community College Foundation’s most loyal supporters, Miley was the recipient of the Hinds Community College Alumni Service Award in 2003.

A teacher who retired after 30 years in Jackson Public Schools, Miley graduated from Utica High School and Hinds Junior College. She also graduated from Millsaps College and received a master’s degree from Mississippi College.

Miley now lives in north Jackson but still maintains close ties to Utica where she grew up.

She has been a member of several organizations that allowed her to shine in a service role. She is a member of the Tau Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma having served as recording secretary, first vice president, president and central district director. She was selected as Woman of Distinction and received the Red Rose Award.

In 2009 the Hinds Foundation honored her at the National Philanthropy Day Recognition Ceremony for her financial support of the college for more than 30 years. In 2013, she received one of the highest awards at the state level – the Zeta State Achievement Award. She has spearheaded the formation of two grants-in-aid for Tau Chapter. One is the Little-Winters and the other is the Dorothy Davis Miley Grant-in-Aid.

She is also a member of the Jackson-Madison Gideons Auxiliary, having served as president, vice president and scripture secretary. She is a member of Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society, J.O.Y., MPE and Mended Hearts (Chapter 76) where she has served as the Sunshine Committee person for many years. She is a lifetime member of the Mississippi Retired Public Employees Association.

Miley is a member of Galloway United Methodist Church in Jackson where she is also a member of Circle 5 U.M.W. and the Ben Fatherree Sunday School Class.

The Louise White Davis Scholarship

web_Miley Scholarship_Herman and Louise Davis

Miley’s mother Louise White Davis was a native of Edwards. She graduated from Central High School in Memphis and Soulle Business School in New Orleans. She came to Utica to work as one of three bookkeepers for Mr. D.C. Simmons.

While in Utica, where she lived most of her life, she met her future husband, H.H. Davis, who worked at Peoples Bank as a teller. After they were married, she and her husband owned and operated “Shine” Davis Grocery. She was also a notary public and a representative for several floral companies.

The Mamie Louise Miley Scholarship

Stellablue Paige Miley Griffing, Jonathan (Jon) Griffing, Greenlee Maye Miley Griffing, Mamie Louise Miley Griffing and Rainey Maize Miley Griffing

Stellablue Paige Miley Griffing, Jonathan (Jon) Griffing, Greenlee Maye Miley Griffing, Mamie Louise Miley Griffing and Rainey Maize Miley Griffing

Miley’s daughter, Mamie Louise Miley Griffing, is a 1995 graduate of Woodland Hills Baptist Academy. She received bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Southern Mississippi, in 2000 and 2003, and is near completion of her Specialist’s Degree.

She has taught special education with emphasis on autism at several different public schools. She currently is an adjunct instructor at Hinds’ Rankin Campus.

She is married to Jonathan (Jon) Griffing and they live in Jackson with their three daughters: Greenlee Maye Miley Griffing, 5; Stellablue Paige Miley Griffing, 4; and Rainey.

Scholarships at Hinds Community College

Scholarships are awarded on the basis of a student’s desire for achievement, involvement in extracurricular activities, financial need, grades and letters of recommendation.

Endowed scholarships may be established with a minimum gift of $15,000 donated to the Hinds Community College Foundation.

The gift will constitute the initial principal for the endowment. The principal will be maintained and only the income earned will be awarded in the form of scholarships.

Non-endowed scholarships may be established with a minimum gift of $500. All gifts of cash and/or stocks are fully tax deductible.

For more information about establishing a scholarship at Hinds Community College, contact Betty Carraway, 601.857.3800, ecarraway@hindscc.edu.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

0 Comments Off on Hinds CC alumna establishes 3 new endowed scholarships 1131 05 February, 2016 News more
Miss Hinds Community College 2016 named
Posted by
04 February

Miss Hinds Community College 2016 named

Courtney Helom, of Jackson, was named Hinds Community College 2016 in the annual pageant Feb. 3.

As Miss Hinds Community College, Helom will participate this summer in the Miss Mississippi pageant.

Miss Hinds Community College 2015 Maggie Shoultz crowns Courtney Helom, of Jackson, as Miss Hinds Community College 2016 as Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse looks on during this year's pageant Feb. 3. Helom is a sophomore at the Raymond Campus studying biology. Her platform is "Girl Scouts of America: beYoutiful". The pageant is an official preliminary pageant of the Miss America Pageant program. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Miss Hinds Community College 2015 Maggie Shoultz crowns Courtney Helom, of Jackson, as Miss Hinds Community College 2016 as Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse looks on during this year’s pageant Feb. 3. Helom is a sophomore at the Raymond Campus studying biology. Her platform is “Girl Scouts of America: beYoutiful”. The pageant is an official preliminary pageant of the Miss America Pageant program. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Helom, 20, is a Raymond Campus sophomore majoring in biology. She attended St. Joseph Catholic School and is a cheerleader and a member of Hinds Connection. Her talent was a monologue titled “Emmitt Till,” in which she took on the character of Till’s mother, and her platform is “Girl Scouts of America: beYOUtiful.”

First runner-up was Abigail Walters, 19, of Vicksburg, a Raymond Campus sophomore majoring in nursing. Second runner-up was Mary Neely Meyers, 19, of Madison, a Raymond Campus freshman majoring in business and marketing.

From left, second runner-up Mary Neely Myers, of Madison; Miss Hinds Community College 2016 Courtney Helom, of Jackson; first runner-up Abigail Walters, of Vicksburg.

From left, second runner-up Mary Neely Myers, of Madison; Miss Hinds Community College 2016 Courtney Helom, of Jackson; first runner-up Abigail Walters, of Vicksburg. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

 

0 Comments Off on Miss Hinds Community College 2016 named 1588 04 February, 2016 News more
Governor, Lt. Governor tout community college role in economic development
Posted by
04 February

Governor, Lt. Governor tout community college role in economic development

Hinds Community College Student VOICES were among the students at the Feb. 3 Capitol Day. From left are instructor Jeff Hughes, Daniel Powell of Jackson, Jonathan Sutton of Byram, Rep. Alyce Clarke of Jackson, Michael Pham of Byram, Chen Elizar of Florence, Lena Dixon of Raymond and Kenechukwa Okoye of Clinton.

Hinds Community College Student VOICES were among the students at the Feb. 3 Capitol Day. From left are instructor Jeff Hughes, Daniel Powell of Jackson, Jonathan Sutton of Byram, Rep. Alyce Clarke of Jackson, Michael Pham of Byram, Chen Elizar of Florence, Lena Dixon of Raymond and Kenechukwa Okoye of Clinton.

JACKSON – Gov. Phil Bryant and Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves lent their voices in support of Mississippi’s 15 community colleges and their role in providing workforce training throughout the state.

Bryant repeated his desire to use $50 million in funds from the Mississippi Department of Employment Security to help fund workforce training.  Bryant noted that the state has “great opportunities … to train the workforce of the future in the community colleges across this great state. I’ve asked the Legislature to help us,” he said. “Those funds can go to the community colleges directly to help train the workforce of the future. We understand there is no better place to invest that $50 million than the community college workforce program.”

Gov. Phil Bryant is surrounded by community college students as he pitches a $50 million appropriation for workforce training at the annual community college Capitol Day on Feb. 3.

Gov. Phil Bryant is surrounded by community college students as he pitches a $50 million appropriation for workforce training at the annual community college Capitol Day on Feb. 3.

Bryant is a graduate of Hinds Community College who was working changing tires when he got a postcard inviting him to come to Hinds. “I got in my 1955 Chevy and drove to Raymond. The next day I was a college student,” he said. “Hinds Community College and colleges all over the state in the 1970s and today open the door for higher education to a blue-collar generation that that would have never been able to achieve success without a community or junior college.  And it goes on today.”

Like Bryant, Reeves touted the quality of the colleges. “The fact is our tremendous community college system in Mississippi puts us at a competitive advantage compared to many other states when trying to recruit business and industry to our state,” he said. “This system also puts us at a competitive advantage because of all the work they do on workforce development to provide the skills necessary not for the jobs of 50 years ago but for the jobs of the next 50 years.”

Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves speaking at the Feb. 3 Capitol Day news conference for community colleges.

Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves speaking at the Feb. 3 Capitol Day news conference for community colleges.

In August, WalletHub, a financial analyst company for small business and consumers, gave Mississippi’s community colleges the top national ranking for cost, classroom experience and education/career outcomes. And out of the 150 colleges nationally eligible to compete for the prestigious 2017 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, which highlights the critical importance of improving student success in America’s community colleges, seven of them are in Mississippi. Last month, a report on the success of community college transfer students earned Mississippi a sixth in the nation ranking for the number of community college students who transfer to a university and fourth in the nation for the percentage of low income community college students who transfer and earn a bachelor’s degree.

“Once again Mississippi’s community and junior colleges rank high in the nation. For more than a century our two-year schools have provided a trained workforce for Mississippi’s expanding economy, as well as a great place for students of all ages and backgrounds to begin their pursuit of a baccalaureate degree,” said Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College instructor Brian Carriere, president of the 1,000-plus member MFACJC. “With continued support from our Legislature, Mississippi’s community and junior colleges will continue to provide a great return on investment for our students, citizens and state.”

Dr. Jesse Smith, president of Jones County Junior College and chair of the Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges (MACJC), was also among those speaking.

“A recent study notes that each dollar invested in Mississippi Community Colleges yields a return of $4.86 in tax revenue over a student’s working lifetime,” Smith said. “Mississippi’s No. 1 nationally ranked community college system is the only government investment that yields back to both the student and the state.  Decreased investment from the state leads to increased tuition costs and less educational attainment for the citizens of our state.”

“Each of the 15 community colleges in Mississippi strives to keep tuition low and affordable, without sacrificing the level of qualified faculty in the classroom,” he said.

Two community college students shared their experiences.

Jessica Culpepper, an early childhood development major, said Meridian Community College was a good choice for her.

“It’s cheaper on me and my parents.  I live at home. I sleep in my own bed. It gives me an opportunity to get a feel for what I really want to do for the rest of my working life,” said Culpepper, who said she has dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder.

Tyler Abney said he chose Pearl River Community College because “coming from a low income family, I knew that college would be nothing but a dream if I could not find enough scholarship money. It was either scholarships or pay student loans the rest of my life — and I didn’t see that as an option. However, I was able to work hard enough to be awarded an education at Pearl River Community College.”

Dr. Andrea Mayfield, executive director of the Mississippi Community College Board, said the students’ inspiring stories wouldn’t be possible without funding from the state Legislature.

“With appropriate legislative support our community colleges will continue to create the very best workforce training and education programs in the country,” she said. “Our system is the best. It is the best at providing career and working opportunities for the people of our great state. It is essential that we do everything that we can everything in terms of legislative power to keep Mississippi first in education. Our system needs the money to develop our workforce and career-technical opportunities and we need your support.”

While community colleges have had much success in Mississippi, they’ve had to do it with lean funding. The community colleges are asking for “fair and equitable funding” in comparison to their K-12 and university counterparts.

The colleges are focusing their efforts on demonstrating their value and return on investment.

Community College leaders are asking for about $83 million to keep tuition costs down, produce more graduates and skilled workers, attract and retain qualified faculty, expand allied health programs and update technology. General operating funds and faculty salaries are top priorities.

The second priority for the colleges is $20 million for Workforce and Economic Development. Half of this money would go toward the MI-BEST Career Pathways program. MI-BEST is a team teaching model in which GED preparation and job skills training is done concurrently.   Only 57 percent of Mississippi’s prime working age adults are employed, and many of those who are not have no education or training to fall back on. The rest of the money would go to updating Career-Technical Education equipment and facilities and to update or start new programs.

The colleges’ third priority is $75 million for capital improvements, including $37,500 in bonds for FY 2017 and 2018 each. This approach gives community colleges the same opportunities universities already have for a multi-year bond bill.

0 Comments Off on Governor, Lt. Governor tout community college role in economic development 1226 04 February, 2016 News more
Five Hinds CC students selected for UMMC health initiative
Posted by
02 February

Five Hinds CC students selected for UMMC health initiative

Five students of Hinds Community College have been selected for a program aimed at building the ranks of males of color in healthcare.

Eddie V. Anderson, Utica Campus; Antonio McBeth and Christian Minor, Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center; Michael Pham, Raymond Campus and Zavier Smith, Utica Campus, will participate in the Health Equity and Leadership Initiative through the University of Mississippi Medical Center. The program provides those preparing for medical careers opportunities to develop skills from leaders in the healthcare workforce through in-person seminars and online sources.

“Males of color are underrepresented in our health profession schools and our goal is to offer an intimate experience for talented students such as those accepted to the Health Equity & Leadership Initiative,” said Dr. Juanyce D. Taylor, director of the program at UMMC. “The leadership development activities and shadowing experiences allow participants to learn the inner dynamics and clinical aspect of a large, complex academic health center. Essentially, we are building a stronger and more diverse health care workforce.”

Eddie V. Anderson

Eddie V. Anderson

Anderson, of Jackson, is a petty officer third class in the Navy and 2015 Hinds graduate who plans to attend nursing school. “I’m in the medical field to help people who aren’t knowledgeable about their health to do those things to improve their health,” he said.

Antonio McBeth

Antonio McBeth

Patient interaction is also important to McBeth, of Lena, in Leake County. “Interaction with the patient is an experience like no other,” said McBeth, who earned a degree in psychology from the University of Southern Mississippi before returning to Hinds to pursue eventually becoming a family nurse practitioner. “No two patients are the same, and I enjoy it.”

Applicants are recommended by faculty at their respective colleges, typically an instructor, adviser or community leader.

UMMC bases the program on research showing males of color are significantly underrepresented in most health professional programs. The program’s purpose is to support underrepresented males aged 17 to 25 enrolled in two-year colleges in Mississippi to become leaders in the healthcare workforce, while increasing access to health professional education, training, and career options. Funding for the program comes from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Dr. Mitchell Shears, academic dean for the Utica Campus, where Anderson and Smith attend class, sees the program as a chance to sell the medical field as a viable career option for an emerging pool of students.

“It is our desire on the Utica Campus to assist more students, particularly males of color, in finding opportunities like this to make them more marketable to four-year institutions and the workforce after their collegiate experiences,” Shears said.

Prospective medical careers have been shaped among this year’s participants by personal experiences.

Christian Minor

Christian Minor

“When my mother was in a car accident in 2002, I saw what the nurses in the hospital were able to do for her,” said Minor, of Jackson, a sergeant in the Mississippi National Guard who plans to be a registered nurse. “They asked about our spiritual lives and how we could get help financially.”

Michael Pham

Michael Pham

Pham, of Byram, plans to attend Mississippi State University in biochemistry before going to medical school. He doesn’t take for granted the opportunity he has. “My family left in Vietnam are farmers, so I wouldn’t have had the same opportunity to go to school there, learn something and give back to the community,” he said. “I’d have to drop out and help get money for my family, as my cousins do.”

Zavier Smith

Zavier Smith

Smith envisions being an orthopedic surgeon because of his personal experience. “I played football at Raymond High School, and I had a torn pec one time and had to have surgery. Going through that, I learned things, like how muscles contract,” he said.

The program fits with UMMC’s past support of expanding the health profession in more sectors of the community.

“The University of Mississippi Medical Center has a history of supporting pipeline programs designed to increase its diversity and create pathways to health profession careers,” said Taylor, who is assistant dean for Research and Innovation and chairs the Department of Health Sciences, where she is also an assistant professor. She is also program director for the Master of Health Sciences at UMMC’s School of Health Related Professions.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 11,500 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 Comments Off on Five Hinds CC students selected for UMMC health initiative 1751 02 February, 2016 News more