http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Rankin, Vicksburg-Warren Campus students finish tops in Hinds CC welding competition

Monthly Archives: April 2015

Rankin, Vicksburg-Warren Campus students finish tops in Hinds CC welding competition
Posted by
17 April

Rankin, Vicksburg-Warren Campus students finish tops in Hinds CC welding competition

Rankin, Vicksburg-Warren Campus students finish tops in Hinds CC welding competition

Hinds CC welding students Nathan Lantrip, from left, Matthew Brown, James M. Franklin, Jody Jones and Tony Kaho hold prizes won during a welding competition held Thursday at the Career and Technical Building at the Rankin Campus.

Hinds CC welding students Nathan Lantrip, from left, Matthew Brown, James M. Franklin, Jody Jones and Tony Kaho hold prizes won during a welding competition held Thursday at the Career and Technical Building at the Rankin Campus.

PEARL – Nathan Lantrip hadn’t gone behind a welder’s shield since high school before enrolling at Hinds Community College last summer.

On Thursday, the Brandon native’s smooth weld on a plate test proved he might be a man of steel after all. His workmanship was judged best among 15 of his peers in HCC’s welding program who took part in a competition at the Career and Technical Building at the Rankin Campus, the first such event held at the facility.

“I haven’t welded since high school,” Lantrip said. “I lost my job in sporting goods because it got bought out by another company. I figured I’d might as well go back to school.”

The 37-year-old husband and father said the pressure of the event was nearly as hot as the torch used to bind the seven-inch plates together in the curtained booths set up for each contestant.

“I was fine all the way until they said go,” Lantrip said. “Got to the last pass, then he said, ‘Hurry up!’, then I got nervous again. It all worked out in the end, I guess.”

Rounding out the top five were Matthew Brown, of Vicksburg; James M. Franklin and Jody Jones, both of whom attend the Rankin Campus; and Tony Kaho, of the Raymond Campus. Each got to choose a prize from among a collection of welding gear and supplies donated by Yates Construction. Resumes each student brought was to be sent to the DeKalb, Miss.-based construction company’s human resources department so each would be considered for jobs.

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“It was fun and a challenge,” Brown said. “They were actually more lenient than I thought they’d be; I thought there’d be a judge in each booth. I brought my own hard hat and hood, that way I’d be 100 percent comfortable.”

Brown, 21, along with others in the top five, seeks a Technical Certificate to add to his work experience in the field with contract welding jobs. Doing so, organizers said, eventually will enable them to name their price in the workplace.

“Welders are really hard to find right now,” said Malcolm Rainwater, human resources manager and site lead for Yates, told contestants during a brief review session before the contest. “What you’re doing is exactly what we need. We need welders who will come to work when they’re supposed to. And when you get certified, you’ll make a pocketful of money. We’re paying top pipe-welders $30 an hour.”

Students in the program earn a Career Certificate after 30 semester credit hours are completed. A Technical Certificate is earned after 45 hours. Associates of Applied Science degrees are attainable after 60 credit hours.

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“Ultimately, they’re all winners because they made it here,” said Sherry Franklin, career and technical dean at the Rankin Campus. “We want to build partnerships with business and industry, and this is a great showcase for our welding division at Hinds Community College as our students are preparing for the workforce.”

Competitors were graded on eight key points – good fusion and penetration of the base metal, little or no porosity or slag inclusion, uniform appearance of beads in the binding weld, minimum distortion, fullness and completion of welds at the end, whether a maximum of 1/8 of an inch of reinforcement was achieved, whether ¼ inch of linear indication was reached, and whether at least two passes, or overlaps in the bonded metal, were visible on the weld’s face.

“This is our first competition,” said Phillip Manning, craft training manager for Yates, during the review session. “But, with the quality instructors at Hinds, we felt like we’d have good leadership. We have the potential to have some good employees come out of these programs.”

Ken Daniels, of Airgas, a key supplier in the welding industry, judged the event.

“Airgas is happy to partner with the colleges and vocational schools,” Daniels said. “There’s a shortage of skilled labor out there. We need to get people in the pipeline for the jobs that are out there and open. And it needs to be a stepping stone for their education – keep trying to get that next certification to get out of that minimum wage class and into that skilled labor class we’re so short on. That way, when you’re 50 years old, you’re telling someone how to do it instead of having to get down there in the ditch and do it yourself.”

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Posted by on 15 April

Hinds CC Gateway to College high school program turns interests into career paths

Colby Miller

Colby Miller

Michael Harris

Michael Harris

Colby Miller was losing interest in school and his grades reflected it, despite a zeal for all things tech. The same applied to Michael Harris, who yearned to emulate his father’s skills but just couldn’t make it happen in the classroom.

Each might have dropped out of school if not for a new program at Hinds Community College’s Vicksburg-Warren Campus that’s geared to keep students from giving up on their studies.

“In high school, I’d be lucky if I made a D in class, with all the students who are loud, talkative and don’t cooperate with the teacher. So, it’s hard to concentrate,” Miller said. “Here, you’re in classes with actual college students. They’re paying for it and they’re here to learn. And I’m making As, Bs and Cs.”

For Harris, it was test anxiety.

“I’d understand what the lessons were teaching, but when it came time for tests, I’d just get nervous,” he said.

The Gateway to College program targets those in the school system who have dropped out or are at risk of doing so because they have fallen behind in high school credits. Once directed toward the program, often by high school guidance counselors, students age 16-20 are placed in small learning communities and take basic skills classes while dually enrolled at Hinds.

Students entering the program must read on an eighth-grade level and pass Hinds’ placement test for full participation. Classes in reading, math, college skills and other subjects are then aligned for the level at which they would have been taken in a traditional high school setting.

Hinds began the program at the Rankin Campus in fall 2012 as the first Mississippi community college to become a part of the national Gateway to College network. In June 2014, the second full year, the Rankin program graduated 35 students.

“We were able to kick off the Vicksburg Gateway to College program this semester through great support from the Vicksburg Warren School District,” said Vicksburg-Warren Campus Dean Marvin Moak. “The principals and counselors were instrumental in helping us select the first group of Gateway participants. This program gives its students the opportunity to complete their high school education and receive college credit while doing that.”

Students who graduated from the Rankin program last year were able to earn an average of 22 college credits.

Moak says that is a big advantage. “These graduates will be able to seamlessly transition from high school to college. It is our hope that many of them will take advantage of our recently expanded career-technical programs for our campus,” he said.

Miller and Harris, both 19, are two of 28 students enrolled in the program this year, said Angela Davis, resource specialist for the program at the Vicksburg-Warren Campus.

“Students in the program are those where the high school environment just was not cutting it anymore,” Davis said.

Most often recommended are students who have trouble getting started in high school, said Program Director Denetra Taylor.

“We have the whole gamut,” Taylor said. “Right now, we’re looking at students who are maybe 17 and about to repeat the ninth grade for the third time.”

Kaylae Hartley

Kaylae Hartley

Kaylae Hartley, 18, said her grades have stabilized in the program after a rough start in high school.

“I made all As and Bs in elementary school, but when I got to junior high, I was slipping,” Hartley said.

She learned of the program through her high school counselor.

Harris and Miller say they already have future plans on what they want to do after they finish the Gateway to College program. Harris, also an expectant father, wants to learn the ins and outs of welding once his basic coursework is completed.

“My dad used to work at LeTourneau Technologies, so he’s pretty good at welding,” Harris said. “Last year, I took a welding class, but I just got to the grinding and torch-cutting part. It’s just something I think I could be interested in.”

Miller sees video games in his future, and not just playing them. “I want to go to a technical college for game development,” he said. “I want to create the characters and environments of video games.”

Without the Gateway to College program, their plans might just be pipe dreams.

For information about the program, contact Denetra Taylor at 601. 601.619.6881 for the Vicksburg-Warren Campus or Rebecca Tullos at 601.936.5580 for the Rankin Campus program.  Or see the Hinds website at http://www.hindscc.edu/programs-of-study/abe_ged/gateway-to-college/gateway-to-college#gsc.tab=0

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC Career and Technical Division to host welding competition
Posted by
15 April

Hinds CC Career and Technical Division to host welding competition

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PEARL – The Career and Technical Division of Hinds Community College is partnering with Yates Construction to offer a welding competition for Hinds students this semester.

Fifteen students from the Raymond, Rankin, Vicksburg and Utica campuses will compete in various welding disciplines starting at 8 a.m. Thursday, April 16 at the Career-Technical Building off Greenfield Road in Pearl. The address is 1060 Commercial Park Drive in Pearl.

For more information on the competition, contact Rankin Campus Career-Technical Dean Sherry Franklin, 601.936.5550 or SDFranklin@hindscc.edu.

 

Media representatives are invited to cover the competition. To rsvp, contact Danny Barrett at 601.857.3343 or danny.barrett@hindscc.edu

 

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Coaching dream drives adult student back to Hinds CC
Posted by
14 April

Coaching dream drives adult student back to Hinds CC

No. 40 volunteer baseball coach Tim Axton of Brandon with Hinds Community College baseball player Marshall Boggs at the spring 2014 College World Series in Enid, Okla.

No. 40 volunteer baseball coach Tim Axton of Brandon with Hinds Community College baseball player Marshall Boggs at the spring 2014 College World Series in Enid, Okla.

Hinds Community College baseball coaches Tim Axton, left, Dan Rives, Chad Bradford and head coach Sam Temple

Hinds Community College baseball coaches Tim Axton, left, Dan Rives, Chad Bradford and head coach Sam Temple

The following feature story was published in the spring 2015 issue of Hinds Community College’s alumni magazine, Hindsight.

Hinds Community College and baseball. Both of those have figured prominently in Tim Axton’s (2014) life, 12 years apart.

Axton of Brandon was first a Hinds student from 1998 to fall 2000. He played catcher on the 1999 baseball team coached by Rick Clarke that went to the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) World Series, achieving a 16-30 overall record and a 13-11 record in the South division.

Axton went on to Mississippi State University but didn’t finish his college career then, however. He decided to go to work, then married and started a family.

He came back to Hinds in fall 2012 with a definite goal in mind: get a degree in education, become a teacher, maybe a principal at some point but definitely a baseball coach.

Family members helped convince him that he needed to do it. “I never thought I could go back to school. I was very scared to do that,” he said.

He had a conversation with Hinds head baseball coach Sam Temple (1990), who agreed it was what he needed to do.

Axton and Temple have known each other for years. Axton was a ninth grader on the Northwest Rankin High School baseball team coached by Hinds graduate Jeff McClaskey (1983), who was named athletic director at Rankin County’s Northwest Rankin High School in February. Temple also played under McClaskey at Porters Chapel Academy in Vicksburg and did his student teaching under McClaskey at Northwest Rankin.

“That’s where the relationship started,” Temple said.

So Axton enrolled in Hinds full-time and began taking steps toward his goal.

“I came back to start my quest to getting my degree in education. I was 34 years old and had not been in school in a long time. Everything had changed. Technology had changed; how you learn had changed,” he said.

“I sat down in class trying to take notes; I was flipping pages trying to take notes. I looked up and everybody was typing on a laptop or tablet or something and I knew I was out of place,” he said, laughing.

But he wasn’t. Not only did he graduate from Hinds the second time around, he is now enrolled in the Delta State University 2 plus 2 program that allows him to get his education degree through hybrid and online classes through Hinds.

Axton’s second stint in college is as a married father of four with a construction business doing home remodeling and cabinet making. If all that isn’t enough, thanks to his long-standing relationship with Temple, he has been a volunteer baseball coach at Hinds for two years, coaching first base, catchers and hitters, and getting valuable experience he will need later.

“I went back to school because I wanted to be a baseball coach. I wanted to be a part of that again,” he said.

Temple was all for allowing Axton to be involved with the team. He knew Axton would need the experience on his resumé in order to achieve his dream of coaching.

“Tim loves Hinds the way I do. He played here; he’s an alumnus. Hinds is very special to him — the program and those players. The relationship he has with them has always been great. His value is tremendous,” Temple said.

Axton even made his second trip to a baseball World Series with Hinds in May 2014 when the Eagles came within one game of winning the series in Enid, Okla., finishing with a 40-21 record. “It was just as exciting, and it brought back all the memories it did as when I was a player,” he said.

Both Axton and assistant coach Chad Bradford (1995), a former Eagles standout baseball player and member of the Hinds Sports Hall of Fame class of 2007, were invaluable for the second trip to the World Series, Temple said. “Both of those guys brought a great wealth of knowledge that helped prepare our players. They were able to tell the players about how it was and how it will be,” he said.

But Axton’s added value to the team is also in his ability to be a role model as a student to the other student-athletes. With his busy schedule as husband, father, builder, student and coach, he epitomizes the accomplishments of someone who is goal oriented and excellent at time management, Temple said.

“He doesn’t miss a day even though he’s a volunteer, which is a just a great example to our young men,” Temple said. “He is a living example of not only hard work but determination that when you make up your mind, that you want to do something, you can finish it no matter what comes in there.

“Whenever our guys feel a little gloomy about their time in reference to baseball and school, it’s always a conversation I let Coach Axton have. Absolutely no excuses,” Temple said.

For more on the 2 plus 2 elementary education program partnership between Delta State University and Hinds Community College, contact Terry Parrish at 601.502.7590 or see the Hinds website at http://www.hindscc.edu/programs-of-study/academic-2-plus-2-programs/College-University-Agreements/dsu/index#gsc.tab=0

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC announces speakers for record number of spring graduation ceremonies
Posted by
14 April

Hinds CC announces speakers for record number of spring graduation ceremonies

Lorie Ramsey

Lorie Ramsey

Judge Jim Smith

Judge Jim Smith

Dr. Alfred Rankins

Dr. Alfred Rankins

Hinds Community College will have a record number of graduation ceremonies in May with eight scheduled over three days.

The college decided to increase the number of ceremonies to make the experience less crowded and more enjoyable for the graduates and their families, said Randall Harris, associate vice president for Student Advancement.

Nursing and allied health graduates will have ceremonies on Thursday, May 14 as follows: 9 a.m., associate degree nursing graduates; noon, transition to ADN; 3 p.m., allied health.  Lorie Ramsey, chief operating officer at Merit Health River Region, is the speaker for all three.

Hinds alumnus James W. Smith Jr. of Brandon, retired Mississippi Supreme Court chief justice and president of the Hinds Community College Foundation, is the speaker for the second day of graduation ceremonies. On Friday, May 15, academic and technical graduates, except for those attending the Utica Campus, will have ceremonies as follows: 8 a.m., students whose last names begin with A-E; 11 a.m., F-K; 2 p.m., L-R; and 5 p.m., S-Z.

Those ceremonies will take place at Cain-Cochran Hall on the Raymond Campus.

The Utica Campus will have a separate ceremony at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 17 at J.D. Boyd Gym. Dr. Alfred Rankins Jr., president of Alcorn State University, will be the speaker.

The speaker for the first day of ceremonies, Ramsey has been the chief operating officer at Merit Health River Region since October 2014. Merit Health is a healthcare system licensed for 392 beds and is comprised of Merit Health River Region, Merit Health River Region West Campus, the Street Clinic, the Family Medicine Clinic and One Medical Plaza Clinic.

She has more than 15 years of healthcare management experience. A native of Baton Rouge, she received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at Mississippi College and her Master of HealthCare Systems Management at Loyola in New Orleans.

Prior to accepting the chief operating officer role, she served as the chief nursing officer at Central Mississippi Medical Center. She has also served as chief nursing officer at Lakeside Hospital in Metairie, La., and at Crossgates River Oaks Hospital in Brandon. While at Central Mississippi Medical Center, Ramsey was instrumental in the implementation of a Care Transitions Team, “Health Connect.” The hospital was the first facility in the state to implement a Care Transitions team. She worked with the Mississippi Department of Health to expand Health Connect throughout the state of Mississippi.

The facility also achieved Level III Trauma Designation under her direction. While at Crossgates, Ramsey was instrumental in the opening of the state of Mississippi’s only Burn Unit.

She is married to John Ramsey, and they have three sons, Cody, Caleb and John. Her hobbies are tennis, knitting and pilates.

Smith is now a lawyer with Ogden and Associates in Jackson specializing in trial and appellate practice.

He is a Rankin County native who graduated from Hinds in 1963. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Southern Mississippi in 1965 and a master’s degree from Mississippi College in 1973. He received a law degree in 1972 and a master’s of law degree in 2007, both from Mississippi College.

He was admitted to the bar to practice law in 1972. He served as Pearl City prosecutor, district attorney for the 20th district for seven years, a Rankin County judge for 10 years and 16 years as a Mississippi Supreme Court justice. He is a U.S. Army Veteran, Operations and Intelligence Specialist Nuclear Missiles. He is also a former teacher and principal at Pearl Junior High.

Among his many professional honors and awards, he was named to the 500 Leading Judges in America in 2006, USM Hall of Fame in 2006, Mississippi College Law School Lawyer of the Year 2006, Hinds Community College Alumnus of the Year in 1996, Gov. Kirk Fordice Freedom Award in 2008, Mississippi Defense Lawyers Association Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009, Mississippi National Wild Turkey Federation Lifetime achievement Award in 2008 for Conservation efforts. He has been named Who’s Who in American Law, Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the World, all in 2000.

He is married to Kathy Morris, who is an English instructor at Hinds’ Rankin Campus. They have four children and six grandchildren.

Rankins, the speaker for the May 17 ceremony on the Utica Campus, is the 19th president of Alcorn State University, where he serves as the chief executive officer of the nation’s oldest public land-grant Historically Black College and University. Rankins has administrative oversight for Alcorn’s sprawling 1,700-acre Lorman campus and branch locations in Natchez and Vicksburg, including more than 120 buildings totaling nearly 2 million square feet, and a $110 million operating budget.

A native of Greenville, Rankins received a Bachelor of Science degree from Alcorn State University and both Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees from Mississippi State University.

Prior to his appointment as Alcorn’s president, Rankins served as deputy commissioner for Academic and Student Affairs for the state College Board. As the College Board’s chief academic and student affairs officer, he advised the Board of Trustees and commissioner of higher education on all matters pertaining to academic programs, policy and planning; student access, readiness and success; and faculty affairs. While serving as deputy commissioner, Rankins also served as acting president of Mississippi Valley State University in Itta Bena.

Prior to his appointment on the College Board staff, Rankins served on the faculty at Mississippi State University (MSU) in Starkville, where he was a tenured associate professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and extension specialist with the MSU Extension Service.

Rankins and his wife, Juandalyn, have two children, Aftyn Elise and Alfred Elijah.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Nursing a calling for Hinds CC Carla McCulloch Scholarship winner
Posted by
14 April

Nursing a calling for Hinds CC Carla McCulloch Scholarship winner

Ashley Louis

Ashley Louis

Ashley Louis of Jackson says she “grew up in nursing.” Her mom is a nurse, and so are some of her relatives.

But it was the birth of her premature son, who is now 12, that made her truly want to be a nurse.

“He was very low birth weight. He had to stay in ICU (intensive care unit) for over a year,” she said. “When I saw how those nurses were, how they could care for him, that upped my appreciation for nursing.”

Louis, 34, a second semester Associate Degree Nursing student at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, is the

Ashley Louis of Jackson is the winner of the annual Carla McCulloch Scholarship for nursing students at Hinds Community College. From left are Rosalind Ratcliff, Hinds clinical instructor; Dene Bass-Cook, retired Hinds instructor who presented the scholarship; Louis' mother, Margie Davis; Ashley Louis, her husband Charles Buck; and Dr. Irish Patrick-Williams, Hinds instructor.

Ashley Louis of Jackson is the winner of the annual Carla McCulloch Scholarship for nursing students at Hinds Community College. From left are Rosalind Ratcliff, Hinds clinical instructor; Dene Bass-Cook, retired Hinds instructor who presented the scholarship; Louis’ mother, Margie Davis; Ashley Louis, her husband Charles Buck; and Dr. Irish Patrick-Williams, Hinds instructor.

The scholarship was created by Larry and Carol McCulloch, formerly of Magee but now residents of Roanoke, Va., in memory of their daughter Carla, a Simpson Academy graduate who was a Hinds nursing student at the time of her death in an April 1991 accident.

The award is made annually to a second semester nursing student who demonstrates the caring and enthusiasm for nursing that Carla embodied. She was a dedicated nursing student who took care of loved ones but also had a fun-loving streak.

Dene Bass-Cook, retired nursing clinical instructor, made the presentation on behalf of the McCulloch family, which was unable to be present. Bass-Cook said Carla McCulloch was an ardent advocate for her fellow classmates and her patients.“She was never hesitant in defending her peers and defending her patients. She was a mentor to her peers. She was a coach to those who felt like they were falling off the edge of the earth and there was no place to go. She was a definitely a role model,” she said.

Louis has been accepted into the dual enrollment program at the University of Southern Mississippi, which will allow her to complete her bachelor’s degree in nursing quicker.  She plans to continue her education with a master’s degree as a nurse practitioner either in critical care or nurse anesthetist.

For more about the Hinds nursing program, see http://www.hindscc.edu/programs-of-study/nursing-and-health-related-programs/index#gsc.tab=0

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC

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Hinds CC reschedules annual Golf Fun Fest
Posted by
13 April

Hinds CC reschedules annual Golf Fun Fest

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Hinds Community College’s annual Golf Fun Fest originally scheduled for Thursday has been rescheduled for Wednesday, May 6 because of expected inclement weather throughout this week.

The golf tournament held each year at Eagle Ridge Golf Course in Raymond in the college’s biggest fund-raiser and provides money used for student scholarships and other foundation projects.

For more information, please contact Alumni Coordinator Libby Posey, Olivia.posey@hindscc.edu, or call 601.857.3363.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC

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Radio-controlled Jet Rally at Hinds CC airport April 23-25
Posted by
13 April

Radio-controlled Jet Rally at Hinds CC airport April 23-25

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The Mississippi Afterburner Jet Rally at Hinds Community College’s John Bell Williams Airport in Raymond is April 23-25. As part of the rally, spectators will see radio-controlled turbine powered RC-UAV jets perform dazzling high speed aerobatics at speeds up to 200 mph.

The event is sponsored by the Mississippi Jets Radio Control Club, John Bell Williams Airport and the Hinds Community College Aviation Department.  All proceeds help support student scholarships and department projects.

Concessions will be available for purchase each day. The “Fly-in Special” for Thursday and Friday is smoked chicken, potato salad, slaw, beans, roll, banana pudding and drink for $10. Come out to experience the excitement of the real sounds and sights of jet aerobatics.

For additional information call Michelle Jackson at 601.857.3884 or go to www.mississippijets.com

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2013. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC ‘Take Back the Night’ walk to promote awareness of sexual assault
Posted by
10 April

Hinds CC ‘Take Back the Night’ walk to promote awareness of sexual assault

web_RHA Take Back The Night

 

The Residence Hall Association at Hinds Community College’s Raymond Campus will host a series of Take Back the Night™ activities throughout April, culminating in a campus walk on April 30. The goal is to boost awareness of sexual assault.

College campuses and communities around the country hold TBTN events throughout the year, primarily during the months of October, November, March and April to coincide with Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Sexual Abuse Awareness Month, Women’s History Month and Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

“Sexual assault is a big thing that could happen on any college campus. We need to make people aware,” said Allison Thurman, a nursing student and director of external communications for the Raymond Campus Residence Hall Association. “Younger girls who just get to college, they may think, ‘Oh, this is normal. What this guy is trying to do, this is normal.’ They may not realize it’s sexual assault, and you don’t have to take this. We’re trying to bring awareness to them and to let them know how to protect themselves and let people break the silence.”

Beginning at 7 p.m. on April 30, the Raymond Campus walk will encircle the residence halls and will feature chants and signs promoting awareness of sexual assault, ending in the Courtyard in the center of campus. The walk will include students, faculty and staff, as well as members of the community. It will conclude with a Point of Light ceremony and a guest speaker.

“Creating awareness allows victims to know they are not alone and may receive support from the Hinds campus community. This also allows our campus community to feel safe knowing the College supports them,” said Alonzo Bouldin, resident hall director who is organizing the project.

Other events leading up to Take Back the Night include:

•           Campus clean-up sign-up is April 13-28 with the clean-up at 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. April 29.

•           Dinner and a show in the Raymond Campus cafeteria on April 13 and 14, co-sponsored with the Counseling Center

•           Associated Student Government and Residence Hall Association night, April 23

Take Back The Night® is an international Foundation that serves to create safe communities and respectful relationships through awareness events and initiatives. We seek to end sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual abuse and all other forms of sexual violence.

“We would love to see students, faculty and staff as well as community members participate in the walk. A larger number of participants allow us to make a stronger stance against sexual misconduct,’’ Bouldin said.

In January 2014, The White House reported that one-in-five women are sexually assaulted in college. In response, President Obama created the White House Task Force to protect students from sexual assault in an effort to develop and coordinate federal response to campus rape and sexual assault.

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, 78 percent of sexual violence involved an offender who was a family member, intimate partner, friend or acquaintance. Additionally, the percentage of sexual assault victimizations reported to the police has declined in recent years and the most common reason for victims not reporting was fear of reprisal.

For more information about this event or to participate, please contact The Housing and Resident Life Office at .601.857.3222 or email Alonzo Bouldin at Alonzo.BouldinJr@hindscc.edu

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Jobs, environment to benefit from Precision Agriculture partnership between Hinds CC, MSU
Posted by
09 April

Jobs, environment to benefit from Precision Agriculture partnership between Hinds CC, MSU

Mississippi State University President Dr. Mark Keenum, Gov. Phil Bryant, former Board of Trustees President Ted Kendall, president of Gaddis Farms in Hinds County, and Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse

Mississippi State University President Dr. Mark Keenum, Gov. Phil Bryant, former Board of Trustees President Ted Kendall, president of Gaddis Farms in Hinds County, and Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse and Mississippi State University Dr. Mark Keenum shake after signing a 2 plus 2 agreement for Precision Agriculture on April 9.

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse and Mississippi State University Dr. Mark Keenum shake after signing a 2 plus 2 agreement for Precision Agriculture on April 9.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Gov. Phil Bryant

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and Gov. Phil Bryant

A partnership between Hinds Community College and Mississippi State University on a program to tie its agriculture programs to emerging technology is poised to help grow jobs in Mississippi and protect the environment.

“Today gives us a unique opportunity to feature a new program in Precision Agriculture at Hinds Community College,” Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse said on Thursday as program directors at each institution signed off on the agreement. “It is one that we are extremely proud of.

Precision Agriculture gathers an array of technological advances to create topographic maps to help farmers and farm families to decide what to plant and where, irrigation strategies, pest control and more. The list of what’s employed includes computers and Global Navigation Satellite Systems as well as unmanned aircraft vehicles, remote sensing, global positioning geographic information systems and variable rate technology.

Gov. Phil Bryant, on hand for the ceremony, said today’s agriculture students are studying the technology of the future.

“When my grandparents were in agriculture, it was a long, hard of manual labor,” Bryant said. “We were fortunate if someone would come across a tractor. Now with aviation, precision agriculture is the future. This system helps protect our environment, so the pesticides we use will be used in just the right amount – not more than we need, not less than we need.”

Ted Kendall, a Mississippi State graduate and former member of the Hinds Board of Trustees, marveled at the technology available now.

“We’ve seen some amazing changes,” said Kendall, president of Gaddis Farms in Hinds County. “With the technology of today in agriculture we will be able to meet the challenges.”

Sean Meacham is a 2014 graduate of HCC’s aviation program. As an employee of MSU’s High Performance Computing System in the university’s Geosystems Research Institute, he surveys agricultural fields with unmanned aerial systems that collect field data for farmers and researchers.

“They can use that information to get a better yield and to better cater to what the farmer needs,” Meacham said. “We also do weed management. In the Pearl River, we can detect invasive weeds that are coming in and smothering out the native species of plants, which allows Louisiana or Mississippi to target these areas to prevent the weeds from messing up the natural resources, birds and animals. With plants that get where boats go through, we’re able to tell nitrogen deficiencies, where there’s too much or not enough water.”

MSU President Dr. Mark Keenum said the emerging field and new partnership will aid in the challenge of doubling food production to adequately address the food needs of the world.

“These high-tech jobs we’re talking about in agriculture are going to be an integral part in the research we’re doing, and what we’re doing today, in helping us attract these industries and businesses and innovative technologies of the future,” Keenum said.

Hinds will offer two separate degree options as part of the program, to be available this fall. One, the Associate of Applied Science degree, will allow students the opportunity to go directly into the workforce. A second option is an Associate of Arts that will allow students to transfer to Mississippi State with 60 hours of community college coursework toward a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Engineering Technology and Business with a concentration in Precision Agriculture, a program which Mississippi State already has in place.

“As we were in the process of developing this Precision Agriculture Program, I have often been asked just what Precision Agriculture is,” said Dr. Chad Stocks, associate vice president for Workforce Training and Raymond Campus assistant dean of Career and Technical Programs at Hinds. “And my answer to the question was ‘Doing the right thing, in the right place at the right time.’”

Hinds Community College’s aviation department is headquartered at John Bell Williams Airport near the Raymond Campus, which is the only airport in Mississippi owned and operated by a community college. The existing aviation program includes Commercial Aviation, Aviation Maintenance Technology and Aviation Technology. Aviation Technology has four programs: Air Traffic Control Technology, Airport Operations and Aviation Security Technology, all based on the Rankin Campus, and Unmanned Aerial Systems, based at the airport.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

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