http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC to dedicate new Fitness Trail on the Raymond Campus

Monthly Archives: September 2015

Hinds CC to dedicate new Fitness Trail on the Raymond Campus
Posted by
30 September

Hinds CC to dedicate new Fitness Trail on the Raymond Campus

Community members, students and employees are invited to wear their sneakers and try out Hinds Community College’s new Fitness Trail on the Raymond Campus as part of a ribbon-cutting and dedication ceremony during Homecoming week activities.

The Fitness Trail is a part of the Healthy Hinds, Healthy Community initiative, which is funded by a Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi Foundation grant.  The trail will be dedicated at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 13. The trail begins and ends at the north parking lot by the tennis courts near Joe Renfroe Stadium on the Raymond Campus.

WEB_TrailRibbonCutting

Among the activities, Physical Therapists Assistant students will model stretching exercises and nursing students will perform blood pressure and pulse checks as well as counsel about BMI (Body Mass Index). The students from Hinds’ Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center will be available before the ceremony at 2:30 p.m. and afterward.

All attendees will be asked to commit to walking the one-mile trail three times a week with a goal of walking 30 miles by Christmas break. Commitment cards will be entered into a drawing for a free Fitbit.

After the ceremony, everyone is invited to walk the trail and try out the three fitness stations with the help of trained college Wellness Complex personnel. Healthy snacks including fruit and water will be provided as well as a limited number of T-shirts to the first participants. Cheering everyone on will be the Hinds cheerleaders with Ernie the Eagle, Hi-Steppers and Eagle band drum line.

For more information, call 601.857.3363.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 11,500 credit students in fall 2015. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 Comments Off on Hinds CC to dedicate new Fitness Trail on the Raymond Campus 1196 30 September, 2015 News more
Posted by on 29 September

Five inducted into Hinds’ Sports Hall of Fame for 2015

Key pieces of Hinds’ success on gridiron and other fields of play were inducted into the college’s Sports Hall of Fame for 2015.

Inductees were:

  • Linda Bilbo Alford, softball and golf, 1975-1977
  • Johnny Bishop, football, 1985-1986
  • Morris Currie, football and basketball, 1954-1956
  • Rob Fyke, soccer and tennis 1996-1998
  • Paul “PJ” Jamison, basketball, 1968-1970

 

Linda Alford

Linda Alford

Alford, a Jackson native, was a key cog for the only junior college in Mississippi to compete in softball in 1977, pitching every game that year. The Lady Eagles finished second in what was called the State Women’s Intercollegiate Softball Tournament.

After her Hinds career, she took the mound at the University of Southern Mississippi, then at Mississippi College, where she earned her Bachelor of Science degree in business administration.

She stayed active in sports in and out of a professional career that included employment at Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company, where she played on a women’s softball team. She was president of the Jackson Women’s Golf Association for two years and coached youth basketball.

Alford and her husband, Sonny, who also attended Hinds, live in Brandon. They have two adult sons and a daughter and three grandchildren.

Johnny Bishop

Johnny Bishop

Bishop, a Pelahatchie native, was a two-way standout for the Eagles on the gridiron.

Bishop started at center both years at Hinds and also played defensive tackle. He moved on to Louisiana Tech University, where he started at left tackle and long-snapper. He also held the school’s power clean record in weightlifting.

He graduated from Louisiana Tech in 1989, then worked 14 years in the poultry industry, at B.C. Rogers Poultry Processors and Peco Foods. In the 2000s, he coached high school football, soccer, softball and power lifting in stints at Pelahatchie, Pearl and Puckett. In 2008, Puckett Attendance Center won the 1A state championship with Bishop on a staff honored as the 1A Coaching Staff of the Year.

That same year, Bishop earned a Master of Education degree in K-12 administration from Mississippi College and taught math courses alongside coaching at the three secondary schools.

Bishop died in January 2015. Three months later, the Rankin County School District named the girls softball field at Pelahatchie High School after Bishop, immortalizing his efforts in its construction as Johnny Bishop Field.

Morris Currie

Morris Currie

Currie, a Utica native, was one of three quarterbacks on a team that won the 1954 Junior Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif.

Known by his teammates as “Sweet Marie,” as coach Joe Renfroe called him, Currie was a patient ballplayer and applied it 100 percent to both practice and games. The 5-11, 165-pound Currie teamed with fellow Hall of Famer Durwood Graham and the full roster of just 23 to upend El Camino (Calif.) 13-7 in the now-defunct game.

With quarterbacks Charles Nourrcier and Ernest Breithaupt, Currie keyed Hinds to a 9-0 mark in 1954. The Eagles outscored the opposition 287-73 and notched three shutouts, over Pearl River, Holmes and Southwest. Other wins came over Northwest, Perkinston (now Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College), Jones, East Central, Copiah-Lincoln and Sunflower (now Mississippi Delta Community College).

Currie worked in the media after his college days, as National Advertising Director for the State-Times newspaper in Jackson and in sports broadcasting. A member of the Mississippi Broadcasters Association for more than 40 years and past president of the Jackson Touchdown Club, he was the Voice of the Jackson Prep Patriots for 26 years and the Voice of the Mississippi High School Activities Association State Basketball Tournament for 29 years.

Now retired, Currie lives in Bolton and has two adult daughters.

Rob Fyke

Rob Fyke

Fyke, a Starkville native, racked up playing time and awards on both the grass and court in his two years at Hinds.

Fyke starred on the Eagle soccer team and was a two-time Most Valuable Offensive Player, as well as an All-Region XXIII and All South selection in 1997. At the same time, he made all-state twice on the tennis court, where he won two doubles state championships and two runner-up championships in singles.

At Mississippi State University, Fyke made the Southeast Collegiate Soccer League all-tournament team and was the league’s scoring champion.

Later, Fyke was an assistant soccer coach on four state finalist teams at Clinton High School, with two of them winning the championship. He was a head coach on two North State finalists in tennis at Starkville and Clinton. In 2013-14, he was named Outstanding Teacher by the Starkville School District.

Fyke teaches biology and botany at Starkville High School and coordinates summer youth tennis. He and his wife, Kristen, have two sons and a daughter, aged 1 to 8.

Paul Jamison

Paul Jamison

Jamison led the Eagles on the basketball court with talents measured on the stat sheet and in the locker room.

Jamison, a Jackson native, led the team in scoring and rebounding for Coach Troy Arlis Ricks. He made all-state after his second year.

He played collegiately after Hinds at West Florida and Belhaven University, where he was a top scorer and rebounder.  After graduating from Belhaven in 1973, Jamison moved to the Carolinas and worked as a commercial property consultant and with the South Carolina Department of Revenue.

His volunteer activities included work in Charlotte, N.C. with persons going through suicidal crisis. Poetry, golf, music, dancing, karaoke and acting are among his leisure activities.

0 Comments Off on Five inducted into Hinds’ Sports Hall of Fame for 2015 1126 29 September, 2015 News more
Posted by on 29 September

Valley Services wins Hinds CC Alumni Service Award

It’s possible to change with the times and be a model of consistency – so says the leadership team that runs Valley Services, the Mississippi-based company that feeds students and faculty at Hinds’ cafeterias but also caters many of the college’s special events.

This year’s Alumni Service Award recipient plans to keep delivering champion service to the college, based on a commitment that dates to 1971. This is the first time Hinds has named a company, instead of an individual, as the recipient.

“It’s an honor for Valley Services to receive this award,” CEO Jim Walt said. “We’re certainly humbled.”

The most recent event Valley Services catered was the Winter-Reed Partnership Award ceremony that honored Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. Valley Services was the title sponsor, also announcing a new Hinds scholarship to be given to a member of Hinds Connection, the student public relations and recruiting group that helps facilitate many Hinds events catered by Valley.

Jim Walt, CEO of Valley Services, left, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, center, and George Ardelean, Valley Services' executive vice president for dining and health services, stand during a break at the Winter-Reed Partnership Award ceremony. Valley catered the event Sept. 1 that honored Dr. Muse.

Jim Walt, CEO of Valley Services, left, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, center, and George Ardelean, Valley Services’ executive vice president for dining and health services, stand during a break at the Winter-Reed Partnership Award ceremony. Valley catered the event Sept. 1 that honored Dr. Muse.

“We’ve had the distinct pleasure of working with the exemplary students in Hinds Connection at many events,” Walt said. “Valley, in support of Dr. Muse’s educational vision, each year will recognize a student of the Hinds Connection for the annual scholarship.”

Founded in 1960 by the late Bill Hogg, the company is the sixth-largest contract food service company in the U.S. and the single-biggest contractor that specializes in meals for seniors. It has been the contract food products provider for Hinds since 1971. Valley provides food products at nine other community colleges in the state, but its contract with Hinds is the longest-held in the education sector.

“We try to keep food to the students’ liking, and that means fresh,” said George Ardelean, the company’s executive vice president for dining and health services and chair of Hinds’ Golf Fun Fest. “Freshness is a big part of it, and it’s where the momentum has shifted in the industry.”

A commitment to keeping only the freshest romaine lettuce in the salad bar and catfish worthy of a Mississippian’s lunch plate began with the founder’s friendship with Muse.

“Dr. Muse had a business relationship with Bill for many, many years and were friends,” Walt said. “It’s been a very long and tenured relationship with the college.”

Valley’s service to Hinds extends beyond student and employee cafeterias at the Raymond and Utica campuses. The company’s products grace tables at the Eagle’s Nest Grille and at Eagle Ridge Conference Center.

The company also caters for fundraisers and other functions at the college. That includes being the title sponsor of the golf fest and Employee Appreciation Day, both annual events, providing breakfast monthly for President’s Cabinet meetings and donating food for many other Hinds events as well as state-level events Hinds participates in. In the community, Valley sponsors fundraising breakfasts for local Boy Scout troops.

Staying ahead of market trends is simply standard practice for Valley.

“Each year, we evaluate our program to keep up with trends in our industry,” Walt said. “We’ve made changes through the years to keep up with the different taste preferences of students, faculty and guests.”

Valley maintains a Hinds presence with administrative office space and Vince Randazzo as the manager and has a distribution center in Flowood.

Vice President for Advancement Jackie Granberry, who oversees all district-wide special events for the college, can testify to the company’s standard of service.

“I depend on Valley quite a bit, and they have never let me down,” Granberry said. “Whether it is a very dignified dinner for a few at the president’s home, a dinner for 500, a reception for dignitaries or anything in between, they always provide the best service and the best food.”

The company views technological or logistical changes in the industry as chances to keep serving up good service.

“It’s such a well-oiled machine, so I think there’s been a consistency that we’ve been able to maintain from a culinary feature,” Ardelean said. “We’ve had at least two recent executive chefs come from the (Hinds) culinary program. It’s been a good flow, and it’s indicative of the management staff we have.”

Walt reminds that it all started with Hogg, who died in 2008. He started the business by selling foods to grocery stores out of his pickup truck. It’s a simplicity and consistency that still resonates with the current chief.

“The company, along with Bill Hogg if he was still alive, feels it’s a great honor for our organization,” he said. “A lot of hard work and dedication by a lot of different people through the years went into this.”

0 Comments Off on Valley Services wins Hinds CC Alumni Service Award 822 29 September, 2015 News more
Posted by on 29 September

MDOT Awards STEM Scholarship to Hinds Community College Student

The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) has awarded a $500 scholarship to Douglas Edward Patrick Jr., a student at Hinds Community College in Raymond.

Patrick, a resident of Clinton, is pursuing a career in computer science. The MDOT scholarship is awarded to students studying STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology and Math) toward a career path in transportation engineering, and majoring in computer science, urban or community planning, or other transportation related technology fields.

MDOT Human Resources Division Training Manager and Scholarship Coordinator Terry Winstead, Transportation Commissioner Dick Hall, Douglas Edward Patrick Jr. and Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse at the Clyde Muse Center on the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in Pearl.

MDOT Human Resources Division Training Manager and Scholarship Coordinator Terry Winstead, Transportation Commissioner Dick Hall, Douglas Edward Patrick Jr. and Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse at the Clyde Muse Center on the Rankin Campus of Hinds Community College in Pearl.

“This scholarship program highlights MDOT’s support for future generations of transportation professionals,” said Transportation Commissioner Dick Hall. “We recognize the need to support educational opportunities for young people in these fields to further the maintenance and advancement of Mississippi’s multi-modal transportation infrastructure.”

Funded in support by the Southeastern Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (SASHTO), the MDOT scholarship is awarded to help defray education expenses, which may include academic fees, tuition and books, room and board, and other related expenses. This is the 12th year of the scholarship program. Student eligibility is determined by GPA and a desire to pursue a career path in transportation STEM.

For more information on MDOT scholarships, visit GoMDOT.com.

0 Comments Off on MDOT Awards STEM Scholarship to Hinds Community College Student 875 29 September, 2015 News more
Posted by on 29 September

‘Play therapy’ vocation has roots in upbringing at Hinds CC for Prewitt

It was a wooden ventriloquist doll named Jerry that brought Rebecca Brooks Prewitt out of her shell as a child.

“My parents taught speech at Hinds,” Prewitt remembers. “They were very verbal and well-spoken. As a child, I was very shy. I began using Jerry when I was in the seventh grade. Jerry became my voice. He’s been with me quite some time.”

Rebecca Prewitt, a pediatric outpatient social worker at University of Mississippi Medical Center, holds a rubber duckie, one of many toys she keeps around as a licensed play therapist. She earned her specialization in the emerging field of study earlier this year. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

Rebecca Prewitt, a pediatric outpatient social worker at University of Mississippi Medical Center, holds a rubber duckie, one of many toys she keeps around as a licensed play therapist. She earned her specialization in the emerging field of study earlier this year. (April Garon/Hinds Community College)

These days, Prewitt, the daughter of longtime Hinds teachers Sue Brooks and the late Fred Brooks, is building on her own use of play as a voice to foster positive mental health in children. Earlier this year, Prewitt became a registered play therapist with the Clovis, Calif.-based Association for Play Therapy (APT). It came after completion of a specialized play therapy career track degree program at the University of Mississippi – the first of its kind in the nation.

Her upbringing spent in the academic atmosphere of Hinds shaped her own desire to be an educator. Her own experiences helped her see an even greater mission as it relates to children’s emotional health.

“I grew up in the environment of academia, being a third-generation teacher,” said Prewitt, whose parents are the namesakes of Brooks Hall, where speech is taught, and Brooks Theatre on the Raymond Campus. A brother, Rick Brooks, and one of her sons, Matthew, are Hinds alumni.

Prewitt’s educational journey began at Hinds where she was extremely involved in campus life. She was a member of the Hi-Steppers dance team, sang in the choir, was an officer in Phi Theta Kappa and was involved in the Wesley Foundation.

She moved on to the University of Southern Mississippi where she received a bachelor’s in elementary education and a master’s in social work. She taught in Oklahoma for four years and one year at Hinds, in the Resource and Coordinating unit under former vice president Bob Mullins.

“I was in education for a while but wanted to do more counseling,” she said. “My goal at that time was to be a therapist. I was excited to find a way to blend the two. I don’t formally do play therapy, but it informs my work here.”

Those like Prewitt who are licensed in the discipline help client children use play as the language by which their emotions are expressed. The association claims a membership of more than 1,000 individuals and credentialed play therapists nationwide, a number that includes 35 in Mississippi.

Play therapy “is separate from my actual work, but it’s all tied in,” said Prewitt, whose official job is as a pediatric outpatient social worker at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. “In play therapy, children are brought over to a play room. As play therapists, we facilitate. We start at ages 3 to about 12. They may be too young to talk about their feelings, so they play out what’s bothering them.”

UMMC collaborated with Ole Miss to provide space and clients for Prewitt to complete a practicum for her degree in the specialty, though the discipline is not part of the hospital’s array of services.

Typically, cases are brought to specialists such as Prewitt through schools, pediatricians, other doctors’ offices and word of mouth. Analyses from play sessions can help school counselors, parents and other professionals draw conclusions.

“Children experience trauma of many kinds,” she said. “We have what we call ‘Big-T Trauma,’ which is like an earthquake, a hurricane, seeing someone shot or being in a family experiencing divorce or loss. Then we have ‘Little-t traumas,’ such as when a bicycle gets stolen, someone won’t share their cookie, or a friend moves a few blocks away.

“Play is a child’s language, and the toys are a child’s words,” she said. “So, we choose toys of different categories. One is real life, such as a toy kitchen area. Another is expressive toys, like puppets, stuffed animals, art or clay. The third is the aggressive category, such as dart guns or handcuffs like the cops use. We encourage them to show metaphorically what’s happening. A child who has distress might do some kind of nurturing activity, like they might serve somebody food or drink. They might put a doll to bed or give it a bath. These are all ways they might soothe themselves.”

As for Jerry, her ventriloquist doll, his legs and arms aren’t as sturdy as they used to be, but he’s still alive and kicking.

“I might have Jerry tell a story about his life, and it might mirror something going on in the child’s life,” Prewitt said.

Prewitt’s mother still remembers how Jerry – referred to almost in human terms when the subject comes up – helped a shy girl grow into a confident woman.

“My earliest memory of it was when she was in elementary school,” Sue Brooks said. “She was interested in ventriloquism, so we were able to get her Jerry and he really brought her out.

“She was always interested in things, but she was just shy. With Jerry, she could meet people and address them. He helped her find her voice.”

That same idea is being put to work for children with whom Prewitt works as a play therapist.

“If a child can play out their problem and put it out for themselves and us to see, there’s not a lot that can’t be helped,” Prewitt said. “Not a lot can be done to change a child’s situation, but the therapy can help the way a child relates to their situation.”

0 Comments Off on ‘Play therapy’ vocation has roots in upbringing at Hinds CC for Prewitt 1321 29 September, 2015 News more
Reluctant Hinds CC scholar makes education a life’s work
Posted by
29 September

Reluctant Hinds CC scholar makes education a life’s work

Dr. Tom Burnham in the McLendon Library on the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College. Hinds Community College will honor Alumnus of the Year Dr. Tom Burnham of Oxford; Alumni Service Award recipient Valley Services Inc., headquartered in Flowood, and Sports Hall of Fame Inductees Linda Alford of Jackson, the late Johnny Bishop of Pelahatchie, Morris Currie of Bolton, Rob Fyke of Starkville and Jackson native Paul Jamison at the Oct. 15 Alumni Recognition Dinner. The reception is 4:30 p.m. with the dinner to begin at 5 p.m. at Mayo Gymnasium on the Raymond Campus. For information on purchasing tickets call 601.857.3363.

Dr. Tom Burnham in the McLendon Library on the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College. Hinds Community College will honor Alumnus of the Year Dr. Tom Burnham of Oxford; Alumni Service Award recipient Valley Services Inc., headquartered in Flowood, and Sports Hall of Fame Inductees Linda Alford of Jackson, the late Johnny Bishop of Pelahatchie, Morris Currie of Bolton, Rob Fyke of Starkville and Jackson native Paul Jamison at the Oct. 15 Alumni Recognition Dinner. The reception is 4:30 p.m. with the dinner to begin at 5 p.m. at Mayo Gymnasium on the Raymond Campus. For information on purchasing tickets call 601.857.3363.

Note: This story is from the fall 2015 Hindsight alumni magazine. To become a member of the Alumni Association, click here.

Dr. Tom Burnham’s higher education career at Hinds Junior College got off to a rough start.

A scared young kid from rural Rankin County without a lot of real-world experience, Burnham (1967) didn’t object to the idea of a college education — it was being away from home in an unfamiliar environment that troubled him.

But Burnham, the 2015 Alumnus of the Year, not only finished his education at Hinds, he continued at Mississippi College where he received bachelor and master’s degrees and Delta State University where he earned a specialist degree and a doctorate. And, in a twist of irony considering his reluctance, his entire career has been spent in the field of education.

He is now the director of the Principal Corps based at the University of Mississippi where he recruits great teachers to become public school principals and visionary leaders.  Among his many other jobs, he has been dean of the College of Education at the University of Mississippi, 2004-2009, and state superintendent of education twice, 1992-1997 and 2010-2012, crafting education policy for the state’s more than 500,000 public school children.

Early in his own educational career, such possibilities didn’t occur to him. He came from Puckett, in rural east Rankin County, and was the first person in his family to attend college. It was a priority for his dad, Paul Burnham, who worked shift work at Marquette Cement in Brandon and had farm land.

“My dad brought me over here and dropped me off in the circle. When he dropped me off, he gave me $5. And he said, ‘Son, you better spend this carefully because I don’t know when there will be any more,’ ” he recalled.

About two weeks later, in the days when hitchhiking was safe, he caught a ride back home to Puckett. He thought he was home to stay but his dad had other ideas. About the time Burnham made it home, his dad was getting up to work the midnight shift.

“He was livid,” Burnham said, chuckling. “And he put me in the car and drove me back over here. And then went to work that night.

“My dad later joked with me, ‘You know, when I took you back to Hinds, I didn’t know you were going to go to school the rest of your life.’ It was always amusing to him that he had to bring me back to Hinds, and then I just wouldn’t stop going to school,” Burnham said.

Coming to Hinds, though, was “a logical decision. I came out of a small high school. I didn’t know very much. I think I had been on one university campus my entire elementary and high school experience. And it was also the economics of it.”

Burnham lived in Shangri-la and Central dormitories, spending his mornings in class and his afternoons either participating in intramurals or working at a Standard Oil station.  He continued on at Mississippi College with a business administration major but also took as many of the history courses he loved as he could. When he finished, he was advised to student teach in social sciences even though he didn’t have a lot of education courses.

“My plan was to go to work with Standard Oil when I finished, but I just fell in love with teaching,” he said. “After doing student teaching I was pretty much comfortable that was what I wanted to do. I never thought about doing anything else.”

His first job was teaching history at Pearl High School, and his career continued from there, until he eventually became a local principal and superintendent.

A defining moment in his life, however, was about three weeks after he finished his doctorate at Delta State University in 1985. His son, Tom, just shy of 10 years old, was killed in Rankin County when he walked in front of a car.

It took him years to come to terms with his son’s death, ultimately using it to fuel his passion for doing the right thing for children. “The only thing I could do at this point was to make things better for all children, to create a legacy for Tom through what I could do for children. I survived that period by just working to the point of sheer exhaustion,” he said.

Now at the Principal Corps, he tries to take what he’s learned over the years about leadership and education and pass that on to aspiring young school administrators, continuing to mentor them after they are Principal Corps graduates.

He was a mentor for Dr. Norman Session, former Pisgah High School principal who became vice president for the Rankin Campus and Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center on July 1.

“The first time I met Dr. Burnham he was state superintendent, and I attended a state Board of Education meeting. We became close during an 18-month training at Ole Miss. After the training he was assigned to me as my personal mentor, but he was advising me long before that,” Session said. “Dr. Burnham is one of my mentors, and I consider him a friend. He is very knowledgeable about education issues and just about life in general. He is a very strong leader and a mentor to many.”

Burnham is married to Terri, who has also had a life-long career in education. His sister, Cathy Allen, is a retired Rankin County teacher, his daughter, Cassondra Vanderford (1989) married to Craig Vanderford (1990), is now assistant principal at Brandon High School. One of his two grandsons attended Hinds. Both Brett and Ty are now Ole Miss students.

 

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

0 Comments Off on Reluctant Hinds CC scholar makes education a life’s work 877 29 September, 2015 News more
Hinds CC Honors program expands to Rankin Campus
Posted by
24 September

Hinds CC Honors program expands to Rankin Campus

The Honors Institute at Hinds Community College is expanding to the Rankin Campus effective for fall 2016, a move touted as a response to the community.

“Students and parents from Rankin County have been asking for an expansion of the Honors Institute for several years,” said Dr. Norman Session, vice president for the Rankin Campus and two-time Principal of the Year in the Rankin County school system at Pisgah High School where he was previously employed.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse approved the expansion officially on Sept. 18. Some Honors classes will be offered in the spring, with a full launch next August. Joy Rhoads, chair of the Social Sciences Division, will coordinate the program at the Rankin Campus.

In place at the Raymond Campus, since fall 1996, the Honors Institute provides an enhanced and supportive learning environment for students. The Institute offers programming in four broad areas – Honors Program, Leadership Studies, International Studies and Phi Theta Kappa.

“We believe more Rankin County students will attend Hinds if they have access to the Honors Institute at the Rankin campus,” Session said. “There are dozens that qualify, some already on campus here.”

Rhoads said details such as class offerings and teaching assignments are under development.  Staff at Raymond and Rankin are working closely to establish quality programs on the Rankin Campus.

“We are very excited to have the opportunity to build on and expand an already successful Honors Program,” Rhoads said. “This expansion will afford students on the Rankin Campus an enhanced learning opportunity through a collaborative and inclusive environment as well as an opportunity to benefit the college and our community through leadership and service. Certainly, we are grateful for the support we have been given in this undertaking, and we expect that this expansion will serve our students well.”

Rhoads and Honors Program District Director Dr. Ben Cloyd will assist students in class selection and community service. “By next fall, a full range of Honors course offerings will be available to Rankin Campus students,” Cloyd said.

“Honors courses will be a boon to the Rankin Campus, for they will offer stimulation to students who wish to grow intellectually and to the faculty who teach them,” said Gary Fox, academic dean for the Rankin campus. “Naturally, the Rankin community also will profit from their growth.”

Students who enroll in Honors classes at Hinds will have the opportunity to earn Honors scholarships each semester and be considered for priority enrollment in international study and leadership classes.

Session said the Honors Program will be a draw for high school graduates who have participated in the college dual enrollment program. “This program is a new scholarship opportunity for students attending the Rankin Campus,” he said.

The program remains inclusive and requires no previous Honors experience, said District Honors Institute Dean Deborah McCollum. Students can qualify for the program on three criteria – a composite score of 25 or better on the ACT, a 3.5 or better high school GPA (on a 4.0 scale) or a Hinds GPA of 3.5 or better based on college transfer credit classes.

“The Hinds program was developed according to guidelines established by the National Collegiate Honors Council, and we proudly remain a member of this organization today. We are very pleased to offer this programming to students on the Rankin Campus,” McCollum said.

 

For more information on the Honors Program at Hinds, call 601.857.3531/3837, email Joy Rhoads at JDRhoads@hindscc.edu or visit http://www.hindscc.edu/admissions/studentlife/clubs/honors.

0 Comments Off on Hinds CC Honors program expands to Rankin Campus 885 24 September, 2015 News more
Honoré ends M2M summit with challenge to ‘take on the impossible’
Posted by
16 September

Honoré ends M2M summit with challenge to ‘take on the impossible’

Doing the impossible is something retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré has made look easy in uniform and in post-military life.

In closing out this year’s Minority Male Leadership Initiatives Best Practices Summit, the three-star general stressed aiming high to succeed in life wasn’t merely possible – it’s imperative.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

“Don’t be afraid to take on the impossible,” Honoré said to a packed main arena Tuesday at Hinds’ Clyde Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. “I was the proverbial C-student. My mama couldn’t read, my daddy could only read a little bit.

“C-students like me, you gotta hustle,” Honoré said. “You’ve gotta use every gift God gave you to make it. There’s no reason or excuse not to make it. I made it because I didn’t let anyone around me outwork me. And I’m not going to settle for your excuses.”

Honoré, best known for his efforts to restore order in New Orleans as head of Joint Task Force Katrina following the devastating 2005 hurricane, spoke on the virtues of self-discipline and perseverance during the final hour of the summit, themed “Preparing African American Males for Success in the 21st Century”. A recurring theme in his address was preparing the current generation of high school and college students to be world leaders through basic skills.

“When I was growing up, people fought to be able to ride on a bus,” he said. “We won the right to get on the bus, and now we’re the people who drive all the buses. You know what job we want this century? We want to own the bus.”

Retired Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the crowd from floor level at the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

Retired Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré addresses the crowd from floor level at the 2015 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at the Muse Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

Born in 1947 as the youngest of 12 children in Pointe Coupee Parish, La., Honoré, an African-American who identifies as Creole, enlisted in the Army in 1971. By 2004, he was a three-star general and oversaw deployment of National Guard divisions heading to Iraq and Afghanistan. Three years after leading the Katrina effort, he retired, and in 2009 authored the book, “Survival: How a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family from Disasters and Leadership in the New Normal.”

In 2012, a program similar to Hinds’ M2M Initiative was established in Louisiana by Honoré’s alma mater, Southern University. As with M2M, it is geared to increase college graduation rates of minority male students.

Literacy is the most vital basic skill the current generation has to tackle issues on the national and world stage, Honoré said, seasoning his remarks with the use of the Army’s oft-shouted cheer, “Hooah!”

“In the State of Louisiana, one of the largest concentrations of black men is in prisons,” he said. “There are cities in America that assess the reading level of fourth-grade, 10-year-old males to determine how many prisoners they’ll have in 20 years. They have the formula. Because if you can’t read by the time you’re 10 years old, you’ll have a 40 percent chance of having a run-in with the law by the time you’re 14. I didn’t make that up; it comes from the Children’s Defense Fund.

“We’ve got people graduating from high school now who can’t read. And they’re showing up in colleges. I challenge every teacher in here. I don’t care what the test says. These children need to know how to read. If they can’t read, I don’t care how many computers we give them. Life will mean nothing to them.”

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré accepts a copy of his 2009 book " “Survival: How a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family from Disasters and Leadership in the New Normal" for high school students in the Minority Male Initiative. Honoré gave the closing address at the M2M program's Best Practices Summit that ended Tuesday.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré accepts a copy of his 2009 book ” “Survival: How a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family from Disasters and Leadership in the New Normal” for high school students in the Minority Male Initiative. Honoré gave the closing address at the M2M program’s Best Practices Summit that ended Tuesday.

Slides during his address showed a Model of Excellence triangle and the iconic depiction of Gen. George Washington crossing the Delaware River during the American Revolutionary War, which he used as an example of winning the battles of life against long odds.

“Competence, confidence, discipline – that’s what creates excellence,” he said. “Discipline is what we do when nobody’s watching, and you do the right thing. It’s that little voice in the back of your head. Knowing what to do and having the initiative to do it when nobody’s looking is how we create excellence.”

“Twenty percent of the troops (with Washington) were slaves who weren’t free, and they’re fighting for freedom from the British. You got this? But think about this. You sit here today and think about how hard you got it. Think about how hard they had it – fighting for the freedom of a country, but themselves are slaves.

“But, we sit here today at Hinds talking about an enduring problem we’ve had for 239 years we’ve yet to resolve. The good news is we’re talking about it and we’ve given you an action plan for success. That action plan is you. The only one who will determine your success is you.”

“We need you to be prepared to take on the impossible,” he said. “Previous generations did it. They fought and won our freedom when they were not free themselves.”

The M2M Minority Male Initiative is a grant-funded project based at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center on Sunset Drive. The initiative provides leadership training, career counseling, tutoring, mentoring and opportunities for travel to senior level universities for program participants.

0 Comments Off on Honoré ends M2M summit with challenge to ‘take on the impossible’ 899 16 September, 2015 News more
Posted by on 11 September

Hinds CC summit features noted author, general known for post-Katrina leadership

Limited space is still available to hear two headline speakers for the Sept. 14-15 Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit at Hinds Community College.

The summit, “Preparing African American Males for Success in the 21st Century,” begins at 10 a.m. Monday, Sept. 14 and ends with a closing plenary session on Tuesday, Sept. 15. All sessions are at Hinds Community College’s Clyde Muse Center on the Rankin Campus in Pearl.

New York Times Bestselling author Wes Moore of Baltimore speaks in a session that begins at 4 p.m. on Monday.

Wes Moore

Wes Moore

Lt. General Russel Honoré, USA (retired), known for his efforts to restore order in New Orleans immediately after Hurricane Katrina in 2005, speaks on Tuesday at 3:45 p.m.

Lt. General Russel Honore'

Lt. General Russel Honore’

The summit audience includes high school students and principals, parents, current and retired educators, community members – anyone interested in helping African American Males prepare for success.

There will be limited general seating for individuals not registered for the summit at the Moore and Honore’ sessions.

http://hub.hindscc.edu/minority-male-leadership-initiative-best-practices-summit

Moore, who speaks on Monday, is a Rhodes Scholar, decorated combat veteran and White House Fellow. His book, “The Other Wes Moore,” became an instant New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller. It chronicles the lives of himself and another young man named Wes Moore who is serving a life sentence in prison for felony murder. He has written a new book, called “The Work,” which is a series of life lessons.

Born in 1978, Wes and his sisters were raised by their widowed mother. Despite early academic and behavioral struggles, he graduated Phi Theta Kappa in 1998 as a commissioned officer from Valley Forge Military College, and Phi Beta Kappa from Johns Hopkins University in 2001, where he also played football and earned a bachelor’s degree in International Relations. He then became a Rhodes Scholar, studying International Relations at Oxford University.

After his studies, Moore, a paratrooper and captain in the United States Army, served a combat tour of duty in Afghanistan with the 1st Brigade of the 82nd Airborne Division. Wes then served as a White House fellow to Secretary of State Condeleezza Rice. He serves on the board of the Iraq Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), The Johns Hopkins University, and founded an organization called STAND! that works with Baltimore youth involved in the criminal justice system.

Tuesday’s speaker, Honoré, was commander of the Joint Task Force Katrina and Global Preparedness Authority and worked in New Orleans to help restore order. He is chairman of the Louisiana Bicentennial Commission, a board member with the Louisiana Disaster Recovery Foundation and a member of the National Academy of Public Administration.

He is the author of “Survival: How a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family from Disasters and Leadership in the New Normal,” which details how to be an effective leader in the 21st century.

The M2M Minority Male Initiative is a grant-funded project based at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center on Sunset Drive. The initiative provides leadership training, career counseling, tutoring, mentoring and opportunities for travel to senior level universities for program participants. The goal is to increase the graduation rate for minority male students

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

0 Comments Off on Hinds CC summit features noted author, general known for post-Katrina leadership 860 11 September, 2015 News more
Posted by on 11 September

Golf tournament namesake ‘committed to Hinds,’ loved youth sports

For years, both during and after each had made their mark on education in Warren County, Clyde Donnell and Othel Mendrop strode the greens of Clear Creek Golf Club in Bovina to talk about the college and the game each loved.

Both are gone now, but this year the Hinds Community College golf tournament and scholarship benefit that had honored one will now honor both.

“He was committed to Hinds in no uncertain terms,” Caroline Mendrop said this month, as organizers with Hinds’ Alumni Association prepared to add her late husband’s name to that of Donnell’s in the title of the scholarship benefit put on by the association’s Warren-Claiborne County chapter. “All my children went to Hinds, and we are a Hinds Junior College family.”

Othel Mendrop

Othel Mendrop

The Clyde Donnell and Othel Mendrop Memorial Golf Tournament is Sept. 16 at the east Warren County golf course and will again benefit a scholarship fund for students through the Warren-Claiborne County chapter of the Alumni Association. About $160,000 has been raised in the more than 25 years since the tournament began. Proceeds from the tournament began going to the scholarship in 1999. The scholarship became endowed in 2003.

Registration begins at noon, with play to begin at 1 p.m. For more information, contact alumni coordinator Libby Posey, at 601.857.3350.

Born in Vicksburg in 1927, Mendrop attended Hinds and Memphis State College on basketball scholarships. After a master’s degree in administration from Mississippi College and four years in the U.S. Air Force, he coached basketball and football and was principal in the former Warren County School District. For 10 years, he was principal at Warren Central High School and coached girls track there. Later, he became assistant superintendent of education for the district.

The 1989 inductee to the Hinds Community College Sports Hall of Fame also coached youth sports and continued to enjoy watching his family’s activities after retiring. The great-grandfather of four died in 2014.

“He loved Hinds and he was thrilled to see his children and grandchildren do well, especially in sports,” said Melanie Mendrop Dornbusch, one of four children. “Clyde Donnell was a buddy of his and they were in a golf group. They loved to play.”

Donnell was a member of the college’s Board of Trustees and the Foundation Board, as well as a former Warren County supervisor from District 1. He died in 2005, and the golf tournament’s organizing committee named the annual scholarship benefit for him.

Caroline Mendrop said the honor is befitting an ardent supporter of the college and champion for education.

“Hinds meant so much to him,” she said. “We felt so humbled by it. His friends told me when he died, ‘You know he’s got a tee time already up there.’”

0 Comments Off on Golf tournament namesake ‘committed to Hinds,’ loved youth sports 819 11 September, 2015 News more