http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans Ridgeland eighth-grader wins state Geographic Bee hosted at Hinds CC

Monthly Archives: March 2015

Ridgeland eighth-grader wins state Geographic Bee hosted at Hinds CC
Posted by
30 March

Ridgeland eighth-grader wins state Geographic Bee hosted at Hinds CC

Hinds Community College hosted the Mississippi Geographic Bee on March 27. Pictured are Chelsea Zillmer, associate director for the National Geographic Bee, left; Ian Espy, Edmund Doerksen, Edwin Griffis and Ginger Manchester, Hinds Community College coordinator of the state bee.

Hinds Community College hosted the Mississippi Geographic Bee on March 27. Pictured are Chelsea Zillmer, associate director for the National Geographic Bee, left; Ian Espy, Edmund Doerksen, Edwin Griffis and Ginger Manchester, Hinds Community College coordinator of the state bee.

Ian Espy, a Ridgeland eighth-grader, is the winner of the 27th annual Mississippi Geographic Bee held March 27 at  Hinds Community College’s Muse Center in Pearl.

Espy, who attends St. Andrews Episcopal School, will compete in the national Geographic Bee May 11-13, 2015 in Washington D.C. The winner will be crowned National Geographic Bee champion. He emerged the victor from among 55 students aged 10-14 from throughout the state.

His prize included an all-expense paid trip to the nation’s capital for him and his parents to represent the state in the national competition and compete for a $50,000 scholarship. He also received $100.

The second place finisher was Edmund Doerksen, a sixth-grader from Oxford Intermediate. He received a check for $75.

The third place finisher was Edwin Griffis of Ridgeland, an eighth-grader from Jackson Preparatory School. He received a check for $50.

Each of the three winners received the “National Geographic Collegiate Atlas of the World”. Espy, as the top finisher, received a backpack and a DVD set of National Geographic issues.

The state bees are the second level of the annual national competition. The first level began in November. State-level contests draw more than 12,000 schools in which millions of students participate.

“They study on their own,” Ginger Manchester, coordinator of the state Geographic Bee, said. “There are no books given out that say, ‘Learn these things’.”

The national competition will be National Geographic Society headquarters and moderated by Soledad O’Brien.

“Geography is a very important subject in school as students prepare to go out into the workforce,” said Chelsea Zillmer, associate director for the National Geographic Bee. “They need to have a global perspective to understand different cultures and different economic situations.”

This year’s bee is again sponsored by Google Inc. and Plum Creek, a private land company that owns about 7 million acres of timberland in the U.S. Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus had hosted past state bees.

The state Geographic Bee coordinator is Ginger Manchester, 601.672.5283.

 

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC president honored by state Senate for role in creating T-Ball
Posted by
27 March

Hinds CC president honored by state Senate for role in creating T-Ball

Flanked by members of his family, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse smiles as state Sen. Dean Kirby, R-Pearl, explains the purpose behind the resolution honoring Muse as a creator of T-ball.

Flanked by members of his family, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse smiles as state Sen. Dean Kirby, R-Pearl, explains the purpose behind the resolution honoring Muse as a creator of T-ball.

 

Sen. Hillman Frazier, D-Jackson; left, Rep. Tom Weathersby, R-Florence, who joined state senators in their chamber, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Sen. Dean Kirby, R-Pearl; Sen. Josh Harkins, R-Flowood; Sen. Willie Simmons, D-Cleveland; and Sen. Robert Jackson, D-Marks. Weathersby is holding a replica of the first tee made signed by a group of legislators.

Sen. Hillman Frazier, D-Jackson; left, Rep. Tom Weathersby, R-Florence, who joined state senators in their chamber, Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse, Sen. Dean Kirby, R-Pearl; Sen. Josh Harkins, R-Flowood; Sen. Willie Simmons, D-Cleveland; and Sen. Robert Jackson, D-Marks. Weathersby is holding a replica of the first tee made signed by a group of legislators.

 

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and his family at the state Capitol.

Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse and his family at the state Capitol.

Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse was honored with a state Senate Concurrent Resolution on March 27 for his role in the invention of the game of T-ball.

The effort was led by Sen. Dean Kirby, R-Pearl. “Clyde Muse has been honored many times by the Legislature, and will be honored many more times, I’m sure,” Kirby said in introducing the resolution from the floor of the state Senate. “Dr. Clyde Muse is being honored today in a light-hearted but very serious way.”

Kirby noted that the game of T-Ball has brought a lot of joy to not only kids but to their parents and grandparents. “T-ball is a lot of fun. It’s one of the great things that Clyde Muse brought to us. We’re so grateful for that. That is something that is a minute part of his life but it’s one of the many things he brought to us that we really and truly appreciate.”

Muse helped bring about the game when he and a colleague were looking for a way 8- and 9-year-old boys who don’t have the developed eye-hand coordination could participate in baseball. Now the game is played by preschoolers worldwide.

“I’ve had one original idea in my life,” Muse told senators, laughing. “The first game we played I knew it was going to be a tremendous success. I saw how much fun the little children have.”

Muse brought many of his family members to the floor of the Senate, including some of his eight great-grandchildren. “My great-grandchildren have benefited from playing T-ball. I enjoyed watching them play.”

Muse said the game was never patented. “I didn’t have enough sense to do that,” he said.

 

Below is the text of the resolution:

Senate Concurrent Resolution 581

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION RECOGNIZING AND SALUTING HINDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE PRESIDENT DR. CLYDE MUSE FOR INVENTING THE GAME OF T-BALL.

WHEREAS, the game of T-Ball, which is now played worldwide, was conceived by two men in Starkville, Mississippi.  One of these men grew up in Sebastopol, played basketball at East Central Junior College, is recognized as an outstanding educator, and now serves as the President of the largest community college in Mississippi; and it might not be surprising to know that he still maintains a keen interest in sports; and

WHEREAS, Dr. Clyde Muse, now President of Hinds Community College, remembers coming to Starkville when he was a coach in 1957 and working with the summer program of Boys’ Little League Baseball.  Many volunteers were involved, including the Executive Committee of the Starkville Junior Baseball Association, the volunteer coaches of individual teams (usually dads of the players), volunteers who ran concessions (usually moms or wives of coaches), businesses which provided shirts and equipment, and younger or older family members who helped with mowing and field preparation.  These energetic volunteers helped make the program a big success; and

WHEREAS, the T-Ball story (originally written as tee-ball) actually began with the sponsorship by the Rotary Club in 1951 of the Starkville Junior Baseball Association and the appointment of a few member volunteers as an executive committee to set policies for summer baseball play by young boys in Starkville.  Four teams and 36 boys, ages 10-12, were involved the first year, and regular baseball was played.  As the T-Ball program grew, money became available through Rotary sponsorship, city help, and boys’ fees to hire coaches to handle daily activities as a summer job; and

WHEREAS, by 1960, the people involved, especially Dr. Muse and Professor Littlejohn, a Mississippi State University Accounting Professor, felt very strongly that eight- and nine-year-olds needed to be involved in the program.  But the rules of the game in regular baseball meant that too much game time would be spent by a young pitcher trying to get a good pitch across the plate and by a young batter trying to muster eye and muscle coordination enough to hit it.  They needed to make the game interesting and provide the right experience for boys who needed to be ready to play in the Little Boys Minor League at age ten.  Dr. Muse recalls sitting in Professor Littlejohn’s office discussing how the game might be modified to overcome those problems and involve the eight- and nine-year-olds.  The result was a stationary ball, instead of a thrown pitch, and a much shorter game.  The two of them discussed and wrote the original T-Ball Rules and then presented them to the Executive Committee of the Starkville Junior Baseball Association, which endorsed and proceeded to implement them in the summer of 1961; and

WHEREAS, infield players have the same positions as in regular baseball.  Everyone else played in the outfield and all had a turn at bat.  Only one swing at the ball was allowed; either the ball was hit, or the player was out.  Games were five innings, and no inning was started after an hour of play.  The field overall was smaller.  Eight- and nine-year-olds played on separate teams.  No official score was kept, and no after-season championship games were played.  This was designed to emphasize sportsmanship and fun of the game and to recognize the potential of each player on the team.  Boys who were at least eight, but younger than ten, by July 31 could sign up and play; and

WHEREAS, much thought was given to how to make the tee, and several parents and boys were involved in demonstrations to figure it out.  Dr. Muse remembers going to Western Auto for help and together deciding on a radiator hose to use for the top of the tee.  The hose was flexible and could be pushed up and down on a metal plumber’s pipe to adjust for height.  A clamp was attached around the hose at the top of the pipe to keep it from going down the pipe; and

WHEREAS, the Starkville Daily News describes the new T-Ball league as consisting of six teams (three for eight-year-olds and three for nine-year-olds).  There were 60 T-Ball players the first year.  As reported in the newspaper, “The name ‘T-Ball’ is taken from the manner in which the batters hit the ball.  It is knocked off a tee to fielders rather than being thrown by a pitcher.”  Today, boys start T-Ball at age five, and players get two swings at the ball, which is positioned on a tee made of plastic.  An adjustable tube at the top positions the ball about waist high as with the original tee.  Otherwise, most of the original rules are still followed; and

WHEREAS, each year in the United States, on almost any night during the months of May, June and July, thousands of parents and grandparents gather at community baseball fields to watch their children play T-Ball.  It is almost as much a part of our culture as football and soccer, and many of the baseball players who make it to the major leagues began their careers playing T-Ball.  However, hardly anyone knows that the game of T-Ball, which is now played all over the world, originated and was first played in the State of Mississippi.  Next time you are celebrating (or bemoaning) another afternoon at a ball park, remember your child is playing a game created by and for Mississippians:

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE SENATE OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI, THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES CONCURRING THEREIN, That we do hereby recognize and salute Hinds Community College President Dr. Clyde Muse for inventing the game of T-Ball, a Starkville legacy, and extend to him and the other original volunteers the appreciation of all Mississippi residents and parents all over the world whose young boys and girls are involved with T-Ball programs.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That this resolution be presented to Dr. Clyde Muse, forwarded to the T-Ball USA Association, and made available to the Capitol Press Corps

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC students place in DECA state conference
Posted by
26 March

Hinds CC students place in DECA state conference

Eight students in the Hospitality/Tourism and Culinary Arts program at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Academic/Technical Center placed in the Collegiate DECA State Conference, held Feb. 25-27 in Natchez.

They include: second place, Khadijah Hairston of Madison, Travel and Tourism; Amanda Loeffler of Madison, Sales Presentation;

Third place, Antundree McCaskill of Byram, Retail Management; Larita Johnson of Jackson, Accounting; Jessie Pierce of Jackson, Lodging;

Fourth place, Bobbie McClinton of Bolton, Lodging; Brad Hawthorne of Utica, Culinary; Clint Pemberton of Clinton, Culinary;

Sixth place, Rico Hogsett of Durant, Restaurant and Food Service Management; Brittany Godwin of Vicksburg, Culinary; Antundree McCaskill of Byram, Culinary; Jameshia Dennis of Jackson, Culinary.

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Hinds CC instructor earns top educator award
Posted by
25 March

Hinds CC instructor earns top educator award

web_Jill Gore

The National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) has recognized Norma Jill Gore of Brandon, a culinary arts instructor at Hinds Community College’s Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center for high school students, as winner of the 2015 ProStart Educator of Excellence Award. This honor is for educators who recognize, reward and promote excellence in teaching and in connecting students with the restaurant and foodservice industry through the ProStart program.

The application process includes recommendations from administrators and students, as well as words from the educator regarding the ProStart program and the opportunities it affords the students.

“Over the past two years, Mrs. Gore has inspired so many students to achieve their goals in the classroom. She has embraced every student with open arms. I have never had a teacher so dedicated to education,” said Lauren Bonham, a second-year Culinary Arts student.

Gore, a 28-year educator, has an unbridled passion for educating her students. Having joined the faculty of the Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center in 2000, she worked to bring the once struggling Culinary Arts program back to life.

Under her guidance, students are excelling in coursework, lab experiences, and have achieved a 100 percent pass rating on the MSCPAS for several years in a row. The success of the program and the students comes from working with the committed team members of her local advisory committee for Culinary and Restaurant Management. The ProStart program is supported by all committee members because of the rigorous curriculum accompanied by the hands-on experience in the lab. As a direct result of the program, employers are willing to pay students more because they are more knowledgeable and do not have to require as much on the job training.

Affectionately nicknamed “The Hammer,” Gore was thrilled when all 26 of her students “hammered the test one question at a time” and received passing scores on the National ProStart exam in 2014.

“Every second of her class was spent making sure we were prepared to enter competitions, exams, and restaurants with confidence,” said former student Victoria King.

Award recipients will be recognized at the 2015 Education Excellence Awards (EEA) dinner in Chicago in May. They will also participate in special educator programming, including a Food Planet Walking Tour of Chicago’s Gold Coast. The students and staff at the Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center are proud of the accomplishments of Jill Gore and salute her commitment to educational excellence.

For more information, about the culinary program at Hinds, click here.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC Healthy Living softball tournament rescheduled for April 18
Posted by
19 March

Hinds CC Healthy Living softball tournament rescheduled for April 18

web_Cynthia Casey

Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center Second Annual Healthy Living Co-ed Softball Tournament has been postponed until April 18 because of wet field conditions.

The tournament to benefit the Warrior Bonfire Project and Camp Rainbow will be held at the Flowood softball fields.

Sixteen teams have signed up to play in the tournament, with 12 of those teams being Hinds Community College student teams. Organizer Cynthia Casey, learning lab manager at Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, said the goal is to raise $10,000.

“If we raise $10,000 I will let one of the students shave my head in honor of the children with cancer.  So, we need donations,” Casey said.

As part of the event, a prize worth about $4,000 will be given to a soldier.

The Warrior Bonfire Project is a Clinton organization created for service members who have been wounded in combat operations. The purpose of its programs are to encourage camaraderie between those that can fully understand the mindset of a combat wounded soldier and /or their spouse, foster healing through those relationships, inspire growth towards new passions and purpose post military service, or simply know they are not alone. The programs center around hosting trips that include therapeutic small group activities such as hunting, fishing, skiing and more, with each event concluding with a bonfire.

Located in Utica and associated closely with Blair E. Batson Children’s Cancer Clinic,

Camp Rainbow is a five-day camp dedicated to pediatric cancer patients and survivors between the ages of 6-17 in Mississippi.

The top three teams will receive trophies.

For more information, contact Cynthia Casey, 601.278.1254, cdcasey@hindscc.edu.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC VP Colleen Hartfield receives annual Leadership Award
Posted by
18 March

Hinds CC VP Colleen Hartfield receives annual Leadership Award

web_Colleen Hartfield (2)

Colleen Hartfield of Raymond, vice president for Community Relations and Governmental Affairs at Hinds Community College, was presented the Leadership Award from the Women in Higher Education Mississippi Network  at the annual convention on Feb. 19.

The WHEMN Leadership Award honors an actively employed woman who serves as a role model for women of all ages and career paths. WHEMN membership includes public and private, two-year and four-year colleges and universities in Mississippi.

The recipient is a woman recognized for her advocacy of women’s issues, noted for her innovative approach to leadership challenges. Her attitude, values and actions represent her philosophy of how she inspires positive changes in her work environment and her community.

Hartfield has been vice president at Hinds since July 2006 and was previously vice president at Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College and Public Relations director at Hinds. She has worked at Mississippi community colleges for more than 30 years. She is a graduate of the Mississippi State University Community College Leadership Program and the Education Policy Fellowship Program.

Part of her role is serving in a statewide capacity coordinating advocacy efforts and events for the Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges.

“Colleen has offered visionary leadership in her role of presenting Hinds Community College in the best light possible. She also provides a high level of expertise in helping the college in managing governmental affairs,” said Hinds President Dr. Clyde Muse. “I am so pleased to see her get the recognition she deserves from other women involved in higher education in Mississippi.”

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC student named 2015 Coca-Cola Silver Scholar
Posted by
17 March

Hinds CC student named 2015 Coca-Cola Silver Scholar

web_Shanita_Greer_NAHC

Shanita Greer of Jackson, a nursing student at Hinds Community College’s Jackson Campus-Nursing/Allied Health Center, has been named a 2015 Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Silver Scholar. The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation sponsors the Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team program by recognizing 50 Gold, 50 Silver and 50 Bronze Scholars, and providing nearly $200,000 in scholarships annually. Each Silver Scholar receives a $1,250 scholarship and a special medallion.

Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society administers the Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Program and recognizes Coca-Cola Community College scholars during All-State Community College Academic Team Recognition ceremonies held in 38 states. Student scholars also receive recognition locally during ceremonies held on campus and internationally for those who are able to attend Phi Theta Kappa’s Annual Convention.

Greer hopes to eventually work in the neonatal or pediatric intensive care unit and continue her education to eventually earn a doctoral degree in nursing practice. She is married with two children and is actively involved in her children’s schools as well as her church. She is a President’s Scholars with a 4.0 grade point average. She is a member of Alpha Delta Nu Honor Society and Who’s Who Among Students in American Community and Junior Colleges.

Community college presidents or their designated nominators may submit no more than two nominations per campus for this award. An independent panel of judges considers outstanding academic rigor, grade point average, academic and leadership awards, and engagement in college and community service in the selection process.

“We thank the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation for their vote of confidence in community college students by investing in their futures,” said Dr. Rod Risley, Executive Director of Phi Theta Kappa. “Their support is especially welcome during this challenging economic climate, as more and more community college students need additional resources to help them complete their degrees.”

“The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation has a long history of providing financial assistance to outstanding students at community colleges,” said J. Mark Davis, President of the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation. “We are proud to partner with Phi Theta Kappa and make it possible for deserving students to achieve their educational goals.”

Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, headquartered in Jackson, is the largest honor society in American higher education with more than 1,285 chapters on two-year and community college campuses in all 50 of the United States, Canada, Germany, Peru, the Republic of Palau, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the British Virgin Islands, the United Arab Emirates and U.S. territorial possessions. More than 3 million students have been inducted since its founding in 1918, with approximately 134,000 students inducted annually.

For information about Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College, click here.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

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Hinds CC student named 2015 Coca-Cola Gold Scholar
Posted by
16 March

Hinds CC student named 2015 Coca-Cola Gold Scholar

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Mary Catherine Harvey of Forest, a student at Hinds Community College, has been named a 2015 Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Gold Scholar. The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation sponsors the Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team program by recognizing 50 Gold, 50 Silver and 50 Bronze Scholars, and providing nearly $200,000 in scholarships annually. Each Gold Scholar receives a $1,500 scholarship and a special medallion.

Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society administers the Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Program and recognizes Coca-Cola Community College scholars during All-State Community College Academic Team Recognition ceremonies held in 38 states. Student scholars also receive recognition locally during ceremonies held on campus and internationally for those who are able to attend Phi Theta Kappa’s Annual Convention.

Harvey is a member of the Honors Institute, Phi Theta Kappa and Alpha Beta Gamma. She serves as an intern and as vice president of scholarship for PTK, where she led research on the Honors in Action project. As an Honors student, she has logged more than 42 hours of community service with local organizations, including the Mississippi Food Network, the Mississippi Children’s Museum, The Little Lighthouse, and Mississippi Blood Drive as well as with the college’s recycling program. She also serves as a Sunday school teacher and pianist at her church, Harperville Baptist.

After graduating from Hinds in May, Harvey plans to attend the University of Mississippi to earn her bachelor’s degree before considering law school. She enjoys working with children and hopes to work as a child advocate in some capacity.

Community college presidents or their designated nominators may submit no more than two nominations per campus for this award. An independent panel of judges considers outstanding academic rigor, grade point average, academic and leadership awards, and engagement in college and community service in the selection process.

“We thank the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation for their vote of confidence in community college students by investing in their futures,” said Dr. Rod Risley, executive director of Phi Theta Kappa. “Their support is especially welcome during this challenging economic climate, as more and more community college students need additional resources to help them complete their degrees.”

“The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation has a long history of providing financial assistance to outstanding students at community colleges,” said J. Mark Davis, president of the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation. “We are proud to partner with Phi Theta Kappa and make it possible for deserving students to achieve their educational goals.”

Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, headquartered in Jackson, is the largest honor society in American higher education with more than 1,285 chapters on two-year and community college campuses in all 50 of the United States, Canada, Germany, Peru, the Republic of Palau, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the British Virgin Islands, the United Arab Emirates and U.S. territorial possessions. More than 3 million students have been inducted since its founding in 1918, with approximately 134,000 students inducted annually.

For information about Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College, click here.

 As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

 

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Hinds CC hosts author Mary Miller for Southern Writer Series
Posted by
16 March

Hinds CC hosts author Mary Miller for Southern Writer Series

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Mary Miller, author of “The Last Days of California,” will do a reading at Hinds Community College as part of the Southern Writers Series in conjunction with the Peggy Brent Memorial Art Series.

Miller’s reading is 12:30 p.m. to 1:20 p.m., Wednesday, March 18, in Reeves 165 on the Raymond Campus with a reception and Question/Answer 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. in McLendon Library.

“The Last Days of California” is the story of a 14-year-old girl on a family road trip from the South to California, led by her evangelical father.

Mary Miller grew up in Jackson. Her collection of stories, “Big World,” was published in 2009 by Short Flight/Long Drive Books. A graduate of the Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas, she returned to Mississippi in fall 2014 to serve as the John and Renée Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi. “The Last Days of California” is her first novel.

As Mississippi’s largest community college, Hinds Community College is a comprehensive institution offering quality, affordable educational opportunities with more than 170 academic, career and technical programs. With six locations in central Mississippi, Hinds enrolled nearly 12,000 credit students in fall 2014. To learn more, visit www.hindscc.edu or call 1.800.HindsCC.

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Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members
Posted by
12 March

Hinds CC Rankin Campus inducts new Phi Theta Kappa members

The Alpha Omicron Omega Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds Community College’s Rankin Campus inducted new members and officers on Feb. 27.

 

web_RankinPTK_Induction

 

Members include, front from left, Lauren Robertson of Pelahatchie, Allison Reeves of Morton, Madison Fidler of Brandon, Peyton Hill of Chapel Hill, N.C., Erika Chacon of Ridgeland, Hannah Stotland of Brandon; second row, Louvenia Frazier of Pearl, Lauren McCroy of Richland, Amberley Grantham of Florence, Elysha Roush of Clinton; Jordan Gaughf of Brandon; third row, Kaylee Crosby of Richland, Betsy Redfern of Richland, Courtney Peagler of Brandon, Emily Hester of Quitman, Kathleen Hetherington of Brandon, Daniel King of Brandon; fourth row, Sarah Fagan of Brandon, Natalie Blakely of Brandon, Johnnie Smith of Pelahatchie; fifth row, Harlee Dillard of Pelahatchie; Sydney Stone of Bossier City, La.; Kaleb Ortner of Monticello, Ark., Evan McKinley of Florence, Logan Polk of Pearl and Jake Penick of Brandon.

 

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Officers include, front from left, Hannah Stotland of Brandon, vice president of records; Haylee Jones of Harrisville, president; Victoria Palmer of Brandon, vice president of membership; second row, James Weathersby of Shivers, vice president of fellowship; Trevor Jordan of Pelahatchie, vice president of leadership; Joshua Taylor of Flowood, vice president of scholarship.

For more information about Phi Theta Kappa at Hinds, go to http://www.hindscc.edu/admissions/studentlife/clubs/ptk/index.

Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society for community and junior college students. Membership in Phi Theta Kappa is extended to students who have a 3.5 cumulative grade point average or above on 12 or more transferrable credit hours. There are more than 1,200 Phi Theta Kappa chapters throughout the United States and abroad.

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