http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hairdresser, daughter plan education together at Hinds CC nursing expo

Monthly Archives: September 2015

Posted by on 10 September

Hairdresser, daughter plan education together at Hinds CC nursing expo

Sharita Williams, who owns a beauty shop in Franklin County, had always wanted to go back to school. Her daughter, Taylor, a senior at Franklin County High School, is interested in becoming a nurse.

Together, they plan to achieve both goals at Hinds Community College.

“One of my 80-year-old hair clients graduated from community college last year,” Sharita Williams said. “She motivated me to go back.”

Sharita Williams, center, and Taylor Williams, center right, take a tour of facilities during the Hinds Community College Nursing/Allied Health Center Showcase event on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. The event was an open house for prospective students interested in programs offered at the campus. Information booths and learning lab tours were available. The Williamses are interested in the nursing and phlebotomy programs.

Sharita Williams, center, and Taylor Williams, center right, take a tour of facilities during the Hinds Community College Nursing/Allied Health Center Showcase event on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. The event was an open house for prospective students interested in programs offered at the campus. Information booths and learning lab tours were available. The Williamses are interested in the nursing and phlebotomy programs.

Mother and daughter were among about 200 people who attended the 2015 Nursing and Allied Health Showcase on Tuesday at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center. Prospective students and others toured the campus’ learning labs, spoke with faculty, explored the college’s 13 health-related and two short-term programs and got the latest on requirements and deadlines.

“Our faculty spoke with people one-on-one to learn about our programs of study and the promising careers in healthcare that Hinds graduates obtain,” said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

Programs of interest included Medical Assisting Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Physical Therapist Assistant, Associate Degree Nursing (RN), Dental Assisting Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Emerging Medical Science, Health Information Technology, Healthcare Assistant, Practical Nursing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care Technology, Surgical Technology, and two short-term programs, Phlebotomy and Nursing Assistant.

Taylor is already taking a class that is preparing her for a medical career.

“We practice checking vital signs and things,” she said. “I like helping people and making them feel better if I can.”

Annalese Burton, a senior at Philadelphia High School, made the trip from Neshoba County with her mother, Crystal, to find out more about a program that she says virtually runs in the family.

Annalese Burton, center, a senior at Philadelphia High School, and her mother, Crystal, talk with District Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole at the Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015 at Hinds' Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center.

Annalese Burton, center, a senior at Philadelphia High School, and her mother, Crystal, talk with District Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole at the Nursing and Allied Health Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015 at Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing Allied Health Center.

“I have several, several people in my family in the nursing field,” Burton said. “I’ve researched Hinds. It’s small and seems like a family. I feel like I’ll really excel here.”

Technical and associate degree programs at NAHC are nationally accredited by specialty accrediting organizations. The career programs meet state accreditation/approval guidelines.

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Rankin County students get info, advice at Hinds CC College Fair
Posted by
09 September

Rankin County students get info, advice at Hinds CC College Fair

Damian Broom had the look and sound of success, as did many of his fellow high school classmates and peers in Rankin County on Wednesday.

“I love English and I’d like to be a teacher,” said Broom, a Pisgah High School senior, one of about 2,500 high school students at the Rankin County School District College Fair, held at the Muse Center on Hinds’ Rankin Campus.

Looking every bit the teacher in a teal dress shirt and glasses, Broom said a love for the spoken and written word drives him to be an educator.

Pisgah High School students Omar Smith, Thomas Perigo, Damian Broom, Brian Matthews and Ken Williams speak with Hinds Community College Rankin/ Jackson Academic-Technical Center Vice President Norman Session during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. Many colleges were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

Pisgah High School students Omar Smith, Thomas Perigo, Damian Broom, Brian Matthews and Ken Williams speak with Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus and the Jackson Academic/Technical Center, during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. More than 60 universities and branches of the military were present to recruit high school students from the school district.

“I was thinking of graphic design, but I just think English is important,” Broom said.

The annual event draws students from the nine high schools in the Rankin public school system and representatives from more than 60 universities, mainly in Mississippi and Louisiana, and branches of the military.

More than 700 students visited Hinds booths at the fair, said Kathryn Cole, district director of Enrollment Services.

“Students learned all about enrolling at Hinds, as well as the majors and scholarships we have to offer,” Cole said. “We enjoy having Rankin County graduates attend Hinds after high school. Many of them come to Hinds to finish their Associates of Art degree after already having a jump start on college through our dual credit program.”

Prospective student Molly Hunter, of Brandon High School, takes a selfie with Hinds Community College Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. Many colleges were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

Prospective student Molly Hunter, of Brandon High School, takes a selfie with Hinds Community College Director of Enrollment Services Kathryn Cole during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. More than 60 universities and branches of the military were present to recruit high school students from the school district.

The event gives students a chance to talk to recruiters about a range of career paths that only a post-high school education can provide.

McLaurin High School’s Christina Elam is another prospective educator looking to get educated on what’s to offer from universities.

“I’m planning on going to Hinds for a few years, then transferring to Mississippi State, preferably to teach English,” Elam said. “I’ve had a love of being with kids my whole life.”

An engineering career beckons for Saray Benitez, of Northwest Rankin High School, who visited with recruiters from Hinds’ Utica Campus about the STEM-UP program, which fosters careers in science and math.

Hinds Community College Utica Campus recruiters Chelia Thompson, left, and  John Townes met with prospective students, including Northwest Rankin High School student Saray Benitez ,center, during  the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. Many colleges were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

Hinds Community College Utica Campus recruiters Chelia Thompson, left, and John Townes met with prospective students, including Northwest Rankin High School student Saray Benitez ,center, during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. More than 60 universities and branches of the military were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

“I’d like to be a civil engineer,” she said. “I’ve always liked messing with math and science.”

Horace Gentry, a senior at Florence High School, is leaning to nursing and all things medical.

“I have relatives that used to do it and they’ve said you can make a good living off it,” Gentry said. “And I’ve always been interested in how the human body works.”

Ditto for Ariel Griffin and Myaya Harris, both Brandon High seniors and looking into nursing programs – possibly post-natal care.

“I want to take care of babies,” Griffin said. “I wouldn’t want to do deliveries, but I’d like to work to take care of them.”

Myaya Harris of Brandon High School speaks with recruiters at the Hinds table during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. Many colleges were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

Myaya Harris of Brandon High School speaks with recruiters at the Hinds table during the Rankin County School District College Fair held at the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in the Muse Center on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. More than 60 universities and branches of the military were present to recruit high school students from the school districts.

The outdoors is drawing Brandon Wilson’s interest, while Lee Schisler is programming for himself a possible career in information technology.

“I’m actually looking into something to do with wildlife and being a game warden,” said Wilson, also a Florence High senior. “I’m here to find about programs I should take to do that.”

“I’m thinking of doing anything technology-wise,” said Schisler, a Pisgah High School senior. “I’m thinking IT because it’s always a growing market and jobs should always be there.”

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Annual golf tournament renamed for Hinds CC Sports Hall of Famer
Posted by
08 September

Annual golf tournament renamed for Hinds CC Sports Hall of Famer

Hinds Community College’s annual golf tournament at Clear Creek Golf Club in Bovina is being renamed to honor a second big supporter of the annual fundraiser.

The Clyde Donnell and Othel Mendrop Memorial Golf Tournament is Sept. 16 at the east Warren County golf course and will again benefit a scholarship fund for students through the Warren-Claiborne County chapter of the Alumni Association. About $160,000 has been raised in the more than 25 years since the tournament began. Proceeds from the tournament began going to the scholarship in 1999 and were endowed in 2003.

Registration begins at noon, with play to begin at 1 p.m. For more information, contact alumni coordinator Libby Posey, at 601-857-3350.

This year’s tournament is rebranded to add Othel Mendrop’s name to the event. Mendrop, who died in 2014, was inducted to Hinds’ Sports Hall of Fame in 1989 and was an avid golfer and tournament supporter.

Born in 1927, Mendrop attended Hinds and Memphis State College on basketball scholarships. After a master’s degree in administration from Mississippi College and four years in the Air Force, he coached basketball and football and was principal in the former Warren County School District. For 10 years, he was principal at Warren Central High School and coached girls track there. Later, he became assistant superintendent of education for the district.

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Hinds CC receives gift to train, boost ranks of women truckers
Posted by
04 September

Hinds CC receives gift to train, boost ranks of women truckers

Andre’a Gaston had faced challenges before enrolling in truck driver school – mainly being a mother to two daughters and a son.

Driving a manual shift transmission turned out to be a close second in that category, but now she’s certified and bona fide to take on the road.

“At first, I thought my age would prevent me from doing it and the fact I’m a female. I had not driven a stick shift vehicle in my life, and I’m 44!,” Gaston said Thursday during a ceremony in which Hinds Community College received $220,000 from the Walmart Foundation to support the training of more women and underserved populations who enroll in the driver’s academy at KLLM Transport Services.

Andre'a Gaston, who earned her commercial driver's license (CDL) at the KLLM Driving Academy, speaks Thursday during a ceremony to present Hinds with a $220,000 check from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers.

Andre’a Gaston, who earned her commercial driver’s license (CDL) at the KLLM Driving Academy, speaks Thursday during a ceremony to present Hinds with a $220,000 check from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers.

“My entire family is proud of me for taking this big step and doing what no one thought I could do,” Gaskin said.

The Grenada native credited instructors at the firm’s driving academy for helping her secure her commercial driver’s license last week.

“I had my days where I had trouble. But they’re determined. They stick with you and make sure you get it. Anyone who wants this job, it can be done. You’ll have the backing for it from every single teacher and instructor.”

The money, part of a larger $100 million commitment by the retailer to bolster workforce training, education and career pathways for retail workers nationwide, will support training women and underserved populations who enroll in the driver’s academy at KLLM Transport Services. The money comes to Hinds via the Jackson-based Foundation for the Mid South.

Dr. Clyde Muse, from left, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District and Ivye Allen, president of the Foundation for the Mid South, hold a ceremonial check signifying a $220,000 gift to Hinds from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers.

Dr. Clyde Muse, from left, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District and Ivye Allen, president of the Foundation for the Mid South, hold a ceremonial check Thursday signifying a $220,000 gift to Hinds from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers.

“Walmart supported us in this plan to expand opportunities to all folks, but gave us a challenge to do it women,” said Ivye Allen, president of Foundation for the Mid South. “I’m glad today to see females represented here in this profession.”

Diane Smith, one of Gaston’s driving instructors, could attest to her own life-changing achievement. She began driving trucks nearly 20 years ago and ran her own business.

“At first, I didn’t want to be a truck driver because of what people would think of me,” Smith said. “But I did it to provide for my family.”

She started her career at KLLM and was eager to return to KLLM for the opportunity to help other women earn their CDL and become financially secure.

Diane Smith, at podium, speaks at a ceremony Thursday to present Hinds with a $220,000 check from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers. Smith has been a licensed truck driver for nearly 20 years. At left is Andre’a Gaston, who earned her commercial driver’s license last week.

 

Hinds’ partnership with KLLM to train truck drivers at the company’s Richland headquarters and boost their ranks began in fall 2012. KLLM handles the training. Hinds handles the coursework. The facility itself opened in March 2014.

“Basically, one of our goals at the company is to make sure we have a person in all 3,000-plus trucks we currently have,” said KLLM vice president Kirk Blankenship.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse said the funds enhance the partnership’s initial goal of helping train the state’s overall workforce and taps into a growing segment of the student population at Hinds.

“Now, with the Walmart Foundation and the Foundation for the Mid South, we have a secondary goal, and that is to increase the number of female drivers,” Muse said. “Our student body now consists of 65 percent females, so there’s great fertile ground out there to find female students.”

A mix of grants and other investments from Walmart and its philanthropic foundation are part of the Opportunity Initiative, rolled out earlier this year. It will spread the funds over five years to help retail workers across the industry advance careers and achieve greater economic mobility.

“The big focus is on women’s empowerment,” said Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation. “So to hear this provides support to women in retail and transportation sectors and is so important to our community.”

Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, from left, Eric Red, director of the KLLM Driving Academy, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, and Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District, Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, from left, -----, director of the KLLM Driving Academy, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, and Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District, Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, from left, -----, director of the KLLM Driving Academy, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, and Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District, Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, from left, -----, director of the KLLM Driving Academy, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, and Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District,

Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, from left, Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM Transport Services, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation, Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the Central District, Donald Slabach, grants coordinator at Hinds, and Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president for Workforce Development and Coordination of Career/Technical Education, associate dean of Career and Technical Education for the Raymond Campus, hold a ceremonial check Thursday signifying a $220,000 gift to Hinds from the Walmart Foundation to train more women truck drivers.

The grant further enhances the standing of Mississippi’s transportation system, said Dick Hall, transportation commissioner for the state’s central district.

“The training of a driver student like this that will use our transportation system certainly gets my attention,” Hall said.

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Hinds CC’s Muse honored with Winter-Reed award
Posted by
03 September

Hinds CC’s Muse honored with Winter-Reed award

Some call him “the godfather.” Some call him coach. At least one former student calls him “papa.”

But on Sept. 1 all could call Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse honored as he was presented with the prestigious Winter-Reed Partnership Award by former Gov. William Winter, a man Muse referred to as his friend and hero.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, left, the recipient of the 2015 Winter-Reed Partnership Award, and former Gov. William Winter, who presented the award to Muse

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, left, the recipient of the 2015 Winter-Reed Partnership Award, and former Gov. William Winter, who presented the award to Muse

Muse was given the eighth annual award by the Mississippi Association of Partners in Education at a gala celebration at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus facility that bears his name, the Clyde Muse Center.

More than 350 packed the Muse Center to pay tribute, including elected officials, college officials and more than 30 members of Muse’s immediate family. The stage was decorated with a child-sized pedal John Deere tractor and farm vegetables, a nod to the real tractor that Muse owns and his favorite gardening hobby. Among the reception table decorations were watermelons carved with Muse’s face and those of Winter and Reed.

Winter presented the award to Muse “for your contributions for education in Mississippi and for your distinguished career and your life of service to the people of Mississippi.”

Winter also read remarks from Tupelo businessman Jack Reed Sr., who was not able to be present.

“My first impression of Clyde Muse is he is a big man with a big heart.  As big as he is, his love for public education is even bigger,” Reed said in the remarks Winter read. “Congratulations to the godfather. Thank you for putting your broad shoulders to the wheel of public education. “

Former Itawamba Community College President Dr. David Cole has been credited with giving Muse, Hinds president since 1978, the nickname “godfather” as the dean of higher education in Mississippi.  It’s a name that has become synonymous with Muse.

“I call him a mentor, and a colleague and a very dear friend,” said colleague Dr. Williams Lewis, president of Pearl River Community College. “I don’t think there is another individual who has contributed more in his or her lifetime than Clyde Muse has to the success of not just Hinds Community College but to our educational system, both higher education and K-12, as well.”

Dr. Mark Keenum, president of Mississippi State University where Muse received two advanced degrees, said he knows of no one more deserving of the award.

“Dr. Clyde Muse has done as much as anyone in our state to encourage and expand access and participation in education, which is perhaps the greatest need in our state,” said Mississippi State University President Dr. Mark Keenum. “Our community college system is the best in the nation, and the dedication and leadership Dr. Muse has provided at Hinds and statewide over more than 35 years is one of the reasons why.”

Mistress of ceremonies Jackie Granberry, Hinds vice president for Advancement, noted that Muse has been an educator for 63 years, but that may not be his biggest contribution.

“Certainly, he has influenced public policy, has developed innovative programs and has brought groups together to build consensus that has definitely made public education better in Mississippi,” she said. “However, I believe the greatest influence that he has had on our state has been the literally thousands of people he has mentored along the way.  His influence will continue to trickle down through these people.”

One of those he influenced was Carla Nicks, the first African American Miss Hinds Community College in 1989. Nicks, who calls Muse “Papa,” recalled that her future could have been bleak as a child of a single mother. But both Clyde Muse and his late wife Vashti Muse, who taught reading at Hinds Community College, took her under their wing.

“I had seen this tall, regal man walking around campus often and watched him from afar as he engaged with other students everywhere he went,” Nicks said. “And he never changed his gentle hand toward any of them. It didn’t matter what economic condition their life was, where they came from.  It didn’t even matter the color of their skin. He treated mankind as our heavenly father looks and treats his children.”

Educator Dr. Jackie Wofford was a member of Muse’s Starkville High School basketball team in 1961, the year the team won the state championship. Wofford said he will always call Muse “Coach Muse,” and when he calls Muse’s office he always says number 25 is calling.

“He has helped many thousands of young people, and I’m just here as a personal example of this, how he has impacted me as he has impacted and influenced many of you,” Wofford said. “As a coach he fostered our ability as a team to play together.  To be the best we could be . He never talked down to us, he never cursed us. He was firm with us. We knew where he stood when we went to basketball practice. The result was that example he made as a father, coach, principal, teacher.”

Dr. Suzanne Bean, president of MAPE, said it was an honor to recognize Muse as an education hero.

“Dr. Clyde Muse was a most worthy honoree of the Winter-Reed Partnership Award.  His legacy is firmly established as a passionate leader in the field of education.  His impact on hundreds and thousands of people over the years was so apparent during the many tributes offered in his honor,” she said.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC to receive $250K gift from Walmart Foundation
Posted by
01 September

Hinds CC to receive $250K gift from Walmart Foundation

Hinds Community College and KLLM Transport Services are boosting their training capabilities, thanks to a $250,000 gift from the Walmart Foundation that will help diversify the ranks of the trucking industry.

The money, part of a larger $100 million commitment by the retailer to bolster workforce training, education and career pathways for retail workers nationwide, will support training women and underserved populations who enroll in the driver’s academy at KLLM Transport Services. The money comes to Hinds via the Foundation for the Mid South.

The participating groups will join together to discuss the project in a news conference at 9 a.m. Thursday in the Board Room at Fountain Hall on the Raymond Campus. Media representatives are invited and are requested to rsvp at cchayden@hindscc.edu by 8:30 a.m. Thursday. Fountain Hall is located at the intersection of East Main Street and Hinds Boulevard on the Raymond Campus.

Dick Hall, Transportation Commissioner for the state’s Central District, headlines the list of those who will speak at the presentation. Also taking the podium are Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Ivye Allen, president of Foundation for the Mid South, Tice White, of the Walmart Foundation and Kirk Blankenship, vice president of KLLM.

Hinds Community College and KLLM Transport Services have partnered together since fall 2012 to boost the number of truck drivers in Mississippi. KLLM handles the training. Hinds handles the coursework. The program is housed at the KLLM Driving Academy in Richland, which opened as a new facility in March 2014.

A mix of grants and other investments from Walmart and its philanthropic foundation are part of the Opportunity Initiative, which will spread the funds over five years to help retail workers across the industry advance careers and achieve greater economic mobility.

 

 

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