http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Hinds CC president, alumnus honored by Boy Scout Council

Monthly Archives: June 2015

Hinds CC president, alumnus honored by Boy Scout Council
Posted by
25 June

Hinds CC president, alumnus honored by Boy Scout Council

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, left, Dr. Robert Smith, executive director of Central Mississippi Health Services

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, left, Dr. Robert Smith, executive director of Central Mississippi Health Services

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse of Raymond and Hinds alumnus Dr. Robert Smith were honored with the Whitney Young Service Award from the Andrew Jackson Council of the Boy Scouts of America on June 23.

Smith of Terry is the executive director of Central Mississippi Health Services.

The annual award is named for Whitney Young, a civil rights leader and president of the National Urban League who died in 1971. As part of the award, the council is creating a new $1,000 scholarship in honor of Muse and Smith to be awarded to an Eagle Scout this fall at Hinds.

Dr. Robert Mayo, retired Hinds Rankin Campus dean of students and a board member of the Hinds Community College Foundation, said he admires Muse for two talents: being a torchbearer and herding turtles.

He said Muse has been a torchbearer in awarding tens of thousands of diplomas over his career, including when he was a school superintendent, and leading in church and community service.

Mayo said Muse has been a torchbearer in a more unofficial capacity, including using his personal John Deere tractor to help Raymond neighbors break up a garden spot. “He does his tractor work for anybody who needs it,” Mayo said.

He also alluded to one of Muse’s favorite sayings: “If you ever see a turtle sitting on top of a fence post, you know it didn’t get there by itself.”

“Now I’m here to tell you that Dr. Muse has herded many of us turtles and told us not to be afraid to come out of our protective shells, to stick our necks out and try to help others in need in our community,” he said. “In so doing, he has made us move a lot faster and a whole lot further than we ever thought we could. He has inspired us to set goals for ourselves and our community.”

Muse called it a “special privilege for me to share this program with Dr. Robert Smith, who has been a close personal friend for many, many years. We’ve been up and down a lot of roads together and I’ve learned from him so much.”

He also noted that he had been involved with Scouting growing up but was not able to achieve Eagle Scout because his family moved. “Certainly I have remained interested and supportive of Scouting all my life,” he said.

Smith said he was pleased to be honored by the council alongside Muse.

“Nothing is more important, as you know, than providing a helping hand to our young men and women to grow up and become the leaders of tomorrow in an increasing competitive society,” he said. “I can never express enough appreciation for your support of us and this evening’s effort in continuing supporting the boy scouts of America whose moto is preparing young people for life.”

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC Agriculture Department adds three classes for Fall 2015
Posted by
25 June

Hinds CC Agriculture Department adds three classes for Fall 2015

Three classes have been added to Hinds Community College’s Agriculture Department curriculum for Fall 2015.

The classes, offered only on the Raymond Campus, are Animal Science Technology – Beef Option, Animal Science Technology – Poultry Option and Precision Agriculture.

Each expands opportunities for hands-on learning and should sync seamlessly for prospective students from heavy agricultural areas, said Wayne Boshart, Agribusiness Technology instructor.

“The Agriculture Department places a heavy emphasis on hands-on learning,” Boshart said. “Having access to the Hinds Community College Bull Test Station and college farm, managed by Kenny Banes, allows our students to have hands-on experiences with judging live animal confirmation, as well as, herd health and forage and pasture management. Dr. Roger Jones, the Agriculture Department chairman, teaches a Soil Science course that allows students to collect, analyze, and interpret soil sample analysis, which is crucial to the effective production of forages and agronomic crops.”

Poultry and beef industry officials and observers welcome the additions to the curriculum on several levels.

“The addition of these classes at Hinds Community College will provide opportunities for students to gain the applicable knowledge and skills necessary for a career in agriculture,” state Agriculture Commissioner Cindy Hyde-Smith said.

A study released in May by Purdue University ranks Agriculture degrees among three top expected demands in the job market. The industry is Mississippi’s largest, employing 29 percent of the state’s workforce.

“I applaud the leadership and foresight of Hinds in leading the way in academic preparedness to matching job market demands,” Hyde-Smith said. “These students are the future of agriculture, and they can use the skills gained in these programs to help feed and clothe the growing population.”

Andy Berry, executive vice president of the Mississippi Cattlemen’s Association, believes careers in agriculture, especially beef production, are on the upswing.

“The average age of a cattle farmer is in the early 60s. We have a growing world population, but we have a shrinking population in agriculture. Those two factors, along with historically high beef prices, make it very attractive for me to encourage young adults to become involved in beef production,” Berry said. “Currently, there’s not a better time to be involved in agriculture, specifically beef production.”

Poultry is Mississippi’s largest income-producing agricultural commodity, with a direct impact in more than half of the state’s 82 counties and a production value of more than $2.5 billion, according to the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

“These new Agriculture programs take a unique approach to instruction by using industry driven curriculums that included industry partners at the table leading their development,” said Dr. Chad Stocks, vice president of Workforce Development and Coordination of Career/Technical Education and associate dean of Career and Technical Education for the Raymond Campus. “The classes are hands-on, with field trips to local farms and related agriculture businesses.”

Mississippi-based egg producer Cal-Maine, the nation’s largest producer and marketer of shell eggs, helped form the curriculum and is offering paid internships to students who complete the program, Stocks said.

“Poultry companies in Mississippi continue to search for talented students who are interested in a long-term career of providing nutritious poultry product to consumers,” Cal-Maine chief operating officer Sherman Miller said. “I believe that the poultry industry will benefit greatly by the caliber of students that will graduate from the poultry option class. Cal-Maine Foods is excited to be a part of this program, and we believe that Hinds will help introduce local talent into a career path that will last a lifetime.”

Precision Agriculture gathers an array of technological advances to create topographic maps to help farmers and farm families to decide what to plant and where, irrigation strategies, pest control and more. Technicians in the field will install, operate, troubleshoot and repair precision agriculture systems such as GPS (Global Positioning Systems) and GIS (Geographical Information Systems). Students completing a certificate or degree program in Precision Ag will be more competent in their own farm operations or obtain positions such as Precision Ag Technicians (implement dealers), Crop Specialists, Nutrient Management Specialists, Precision Ag Department Managers, Precision Agronomists, and Precision Farming Coordinators.

“Technicians will also use the advanced processing software to collect, visualize, and analyze data that has been collected by the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) known to most of us as drones,” Stocks said.

In April, Hinds and Mississippi State University signed a unique agreement to enhance the program at each institution. At Hinds, two separate degree options are available this fall. One, the Associate of Applied Science degree in the emerging field, allows students to go directly into the workforce. A second option, an Associate of Arts degree, will allow students to transfer to MSU with 60 hours of community college coursework toward a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Engineering Technology and Business with a concentration in Precision Agriculture.

For more information on the new classes or on the Agriculture Department, contact Melissa Washburn at 601-857-3334 or at mcwashburn@hindscc.edu.

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Hinds CC continues registration for second four-week summer, fall terms
Posted by
23 June

Hinds CC continues registration for second four-week summer, fall terms

Registration is continuing at Hinds Community College for the second four-week summer term that begins on June 29 and fall terms that begin on Aug. 17.

To register for classes for any term, students must first be admitted to the college. After meeting with a counselor, new students can then register for classes. Offices are open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and until 6 p.m. on Tuesdays. The Admissions office can be reached at 601.857.3212. Or visit the Admissions tab on the Hinds website at www.hindscc.edu.

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Hinds CC hosts annual intergenerational Camp Silver Eagle
Posted by
23 June

Hinds CC hosts annual intergenerational Camp Silver Eagle

Camp Silver Eagle, Summer 2014.

Registration is now open for the Hinds Community College Creative Learning Fifty-Plus annual intergenerational summer enrichment program, Camp Silver Eagle. This year’s program is “Operation Conservation: Wet, Wild, Winged and Wonderful.”

The camp is July 13-17, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. (8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Awards Day, on Friday) for adults of all ages and children and youth ages 5-16 (with an adult) at the Ted Kendall Agricultural Complex, McKenzie Facility, located on Seven Springs Road in Raymond.

Adults have the option to participate with or without a child or youth partner. Youth 17+ will be considered an adult. This program encourages an intergenerational experience of creative learning and adventure, shared by adults and their grandchildren or any child ages 5-16.

The camp focuses on best backyard conservation practices. Most camp activities are inside; however, there will be outside activities as well, but with access to near-by air-conditioning if needed.

The camp theme is Backyard Conservation: “Get Connected: You, the Backyard and All That Lives There!” with focus programs to include, Water and the Hydrological Cycle, an Enviroscape demonstration, a watershed model, hands-on activities identifying aquatic bugs that are found in different water qualities; Going Wild-native species of MS reptiles; Fisheries Day-Managing Farm Ponds and Small Lakes, Weed Identification and Control, Identification of Common Fishes in Mississippi’s Fresh Water; visit to an private local lake to learn about characteristics we look for  and practices used to manage the Soil, Water, as well as, the fish population; Gardening and Backyard Birding and how best to attract them.

Cost is $35 per Adult, $50 per Adult/first child pair, $15 second child and $10 per additional child. Group rates for 10 or more available. Pre-registration is required; spaces are limited.

For more information and to request a registration form, contact Melody Field, coordinator, Hinds CC Creative Learning Fifty-Plus at 601.857.3773 or mfield@hindscc.edu, or Tommie Winters, 601.946.4054/601.954.5194.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Registration open for Hinds CC free fall summit targeting minority males
Posted by
19 June

Registration open for Hinds CC free fall summit targeting minority males

Wes Moore

Wes Moore

Registration is open to the public for the Minority Male Leadership Initiative Best Practices Summit Sept. 14-15 at the Muse Center at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus. The summit is free but registration is required.

To register, see the Hinds website at:

http://hub.hindscc.edu/minority-male-leadership-initiative-best-practices-summit

The summit, “Preparing African American Males for Success in the 21st Century,” begins at 10 a.m. Sept. 14 and ends with a closing plenary session on Sept. 15.

The summit is open to high school students and principals, parents, current and retired educators – anyone interested in attending. The headline speaker is Wes Moore of Baltimore, a New York Times best-selling author who works for social justice.

For more information about the summit, contact Dr. Shakira Cain at 601.987.8109 or by email at Shakira.Cain@hindscc.edu.

The M2M Minority Male Initiative is a grant-funded project based at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center on Sunset Drive. The initiative provides leadership training, career counseling, tutoring, mentoring and opportunities for travel to senior level universities for program participant.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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GED graduates credit persistence after ceremony Friday at Hinds CC
Posted by
16 June

GED graduates credit persistence after ceremony Friday at Hinds CC

RAYMOND – Fay Lundy was an honors student in high school but she knew nothing about the real world.

That was more than 50 years ago. Between then and now, her education had been in the workplace, but she also felt something was missing.

“I didn’t need school then, because I knew it all,” Lundy said. “But, after a while I realized what I didn’t know. But, by then, I was married and had kids.”

Lundy was among 16 people of varying ages who were recognized during a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus for achieving their General Education Development certificate this academic term.

Being the oldest person in the group didn’t faze the 68-year-old Bolton resident and grandmother of eight who worked in convenience stores, big-box retailers and restaurants as she raised a family.

“I keep telling my grandchildren, ‘Grandma worked hard but didn’t make any money because she didn’t have an education.’”

Thomas Ealey, center, celebrates his earning a General Education Development certificate following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. Also pictured are his daughter, McKenzie, and Dianna Jones, McKenzie’s mother.

Thomas Ealey, center, celebrates his earning a General Education Development certificate following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus. Also pictured are his daughter, McKenzie, and Dianna Jones, McKenzie’s mother.

Thomas Brandon Ealey, 30, one of three honors students among those recognized and among four GED recipients who received $500 from the Education Pays program, hopes to learn those lessons early. He works retail in Flowood these days and has his sights set higher after years of making “a lot of bad decisions.”

“My motivation is my three children, nieces and nephews and the people around me,” Ealey said. “I’m really contemplating law school.”

Thomas Brandon Ealey, right, lends a helping hand to Fay Lundy, left, as they make their way into Eagle Ridge Conference Center on Friday for a ceremony to recognize those who received General Education Development certificates this academic term. following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus.

Thomas Brandon Ealey, right, lends a helping hand to Fay Lundy, left, as they make their way into Eagle Ridge Conference Center on Friday for a ceremony to recognize those who received General Education Development certificates this academic term. following a ceremony Friday at Eagle Ridge Conference Center on the Raymond Campus.

Hinds student and noted fashion and costume designer Nina Ghaffari spoke to this year’s recipients on a message of not giving up despite background and circumstances. Ghaffari, 34, a sociology and human rights major at the Jackson Campus – Academic/Technical Center, was born in Mississippi and received a GED in 1998 from Hinds but was taken to live in her father’s native Iran for 12 years before finding her way back to the United States.

Nina Ghaffari, guest speaker at Friday’s ceremony to recognize those who received a General Education Development certificate this academic term, receives a plaque from Carla Causey, district director of Adult Education at Hinds Community College.

Nina Ghaffari, guest speaker at Friday’s ceremony to recognize those who received a General Education Development certificate this academic term, receives a plaque from Carla Causey, district director of Adult Education at Hinds Community College.

“Risks are all about uncertainty and building a more confident you,” Ghaffari said. “If we take risks on a daily basis, we become confident to take bigger risks. Life is too short to live small.”

Recipients of GED certificates and their stated hometowns included:

  • Lela Bryant, of Flora
  • Ashley Byrd, of Jackson
  • Angela Constancio, of Vicksburg
  • Thomas Brandon Ealey, of Jackson
  • Amber Hohlt, of Jackson
  • Jared Landry, of Clinton
  • Fay Lundy, of Bolton
  • Charles Leager III, of Byram
  • William Liggins, of Vicksburg
  • Malcolm Mobley, of Clinton
  • Tanu Narula, of Clinton
  • Andrew Robinson, of Vicksburg
  • Jessica Roberts, of Vicksburg
  • Curtis West, of Clinton
  • Tauras Williams, of Clinton
  • Victoria Williams, of Clinton

Ealey, Landry and Mobley were Honor Students, with Ealey, Bryant, Byrd and Liggins also recipients of $500 scholarships from the Education Pays program. Begun in 2009, the program is a partnership between Hinds and the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation and awards checks to all Hinds CC Warren GED recipients over the age of 21.

Mobley received a $500 scholarship from Hinds’ Adult Education Advisory Committee.

Hinds offers a tuition free class to all first time college students who are admitted with a GED. The college also offers a $1,000 academic scholarship that is equivalent to the ACT Scholarship for high scoring GED achievers. For more information, visit www.hindscc.edu.

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Hinds CC NAHC students raise thousands for Tupelo veteran to hunt at Tara Wildlife
Posted by
08 June

Hinds CC NAHC students raise thousands for Tupelo veteran to hunt at Tara Wildlife

PEARLThis year’s service project by Hinds’ Jackson Campus – Nursing/Allied Health Center is a win-win for young cancer patients and survivors and military veterans who need friendly ears to hear their stories.

Proceeds from a softball tournament planned by nursing instructors and students raised about $4,000, split evenly between Camp Rainbow, a five-day camp dedicated to pediatric cancer patients and survivors ages 6 to 17 in Mississippi, and the Warrior Bonfire Project, a Vicksburg-based nonprofit for Purple Heart veterans. Rain halted the games, but not the giving.

Funds raised for WBP will pay for an all-inclusive, three-day archery hunt later this year at Tara Wildlife, north of Vicksburg, for Tim Bell, a Blue Springs veteran chosen by the organization to take part in its next event for its next activity, and his spouse, said Lesa Wilson, director of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program at NAHC. The donations were announced Saturday at Hinds’ Military Appreciation Day at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

From left, Angela Dewey and Melody Rayborn Block, both students in the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program, hold a check for $2,000 to the Warrior Bonfire Project from the Nursing/Allied Health Center as part of this year’s community outreach service project.

From left, Angela Dewey and Melody Rayborn Block, both students in the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program, hold a check for $2,000 to the Warrior Bonfire Project from the Nursing/Allied Health Center as part of this year’s community outreach service project.

Also donated for Bell’s hunt were a “Bad-Boy Buggy” from Nelson Golf Cars & Utility Vehicles, in Jackson, a “Mr. Buddy” portable propane heater and a $300 gift card from Bass Pro Shop, purchased by the nursing students.

“We’re very excited to do this for him,” Wilson said. “The DMS students raised money for the gift card by creating and selling t-shirts.”

“On behalf of the Warrior Bonfire Project, its founder, Dan Fordice, and board of directors, we would like to thank you and all of the 2015 Class of Diagnostic Medical Sonography at Hinds Community College for your outstanding efforts to secure an opportunity for one of our Purple Hearts from Tupelo to go on an archery hunt weekend at Tara Wildlife and for his spouse to come along,” said Helen Phillips, director of special projects for WBP. “We thank you for your continued support of our organization, at Hinds Community College and the surrounding areas.

Bell, a first sergeant in the Army’s 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team, was injured in Iraq when his platoon was attacked twice in four months in 2009.

“I love to deer hunt and I am so excited for this opportunity,” Bell said in a letter to Wilson and her students. “Thank you so much for what you folks have done. I wouldn’t ever be able to go to a place like this if it wasn’t for people like y’all.”

WBP was founded in 2012 and involves veterans injured in combat a chance to bond through activities in stress-free environments that promote camaraderie and therapeutic healing. For more information on the organization, visit www.warriorbonfireproject.org.

Each year, the Nursing/Allied Health Center has a community outreach service project to benefit area charities. For more information on future projects or the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program, email lbwilson@hindscc.edu.

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Hinds CC Gateway to College provides path to passion for high school students
Posted by
05 June

Hinds CC Gateway to College provides path to passion for high school students

PEARL – Madison Nance smiled and celebrated with family and friends Thursday outside the Muse Center holding two symbols of pride and joy that came unexpectedly.

“What’s gotten me through is my child,” Nance said, as seven-month-old Cooper nibbled at the corner of his mother’s diploma from Northwest Rankin High School. “I wanted to succeed in life for him.”

Nance was among 27 high school students in Rankin County who received diplomas and earned college credit this past semester thanks to the Gateway to College program, which targets those in the school system who have dropped out or are at risk of doing so because they’ve fallen behind in their studies.

Madison Nance, center left, holds her son, Cooper, while Cooper holds his mother’s high school diploma following the Gateway to College graduation ceremony Thursday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Also pictured, from left, his father, Dillion Cooper, Jana Nance and Ken Nance.

Madison Nance, center left, holds her son, Cooper, while Cooper holds his mother’s high school diploma following the Gateway to College graduation ceremony Thursday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus. Also pictured, from left, his father, Dillion Cooper, Jana Nance and Ken Nance.

By her junior year, her algebra grades had put Nance on a fast track to summer school and possibly not graduating. A cousin had completed the program last year, which made Gateway a viable option, her mother, Jana, said.

Last November, program advisors took Nance to the hospital on a class day as Cooper came two weeks early. Support came from home and school when it came to keeping studies in line as she juggled motherhood and completing her education.

“She was worried she wouldn’t be able to complete algebra,” Jana Nance said. “I was encouraging her at home, but I’m mama. It’s something else when you’ve got ladies who say, ‘Oh, we know you can do this. You’ve just got to buckle down and study’.”

Nance ended up with 24 hours of college credits she’ll use toward her pursuit of a nursing degree.

“I’ve been adamant about nursing since ninth grade,” Nance said. “I want to work in a NICU, with babies.”

A ceremony marking this year’s Gateway graduates was keynoted by Kathy Smith, an English instructor at the Rankin Campus. Smith spoke on the importance of planning and setting goals.

“Nobody else in this world can make your dreams come true,” Smith said. “Your mama can’t, your daddy can’t, your boyfriend can’t, your girlfriend can’t. Are you willing to put in the planning, the time and the effort to make your dreams come true?”

You have just completed a major chapter in the book of your life that your are writing. But it’s not the end. Life is an endurance test. It’s for those who endure and put one foot in front of the other.”

Gateway began at Hinds in the 2012-13 academic term at the Rankin Campus and, this past term, expanded to the Vicksburg-Warren Campus. It functions as a Mississippi Works Partnership between Hinds and the two respective school districts.

Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled on at Hinds.

Students entering the program must read on an eighth-grade level and pass HCC’s placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

Gateway graduates included, front from left, Amanda Witherington, Northwest Rankin High School, 21 hours of college credits; Ashley Porter, Richland High School, 31 hours; Abbie Shanks, Richland High School, 32 hours; Savanah Kees, Florence High School, 16 hours; Chelsea Hughes, Brandon High School, 31 hours; Christina Hust, Northwest Rankin High School, 22 hours; Tiffany Rutland, Florence High School, 17 hours; Taylor Hollis, McLaurin High School, 17 hours; Logan Horton, Northwest Rankin High School, 21 hours; second row from left, Carley Huckeby, Northwest Rankin High School, 24 hours; Amber Flinta, Richland High School, 22 hours; Willesha Holloway, McLaurin High School, 41 hours; Mia Richards, Northwest Rankin High School, 26 hours; Meghan Shepherd, Florence High School, 21 hours; Ashley Edmondson, Brandon High School, 21 hours; Madison Nance, Northwest Rankin High School, 24 hours; Jacob Simpson Northwest Rankin High School, 17 hours; third row from left, Cheyanne Harper, McLaurin High School, 35 hours; Dylan Curtis, Brandon High School, 38 hours; Blake Blakeney, Brandon High School, 18 hours; Kirkland Ledbetter, Brandon High School, 13 hours; Jadland McCoy, Brandon High School, 28 hours; Jordan Young, Northwest Rankin High School, 22 hours; Sam Gabell, Brandon High School, 18 hours; not pictured, Jakavis Cavett, Brandon High School, seven hours; Deanna Thomas, Brandon High School, 20 hours; and Allyson Brennan, Brandon High School, 10 hours.

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Hinds CC Vicksburg Gateway to College program graduates 13 in inaugural year
Posted by
03 June

Hinds CC Vicksburg Gateway to College program graduates 13 in inaugural year

VICKSBURG – Thirteen students whose education was slipping away a year ago walked across a stage of their own last month as the first graduates at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus of a program geared to minimize dropouts from high school.

Those completing the Vicksburg Gateway to College program were:

  • Deonna Roniece Allen
  • Haley Breelynn Carson
  • Caleb Daniel Christmas
  • Tre’Vion Ja’Quae Samuel Ellis
  • Sherika Michelle Lee Kelly
  • Meghan Elizabeth Marbury
  • Lakeithia Jenise McDaniel
  • Colby Stewart Miller
  • Mark Lee Trevillion
  • Curtis Lee Valentine
  • Regina Lasha Valentine

Graduates received certificates of achievement from the program on May 22 as well as high school diplomas from their home schools in Warren County.

The Gateway to College program targets those in the school system who have dropped out or are at risk of doing so because they have fallen behind in high school credits. Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students aged 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds.

Students entering the program must read on an eighth-grade level and pass Hinds’ placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

Marvin Moak, dean of the Vicksburg-Warren Campus, credited collaboration with Vicksburg Warren School District Superintendent Chad Shealy for making the program a reality at the campus. The program debuted in the 2012-2013 term at the Rankin Campus.

The participants have “been people whose situations haven’t fit well with high school, and also some folks who just did not want to do the high school scenario,” Moak said. “Classes are more on a college schedule, and that’s worked out really well for them.”

In addition, certificates for individual achievements went to Carson, for All As; Kelly, for Ms. Head of the Game; McDaniel, All As; Trevillion, for the Gateway Award, Most Improved Student and Perfect Attendance; and Regina Valentine, for Perfect Attendance. Miller received a certificate for Most College Credit, earning 19 credits while finishing his high school diploma.

The program in Vicksburg is directed by Denetra Taylor. Angela Davis works with the program as resource specialist.

 

 

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Veteran services at Hinds CC help keep education, duty to nation in line
Posted by
03 June

Veteran services at Hinds CC help keep education, duty to nation in line

RAYMOND – When it came time to deploy to Kuwait with the Army Reserve, Virginia D. Johnson knew Hinds Community College would have her back like she had the nation’s back.

“I was deployed last year and wasn’t in school,” Johnson said. “But, the Veterans Services Department worked with me to make sure I stayed on track to graduate.”

Johnson, of Jackson, indeed earned an Associate’s of Applied Science on May 14 to pursue her passion of becoming a nurse. She credits Hinds in taking care of the little things to keep her status with the reserve clean and her grades good.

“Whenever I didn’t know what kind of paperwork to submit, they kind of walked me through the steps,” Johnson said. “They let me defer for a year while I was deployed. I came back and it was no problem. The distance learning program was awesome.”

Virginia Johnson poses in a training lab at the Allied Health Center.

Virginia Johnson poses in a training lab at the Nursing-Allied Health Center.

Services that meet the needs of current and former service members are the focus of the college’s Military Appreciation Day at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Muse Center on the Rankin Campus.

Military families will be treated to a day of family-friendly fun wrapped around a chance to pick up information about career services, academic programs, health-related programs and other one- and two-year career and technical programs offered at Hinds.

Hinds’ ability to foster the education of active service members also came in handy for Elizabeth Burgess, a petty officer second class in the U.S. Navy entering the University of Southern Mississippi this fall after transferring from Hinds. She plans to major in anthropology once there.

“Veterans Services helped me realize I didn’t necessarily have to pull out my GI bill to come to school there,” Burgess said. “They just helped me get my paperwork and everything started for USM.”

Both Johnson and Burgess reflect what the Veteran Services office does for active and former service members, office director Ryan Braswell said.

“When I was hired on as the Veteran Services coordinator, my goal was to make using the GI Bill as quick and painless as possible for both the military student and Hinds Community College,” Braswell said.

He said the wide-ranging benefit package afforded by the military may be applied in many ways. “What we found was that students who were active military could actually save their GI Bills and attend Hinds strictly on financial aid,” Braswell said.

Communication is key for any active service member wanting to continue their education and honor their commitment to the nation, Burgess said.

“Always stay in touch with vet services even if you’re not going to use you GI bill,” Burgess said. “They’re there to help guide you and help you through that period.”

The Veterans Health Administration, Veterans Administration Vet Center and Veterans Benefit Administration are expected to offer information at Saturday’s event to service members and their families about an array of benefits. The Office of Veterans’ Benefits will disseminate information on the GI Bill and other various VA Education Programs as well as scholarships available to service members.

Hinds has received national recognition for being a Military Friendly institution. For more information on veterans’ benefits at Hinds Community College, see http://www.hindscc.edu/offices/veterans/index#gsc.tab=0.

For more information on Saturday’s event, contact Braswell at 601.857.3226 or at ryan.braswell@hindscc.edu.

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