http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC graduates academic and career-tech students

Monthly Archives: December 2015

Hinds CC graduates academic and career-tech students
Posted by
18 December

Hinds CC graduates academic and career-tech students

Larry Brown walked across the stage with a golden cord around his neck and satisfaction in his heart.

“I came back to school to inspire my grandkids,” Brown, 51, said minutes before graduating from Hinds Community College cum laude with an Associate of Applied Science in Accounting.

Larry Brown, left, and Linda Brown Long, right, pause for a moment during pre-ceremony preparations for graduation from Hinds Community College on Friday, Dec. 18, 2015. Brown earned an Associate of Applied Science degree and Long, his sister, earned her Associate Degreen in Nursing. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Larry Brown, left, and Linda Brown Long, right, pause for a moment during pre-ceremony preparations for graduation from Hinds Community College on Friday, Dec. 18, 2015. Brown earned an Associate of Applied Science degree and Long, his sister, earned her Associate Degreen in Nursing. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

It was an even bigger family affair than that for Brown. His sister, Linda Brown Long, 53, was also among the more than 800 students who graduated in three ceremonies Friday, Dec. 18 at the Muse Center on Hinds’ Rankin Campus.

Long earned her Associate Degree in Nursing on Friday. They walked in the midday ceremony with the academic and career-tech students simply to be on the same stage for family members.

“I pursued nursing to go into hospice,” Long said, adding an experience taking care of an older family member showed her the way to her new vocation.

“For me, it was taking care of my father who inspired me,” Long said.

It was a time for family for Keren Garrett as well.

Keren Garrett gets a hug from his nephew, Brayden, following graduation ceremonies at the Muse Center on Hinds Community College's Rankin Campus. Garrett earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Landscape Management Technology. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Keren Garrett gets a hug from his nephew, Brayden, following graduation ceremonies at the Muse Center on Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. Garrett earned an Associate of Applied Science degree in Landscape Management Technology. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Garrett, of Jackson, who earned an Associate of Applied Science in Landscape Management Technology, gathered with eight members of his family, including his nephew, Brayden, and his 94-year-old great-grandmother, Maudia Taylor. Garrett said he wants to start his own architectural firm.

“It was wonderful,” Taylor said of seeing her great-grandson walk across the stage. “My heart was big.”

Hinds conferred more than 1,300 credentials, including one-year career certificates or two-year technical certificates for career-technical programs or associate degrees. Some students are receiving more than one credential.

Graduating summa cum laude, with 4.0 grade point averages, are 156 students. Ninety-two graduate magna cum laude with GPAs of 3.6 to 3.99, and 135 graduate cum laude with GPAs of 3.2 to 3.59.

“We as educators look forward to the day in which we can celebrate the achievements of our students,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse.

“My challenge for each of us today is that we’ll choose to be like those people who ride the rollercoaster with both hands held high in the air,” Hughes said. “The truth is they are “all in” and because of that, they experience the joy of the ride to its fullest. You too can experience ultimate joy in life and success if you approach it by going “all in.”

1 2058 18 December, 2015 News more
Hinds CC graduates nursing, allied health students
Posted by
18 December

Hinds CC graduates nursing, allied health students

Kimberly Arnold of Jackson finished her Associate Degree in Nursing at Hinds Community College at age 40. She graduated on Dec. 18.

Kimberly Arnold of Jackson finished her Associate Degree in Nursing at Hinds Community College at age 40. She graduated on Dec. 18.

Kimberly Arnold of Jackson finished her Associate Degree in Nursing at Hinds Community College at age 40.

With the support of her family, she was able to achieve her long-held dream. She finished college the first time in 1998. “Coming back  to school was a challenge for me but I made it,” she said.

She was among more than 800 students who graduated in one of three ceremonies on Friday, Dec. 18 at the Muse Center on Hinds’ Rankin Campus.

Hinds conferred more than 1,300 credentials, including one-year career certificates or two-year technical certificates for career-technical programs or associate degrees. Some students are receiving more than one credential.

Graduating summa cum laude, with 4.0 grade point averages, are 156 students. Ninety-two graduate magna cum laude with GPAs of 3.6 to 3.99, and 135 graduate cum laude with GPAs of 3.2 to 3.59.

“We as educators look forward to the day in which we can celebrate the achievements of our students,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse visits with graduation speaker Bobbie Anderson of Vicksburg at the Dec. 18 ceremony held at the college’s Rankin Campus.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse visits with graduation speaker Bobbie Anderson of Vicksburg at the Dec. 18 ceremony held at the college’s Rankin Campus.

Bobbie Anderson, dean emeritus of Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center, was the speaker for the nursing and allied health ceremony.

She told graduates to concentrate on the four Cs — competency, commitment, caring and communication. She cautioned them not to get too wrapped up in the modern medical technology and forget that they are caring for people. “Don’t forget to hold their hand and share a tear if you need to,” Anderson said.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

Morgan Currington of Vicksburg, sitting, Colie Hollowell of Vicksburg, standing left, and Clair Myers of Terry graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. with degrees in dental assisting.

Morgan Currington of Vicksburg, sitting, Colie Hollowell of Vicksburg, standing left, and Clair Myers of Terry graduated from Hinds Community College on Dec. with degrees in dental assisting.

Sarah Bushnell of Ridgeland, Brittany Frith of Florence, Farisa Husband of Vicksburg and Tammy Watts of Florence received Associate Degrees in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18.

Sarah Bushnell of Ridgeland, Brittany Frith of Florence, Farisa Husband of Vicksburg and Tammy Watts of Florence received Associate Degrees in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18.

Maidee Campbell of Brandon, left, Morgan Masley of Jackson and Katie Pepper of Canton received Associate Degrees in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18.

Maidee Campbell of Brandon, left, Morgan Masley of Jackson and Katie Pepper of Canton received Associate Degrees in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18.

Shetara Granger of Jackson gets a selfie with nursing navigator Delores Garner. Granger received an Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18.

Shetara Granger of Jackson gets a selfie with nursing navigator Delores Garner. Granger received an Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18.

Terri Shores Black, retired Hinds Community College coach and physical education department chair, was the grand marshal and mace bearer for the Dec. 18 graduation ceremony.

Terri Shores Black, retired Hinds Community College coach and physical education department chair, was the grand marshal and mace bearer for the Dec. 18 graduation ceremony.

Joanna Barnes of Brookhaven received a degree in dental assisting from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her is mom Ruby Daniels.

Joanna Barnes of Brookhaven received a degree in dental assisting from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her is mom Ruby Daniels.

Akelia Graise of Jackson got lots of balloons and flowers from family members after receiving a practical nursing degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her is aunt Elizabeth Graise.

Akelia Graise of Jackson got lots of balloons and flowers from family members after receiving a practical nursing degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her is aunt Elizabeth Graise.

Kwmaine Smith of Port Gibson received an Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With him is Lakendra Council.

Kwmaine Smith of Port Gibson received an Associate Degree in Nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With him is Lakendra Council.

Haley Wilson of Brandon, left, and Emily Stewart of Braxton take a selfie after receiving their dental assisting degrees from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18.

Haley Wilson of Brandon, left, and Emily Stewart of Braxton take a selfie after receiving their dental assisting degrees from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18.

Carley Vogt of Florence received a degree in dental assisting from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her is her daughter, Lilyann, 2.

Carley Vogt of Florence received a degree in dental assisting from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her is her daughter, Lilyann, 2.

Michelle Sanders of Richland received a practical nursing degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her are son Garrett Sanders, 13, and her mom, Fran Woods.

Michelle Sanders of Richland received a practical nursing degree from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her are son Garrett Sanders, 13, and her mom, Fran Woods.

Breana Grimsley of Morton received a degree in dental assisting from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her are her parents, Chris and Joanne Grimsley

Breana Grimsley of Morton received a degree in dental assisting from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her are her parents, Chris and Joanne Grimsley

Sherika Epps of Jackson graduated with a degree in dental assisting at Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her is sister Yvette McLendon.

Sherika Epps of Jackson graduated with a degree in dental assisting at Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her is sister Yvette McLendon.

Amy Heggins of Mount Olive received a degree in practical nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her is mom Paula Heggins.

Amy Heggins of Mount Olive received a degree in practical nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18. With her is mom Paula Heggins.

The family of Ceci Bankston of Pearl was thrilled to see her receive a degree in practical nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18.

The family of Ceci Bankston of Pearl was thrilled to see her receive a degree in practical nursing from Hinds Community College on Dec. 18.

Ashley Hollins was on hand for the Dec. 18 Hinds Community College graduation of her friend Lateesha Taylor of Brandon, who received a degree in practical nursing.

Ashley Hollins was on hand for the Dec. 18 Hinds Community College graduation of her friend Lateesha Taylor of Brandon, who received a degree in practical nursing.

Tyeshia Harrington of Brandon, left, helps Samantha Brown of Ridgeland with her cap at the Dec. 18 graduation at Hinds Community College. They graduated with degrees in phlebotomy.

Tyeshia Harrington of Brandon, left, helps Samantha Brown of Ridgeland with her cap at the Dec. 18 graduation at Hinds Community College. They graduated with degrees in phlebotomy.

Bobbie Anderson of Vicksburg, Dean Emeritus of the nursing school at Hinds Community College, was the speaker for the Dec. 18 nursing and allied health graduation ceremony.

Bobbie Anderson of Vicksburg, Dean Emeritus of the nursing school at Hinds Community College, was the speaker for the Dec. 18 nursing and allied health graduation ceremony.

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Hinds CC Board of Trustees begins new year with new officers
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18 December

Hinds CC Board of Trustees begins new year with new officers

New Hinds Community College Board of Trustees  President Paul Breazeale, outgoing Board of Trustees President Dr. Lynn Weathersby and new Vice President Dale Sullivan

New Hinds Community College Board of Trustees President Paul Breazeale, outgoing Board of Trustees President Dr. Lynn Weathersby and new Vice President Dale Sullivan

Paul Breazeale of Jackson was elected president of the Hinds Community College Board of Trustees by his fellow trustees in a Dec. 2 meeting.

Breazeale replaces Dr. Lynn Weathersby, who leaves the board after 16 years of service. Weathersby is retiring as superintendent for the Rankin County school district. Dale Sullivan has been elected as vice president of the board.

Breazeale, a native of Neshoba County, attended East Central Community College and has bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Mississippi State University.  He has been a Hinds trustee since June 2004. A certified public accountant, Breazeale served an eight-year term on the Mississippi Board for Community and Junior Colleges and was chairman for two years. He is a member of the Mississippi Ethics Commission.

“I look forward to working with Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and the other trustees in ensuring that our students are provided the very best educational opportunities.  More specifically, and to better serve our community, I am especially interested in enhancing our workforce development and job training efforts,” Breazeale said.

Sullivan of Wesson is currently deputy director of the Mississippi Association of School Superintendents. He has been retired as superintendent of the Copiah County School district since 2001 after having served 28 years.

He has an associate degree from Copiah-Lincoln Community College, a bachelor’s degree from Delta State University, a master’s from Mississippi College and a doctoral coursework from the University of Mississippi.

“I sincerely believe in the Mississippi community college system and the avenue it provides to the young adults of our state,” he said. “If it had not been for Copiah-Lincoln Community College being only 17 miles from my home I would not have had an opportunity to higher education.

“Hinds Community College offers so much help and so many opportunities to the students in Mississippi and to older adults who need to be retrained for new employment,” Sullivan said.

New Rankin County school district superintendent Sue Townsend joins the Hinds board in January.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Television and Radio Broadcast program at Hinds CC Utica Campus trains for media careers
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17 December

Television and Radio Broadcast program at Hinds CC Utica Campus trains for media careers

As a girl, Alayshia Martin watched all the thrilling highlights of her favorite sport on the news and wondered, “How’d they do that?”

“As a little girl, I loved watching basketball,” Martin said. “I’d be watching the highlights come up, and they’re replaying them. I wanted to learn how to work the camera and make it look so interesting. If other people can do it, I can do it.”

As a first-year student in the Television and Radio Broadcasting program at Hinds Community College’s Utica campus, Martin is learning how the news, sports and more are put together in the modern-day, fast-paced broadcast media.

First-year Television and Radio Broadcast student Alayshia Martin eyes up a shot during a practice shoot at the program's studio on the Utica Campus. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

First-year Television and Radio Broadcast student Alayshia Martin eyes up a shot during a practice shoot at the program’s studio on the Utica Campus. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“Television and Radio Broadcasting, offered on the Utica Campus, prepares students to work in broadcast media in areas such as announcing, broadcasting control, editing, and more,” District Director of Enrollment Kathryn Cole said. “In this program, students benefit from experienced faculty and small class sizes with both classroom instruction and hands-on training.”

Registration for spring 2016 is ongoing; classes begin on Jan. 11. For information about enrolling, go to the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu. The campus is home to 14 career-technical programs including the  Television and Radio Broadcasting program, where students can earn a 2-year Associate of Applied Science degree. For information about the program, call director Tim Crisler at 601.885.7071.

Today’s visual media industries demand versatility beyond what Martin saw even just a few years ago growing up in Summit. Already an intern at a local television station as a result of the program, she’ll continue learning how to operate TV cameras, shoot video, find the best sound bites and write copy.

“You’ll be expected to shoot it, write it and post it before it even gets to the air,” Crisler said. “So, we teach a mixture, everything from writing, speaking and all the behind-the-scenes of putting together and anchoring a whole news show.”

It’s the quality cross-training that has Crisler’s students already in demand.

“All my students have internships at TV and radio stations in the Jackson market,” said Crisler, who worked in broadcasting and public relations 20 years in the Jackson area before coming to Hinds during the fall 2015 semester. “Our goal by the time they leave here is to have more experience than some university students. It’s essential to me to get them out into the industry, so that when they graduate they can walk right into a job.”

Martin and her classmates are taking full advantage of their education both in and out of the classroom.

“I didn’t know I had the capability with the equipment and the software,” she said. “I put what I learned in class into their workstation and it was interesting.

Quality time behind the lens, whether as part of the class or her internship, is priceless for Martin.

“It’s about getting the experience, then getting a good job,” she said.

Special projects and on-campus productions can include covering what’s going on at other career-tech programs on campus, among various opportunities to hone skills.

“We partner with all our departments here on campus and with career-tech to practice our production pieces,” Crisler said. “And I try to cover all six campuses, because learning about different people is part of being a good journalist.

“It’s a multimedia world, and it’s transformed to where you have to know it all. But, when you graduate, your talents will be on the level with the industry.”

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Hinds CC to graduate more than 800 students in Friday ceremonies
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17 December

Hinds CC to graduate more than 800 students in Friday ceremonies

Jeff Hughes

Jeff Hughes

Bobbie Anderson

Bobbie Anderson

PEARL – Hinds Community College will confer more than 1,300 credentials to 811 students at the fall 2015 graduation ceremonies on Friday, Dec. 18.

Students will receive either one-year career certificates or two-year technical certificates for career-technical programs or associate degrees in one of three ceremonies at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Some students are receiving more than one credential.

Graduating summa cum laude, with 4.0 grade point averages, are 156 students. Ninety-two graduate magna cum laude with GPAs of 3.6 to 3.99, and 135 graduate cum laude with GPAs of 3.2 to 3.59.

All nursing and allied health graduates will receive their degrees at 8 a.m. Bobbie Anderson, dean emeritus of Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center, is the speaker for the nursing graduate ceremony.

Ceremonies for academic and career-tech graduates are at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Jeff Hughes, a 27-year math teacher at the college, speaks to those graduates.

Anderson, of Vicksburg, spent 24 years at Hinds’ nursing campus, retiring in 1993 when an annex building on the Chadwick Drive campus was named for her. Her work as an adjunct faculty member for the Associate Degree Nursing program and consultant to other programs continued until 2014. She began her career as a nurse in 1951 as a staff nurse at Vicksburg Hospital.

She holds two master’s degrees, in Counseling and Guidance from Mississippi College, and in Psychiatric/Mental Health from the University of Mississippi. In 2009, she was inducted into the Mississippi Nurses Association Hall of Fame.

Hughes is the curriculum coordinator of mathematics across Hinds’ six campuses and in October was named the college’s faculty honoree for the Legislature’s HEADWAE program in February. The program honors academically talents students and faculty who have promoted academic excellence. He was educated at Mississippi College and the University of Mississippi, where he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics.

He has co-authored two textbooks, College Algebra and Precalculus, and has presented numerous programs at professional conferences across the nation. He is a sponsor of Student VOICES, a student advocacy group at Hinds. Also, Hughes has been the recipient of the college’s Outstanding Academic Instructor of the Year Award and also chosen as Phi Theta Kappa’s Teacher of the Year.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

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Culinary Arts program at Hinds CC Utica Campus trains for food careers
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17 December

Culinary Arts program at Hinds CC Utica Campus trains for food careers

The kitchen is a diverse, popular place these days, particularly in television and social media. But there’s plenty of room at the tables served in the economy.

Careers in food can lead students to several diverse lines of work, from restaurants to food management. In the case of Hinds Community College Utica Campus student James Chapman, it’s a way to keep his options as versatile and varied as his interests. Although he left the farm to attend college, farming is still close to his heart.

“My grandmother and mom both grew up cooking,” said Chapman, a first-year student from Carthage. “They grew crops and lived off the land, lots of greens, different vegetables and fresh food. Even with meat, they had pigs, cows and such.

“At first, I wanted to do weapons engineering for the military,” he said. “But I had talked to a recruiter for the military who told me how much they love cooking because they need an escape. I found out about the culinary program here, and I’m glad I joined it.”

Chapman was among a dozen students in instructor Durnitra Weeks’ class in the Culinary Arts program at the Utica Campus in the fall 2015 semester. The Utica Campus, formerly Utica Junior College, retains its HBCU (Historically Black College and University) status. The campus is home to 14 career-technical programs including Weeks’ class.

James Chapman, left foreground, and Durnitra Weeks, instructor in the Culinary Arts program at Hinds Community College's Utica Campus, stand in the kitchen with seven others enrolled in the program this past semester. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

First-year culinary student James Chapman, left foreground, and Durnitra Weeks, center foreground, instructor in the Culinary Arts program at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus, stand in the kitchen with eight others enrolled in the program this past semester. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“The Hinds Utica Campus Career-Technical Division is proud of the growth we’ve seen in the past year,” said Kenisha Shelton, dean of career-tech programs at the Utica Campus. “Our instructors have been working extremely hard this past year to recruit and retain students and to obtain certification for themselves to stay relevant and connected with industry. The Career and Technical division at Hinds Community College – Utica Campus is definitely turning vision into reality.”

Registration for spring 2016 is ongoing; classes begin on Jan. 11. For information about enrolling in the culinary arts program, go to the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu or call Weeks at 601.885.7114.

“We start out covering the basics – how to boil water and the correct temperature in which to cook certain foods,” Weeks said. “Then, comes the sanitary part, which is cleaning the kitchen according to health standards. Later, we cover seasoning and flavoring techniques with meat and other things like that.”

Weeks, a Bolivar County native and former executive chef and dietary manager in the healthcare industry, herself chose a cooking career over healthcare since it was second nature from an early age.

“I’m from a family of four cooks,” she said. “So, the passion came from watching them and for the enjoyment on their faces.”

Students enrolled in culinary programs at all of Hinds’ locations also learn about the connection of the program to hospitality and tourism. The college’s Hospitality and Tourism Management Technology degree program includes culinary, hotel, travel and tourism concentrations.

Part of the Culinary Arts program at Hinds Community College's Utica Campus includes proper knife work with common food items, such as potatoes. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Part of the Culinary Arts program at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus includes instruction on proper knife work with common food items, such as potatoes. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

“In the Culinary Arts program on the Utica Campus, students receive hands-on training by an experienced chef,” District Director of Enrollment Kathryn Cole said. “Skills are built from the ground up – from simple boiling techniques all the way to working with specialized equipment and ingredients.”

Chapman is keeping his career options open, but both are straight out of the kitchen.

“I have two paths right now. One of them leads to be a culinary specialist in the Navy, and another is finding an apprenticeship for a restaurant, catering or food safety. With that, I’d like to stay in Mississippi.”

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Clothing and Fashion program at Hinds CC Utica Campus trains for new careers
Posted by
17 December

Clothing and Fashion program at Hinds CC Utica Campus trains for new careers

Finding the latest fashions at the right price had to become a talent when Shricker Johnson’s children developed their own tastes in clothes.

“I have two daughters, and my youngest one is a diva with clothes and everything,” said the Crystal Springs native and first-year student in the Fashion Technology program at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus.

Shricker Johnson aligns a piece of material on a sewing machine in the Fashion Technology program at Hinds Community College's Utica Campus. Johnson is a first-year student in the program. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Shricker Johnson aligns a piece of material on a sewing machine in the Fashion Technology program at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus. Johnson is a first-year student in the program. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

In the program, Johnson is blending her desire to continue her education with her creative eye in the hopes she can make a better living for her family.

“I was interested at first in cosmetology, then early childhood education,” she said. “Now, I want to do my own business, me and my girls.”

The Fashion program is one of 14 career-technical programs offered at the Utica Campus. With a one-year career certificate in hand upon completion of the program, students can take the skill to the workforce – fabric stores, alterations companies and manufacturing plants, to name a few.

“The program offers experienced faculty and small class sizes that prepare you for successful employment in clothing, textiles and fashion design fields,” said District Director of Enrollment Kathryn Cole. “This program includes instruction and training in construction, fabric design, pattern design, principles of construction, fitting and alterations, custom tailoring, home furnishings and textiles testing.”

Registration for spring 2016 at Hinds Community College is ongoing; classes begin on Jan. 11. For information about enrolling, go to the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu. For information about the Fashion program, contact Dr. Curtis Gore, the program’s director on the Utica Campus, at 601.885.7116.

“The Hinds Utica Campus Career-Technical Division is proud of the growth we’ve seen in the past year,” said Kenisha Shelton, dean of career-tech programs at the Utica Campus. “Our instructors have been working extremely hard this past year to recruit and retain students and to obtain certification for themselves to stay relevant and connected with industry. The Career and Technical division at Hinds Community College – Utica Campus is definitely turning vision into reality.”

The expansive Fashion program prepares home tailors, crafters, novice sewers and every other kind of student in between with comprehensive coursework on the latest in sewing and embroidering technology. In short, it’s not your grandmother’s sewing machine anymore. Today’s machines are faster and more versatile, Gore said.

“Those machines are computerized, so they have different types of stitch settings,” said Gore, a 20-year clothing designer featured in more than 100 fashion shows in the South. “If you wanted to do some embroidering, say the cuff on your shirt, it has patterns ready once you log into the machine. You can also use a jump drive to download certain images and patterns you want to do.”

Dr. Curtis Gore, director of the Fashion Technology program at Hinds Community College's Utica Campus, points out the next step in making a dress for Shricker Johnson, a first-year student in the program. Johnson is making the dress for her daughter's prom. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Dr. Curtis Gore, director of the Fashion Technology program at Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus, points out the next step in making a dress for Shricker Johnson, a first-year student in the program. Johnson is making the dress for her daughter’s prom. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Students in the program begin with the basics and work up to mastering the modern-day machines used in large-scale manufacturing outfits.

“We start off with garment construction, where we help students use the equipment in the classroom, mainly the sewing machines,” Gore said. “In the tailoring class, students learn to tailor garments to the body, working with linings and things like that. Another is equipment usage, industrial and domestic, which is about how to safely use and maintain the latest sewing and embroidery machines, such as the ones made by Brother and Entrepreneur.

“We teach them to use industrial machines because they may end up having to use one, especially if they end up working in a factory,” Gore said.

For the entrepreneurs-in-waiting like Johnson, it’s a chance to show off some practicality. Her final exam in the class was a turquoise polyester show-stopper of a dress tailored for her older daughter’s senior prom.

“The class shows me how I could take it and transform a shirt I might see on sale somewhere for $40 or $50 into what I really want,” Johnson said. “You can get some fabric of your own and make a top-notch shirt – a shirt of your dreams that won’t look cheap and that nobody else has.”

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Founder’s legacy garners Humanities grant for Hinds CC Utica Campus
Posted by
17 December

Founder’s legacy garners Humanities grant for Hinds CC Utica Campus

Jean Greene, left, Dan Fuller

Jean Greene, left, Dan Fuller

Hinds Community College’s Utica Campus has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to highlight the work of the campus’ founder, William Holtzclaw, a pioneer in African American education.

Black Man’s Burden: William Holtzclaw and the Mississippi HBCU Connection will contribute to a growing body of research and interest in the “Little Tuskegees” as important forerunners of the Civil Rights Era in the Deep South.

William Holtzclaw is the founder of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute, which later became Utica Junior College, and is now the Utica Campus of Hinds Community College. The campus still has its status as an HBCU (Historically Black College and University).

This two-year research program is designed to equip faculty and student-scholars to explore themes in Holtzclaw’s writing in humanities courses, combined with the development of a Summer Teachers’ Institute and teaching resource kit that will be used by other institutions to extend the work beyond the institution.

The work will be focused on the critical study of Holtzclaw’s 1915 autobiography as an important marker of African American education in the Deep South. One outcome of the project will be to publish a digitally typeset edition of Black Man’s Burden, with critical notes, to support student study both at the high school and college level through our summer teacher’s institute and humanities course.

The co-directors of the project are Jean Greene, head librarian and Holtzclaw Collection Archivist, and Dan Fuller, English instructor on the Utica Campus, who is also the 2015-2016 Mississippi Humanities Teacher Award recipient for Hinds.

“Students have struggled with the text of the book,” Greene said. “The timeline is not linear so students have difficulty keeping the process of the creation of the school in context.  An annotated version of this book will help students and faculty understand who Holtzclaw was and why his founding of this school is important in the Mississippi Black Experience.”

Fuller said he is eager to connect students with the work.

“I am thrilled that the NEH has recognized the importance of Dr. Holtzclaw’s legacy here in Mississippi. His story of perseverance in the face of adversity is one that deserves a wider audience. As an instructor, I’m excited about the opportunities to engage our students directly in this research.”

This project builds on the work the William H. Holtzclaw Library spearheaded with the Utica Institute Traveling Exhibit and the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute collection at the Mississippi Digital Library.

The project, like all NEH awards, has gone through four levels of review to reach the award stage.

Level 1: Knowledgeable persons independent of the agency read each application and advise the agency about its merits.

Level 2: NEH’s staff synthesizes the results of the outside review and prepares a slate of recommendations for the National Council on the Humanities.

Level 3: The National Council meets in Washington, DC, to advise the Endowment’s chairman on applications and matters of policy.

Level 4: The chairman considers the advice he or she has received and makes the final funding decisions. All levels of the review process prior to the chairman’s decision are advisory.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC

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Hinds CC Vicksburg high school students inducted into HOSA
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17 December

Hinds CC Vicksburg high school students inducted into HOSA

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New officers were recently inducted into the Vicksburg-Warren Campus Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) from the high school Allied Health program.

They are, from left, clinical instructor Marian Banks, Samuel Sayers, Brittani Mebius, Dagan Abernathy, Lakendria Ray, Alexandria Love, Taylor Ballard, Assistant Dean Teressa McCarty and science instructor Eloise Ford.

The club is a national student organization for health care students. Its mission is to promote career opportunities in the industry and enhance the delivery of quality health care for all.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

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Hinds CC Vicksburg students complete food certification
Posted by
17 December

Hinds CC Vicksburg students complete food certification

web_MIBest1(1)

Hinds Community College Vicksburg-Warren Campus MI-BEST culinary students recently received their Food Handler Certification.

They are, seated from left, Pamela Brown, Abby Keller, Tiara McDaniel and Laurie Hampton; standing, proctor Roderick Hollins, Vicksburg Assistant Dean Dr. Elmira Ratliff, Brandy Greenwood, Jamesia Sanders, Alfred Brown and culinary instructor Tim DeRossette. Not pictured is culinary instructor Matthew Campbell.

MI-BEST, Mississippi Integrated Basic Education Skills Training, helps students without high school diplomas learn GED skills and job skills in specific areas. MI-BEST launched at Hinds Community College in spring 2015.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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